This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'ALL EBM Protocols'.

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASE 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  1 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
1  Introduction 
Synonyms: interstitial lung disease, diffuse parenchymal lung disease. 
1.1 
Description 
  Interstitial lung disorders (ILD) encompass a diverse range of diseases affecting 
the  gas  exchanging  regions  of  the  lung,  which  may  progress  to  diffuse  lung 
fibrosis.[1][2] 
  Some  of  these  present  acutely,  whereas  others  have  a  sub-acute  or  chronic 
course.   
  The  overall  prevalence in the  United  Kingdom  is  1 in 3,000  –  4,000,  and ILDs 
account for 3,000 deaths per year.[3]  
  Aetiology and individual prevalence are described under the separate conditions 
below.  Sarcoidosis is also a cause of interstitial lung fibrosis (see Tuberculosis 
and Sarcoidosis Protocol). 
1.2 
Diagnosis 
  Common features of ILD are a history of progressive dyspnoea and a dry cough, 
associated  with  a  chest  radiograph  (CXR)  that  shows  widespread  pulmonary 
shadows.   
  The  presence  of  finger  clubbing  is  a  variable  sign  in  ILD.    It  occurs  in 70%  of 
patients  with  cryptogenic  fibrosing  alveolitis  and  the  interstitial  alveolitis 
associated  with  rheumatoid  arthritis;  however,  it  is  almost  never  seen  in  the 
fibrosing  alveolitis  associated  with  systemic  sclerosis  and  extrinsic  allergic 
alveolitis.[4]  
  On auscultation, dry, fine end-inspiratory, basal ‘velcro’ crackles are commonly 
heard. 
1.3 
Investigations  
1.3.1 
Lung Function Tests 
  Spirometry:  a  restrictive  defect  reduced  total  lung  capacity  and  forced  vital 
capacity (FVC), with normal FEV1/FVC ratio of greater than 70% (FEV1  = forced 
expiratory volume in 1 second). 
  Blood  gases:  hypoxaemia  and  hypocapnia.    Impaired  gas  diffusion  (reduced 
transfer factor1a). 
  Serial measurements over a period of time are often needed to assess slightly 
low values and recognise excessive longitudinal decline. 
                                                
1a Transfer factor is normally measured by the carbon monoxide absorption rate per unit volume of ventilated lung - DLCO – 
the gas transfer coefficient. 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  2 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
1.3.2 
Radiography  
  CXR:  -  lung  size;  distribution;  size  and  nature  of  nodular  and  reticular 
abnormalities;  the  presence  of  pleural  disease;  hilar  lymphadenopathy  and 
confluent  shadows  allow  the  experienced  eye  to  differentiate  the  types  of 
interstitial  lung  disorders.    This  has  largely  been  superseded  by  computed 
tomography  scans for  diagnosis,  but  CXR  and  physiology  are  the mainstays  of 
follow up. 
  High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) allows detailed evaluation of the 
lung  parenchyma  by  using  1  -  2mm  thick  slices with  a  reconstruction  algorithm 
that maximises spatial resolution.  This allows earlier diagnosis and narrows the 
diagnosis based on HRCT pattern. 
1.3.3 
Biopsy 
  Small  samples  of  lung  parenchyma  can  be  obtained  by  transbronchial  biopsy 
with  a  flexible  bronchoscope;  however,  because  of  the  small  sample  size  it 
should not be used to assess the degree of fibrosis.[5] 
  Larger  samples  can  be  obtained  under  GA  by  either  thoracotomy  or  video-
assisted thoracoscopy.  Surgical lung biopsy is recommended in patients without 
contraindications to surgery.   
  The  histology  is  often  diagnostic  in  the  early  stages,  but  in  advanced  disease 
may show non-specific lung fibrosis with no clue to aetiology. 
1.3.4 
Bronchoalveolar Lavage (BAL) 
  Performed  during  bronchoscopy;  yields  fluid  for  cytology  and  biochemical 
analysis. 
1.4 
Differential Diagnosis 
  Other  causes  of  diffuse  lung  infiltrates  such  as  pulmonary  oedema, 
bronchiectasis,  and  alveolar  cell  carcinoma  are  usually  distinguishable  with  the 
above investigations, which also help to differentiate the following conditions. 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  3 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 

Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis 
Synonym: - Cryptogenic Fibrosing Alveolitis (CFA). 
2.1 
Definition 
Historically, Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) was a family of idiopathic 
pneumonias, sharing the clinical features of dyspnoea, radiological diffuse 
pulmonary infiltrates and various findings of inflammation, fibrosis or both on biopsy. 
 (Appendix A: Table 1)  
A consensus statement, published in 2000,[5] now limits IPF to patients with a 
specific histological finding on biopsy, that of ‘usual interstitial pneumonia’ (UIP).  
However, as few patients in the UK undergo open lung biopsy,[6] the group will retain 
its heterogeneity, making prognosis more difficult.   
2.1.1 
Aetiology of IPF 
  The  cause  of  IPF  is  unknown,  but  it  is  probably  an  inflammatory  and  immune 
response to lung damage in genetically predisposed individuals.[4]  Reports have 
described  familial  cases  of  IPF  with  an  autosomal  dominant  pattern  of 
inheritance.[7]  Some cases may be associated with previous exposure to dusts 
(e.g.  metal or  wood), and about 30%  have auto-antibodies such as rheumatoid 
or  anti-nuclear  factor.    Cigarette  smoking  may  be  an  independent  risk  factor, 
75% of cases of IPF are current or former smokers.[8]  Latent viral infections have 
also  been  implicated,  but  to  date  no  candidate  virus  has  been  shown  to  cause 
IPF.[8]  
2.1.2 
Prevalence of IPF 
  The  precise  prevalence  of  IPF  is  unknown  but  is  estimated  at  between  3  -  6 
cases per 100,000 in the general population[5] and it is slightly more common in 
males than females.[8] 
  The incidence of IPF increases with age.  Patients become symptomatic in the 
fifth and sixth decade and approximately 2/3 of patients are over the age of 60 at 
the  time  of  diagnosis.[5]  In  the  age  group  35  -  44  years  the  prevalence  is 
2.7/100,000.[5]  
2.2 
Diagnosis 
  Insidious onset of non-productive cough and progressive dyspnoea. 
  Dyspnoea most prominent and disabling symptom. 
  Clubbing in 70%. 
  Dry,  end-inspiratory,  ‘velcro’  basal  crackles  in  80%.   With  disease  progression 
these become pan-inspiratory and extend to the upper zones.   
  Cyanosis,  cor  pulmonale,  an  accentuated  pulmonary  second  sound,  right 
ventricular heave and peripheral oedema may be observed in the late phases of 
the disease. 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  4 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
2.3 
Investigation 
2.3.1 
Pulmonary Function Testing in IPF 
  Reduced  total  lung  capacity  (TLC),  functional  residual  capacity  (FRC)  and 
residual volume (RV). 
  Smokers  and  patients  with  superimposed  COPD  may  have  normal  volumes 
early in the disease. 
  Patients are tachypnoeic, taking rapid shallow breaths. 
  FEV1 and FVC are reduced.  But FEV1/FVC ratio is normal or raised (> 70%). 
  The  gas  transfer  factor  DLCO  is  reduced  because  of  a  reduction  in  capillary 
volumes as well as ventilation and perfusion abnormalities. 
  Formal  cardiopulmonary  exercise  testing  is  more  sensitive  in  the  detection  of 
abnormalities  of  oxygen  transfer.    Exercise  gas  exchange  is  a  sensitive 
parameter  to  monitor  the  clinical  course,  but  is  not  often  performed  in  UK 
practice. 
2.3.2 
CXR in IPF 
  Most have abnormal CXR at time of presentation and basal reticular shadowing 
may be present for years before the development of symptoms.  A normal CXR 
does not exclude the histological finding of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) on 
biopsy. 
  Peripheral  reticular  opacities  at  lung  bases,  with  reduced  lung  volumes  are 
common findings.  Patients with co-existing emphysema may have preserved or 
increased lung volumes. 
2.3.3 
High Resolution Computed Tomography in IPF 
  Pattern in IPF of patchy, predominantly peripheral, sub-pleural, bibasal reticular 
abnormalities.[5]  A normal HRCT scan cannot exclude infiltrative disease.  One 
third of cases will be missed if HRCT scans alone are used for diagnosis.[5]  
  Patients  with  predominant  reticular  opacity  or  honeycombing  usually  progress 
despite treatment. 
  The extent of lung fibrosis on HRCT is an important predictor of survival.[5]  
2.3.4 
Bronchoalveolar Lavage in IPF 
  Despite its value as a research tool, the diagnostic use of BAL in IPF is limited.[5]  
2.3.5 
Lung Biopsy 
  UIP  is  the  histological  pattern  that  identifies  patients  with  IPF.[5]    However,  a 
review  of  200  patients  in  the  UK  showed  that  transbronchial  or  open  lung 
biopsies  were  performed  in  only  33%  and  7.5%  of  patients  respectively:  the 
diagnosis of IPF was made on clinical grounds in most cases.[6]  
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  5 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
2.4 
Treatment 
  Conventional  treatment  options  include  corticosteroids,  immunosuppressives 
(e.g.  azathioprine),  cytotoxic  agents  (e.g.  cyclophosphamide)  and  antifibrotic 
agents (colchicines or d-penicillamine) either alone or in combination. 
  Given  that  there  is  no  clinical  evidence  that  treatment  improves  survival  or 
quality  of  life,  (and  that  treatment  is  associated  with  risk  of  complications) 
therapy may not be indicated for all patients.[5]  
2.4.1 
Corticosteroids 
  Used  ubiquitously,  but  no  randomised  controlled  trial  data:  10-30%  objective 
improvement; 40% report subjective improvement.[3]  
  High doses used 40-100mg for 2-4 months and then dose reduced. 
  If  improvement  occurs,  it  happens  in  the  first  3  months  of  treatment,  and 
responsive patients are maintained on corticosteroid therapy. 
  Relapses  or  deterioration  whilst  on  steroids  warrant  escalation  of  dose  or 
addition of an immunosuppressive agent. 
2.4.2 
Cytotoxic Treatment (Azathioprine/Cyclophosphamide) 
  Used for steroid non-responders or those with side effects on steroids.[3][5]  
  Favourable responses in a few small treatment trials. 
2.4.3 
Lung Transplantation 
  Patients <55 years old, without complicating medical illnesses should be referred 
early  to  regional  transplantation  centres.[8]    Patients  up  to  65  years  old  may  be 
considered for transplantation. 
2.5 
Prognosis 
  IPF kills about 1500 people p.a.  in the UK[3] and the mortality is increasing.  The 
highest  rates  of  mortality  in  the  UK  occur  in  the  industrialised  central  areas  of 
England  and  Wales.    The  mean  length  of  survival  from  the  time  of  diagnosis 
varies between 3.2 and 5 years.[5 
  The  cause  of  death  is  respiratory  failure  in  40%.    In  the  majority  death  is 
triggered  by  a  complicating  illness,  mainly  coronary  artery  disease  and 
infections.  Bronchogenic carcinoma occurs in 10-15% of patients. 
  Spontaneous remissions do not occur.   
  Some patients follow an indolent course over many years, and these are thought 
to represent other disorders misdiagnosed as IPF.[7] 
  Indicators  of  longer  survival  include:  younger  age  at  onset  (<  50),  female  sex, 
beneficial  response  or  stable  disease  3  -  6  months  after  initial  corticosteroid 
treatment.[5]  
  Following lung transplantation a 5-year survival rate of 50 - 60% is quoted.[5]  
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  6 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  7 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 

Connective Tissue Diseases 
3.1 
Description 
In about 35% of cases the typical features of IPF occur as part of a connective 
tissue disease, which often has various other lung complications.[9]  
3.2 
Rheumatoid Disease 
  Interstitial  lung  disease  is  clinically  detected  in  less  than  5%  of  patients  with 
rheumatoid arthritis, although studies have shown a much higher prevalence of 
interstitial changes using HRCT scans.[10][11]  
  The natural history of interstitial lung disease in rheumatoid arthritis has not been 
well  studied,  and  there  are  no  data  on  prognostic  factors.    The  radiological 
changes on HRCT scanning were more peripherally distributed in RA compared 
to  IPF.[12]    Rheumatoid  factor  may  prove  to  be  protective  against  progressive 
fibrosis.    Drugs  such  as  methotrexate,  gold  or  penicillamine  may  cause  lung 
fibrosis. 
3.3 
Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma) 
  Progressive systemic sclerosis and the CREST variant: (Calcinosis; Raynaud’s 
phenomenon; 
oesophageal 
dysfunction/dysmotility; 
Sclerodactyly; 
and 
Telangiectasia)  have  interstitial  lung  involvement  that  is  indistinguishable  from 
idiopathic fibrosing alveolitis.[13]  
3.4 
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus 
  Acute  lupus pneumonitis  occurs  in only  0.9%  of cases  and generally  develops 
during a generalised flare of SLE with multi-system involvement.  This presents 
clinically as severe dyspnoea of recent onset, tachypnoea, fever, basal crackles 
and  hypoxaemia.    CXR  shows  diffuse  basal  alveolar  infiltrates  and  pleural 
effusions.    The  mortality  is  high  (50%)  and  survivors  have  evidence  of  a 
restrictive ventilatory defect with hypoxaemia.[9][14]  
  Chronic  diffuse  interstitial  lung  disease.    Symptomatic  interstitial  lung  disease 
has  a  prevalence  of  3%.    All  patients  present  with  dyspnoea  and  half  have 
pleuritic pain.  Restrictive defects are present on pulmonary function testing and 
diffusion capacity is reduced.[9][14]  
  Shrinking  lungs  syndrome  (SLS)  is  characterised  by  unexplained  dyspnoea, 
small lung volume with restrictive physiology and an elevated diaphragm that is 
thought to be due to a myopathy.  Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment 
with most patients returning to their previous pulmonary function.[15]  
 

EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  8 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
3.5 
Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis 
  Interstitial  lung  disease  is  detected  in  5  -  40%  of  patients  and  may  present 
clinically as three types[16]: 
1.  Acute/sub-acute: 
with 
severe 
rapidly 
progressive 
dyspnoea 
and 
hypoxaemia. 
2.  Chronic: with slowly progressive dyspnoea. 
3.  Asymptomatic. 
  The onset of respiratory symptoms may precede, coincide or follow the onset of 
the 
myositis. 
 
Corticosteroids 
are 
the 
mainstay 
of 
treatment.  
Immunosuppressant and cytotoxic agents are used second-line.  The decision to 
treat is usually based on clinical, (rather than radiological), activity. 
 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  9 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 

Extrinsic Allergic Alveolitis 
Synonym: - hypersensitivity pneumonitis. 
4.1 
Description 
Extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) is an immunologically induced inflammatory lung 
disease resulting from repeated inhalations of any one of a variety of causative 
agents, including organic dusts and active chemicals.  This response involves 
antibody reactions, immune complex formation, complement activation and cellular 
responses, causing inflammation of the lung parenchyma, alveolar walls and 
terminal airways.[17]  
4.1.1 
Aetiology 
  Farmer’s and mushroom/malt/sewage-worker’s lung – inhalation of spores from 
various  fungi  which  grow  in  warm  damp  hay/straw/grain;  vegetable/mushroom 
compost;  whisky  maltings  and  sewage.    Occupational  exposure  to  cheese 
mould, mouldy corks and sugar cane mould are also implicated in EAA. 
  Bird-fancier’s  lung  –  inhalation  of  avian  antigens  by  keepers  of  racing  pigeons 
and pet birds. 
  Rodent-handler’s lung – inhalation of rodent urinary protein. 
  Humidifier  lung/ventilation  pneumonitis  –  inhalation  of  bacteria/fungi/moebae/ 
nematode debris from water in air conditioners/humidifiers. 
  Pituitary snuff-taker’s lung – inhalation of cattle or pig pituitary extracts. 
  Plastic/laboratory  workers  and  paint/vineyard-sprayers  –  inhalation  of  solvents, 
isocyanates, fungicides and other chemicals.[17]  Isocyanates cause occupational 
asthma in the majority of cases, with hypersensitivity pneumonitis accounting for 
1-4.7%.[18] 
4.1.2 
Prevalence 
  Estimated  to  contribute  less  than  1%  to  occupational  lung  disease.[19]  
Approximately  50%  of  cases  affect  farm  workers,  and  15%  affect  workers  in 
material,  metal  or  electrical  processing  trades.[17]    Smokers  are  less  likely  to 
develop all types of EAA. 
  In the UK bird-fancier’s lung is the most prevalent at present, since 12% of the 
population keep birds and of these 0.5 to 7.5% will develop bird-fancier’s lung. 
  In  areas  of  high  rainfall,  where  ‘traditional’  farming  methods  are  used,  the 
prevalence of farmer’s lung may reach 10%.  However, where modern farming 
methods are used, the prevalence is 2 - 3% or less and the farming population 
represents only 1 - 2% of the total population. 
  In  developed  countries  humidifier  lung  is  being  recognised  with  increasing 
frequency, both at work and at home. 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  10 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
4.2 
Diagnosis 
  There  is  no  diagnostic  test  that  is  pathognomonic  for  EAA.    The  clinical 
presentation  can  be  acute,  sub-acute  or  chronic,  as  summarised  in  Table  2 
(Appendix A). 
  EAA should be distinguished from the effects of toxins (e.g. paraquat) and dusts 
(e.g. asbestos). 
4.3 
Treatment 
The acute exacerbation of EAA may be treated with corticosteroids, which produces 
a rapid clinical improvement.  There is some debate as to whether this rapid 
improvement increases the likelihood of further exposure, by decreasing antigen 
avoidance.[20]  
The mainstay is complete avoidance of exposure to the provoking antigen.  Those 
unable or unwilling to change their causative occupation can use industrial 
respirators, which filter out 98% of respirable dust from the ambient air.[17]   
Continuing exposure should be accompanied by surveillance (with regular CXRs 
and lung function tests).  When there is progressive disease exposure should cease. 
4.4 
Prognosis 
If exposure to the antigen ceases: The risk of continuing symptoms on cessation of 
the exposure increases with the duration of exposure.  Following acute EAA, 
continuing inflammation and membrane leakiness was found for 2 - 15 years, even 
when patients were asymptomatic.   
Continuation of antigen exposure: The risk of continued exposure is progressive 
fibrosis; however this only occurs in a minority of affected subjects.[17]  A follow-up 
study of farmers with acute farmer’s lung showed that, whilst the majority continued 
to live on farms, only 39% developed radiological changes of fibrosis and only 30% 
developed an impairment of gas transfer.[21]   
 
  
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  11 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 

Main Disabling Effects  
  The  chronic  interstitial  lung  disorders  cause  a  restrictive  pattern  of  ventilatory 
impairment, which leads to an overall reduction in lung volume and impaired gas 
diffusion across the alveolar-capillary membrane.  As lung function deteriorates, 
progressive dyspnoea will restrict exertional activities. 
  Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment in IPF and other forms of diffuse 
lung  disease.    These  are  used  at  high  doses  and  for  long  periods  of  time, 
increasing the risk of side-effects, which may be disabling (Table 3).   
  Problems may occur with reduced atmospheric pressure.  Commercial air travel 
usually  involves  depressurisation  to  a  cabin  altitude  of  6,000ft  (1,830m).    The 
reduced partial pressure of oxygen has little effect on healthy travellers, but with 
pulmonary disease may cause symptoms or subtle signs of hypoxia.   
5.1 
Assessing The Claimant 
  Clinical  respiratory  examination  findings  do  not  correlate  well  with  functional 
ability and the assessment is best made from the: 
1.  The  History  of  Activities  of  Daily  Living  (Typical  Day),  taking  variation  into 
account. 
2.  Informal Observation of the claimant’s activities at examination. 
  In  the  IB-PCA,  the  functional  areas  first  affected  are  ‘walking  up/down  stairs’, 
and ‘walking’.  Other physical functional areas may be affected by the musculo-
skeletal  side  effects  of  high-dose  steroid  therapy,  namely  proximal  myopathy 
and  osteoporotic  fracture.    Vision  may  be  affected  by  the  development  of 
cataracts  and  glaucoma.    Mental  health  may  also  be  affected  by  high-dose 
steroid therapy and psychological side effects are more common with increasing 
age.[5]  Euphoria may cause patients to underestimate their level of disability. 
  Exemption  from  the  IB-PCA  should  be  considered  if  the  limitation  of  effort 
tolerance is severe and progressive, causing significant limitation of normal daily 
activities  that  require  more  than  minimal  exertion  (e.g.  climbing  stairs/washing/ 
dressing).    Clinical  examination  in  these  cases  may  show  clinical  signs  of  cor 
pulmonale. 
5.2 
Occupational and  Legislative Issues 
  Assessment of fitness for work in the presence of chronic lung disease depends 
essentially on whether the various elements of pulmonary function are adequate 
and  whether  there  is  any  restriction,  through  breathlessness,  of  capacity  to 
undertake  the  level  of  physical  exertion  required  by  the  job  in  its  particular 
environment.  Rarely, cough alone may be sufficiently distressing to the worker 
(or fellow workers) to limit effective work capacity. 
  With mild degrees of impairment (e.g. FEV1 > 60% predicted) the results of lung 
function  tests  correlate  poorly  with  symptoms  and  the  results  of  exercise  tests.  
However,  most  subjects  with  FEV1  in  the  range  40  -  60%  of  predicted  have 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  12 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
symptoms  on  strenuous  exertion,  and  with  FEV1  <  40%  of  predicted  heavy 
manual work becomes very difficult to sustain.[22]  
  The degree of impairment of lung function is only one of a number of factors that 
determine work capacity, psychological factors such as motivation and mood are 
also important.   
  Most  occupational  respiratory  hazards  are  controlled  by  the  Control  of 
Substances  Hazardous  to  Health  (COSHH)  Regulations  1994  and/or  the 
management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1992.   
  These regulations place a duty on employers to assess whether the use of any 
substance  constitutes  a  risk  to  the  health  of  employees.    Where  a  risk  of  ill 
health  exists  and  medical  tests  can  identify  pathological  change  at  an  early 
stage (when remedial action can be taken), such tests must be provided.   
  The  risk must  also be  controlled  by  appropriate means,  such  as elimination  of 
the harmful agent, enclosure of the process, exhaust ventilation or the provision 
of  respiratory  protection.    Workers  exposed  to  respiratory  sensitisers  giving  a 
risk  of  EAA  should  be  subject  to  periodic  assessment  by  questionnaire  and 
measurements  of  ventilatory function.   EAA  is  a prescribed  disease  (B6) under 
the Social Security Contributions and Benefits Act (1982), so affected workers in 
the relevant occupations are eligible to claim Industrial Injuries Scheme Benefit 
which, if awarded, is usually payable for life. 
  Most  occupational  causes  of  EAA  are  associated  with  the  handling  of  mouldy 
vegetable produce; drying vegetable material before storage could prevent most 
cases.   
5.3 
Rehabilitation 
  Pulmonary rehabilitation programmes use a supportive environment in which to 
restore  muscle  strength and  endurance,  maximise functional  level  and  improve 
quality of life.   
  Objective  measures  are  necessary  to  assess  functional  improvement,  such  as 
the 6-minute walking test or the shuttle walk test.  It has been claimed that a 6-
minute walking distance of 150 feet represents the minimum distance necessary 
to maintain independent living in an apartment setting.   
  There  is  little  published  data  on  exercise  reconditioning  and  ILD.    One  study 
showed an improvement in 6-minute walking distance from 213 to 506 feet after 
the  training  programme,  despite  no  substantial  improvement  in  pulmonary 
function  tests.    Although  the  improvement  appeared  substantial,  the 
investigators did not assess the impact on quality of life scores.[23]  
  Patients  with  end-stage  interstitial  lung  disease  may  not  be  referred  to 
rehabilitative  programmes  as  they  may  be  considered  beyond  rehabilitation.  
Referral early in the course of the disease may improve functional capacity.[23]  
 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  13 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
Appendix A - Tables 
Table 1:  Historical Classification  
 
IDIOPATHIC INTERSTITIAL PNEUMONIAS 
Clinical Terminology 
Pathological Findings 
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis 
Usual interstitial pneumonia 
Desquamative 
interstitial 
Desquamative 
interstitial 
pneumonia or 
pneumonia or 
Respiratory  bronchiolitis  interstitial 
Respiratory  bronchiolitis  interstitial 
lung disease 
lung disease 
Acute interstitial Pneumonia 
Diffuse Alveolar Damage 
Non specific interstitial pneumonia 
Non specific interstitial pneumonia 
Cryptogenic organising pneumonia  
Organising 
pneumonia, 
Bronchiolitis  obliterans  organising 
peribronchiolar inflammation 
pneumonia 
Table 2:  Presentation of Extrinsic Allergic Alveolitis 
 
 
PRESENTATION 
Features 
Acute 
Sub-acute 
Chronic 
Fever Chills 



Dyspnoea 



Pr
Produc
od
Cough 
Non-productive 
tive 
uct
ive 
Malaise 



Weight loss 



Dif
Crackles 
Bibasal 
Diffuse 
fus

Nodula
Fib

CXR 
Nodular infiltrates 
ros
infiltrat
is 
es 
Pulmonary 
Function 
Restrictive 
Mixed 
Mi
xe
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  14 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
Tests 

De
Decrea
cre
DLCO 
Decreased 
sed 
as
ed 
Adapted from Grammer 1999[24] 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  15 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
Table 3:  Potential Side Effects of High Dose Steroids 
 
 
SIDE EFFECT 
Osteoporosis 
Vertebral compression fracture 
Musculo-skeletal 
Aseptic  necrosis  of  femoral  or 
humeral head 
Myopathy 
Depression 
Psychological 
Euphoria 
Psychosis 
Cardiovascular 
Hypertension 
Truncal obesity 
Hyperglycaemia/diabetes 
Endocrine and Metabolic 
Metabolic alkalosis 
Secondary adrenal insufficiency 
Posterior capsular cataracts 
Ophthalmic 
Raised intra-ocular pressure 
 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  16 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 

References 
1. 
Du Bois R.  Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Disease.  In: Weatherall D, Ledingham 
J,  Warrell  D,  editors.    Oxford  Textbook  of  Medicine:  Oxford  University  Press, 
1995:2779-2786. 
2. 
Bourke S, Brewis R.  Interstitial Lung Disease.  Lecture Notes on Respiratory 
Medicine.  5th edition ed.  Oxford: Blackwell Science, 1998. 
3. 
Du  Bois  R.    Diffuse  Lung  Disease:  an  approach  to  management.    British 
Medical Journal 1994;309:175-9. 
4. 
Du Bois R.  Cryptogenic Fibrosing Alveolitis.  In: Weatherall D, Ledingham J, 
Warrell  D,  editors.    Oxford  Textbook  of  Medicine.    Third  ed.    Oxford:  Oxford 
University Press, 1995:2786-2795. 
5. 
Anonymous.    American  Thoracic  Society.    Idiopathic  pulmonary  fibrosis: 
diagnosis  and  treatment.    International  consensus  statement.    American 
Thoracic  Society  (ATS),  and  the  European  Respiratory  Society  (ERS).  
American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine 2000;161(2 pt 1):646-
64. 
6. 
Johnston  I,  Gomm  S,  Kalra  S,  Woodcock  A,  Evans  C,  Hind  C.    The 
management  of  cryptogenic  fibrosing  alveolitis  in  three  regions  of  the  United 
Kingdom.  European Respiratory Journal 1993;6:891-3. 
7. 
Ryu  J,  Colby  T,  Hartman  T.    Idiopathic  pulmonary  fibrosis:  current  concepts.  
Mayo Clinic Proceedings 1998;73(11):1085-101. 
8. 
Gross  T,  Hunninghake  G.    Idiopathic  pulmonary  fibrosis.    New  England 
Journal of Medicine 2001;345(7):517-25. 
9. 
Shaw  R.    The  Lung  in  Collagen  Vascular  diseases.    In:  Weatherall  D, 
Ledingham J, Warrell D, editors.  The Oxford Textbook of Medicine.  Third Ed: 
Oxford University Press, 1995:2796-2800. 
10. 
Fewins H, McGowan I, Whitehouse G, Williams J, Mallaya R.  High definition 
computed  tomography  in  rheumatoid  arthritis  associated  pulmonary  disease.  
British Journal of Rheumatology 1991;30:214-6. 
11. 
Gochuico B.  Potential pathogenesis and clinical aspects of pulmonary fibrosis 
associated with rheumatoid arthritis.  American Journal of the Medical Sciences 
2001;321(1):83-8. 
12. 
Rajasekaran B, Shovlin D, Lord P, Kelly C.  Interstitial lung disease in patients 
with  rheumatoid  arthritis:  A  comparison  with  cryptogenic  fibrosing  alveolitis.  
Rheumatology 2001;40(9):1022-25. 
13. 
Semenzato  G,  Adami  F,  Maschio  N,  Agostini  C.    Immune  mechanisms  in 
interstitial lung diseases.  Allergy 2000;55(12):1103-20. 
14. 
Cheema  G,  Quismorio  FJ.    Interstitial  lung  disease  in  systemic  lupus 
erythematosus.  Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine 2000;6(5):424-9. 
15. 
Warrington K, Moder K, Brutinel W.  The shrinking lungs syndrome in systemic 
lupus erythematosus.  Mayo Clinic Proceedings 2000;75(5):467-72. 
16. 
Hirakata  M,  Nagai  S.    Interstitial  lung  disease  in  polymyositis  and 
dermatomyositis.  Current Opinion in Rheumatology 2000;12(6):501-8. 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  17 
 

 
 Medical Services 
 
 
17. 
Hendrick  D.    Extrinsic  Allergic  Alveolitis.    In:  Weatherall  D,  Ledingham  J, 
Warrell  D,  editors.    Oxford  Textbook  of  Medicine.    Third  ed.    Oxford:  Oxford 
University Press,
 1995:2809-2817. 
18. 
Raulf-Heimsoth  M,  Baur  X.    Pathomechanisms  and  pathophysiology  of 
isocyanate-induced  diseases--summary  of  present  knowledge.    American 
Journal of Industrial Medicine
 1998;34(2):137-43. 
19. 
Meyer  J,  Holt  D,  Chen  Y,  Cherry  N,  Mcdonald  C.    Sword  99:surveillance  of 
work-related  and  occupational  respiratory  disease  in  the  UK.    Occupational 
Medicine
 2001;51(3):204-208. 
20. 
Kokkarinen JI, Tukiainen HO, Terho EO.  Effect of corticosteroid treatment on 
the  recovery  of  pulmonary  function  in  farmer's  lung.    American  Review  of 
Respiratory Disease
 1992;145(1):3-5. 
21. 
Braun  SR,  doPico  GA,  Tsiatis  A,  Horvath  E,  Dickie  HA,  Rankin  J.    Farmer's 
lung disease: long-term clinical and physiologic outcome.  American Review of 
Respiratory Disease
 1979;119(2):185-91. 
22. 
Scarisbrick  D,  Hendrick  D.    Respiratory  Disorders.    In:  Cox  R,  Edwards  F, 
McCallum  R,  editors.    Fitness  for Work.    Second  Ed:  Oxford  University  Press, 
1995. 
23. 
Markovitz  G,  Cooper  C.    Exercise  and  interstitial  lung  disease.    Current 
Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine 1998;4(5):272-80. 
24. 
Grammer  L.    Occupational  allergic  alveolitis.    Annals  of  Allergy,  Asthma,  & 
Immunology 1999;83(6 Pt 2):602-6. 
 
 
EBM – Interstitial Lung Disease 
Version: 2 a (draft) 
MED/S2/CMEP~0053(n)  
 
Page  18