This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Peer review documentation'.

 
 
 
Warwickshire 
Anti-Social 
Behaviour Strategy 
2012-2015 
 
December 2012 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Foreword 
 
Anti-Social behaviour (ASB) remains a high priority in Warwickshire, confirmed by 
the 2012 strategic assessment.  All agencies remain committed to the reduction of 
ASB incidents and to making the most effective use of available resources. Anti-
social behaviour affects the quality of life of our citizens, impacts directly upon levels 
of fear of crime and is linked with several crime types, including criminal damage, 
arson and harassment.   
 
There is an expectation for all partners involved in Community Safety Partnerships to 
consider anti-social behaviour when developing Partnership Plans.  
 
 
This strategy and accompanying action plan have the support of all members of 
Safer and Stronger Partnership Board.  Its fundamental aim is to improve the quality 
of life for people across the county by tackling the causes and effects of anti-social 
behaviour in individuals, families and communities.  
 
We define ASB as: 
 “behaviour which causes or is likely to cause harassment, alarm or distress to one 
or more people who are not in the same household as the perpetrator”.  
 
The following examples of behaviours are included in this definition of ASB:  
 
•  Nuisance behaviour- general rowdy behaviour and nuisance, prostitution, 
aggressive begging, street drinking, animal nuisance  
•  Noise Nuisance - loud music, playing ball games near to people’s houses. 
•  Intimidation or harassment - Malicious phone calls, offensive material through 
letter boxes. 
•  Environmental quality issues - Litter, dog fouling, fly tipping, abandoned vehicles, 
dumped rubbish. 
•  Aggressive and threatening language and behaviour - Verbal and physical abuse 
including threatening and offensive gestures. 
•  Violence against people and property – ASB-based vandalism, violence, arson, 
criminal damage.  
•  Hate behaviour - ASB based on targeting individuals because of their perceived 
differences. This includes race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, and disability. 
 
Underpinning our strategy we have agreed the following principles.  We aim to: 
•  employ a victim centred approach when addressing anti-social behaviour  
•  balance enforcement of standards with provision of support for the 
individuals, families and communities involved 
•  focus on prevention and causes of ASB, recognising that both short and 
long-term measures will be necessary 
•  work in partnership to ensure co-ordinated approaches, focusing on what 
works and sharing good practice 
•  listen to the individuals and communities affected by ASB and avoid 
demonising any sections of the community 

•  ensure early intervention where problems occur  
•  target effort on areas and groups that are most affected by the negative 
consequences of ASB, to ensure work undertaken has the maximum 
possible impact 
•  Support communities to tackle ASB themselves. 

National Strategic Context 
 
Putting Victims First; More Effective Responses to Anti-Social Behaviour  
 
The government has recently published its proposals on anti-social behaviour and is 
committed to the following: 
•  concentrating on supporting victims, in order to stop such behaviour;  
•  ensuring that the perpetrators are punished;  
•  for authorities to take their problems seriously;  
•  to protect victims from further harm. 
 
Local agencies should focus their response to ASB on the needs of the victims 
through: 
 
•  Identifying high risk victims at the first point of contact or at the earliest 
opportunity, offering support, ensuring concentration on risk reduction 
   
•  Frontline professionals having more freedom to use early intervention informal 
measures, such as Acceptable Behaviour Contracts (ABCs) or restorative 
approaches to stop perpetrators, prior to any formal approach  
 
•  Improving our understanding of victims’ experience and the impact of ASB 
upon their quality of life. Some people with a disability or long term health 
condition can be affected disproportionally by the effects of ASB  
 
•  Community Triggers which will give victims and communities the right to get 
action where a persistent problem has not been addressed. In Warwickshire, 
we will review our processes once this power is introduced 
  
•  Community Harm Statements which will ensure that communities can get their 
voices heard, through a standard template, to present evidence of community 
harm to courts, and for casework and partnership working 
 
•  Restorative justice which will enable communities to have a say in the way 
that an offender can make amends for their crimes, getting them to face up to 
the consequences of their actions 
 
•  Neighbourhood Justice Panels which can be used for low-level crime and 
ASB, facilitated by representatives of the local community 
 
•  A speeding up of the eviction of anti-social tenants through a new mandatory 
route for both private and social landlords, to reduce the length of time 
possession takes 
 
•  A focus on long term solutions by addressing the underlying issues in order to 
prevent ASB happening in the first place 
 
 
 

 
The proposed streamlining of the current powers are summarised in the table below: 
 
Dealing with Antisocial Individuals 
 
Proposals 
Benefits of New system 
1. 
Criminal Behaviour Order- 
The new order supports changes to 
available on conviction for any criminal 
behaviour to prevent re-offending, rather 
offence, and can include prohibitions 
than simply prohibitions to stop the person 
and support, to stop future behaviour 
from doing something (e.g. going to a 
which could lead to further ASB or 
particular place). The ASBO only included 
criminal offences. 
prohibitions on behaviour. 

Crime Prevention Injunction – a 
The civil standard of proof requires proof ‘on 
purely civil order with a civil burden of 
the balance of probabilities’ rather than 
proof, making it much quicker and 
‘beyond reasonable doubt’ which will make 
easier to obtain. The injunction would 
injunctions quicker to get. This means that 
also have prohibitions and support 
problem behaviour can be addressed more 
attached and a range of civil sanctions 
quickly. 
for any breach. 
Police officers and other professionals can 
give evidence on behalf of the community, 
which protects vulnerable witnesses.  
The new injunction contains support to 
change behaviour rather than just stopping 
the person from doing something, to help 
reduce re-offending.  
Sanctions for breach are civil, not criminal, 
which prevents people getting a criminal 
record unnecessarily. 
 
 
Dealing with ASB in the community 
 

Proposals 
Benefits of New system 

Community Protection Notice – to  The notice can be used in a variety of situations 
deal with particular problems which 
(not addressed by the powers it is directly 
affect the community’s quality of 
replacing), allowing areas to respond flexibly to 
life, and direct the person 
local issues as they arise.  
responsible to stop causing a 
The notice will also extend the powers the 
nuisance and/or require them to 
police have to deal with noise nuisance – 
‘make good’ 
currently dealt with by Local Authorities, many 
of whom do not have out of hours services. 

Community Protection Order 
The order can be used in a variety of situations 
(public space) – An order to deal 
(not addressed by the powers it is directly 
with ongoing/persistent ASB in a 
replacing), allowing areas to respond flexibly to 
public place, applying restrictions to  local issues as they arise. 
how the public space can be used. 
The order allows local areas to make decisions 
without having to go through central 
government, with oversight provided by 
communities and the Police and Crime 
Commissioner. 

 

Directions Power – a 
The new power will not require the police to 
power to direct any individual 
designate a ‘dispersal zone’, which will reduce 
causing or likely to cause crime or 
bureaucracy for the police and allow them to 
disorder, away from a particular 
act more quickly to address problems in an 
place, and to confiscate related 
area. 
items. 

Community Protection 
Bringing the premises closure powers together 
Order (closure) – An order 
and simplifies the system, whilst keeping the 
which could be used to 
benefits of the existing system in providing 
close a premise temporarily, 
respite to communities. 
or for up to six months. 
 
 
Changes to ASB recording 
 
Previous categories of recording ASB incidents included a range of headings, under 
the definition of ASB. However, these did not enable call handlers or practitioners to 
consider the risk involved for the caller, other individuals or the community as a 
whole. Recording ASB categories have changed, to reflect a case management 
rather than an incident based approach.  
 
The three new ASB categories for recording by police, are: 
 
•  Personal 
•  Nuisance 
•  Environmental 
 
These simplified categories are designed to change the emphasis from merely 
recording and responding to incidents, to identifying those vulnerable individuals, 
communities and environments, most at risk and therefore in need of a response 
before the problems escalate.  
 
ASB - Personal 
‘Personal’ identifies ASB incidents that the caller, call-handler or anyone else 
perceives as either deliberately targeted at an individual or group or having an 
impact on an individual or group, rather than the community at large. It includes 
incidents that cause concern, stress, disquiet and/or irritation through to incidents 
which have a serious adverse impact on people’s quality of life, from minor 
annoyance to the risk of harm, deterioration of health and disruption of mental or 
emotional well-being, resulting in an inability to carry out normal day to day activities 
through fear and intimidation. 
 
ASB – Nuisance 
‘Nuisance’ includes incidents where an act, condition, thing or person causes 
trouble, annoyance, inconvenience, offence or suffering to the local community in 
general, rather than to individual victims, where behaviour goes beyond acceptability 
and interferes with public interests, including health, safety and quality of life. 
Individuals and communities will have differing expectations and levels of tolerance 
of what goes beyond acceptable behaviour, which will be considered in each 
situation. 

ASB - Environmental 
‘Environmental’ includes incidents where individuals and groups have an impact on 
their surroundings, including natural, built and social environments. This is about 
encouraging reasonable behaviour whilst managing and protecting the environment 
so that people can enjoy their own private spaces as well as shared or public 
spaces. People’s physical settings and surroundings are known to impact positively 
or negatively on a sense of well-being. The perception that nobody cares about the 
quality of a particular environment, can cause those affected to feel undervalued or 
ignored.  
 
Encouraging Active and Safer Communities 
  
Home Office analysis indicated that people living in areas with strong informal social 
control, experienced lower rates of crime and perceived ASB, compared to people in 
otherwise similar neighbourhoods. Baroness Newlove reported on her experiences 
when visiting active communities across the UK, and set out her vision for creating 
more active and safer communities, as detailed below.   
 
•  Residents feel safer in their area; know and can rely on, their neighbours; and 
feel happy to live there, 
 
•  The community has a sense of pride and ownership in their area, looking at 
how they can improve the neighbourhood,  rather than relying solely on 
agencies. 
 
•  People feel confident and willing to intervene and challenge behaviour 
 
•  Parents take responsibility for their children 
 
•  People within the community, have the skills, resources and support to set up 
their own groups and projects, and these are growing in number and thriving. 
But  if they feel out of their depth or threatened,  there is a clear mechanism 
from agencies to support them – they do not feel abandoned 
 
•  People who do the right thing are celebrated. 
 
•  Savings made by active communities are used to benefit those communities. 
 
Baroness Newlove’s vision of active communities, coupled with the Big Society 
agenda, sees agencies building community engagement and participation into 
tackling ASB in the future. Communities are not only involved in identifying what their 
local issues are, but also in how the problems are addressed. 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


The Current Position in Warwickshire 
 
In Warwickshire, ASB appears to have decreased substantially over the year. 
However, using the 3 new categories of ASB, it has not been possible to compare 
2011/12 to 2010/11.  
 
ASB in Warwickshire 2011/12 
 
Warwickshire Areas 
% of Total 
Nun & 
South 
Warks 
ASB Incidents 
Anti-Social Behaviour Incidents 
North 
Warks 
Bed 
Rugby 
Warks 
Total 
Environmental 
210 
481 
246 
504 
1,441 
7% 
Nuisance 
1,567 
4,949 
2,626 
6,097 
15,239 
70% 
Personal 
563 
1,653 
949 
1,880 
5,045 
23% 
Total Anti-Social Behaviour 
2,340 
7,083 
3,821 
8,481 
21,725 
100% 
Incidents 
Proportion of Anti-Social Behaviour 

11% 
33% 
18% 
39% 
100% 
 
Incidents 
 
 
ASB Review 
Agencies across Warwickshire have recognised that changes to the way that ASB 
was addressed were required and had reviewed current strategic approaches and 
delivery mechanisms. It was clear that there was: 
 
•  Limited concentration on the needs of victims, as the focus had been on the 
offenders and their needs.  
 
•  There was little in the way of risk assessment of the harm being caused to 
victims as a result of ASB, especially the most vulnerable victims. 
  
•  There were few common structures or processes across the county, as all 
districts were working in a different way, with different staff and different 
working practices 
 
Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabularies (HMIC) inspected how ASB was being 
addressed in each police force, compared to the previous inspection in 2010. Overall 
there had been a significant improvement in each area, but some areas had 
improved more than others.  
 
Although there had been improvements in the way that repeat and vulnerable victims 
were identified at the point of report, there was still no consistent identification of 
victims. The key improvement is with the questioning carried out by the call-handler, 
as some victims are not getting the support they need, when they need it. 
 
Additionally, incidents were not being recorded in the right category, so personally 
targeted victims, were more likely to be at higher risk of harm than other victims. 
 

The report for Warwickshire police showed that there had been improvements since 
2010 as follows: 
•  Strong partnership arrangements were in place, with regular meetings to 
decide how best to use resources, with appointed staff to advise on the best 
way to tackle problems 
 
•  The police consulted widely on a new ASB policy to strengthen its approach 
particularly focusing on victims (Warwick district pilot) 
 
However, areas for further improvement include: 
 
•  The force not consistently identifying vulnerable victims and repeat callers  at 
first point of contact 
 
•  Performance management and analysis of ASB could be strengthened at 
strategic level 
 
•  The force should consider conducting a force-wide ASB profile to fully 
understand the risks of harm caused by ASB 
 
•  Further staff training is needed to identify and respond to ASB incidents 
 
•  Satisfaction with the way police dealt with the problem was improved but is 
still lower than the national average. 
 
ASB has been the subject of a multi-agency review over the past few months, 
resulting in a pilot project in Warwick District, which is now being rolled out across 
the county.  
 
The project developed a risk assessment system, to identify vulnerable victims of 
ASB and ensure that there is support for them at an early stage. This has already 
ensured that vulnerable victims, were identified earlier and supported across 
agencies, with their risk being significantly reduced. A countywide database is being 
developed, for all agencies to use. This will ensure that all vulnerable victims are 
supported at an early stage, and that agencies co-ordinate their response to deal 
effectively to reduce the risk and take positive action against the perpetrators of 
ASB.  
 
Warwickshire Anti-Social Behaviour Action Plan 2012-13  
 
 
The countywide ASB action plan sits alongside this document and will be revised 
annually, based on analysis and partner input. All Community Safety Partnerships 
have ASB as a priority in their action plans, with their own actions at local level. 
 
 
Anti-social behaviour is one of the priorities set out in the Community Safety 
Agreement. Performance in relation to ASB will therefore be measured through the 
CSA delivery plan, and reported to the Safer and Stronger Partnership Board. Due to 
the changes in ASB recording, 2011/12 was the baseline year and no target was set. 
The target for 2012/13 therefore is to reduce ASB from that baseline.