This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Enforcing Authority Regulations'.

Health and Safety  
Executive

Local authorities and HSE in partnership
An evaluation
Prepared by PA Consulting Group
for the Health and Safety Executive 2008
RR680
Research Report

© Crown copyright 2008
First published 2008
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be 
reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted 
in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, 
photocopying, recording or otherwise) without the prior 
written permission of the copyright owner.
Applications for reproduction should be made in writing to:
Licensing Division, Her Majesty’s Stationery Office,
St Clements House, 2-16 Colegate, Norwich NR3 1BQ
or by e-mail to xxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.x.xxx.xxx.xx
ii

Health and Safety  
Executive

Local authorities and HSE in partnership
An evaluation
PA Consulting Group
123 Buckingham Palace Road
London  SW1W 9SR 
PA Consulting Group was appointed to undertake an evaluation of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) 
and Local Authority (LA) partnership during the summer of 2008. The purpose of the evaluation was to 
enable HSE to take an informed view of the contribution that the partnership can and should make to a new 
strategy. The evaluation was commissioned by the Local Authority Unit (LAU) of HSE and conducted jointly 
with representatives from Local Authorities Coordinators of Regulatory Services (LACORS). This report is 
the output of that exercise and aims to answer three key questions: 

to what extent has the partnership delivered on the seven commitments in the Statement of Intent? 

do the benefits of the partnership outweigh the costs? 

what does the partnership need to do going forward to ensure its long-term health?
This report and the work it describes were funded by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Its contents, 
including any opinions and/or conclusions expressed, are those of the authors alone and do not necessarily 
reflect HSE policy.
HSE Books

 
Contents 
1 
Introduction 
3 
1.1 
Aims and objectives of this report 

1.2 
Context of the partnership 

1.3 
Evaluation approach 

1.4 
Additional material 

2 
Key findings 
8 
2.1 
Overall assessment of the partnership 

2.2 
Delivering against the Statement of Intent 
10 
2.3 
Developing an effective and coherent partnership 
12 
2.4 
A joint approach to development 
18 
2.5 
Improving communications 
20 
2.6 
Providing information, guidance and support 
23 
2.7 
Examining and adapting the institutions and legal framework 
25 
2.8 
Monitoring and auditing 
27 
2.9 
Developing regulatory services 
29 
3 
Partnership costs and benefits 
30 
3.1 
Costs of the partnership 
30 
3.2 
Benefits of the partnership 
31 
4 
Next steps 
36 
4.1 
Maintaining the partnership 
36 
4.2 
Ensuring the long-term health of the partnership - challenges and opportunities 
38 
4.3 
Partnership teams 
38 
4.4 
Governance structures 
40 
4.5 
Standard setting and performance management 
40 
4.6 
Improving the flow of information and communications between partners 
42 
4.7 
Training and development 
43 
4.8 
Wider stakeholder engagement 
45 
4.9 
Allocation of enforcement responsibilities 
46 
4.10  Summary of recommendations 
47 


 
1  Introduction 
1.1 
Aims and objectives of this report 
PA Consulting Group was appointed to undertake an evaluation of the Health and Safety Executive 
(HSE) and Local Authority (LA) partnership during the summer of 2008.  The purpose of the evaluation 
was to enable HSE to take an informed view of the contribution that the partnership can and should 
make to a new strategy. The evaluation was commissioned by the Local Authority Unit (LAU) of HSE 
and conducted jointly with representatives from Local Authorities Coordinators of Regulatory Services 
(LACORS). This report is the output of that exercise and aims to answer three key questions: 
•  To what extent has the partnership delivered on the seven commitments in the Statement of 
Intent?  
•  Do the benefits of the partnership outweigh the costs?  
•  What does the partnership need to do going forward to ensure its long-term health?  
These questions are answered explicitly in section 2.1 of this report and explored in more detail in 
sections 2, 3 and 4.  
1.2 
Context of the partnership  
The HSE/Local Authority partnership was formally established in 2004, underpinned by the seven 
commitments in the "Statement of Intent" (shown in Figure 1 overleaf.).  These were jointly agreed by 
HSE and Local Authority representative bodies, setting out local government's and HSE's commitment 
to working together to help deliver the Health and Safety Commission's (HSC)1 Strategy for workplace 
health and safety in Great Britain to 2010 and beyond. As a result, a range of partnership activities 
were introduced, including the creation of seven regional Partnership Teams to co-ordinate 
partnership activities and initiated a range of other joint working initiatives, such as joint visits and 
inspections. Alongside the partnership, HSE and Local Authorities have been working jointly on 
delivering the national programme of health and safety priorities outlined in Fit3, "Fit for Life, Fit for 
Work, Fit for Tomorrow".  
                                                     
1 The Health and Safety Executive and the Health and Safety Commission have now merged. To reflect this change, all  
references to HSC have been changed to HSE.  


 
Figure 1. The seven commitments in the Statement of Intent of the HSE LA Partnership  
 
 
De
D ve
v lo
l pm
p en
e t
n  o
  f
o  a
  n
a  e
  f
e f
f e
f ct
c i
t v
i e
v  
e a
  nd
n  
d c
  oh
o er
e e
r nt
n  
t p
  a
p rt
r n
t e
n rs
r hi
h p
i  
p b
  et
e w
t e
w e
e n
e  
n H
  SE
S
and
n  
d
 
LA
L s
A  b
  a
b s
a ed
e  o
  n
o  
n th
t e
h i
e r
i  
r m
  ut
u u
t a
u l 
l s
  t
s r
t en
e g
n th
t s
h  
 

A j
  oi
o n
i t
n  
t a
  pp
p r
p oa
o c
a h 
h t
  o
t  
o d
  e
d v
e e
v l
e o
l p
o men
e t
n  
t o
  f
o  t
  h
t e
h  
e a
  r
a ra
r n
a ge
g m
e ent
n s
t  t
  o
t  
o d
  el
e ilv
i e
v r
e  
 
th
t e
h se
s  c
  o
c m
o mit
i m
t ent
n s
t
 
Im
I pr
p o
r v
o i
v n
i g 
g c
  om
o mun
u i
n c
i a
c ti
t o
i n
o s
n  b
  e
b tw
t e
w e
e n 
n H
  SE
S  
E a
  n
a d
n  L
  A
L s
A
 
HSE
S  
E L
  A 
A
Pr
P ov
o id
i i
d n
i g
n  
g i
  n
i f
n or
o mat
a i
t o
i n
o , 
, g
  u
g i
u d
i a
d nc
n e 
e a
  n
a d
n  
d
 
Par
a t
r n
t er
e s
r h
s ip
sup
u p
p or
o t
r  t
  o
t  
o e
  n
e f
n or
o ci
c n
i g
n  a
  u
a t
u h
t o
h r
o i
r t
i i
t e
i s
e  e
  q
e ui
u t
i a
t b
a l
b y
ip
 
Ex
E am
a in
i i
n n
i g
n  
g an
a d
n  
d a
  da
d p
a t
p i
t n
i g
n  t
  h
t e
h  i
  n
i st
s it
i u
t ti
t o
i ns
n  a
  n
a d
n  l
  e
l ga
g l
a  
l
 
fra
r m
a ew
e o
w r
o k w
  h
w i
h c
i h 
h c
  ur
u r
r en
e t
n ly 
y un
u de
d r
e p
r in
i s 
s th
t e
h  
e
re
r la
l ti
t o
i ns
n hi
h p
i  
p b
  e
b twe
w e
e n 
n H
  S
H E 
E a
  nd
n  
d LA
L s
A
 
Dev
e e
v l
e o
l p
o in
i g
n  
g ar
a r
r an
a g
n e
g men
e t
n s 
s f
  o
f r
o  
r mon
o i
n t
i o
t r
o in
i g
n  
g a
  n
a d 
d a
  u
a d
u it
i in
i g 
g t
  h
t e
h  w
  o
w rk
r  
 
of e
  n
e f
n orc
r in
i g
n  
g a
  u
a th
t o
h r
o it
i i
t e
i s 
s wh
w i
h ch 
h p
  r
p op
o e
p r
e ly 
y r
  e
r fle
l ct
c s
t  t
  h
t e 
e s
  ta
t t
a u
t s 
s o
  f
o  
HSE
S  
E a
  n
a d 
d L
  A
L  
A a
  s 
s pa
p r
a t
r ne
n r
e s
 
Co
C nt
n r
t i
r b
i u
b ti
t n
i g 
g t
  o
t  
o cu
c rr
r e
r nt
n /
t f
/ u
f tu
t r
u e
r  
e i
  n
i i
n t
i ia
i ti
t v
i e
v s
e  t
  o
t  i
  m
i pr
p o
r ve
v  c
  on
o s
n i
s s
i t
s en
e c
n y 
y a
  n
a d
n  c
  o
c -
 
or
o di
d n
i at
a i
t o
i n
o  
n o
  f c
  en
e t
n r
t al
a /
l d
/ e
d v
e o
v l
o ved
e  
d g
  ov
o e
v r
e n
r m
n en
e t
n  r
  e
r q
e ui
u r
i e
r m
e en
e t
n s
t  i
  m
i pa
p c
a t
c i
t n
i g
n on
o  
n
re
r gu
g l
u a
l t
a o
t r
o y 
y s
  er
e v
r ic
i es
e
 
 
It is clear that the partnership has achieved a considerable amount to date, however the regulatory 
landscape for the partnership is changing  and this will mean the partnership needs to evolve: 
•  The Better Regulation Executive (BRE) and the recommendations from the Hampton Review pose 
a number of challenges for the partnership - ensuring risk-based approaches to inspection, 
investigation and enforcement practice.  
•  The establishment of the Local Better Regulation Office (LBRO) with responsibility for improving 
local authority enforcement of environmental health, trading standards, fire safety and licensing 
regulations, will have implications for partnership working.  
•  New Local Area Agreements (LAAs) and equivalent outcome agreements in Scotland and Wales 
will mean that health and safety will have to further compete with other local priorities.  However 
these agreements may also present an opportunity to raise the profile of health and safety across 
local government.  
•  The more joined up and proportionate approach to public service regulation that the 
Comprehensive Area Agreements (CAA) aim to achieve are likely to have an impact on partnership 
working and how Local Authorities report their activities to HSE.  


 
•  The Local Government Associations (LGA) Group Development Strategy is underway and will 
review the ways of working and structures of LGA central bodies, including LACORS.  
These changes are not necessarily 'threats' to the success of  the partnership. However, they do 
mean that the partnership needs to be robust enough to sustain itself for the future, evolve as the 
environment changes and, in a world where resource constraints become more pervasive for partners, 
the partnership must prove that it does add real value to the work of all partners.  
A stocktake2 of the partnership in October 2007 outlined that the partnership was delivering real and 
tangible benefits for health and safety through joint working and declared that the partnership was 
'flourishing'. There was a recognition that there had been a 'step change' in the way that HSE and 
Local Authorities work together.    
This evaluation is based on the premise that there is a need for a partnership to deliver the required 
outcomes and assesses the effectiveness of the current arrangements for doing so. The evaluation 
seeks to build on the findings of the stock-take of October 2007 with a wider analysis of all aspects of 
the partnership, including a greater focus on whether the benefits outweigh the costs.    
For the purposes of this report, we use the term 'partners' to mean all bodies that are currently 
engaged in the partnership - HSE, LACORS and the 410 Local Authorities.   
1.3 
Evaluation approach 
Our overall evaluation approach started from the position of formulating strong, testable hypotheses 
based on a understanding of what constitutes successful partnership working. We then tested these 
hypotheses through three research methods: 
In-depth interviews with key stakeholders  
We conducted fifteen face to face interviews with key stakeholders working at strategic and 
operational levels within Local Authorities (including local councillors, Environmental Health Officers 
(EHOs) and Chief Officers), HSE (including Partnership Managers), and wider representative bodies 
to ensure we captured the views of people who will be influential in developing the partnership in the 
future. These interviews, amongst others, covered large, small, rural and urban Local Authorities to 
help us establish if there was any difference in their experience of the partnership. To provide a wider 
stakeholder view, we conducted interviews with representatives from the Union of Shop Distributors 
and Workers (USDAW), the British Retail Consortium (BRC) and the Small Business Forum (SBF). 
                                                     
2 Available at http://www.hse.gov.uk/aboutus/meetings/committees/hela/171007/h4_01.pdf 


 
National survey  
In order to ensure a robust evidence base for the evaluation that is statistically valid and 
representative across all involved in the partnership, we conducted an on-line national survey. The 
survey was issued to HSE Field Operations Directorate (HSE FOD) and HSE Policy Group staff and 
through LACORS to all 410 Local Authorities. Questions were multiple choice based on the five point 
Leikert scale and respondents were asked to fill in the survey only if they had experience of 
partnership working. 
The survey was sent to around 1500 staff and we received 405 responses from HSE and Local 
Authorities representing a response rate of  27%. There was a roughly equal split in responses from 
HSE and Local Authorities, as shown below:  
Table 1. Number of respondents to online survey by organisation  
Organisation 
No of respondents 
HSE 
208 
LA 
197 
Organisation not known 
30 
Total 
435 
 
A broad mix of responses were received across all levels of HSE and Local Authorities: 
Table 2. Number of HSE respondents by job type and level  
  
HSE Job type  
Job level  
Enforcement  
Sector  
Policy  
Band 0 



Band 1 



Band 2 
33 


Band 3 
85 

13 
Band 4 



Band 5 
16 


Band 6 
11 


Total  
162 
15 
30 
 
 


 
Table 3. Number of LA respondents by job type and level  
LA Job type  
No of respondents  
Heads of Service   
29 
Team Leader 
101 
Health and Safety 
47 
Enforcement Officer 
Technical Officer 
12 
Other  

Total  
197 
 
This sample is of a sufficient size and distribution to be statistically robust and for the key messages 
emerging to be a meaningful representation of the wider population. A copy of the questionnaire and 
the detailed analysis of responses is available as a technical annex to this report.  
Focus groups  
A series of regional focus groups were held in London, Taunton, Edinburgh, Leeds, Manchester and 
North Wales with representatives from HSE and Local Authorities attending. There were 
approximately 12-15 people at each focus group. For Local Authorities, the majority of attendees were 
at operational level (EHOs or Chief Officers) and similarly for HSE, the majority of attendees were 
operational inspectors.  
The focus groups were an opportunity to test the robustness of the emerging findings from the survey, 
prioritise key issues for stakeholders 'on the ground' and explore in more depth opportunities for future 
development.  
1.4 
Additional material 
A short stand alone management summary is available to support this report, with further information 
on the survey methodology, results and analysis contained within a separate technical annex.    


 
2  Key findings  
The partnership is generally in a good state of health given its stage of development and objectives. It 
has  produced a 'step change' in the relationship between HSE and Local Authorities with the 
introduction of successful joint working initiatives in many areas across Great Britain and has 
successfully delivered on many of the objectives it set out to achieve four years ago.  
However, there is a recognition that although the partnership has achieved a lot in its first four years, 
effort and resource need to be committed to ensure the partnership continues to deliver benefit.   The 
partnership is at a clear decision point and partners must now decide what they want from the 
partnership going forward - is the current level of co-operation and co-ordination sufficient or should 
the partnership move towards greater collaboration, co-ownership and joint delivery?  
2.1 
Overall assessment of the partnership 
The partnership has achieved much, moving from a historic situation of co-existence to a position 
where partners now very clearly align their respective activities and support each other where 
appropriate. There is a high level of consensus between partners both at operational and strategic 
levels about the strengths of the partnership, in particular the role of Partnership Managers and Teams 
in building up levels of trust and improving the flow of information and communication between 
partners. There is now more effective joint working on the ground in many areas, resulting in improved 
working relationships between partners and a better understanding of their mutual strengths. In 
addition, the provision of information, support and guidance from HSE to Local Authorities is highly 
valued. Partners have moved from a culture of distrust to a sense of greater equality and this should 
not be underestimated as one of the achievements of the partnership. In our opinion the partnership 
has matured well during its first four years and the foundations are in place for continued success.   
The next section of this report outlines our answers to the three key questions asked as part of this 
evaluation: 
1. To what extent has the partnership delivered on the seven commitments in the Statement of 
Intent?  

The partnership has delivered against much of the Statement of Intent, particularly in the areas of  
communication, the flow of information between partners and the provision of training, guidance and 
support. Commitments on performance management, auditing and examining the institutions and legal 
framework underpinning the relationship between HSE and Local Authorities are perceived to be only 
partially delivered. 


 
2.  Do the benefits of the partnership outweigh the costs?  
Overall, the benefits of the partnership were perceived by partners to outweigh the costs. Key benefits 
focussed on more targeted use of resource, effective joint working on the ground, improved levels of 
trust between partners and greater sharing of information. There is anecdotal evidence of the 
partnership having a positive impact on overall health and safety outcomes but it is difficult to prove a 
direct causal link. It was widely recognised that in order to sustain the benefits of the partnership going 
forward, the current steady state costs of the partnership would need to be maintained. 
3. What does the partnership need to do going forward to ensure its long-term health?  
The partnership should continue to build on its success to date by maintaining and developing the 
Partnership Teams and ensuring there is greater communication about the roles and responsibilities of 
the high level governance structures. In order to develop further the partnership must now address 
some key issues - implementing a more robust performance management framework to ensure 
consistent delivery of health and safety outcomes, better alignment of planning cycles between 
partners' and further improvements to the flow of information and communication between partners.  
The current successes of the partnership are not consistent across regions not all partners fully 
engaged . Although it is recognised that Local Authorities can deliver health and safety outcomes 
without actively taking part in the partnership the evaluation has shown that being involved in the 
partnership results in significant benefits that support delivery of health and safety outcomes. From an 
overall system perspective, there is therefore a need to ensure greater consistency in engagement, 
recognising that in a world of limited resources, 100% engagement is not practical - and given the 
nature of the risk profile across authorities the partnership needs to ensure a focus on the 
relationships that will deliver the greatest impact on health and safety outcomes. 
Findings were broadly consistent across regions, but where any differences were identified, 
particularly in relation to devolved administrations, these are identified within the main body of the 
report. Some differences were evident between large and small local authorities, in particular, in 
relation to their view on how the partnership should develop and again this is discussed within the 
main body of the report. There appears to be no correlation between a Local Authority's CPA rating 
and its involvement in or view of the partnership. 


 
2.2 
Delivering against the Statement of Intent 
The seven commitments in the Statement of Intent (2004) set out very clearly the partnership's aims 
and objectives. The evaluation confirms that the partnership has delivered well against the objectives 
supporting improving communications, developing a partnership based on mutual strengths and 
providing information, guidance and support equitably to partners: 
 
Figure 2.  "To what extent do you feel that the partnership arrangements have delivered on the seven 
commitments in the Statement of Intent?" (combined HSE and LA responses)  
Contributing effectively to current and future initiatives to
23%
improve the consistency and co-ordination of central and
36%
devolved government requirements which impact on regulatory
10%
services
31%
10%
Developing arrangements for monitoring and auditing the work of
30%
the enforcing authorities which properly reflects the status of
21%
HSE and LAs as partners
39%
16%
Examining and adapting as necessary the institutions and legal
43%
framework which currently underpins the relationship between
12%
HSE and LAs 
29%
47%
Providing information, guidance and support to enforcing
31%
authorities equitably
3%
19%
50%
34%
Improving communications between HSE and LAs
4%
12%
33%
A joint approach to development of the arrangements to deliver
39%
these commitments
5%
24%
25%
Developing an effective and coherent partnership between HSE
55%
and LAs based on their mutual strengths
5%
16%
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Wholly delivered/exceeded expectations of delivery 
Partially delivered 
Not delivered 
Don't know 
 
 
Source: HSE LA evaluation national on-line survey 
10 

 
However, there is little evidence that the partnership has delivered on the development of performance 
management arrangements and examining the legal arrangements of the partnership. At focus groups 
and in the on-line survey, there was strong consensus that the lack of strong performance 
management structures means there is little or no consequence for non-engagement in the 
partnership and, in addition, that the existing Enforcing Authority Regulations were 'unhelpful' in 
supporting partnership arrangements.  
A summary of progress against each of the Statement of Intent commitments is included below, with 
these developed in more detail in the following sections. The information is a collation of results from 
the on-line survey and insights gathered from the focus groups and in-depth interviews. 
Table 4. Summary of how the partnership has delivered against the Statement of Intent 
 
Statement of Intent  
How has the partnership performed? 
Development of an 
√  Better targeting of resources towards priority areas as a result of joint working and 
effective and coherent 
joint planning of projects.  
partnership between 
√  A more trusting relationship between partners with better mutual understanding of 
HSE and LAs based on 
their respective roles and responsibilities.  
their mutual strengths  
√  Better on the ground working relationship through joint visits and inspections.  
√  Raised profile of Health and Safety within Local Authorities.  
A joint approach to 
√  Increased role of Local Authorities in decision-making process through fora such as 
development of the 
LACORS and the Local Government Panel (LGP). 
arrangements to deliver 
√  More effective fora for Local Authorities and HSE to plan how they will deliver 
these commitments 
priorities e.g. regional and county level fora. 
X  Sufficient engagement of Local Authorities in the setting of strategic priorities. 
Improving 
√  Improvements in the flow of information between partners (HSE and Local Authorities 
communications 
but also inter-authority) through Partnership Teams.  
between HSE and LAs 
√  Increased informal communication as a result of joint visits and inspections.  
√  Better links between HSE and Local Authorities through LACORS.  
√  HELex extranet an invaluable source of information for Local Authorities.  
X Clear and robust communications above regional group level. 
Providing information, 
√  Increased access to training, support and guidance for Local Authorities from HSE.  
guidance and support to 
√  Access to the Health and Safety Laboratory (HSL) was invaluable. 
enforcing authorities 
equitably 
√  Increased sharing of advice between partners on joint inspections.  
X  Full exploitation of the Local Authority opportunities to provide information, support 
and guidance to other Local Authorities.  
 
 
11 

 
Statement of Intent  
How has the partnership performed? 
Examining and adapting 
√  Introduction of the Section 18 Standard which applies to all Enforcing Authorities.  
as necessary the 
√  Greater representation of views of local councillors at a strategic level with the HSE 
institutions and legal 
Board through the LGP. 
framework which 
currently underpins the 
√  Review of Enforcing Authority Regulations resulting in the introduction of the Flexible 
relationship between 
Warranting initiative. 
HSE and LAs  
√  Reconstitution of HELA to provide strategic oversight of the partnership between 
Local Authorities and HSE, including setting up specific Task and Finish Groups to drive 
forward projects.  
X  Clarity at operational level about high-level governance structures. 
Developing 
√  Raised profile of  monitoring and auditing e.g. through the HELA Task and Finish 
arrangements for 
Group to ensure compliance with the Section 18 Standard.  
monitoring and auditing 
X  Lack of effective and robust auditing mechanisms such as inter-authority auditing 
the work of the enforcing 
and peer review.  
authorities which 
properly reflects the 
X  Clear measures of success for the partnership. 
status of HSE and LA as 
X  Effective performance management of Local Authorities, particularly those that are 
partners (for example, 
less effective in delivering on health and safety outcomes.  
replacement of the LAe1 
form) 
Contributing effectively 
√  Greater flexibility in enforcement boundaries, currently through the piloting of flexible 
to current and future 
warrants.  
initiatives to improve the 
X  Clarity about the role of the partnership going forward in relation to the Local Better 
consistency and co-
Regulation Office (LBRO). 
ordination of central and 
devolved government 
requirements which 
impact on regulatory 
services 
 
Key: √ - largely delivered. x - areas for further development 
In the following sections we will explore these themes more fully. 
2.3 
Developing an effective and coherent partnership  
 
Commitment 1 of the Statement of Intent: Developing an effective and coherent partnership between HSE 
and LAs based on the principle of making the best use of their respective strengths, and applying 
collective resources in the best way to tackle national, regional and local priorities for health and safety. 
12 

 
2.3.1  The partnership has led to a better targeting of resources with 
more joint work planning  
Increased targeting of resources towards agreed priorities was seen to be a key benefit for partners - 
clearly evidenced within the national survey (see figure 3 below), in stakeholder meetings and through 
focus groups. All partners have significant resource constraints which means that to deliver benefits 
the partnership must ensure that the limited resources available in health and safety are used to the 
best effect both locally and nationally.  
 
Figure 3.  Positive responses to the survey question "I can point to clear evidence of the following 
benefits from partnership working in terms of outcomes for me" 
33%
I have been able to identify direct cost savings
67%
38%
I have been able to secure additional resources
62%
28%
I am more aware of recent developments
72%
Improved my access to support, training and
12%
guidance
88%
Enabled joint inspections which has allowed me to
45%
raise the quality of service I provide
55%
Enabled sharing of best practice which has helped
34%
me to improve the standard of my work
66%
38%
Better targeting of resources towards priorities
62%
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
HSE 
LA 
 
 
Source: HSE LA Evaluation national on-line survey 
Overall, Local Authorities are more likely than HSE to agree that the partnership has brought clear 
benefits, including better targeting of resources towards priorities and identification of direct cost 
savings.  Respondents to the survey and representatives at focus groups gave the following examples 
of how the partnership has facilitated better targeting of resources:  
•  Joint creation of focused service and/or work plans has helped Local Authorities to identify priorities 
and target resources. 
•  Central leadership on priority topics has led to improved consistency in high risk areas.  
13 

 
•  Sharing of materials, employees and expertise in response to specific initiatives and campaigns 
(for example, 'Working at Heights') make it easier for Local Authorities to understand where to put 
their resources. 
•  Sharing agendas openly between partners and having a clear understanding as to the rationale 
behind national priorities set by HSE can mean that Local Authorities are more motivated to target 
resources into priority areas.  
The partnership has facilitated and improved joint planning of projects at a regional and local level. In 
some areas strong regional structures exist for joint planning and Local Authorities and HSE now work 
together to plan for their local area, producing a work-plan to deliver over the year.  
 
Case study 
In London, the management structure is set up for joint working and producing genuine joint work plans, and 
allows for the assimilation of Local Authority plans into Divisional and wider strategic priorities such as Fit3. 
In Wales, there are three regional Task Groups containing representatives from each Local Authority and HSE in 
Wales (North Wales, South West Wales and South East Wales). All Task Groups sign up to deliver one 'all Wales' 
project, but each Task Group plans at a regional level what their regional priorities are and how to deliver them.  
 
Joint work plans allow HSE and Local Authorities to work together to achieve outcomes in their 
regional area resulting in joint ownership and delivery of health and safety outcomes, a fundamental 
aspects of successful partnership working. 
"Before the South West Regulators' Forum  (SWeRF), I was not aware of any regional group 
that looked at regional planning of delivery. This has produced improved information flows, 
sharing of ideas and practices, and communication with Local Authorities in other counties in 
the region. The partnership team has been fundamental to improving the relationship 
between Local Authorities and HSE, and providing a mechanism for opening up dialogue and 
working together for the benefit of the business and public"  (LA Inspector) 
 
2.3.2  The partnership has resulted in a more trusting, although not 
necessarily a more equal, relationship 
There was a high degree of consensus in all focus groups, interviews and through the survey that the 
partnership has resulted in a shift in the relationship between HSE and Local Authorities from a 
'parent-child' relationship to one based on greater equality and mutual understanding of each other's 
strengths. Whereas traditionally, the HSE was seen to be the enforcer of high risk and 'important' 
premises and the relationship tended to be about 'who did what’ in terms of enforcement boundaries, 
the relationship is now based on the feeling that partners are inspectors in the wider health and safety 
system.  
14 

 
 
 
"Closer links have enabled good working relationships to blossom and have also broken 
down misconceptions and potential competitive tendencies" (HSE Inspector) 
"HSE and LA inspectors are talking now in terms of the same priorities and same 'language' 
and because there is more interaction and understanding of respective roles, there is more 
mutual respect"   (LA inspector). 
 
At an operational level, there is a much better relationship between Local Authorities and their local 
HSE FOD counterparts. Increased familiarity and contact between the partners has resulted in 
increased respect for each other's roles and increased mutual support.  
Local Authorities have described how HSE is less frequently "dominating" in the relationship and is 
more likely to ask their opinion. Local Authorities are now more likely to recognise the strengths of the 
HSE with its specialist expertise and more focused approach to enforcement. Local Authorities value 
the expertise and experience that HSE inspectors bring, e.g. help and support with fatal accidents and 
investigations. 
Increased joint working has meant that HSE now has a greater understanding of the constraints of 
Local Authorities in delivering health and safety outcomes, including constraints on resources, internal 
political pressures, competing local priorities and the lack of profile and status of health and safety. 
HSE now also recognises the coverage that Local Authorities have in getting across health and safety 
messages to their local community, particularly businesses. HSE is more likely to recognise the 
strengths that Local Authorities bring to the table, such as knowledge of the local community and an 
understanding of health and safety synergies with other policy areas. 
However, despite increased levels of trust, attendees at three focus groups and a small proportion of 
on-line survey respondents felt that the partnership was not still not an 'equal' one for a variety of 
reasons:  
•  HSE is still viewed by Local Authorities as being the main driver in the relationship, shaping the 
agenda nationally, driving projects forward and setting priorities.  
•  Where strong regional links were not in place, some Local Authorities felt that they were being 
'pushed' into projects with little opportunity to influence the agenda at a national level. During some 
discussions on Fit3, they felt that resources had been unnecessarily directed away from local 
priorities due to the need to comply with national priorities.  
For some this was problematic and raised the question of whether the partnership was a "true" 
partnership or a relationship of a different kind.   Other respondents commented that an 'unequal' 
partnership did not necessarily mean that the partnership was not effective. For example, some Local 
Authorities (particularly where strong regional planning and joint visits exist), fully recognised and 
15 

 
accepted the HSE's role as the central policy making body and national regulator and did not see this 
as a barrier to effective delivery of the partnership. 
Given HSE's role as a national body and Local Authorities' focus on delivering local priorities there will 
always be an element of tension and some imbalance in the relationship. However as the rest of this 
evaluation evidences, this does not necessarily detract from the ability of the partnership to support all 
partners in meeting their objectives but does mean the partnership needs to actively monitor the status 
and health of the partnership and be open to develop the relationship to reflect the changing dynamics 
of the partnership. 
2.3.3  Health and Safety still has a relatively low priority within most 
Local Authorities and there is inconsistency in levels of 
engagement 

The partnership has gone some way towards raising the profile of health and safety within Local 
Authorities through the work of the Partnership Teams, the LGP, HELA and the work of the LACORS 
Policy Forum. However, health and safety still has a relatively low priority within Local Authorities for a 
variety of reasons:  
•  EHOs within Local Authorities have a range of responsibilities over and above health and safety 
which often take priority, particularly if a target is associated, such as food safety.  
•  General resource constraints within Local Authorities mean that it is not possible to do everything 
that HSE would like to, even if the 'will' exists amongst EHOs.  
•  Local councillors usually have limited interest in health and safety it does not feature highly in Local 
Authority Cabinet or other governance meetings or feature favourably in the local media.  
Despite high levels of engagement from some Local Authorities, there is real variation in the level of 
commitment to health and safety between Local Authorities, resulting in an uneven implementation of 
health and safety strategies. This is widely recognised by both HSE and Local Authorities who do 
engage, leading to them posing challenges to the benefits of partnership working.   
2.3.4  Joint visits and inspections are seen to have improved 
relationships between partners and in some cases, have led to 
better enforcement 

Joint visits and inspections between HSE and Local Authority operational staff are an important part of 
partnership working and where these have taken place, partners were broadly positive about their 
impact. They are seen to improve the flow of information between partners and improve the 
enforcement process as a whole. For example:  
•  Joint inspections allow for the exchange of information, learning opportunities and sharing of best 
practice, thereby improving the confidence of all staff involved.  
•  Joint visits and inspections have developed trust between partners and are evidence of improved 
working relationships at an operational level.    
16 

 
•  Joint inspections on multi-site industrial estates have resulted in quick and efficient updating of both 
authority databases and has ensured that the HSE line has been communicated to Local 
Authorities.  
"A problem raised in the LA enforced sector was also apparent in the HSE enforced 
premises, and we were able to develop agreed, consistent advice for application in all steel 
stockholders. This was both equitable and enhanced HSE's reputation with the industry" 
(HSE Inspector) 
 
In general, Local Authorities felt slightly more positive about joint visits and inspections than HSE, 
citing as invaluable learning from HSE inspectors on the ground. There was the sense that LA 
inspectors felt more 'confident' inspecting as a result of working closely with an HSE inspector and had 
a greater understanding of enforcement in relation to topics for Fit3.  
Joint inspections have resulted in increased understanding of partners' mutual strengths. Local 
Authorities have reported that they have learnt from HSE's more focused style of enforcement, with 
HSE inspectors report that they have learnt about the more educative and advisory style of 
enforcement from Local Authorities.  
Joint visits and inspections are also perceived to improve enforcement outcomes, one of the key 
objectives of the partnership. Although these examples are anecdotal, they point to clear emerging 
evidence of the benefits of the partnership:  
•  Enforcement ‘issues’, particularly supply chain issues, can be dealt with more quickly when 
partners are present on site.  
•  Consistency of enforcement is improved as standards are shared and understood by partners.  
•  Improved sharing of information about the duty holder helps to identify problems or issues which 
are common to both organisations.  
•  Duty holders receive a one-stop shop 'service' and response to their problem quickly.  
 
Case Study  - Drinks Delivery Pilot  
Following a successful joint HSE/council pilot in Blaenau Gwent and Cardiff, all 22 local authorities in Wales 
participated in a project to improve manual handling practices in pubs and other licensed premises. During the 
pilot, a training DVD was developed to assist landlords in providing suitable manual handling training for what is 
sometimes a transient workforce. Approximately 600 premises were visited by council regulatory officers using an 
inspection toolkit including benchmark standards, ensuring a consistent enforcement approach across Wales. 
Initial evaluation indicates substantial improvement within both the drinks delivery sector and the licensed trade 
and further visits are planned.  (Your Council's role in health and safety, HSE and LACORS)  
17 

 
2.3.5  HSE and Local Authorities have ongoing concerns about roles, 
responsibilities and resource 
Although the partnership has resulted in improved joint relations, concerns remain about the impact of 
the partnership on roles, responsibilities and resources. 
Some Local Authorities reported that they believed that the partnership placed an additional resource 
requirement on them through, for example Fit3, or greater co-ordination and planning required by the 
partnership. Although a very small proportion, some saw a risk that the partnership could be viewed 
cynically as HSE trying to use a 'cheaper' resource to deliver its priorities. Similarly, some HSE 
inspectors reported that committing to the partnership at a time of reducing resources meant they 
were being taken away from other priorities.  
Both HSE and Local Authorities saw resource constraints as a threat to the partnership. Finite 
resources mean that however committed people are to the partnership, they may be unable to deliver 
on those commitments if other pressures arise.  
Some HSE staff felt that the division of roles and responsibilities was not clear and that, despite the 
additional training and guidance offered to Local Authorities, Local Authority inspectors were not as 
confident as HSE staff to enforce health and safety, leading to concerns about consistency of 
enforcement. 
Some interviewees also commented that there was a lack of clarity about the difference between the 
ELOs and the Partnership Managers. In some areas, Partnership Managers were former ELOs. In 
others the role of the ELO has been similar to that of the current Partnership Manager with some 
ELOs going beyond their 'traditional' role as advisors on the enforcement boundaries between HSE 
and Local Authorities. A small number of Local Authority representatives felt they were unclear in 
some cases who they should contact and wanted greater clarity about respective roles and 
responsibilities.  
2.4 
A joint approach to development 
 
Commitment 2 of the Statement of Intent: A joint approach to developing the arrangements to deliver 
these commitments. 
2.4.1  There are a range of structures and processes which allow Local 
Authorities to influence and engage in the decision making and 
planning process  

Overall, the role that Local Authorities have in shaping the agenda of the partnership has greatly 
improved.  Structures and processes that allow Local Authorities to influence and engage in the 
decision making and planning process are in place and where they work, are effective. In some areas, 
where regional coordination is particularly effective, Local Authorities have strong input into HSE 
programmes and strategies.   
18 

 
It is widely recognised that LACORS, through the Policy Forum, plays an important role in allowing 
representatives from Local Authorities to influence and engage with health and safety policy making.  
The Policy Forum comprises Local Authority representatives from eleven government regions across 
Great Britain: a health and safety liaison group nominee and a heads of service group nominee from 
each region. The health and safety liaison group nominee is drawn from county liaison groups whose 
membership comprises health and safety officers from individual Local Authorities.  Similarly Heads of 
Service participate in county and regional groups and are nominated to sit on the Policy Forum. The 
regionally nominated representatives act as a conduit for information into and out of county and 
regional liaison groups, allowing issues identified within regions to be raised at the Policy Forum and 
key messages communicated back to the regions.     
The LACORS Policy Forum also plays an important role in ensuring views from the regions are fed 
into other governance bodies. LACORS undertake the joint role as secretariat to HELA and the Local 
Government Panel. The co-chair of HELA is also the Chair of the LACORS Health and Safety Policy 
Forum and other members of the LACORS Policy Forum make up the local government 
representation on HELA. Views collated within the LACORS Policy Forum are fed into HELA via the 
representatives from the Policy Forum. This process is designed to ensure that the views from the 
county groups are fed to the regional Policy Forum representatives, these in turn are fed into LACORS 
Policy Forum which feeds into HELA.  
Political representation of Local Authorities is through the LGP which is made up of local councillors 
nominated by the local government associations. This ensures that the voice of local councillors is 
heard at HSE Board level. LGP has made real progress in ensuring that the views of local councillors 
are heard at the highest level within the HSE.  There has been real improvement in the way meetings 
are held and in the way that partners engage with one another on a more equal basis.  However, 
challenges remain in ensuring that the views of Local Authorities are fully represented. These include:  
•  Feedback mechanisms from the Policy Forum to County and Regional Liaison Groups. These are 
not always as effective as they could be.  There is an element of disconnect between what 
happens at the LACORS Policy Forum and activities beneath at a Regional and County Liaison 
Group level.  Although formal mechanisms do exist, LACORS are dependent upon individual 
representatives taking an active role in communicating with Local Authorities within their area to 
ensure the effectiveness of this structure. 
•  At a regional and local level, Local Authorities often do not have a chance to influence and engage 
with the setting of priorities.  More could be done by HSE to understand local priorities and feed 
these into the HSE priorities. Where there is a disconnect and local priorities take precedence, 
such as the implementation of Smoke Free legislation, Local Authorities can find it difficult to see 
how partnership adds value.  
•  HELA has a strong 'brand' amongst some Local Authorities. However there is a lack of clarity about 
the roles and responsibilities of HELA and how the views of Local Authorities are fed into this body  
•  There is the recognition that the LGP membership can change due to local election results. This 
means that continuity in the relationships built up by local councillors with the HSE Board may be 
lost.  
19 

 
•  It is recognised that the LGP could do more to fulfil its role as providing high level strategic direction 
to the partnership.  
2.4.2  Although improvements have been made in joint planning, there 
remain issues with timing 
The partnership has made progress in ensuring HSE involves and engages Local Authorities early on 
in the planning process, for example, Fit3 has been particularly effective in engaging Local Authorities 
early in the planning cycle. However due the nature of central government and local government 
planning processes there remain tensions. 
Local Authorities develop their plans during late autumn with the aim of fixing them by the end 
of January. HSE generally undertakes planning during the winter with the aim of fixing plans in 
March. During the earliest stages of the partnership this meant that Local Authorities had fixed their 
plans before they received any planning information from HSE, leading to considerable frustration on 
both sides. Local Authorities felt that HSE failed to take reasonable account of their planning needs, 
HSE perceived Local Authorities to be unwilling to take on board HSE proposals. 
Considerable progress has been made in this area, particularly through Fit3. Local Authorities are now 
represented on all HSE's main project/programme boards, helping to make early decisions on the 
direction and implementation of planning. This means essential information is now made available in 
the autumn to allow Local Authorities to make provision for activities within their plans and it is 
supplied in a format better suited to Local Authority needs.  
Nevertheless, there remain tensions. Details of some of the HSE-driven campaigns still only emerge 
after Local Authority plans are fixed. This may limit the ability of some Local Authorities to react when 
their resources have already been committed to other priorities. The recent Ladders Campaigns were 
cited by Local Authority representatives as illustrating this problem. 
Arrangements should be reviewed to ensure as much information as possible is provided to Local 
Authorities when they need it. This is important for HSE as identifying resources and how they will be 
used within Local Authority plans is essential to ensuring Local Authority inspector resource can be 
committed to targeted health and safety activities. 
2.5 
Improving communications 
 
Commitment 3 of the Statement of Intent:  Improving communications between HSC, HSE and Local 
Authorities to ensure, in particular that Local Authorities and their representative bodies are adequately 
involvement in the development of policy advice to the HSE, and in the planning and delivery of the 
operational activities with carry them into effect. 
20 

 
2.5.1  The partnership has improved the flow of information and 
communications between partners 
Good partnerships require the provision of information to flow freely between partners and for effective 
communication to take place at all levels. Respondents in the survey and in interviews saw 
improvements to information flows and communications as one of the key benefits of the partnership, 
breaking down barriers and leading to sharing of best practice and advice.  
Figure 4.  "There is a good communication/flow of information between partners" 
73%
Agree 
44%
23%
Neutral 
41%
4%
Disagree 
14%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
HSE 
LA 
Source: HSE LA evaluation national on-line survey 
41% of respondents who were asked what benefits accrued from the partnership in terms of outcomes 
for them, said that the partnership has made them "more aware of recent developments".  
"The HSE and Local Authorities have worked together to deliver a wide range of 
communication mechanisms not least through the county group. The quality of information 
emanating from HSE is second to none, although some times the partnership role and the 
role of Local Authorities is not overly reflected in the publications. Again, I think there is more 
work to do in this area, hence 'partially delivered'".   (LA inspector) 
Figure 5. " I believe that the role of Partnership Teams has been valuable to joint working" 
3%
Strongly disagree 
8%
26%
Neutral 
32%
71%
Strongly agree/agree 
60%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
HSE 
LA 
Source: HSE LA evaluation national on-line survey 
 
21 

 
The partnership has put in place a number of activities which have successfully increased the flow of 
information and communications at an operational level: 
•  Partnership Teams have opened up dialogue between Local Authorities and HSE and continue to 
be a vital channel for information and communication. 
•  Buddy Inspectors are valued by Local Authorities as a point of contact if they have an enquiry or an 
issue that needs to be resolved quickly, or where they need informal advice.  
•  Workshops, joint meetings and training events are seen as networking opportunities and improve 
communications between partners.  
•  Partnership Liaison Officers (PLOs) are valued by HSE as a means of improving communications, 
increasing knowledge by HSE of Local Authority ways of working. Additionally, PLOs act a useful 
on-going point of contact within Local Authorities for HSE after the secondment. 
•  Regional and County Fora bring partners together in one place to share information about their 
work and improve informal communications between partners, providing better communication not 
only between HSE and Local Authorities but between individual Local Authorities.  
•  The HELex extranet is a useful source of information particularly for Local Authorities.  This allows 
access to HSE information quickly and easily. The LACORS website was also viewed by survey 
respondents as a useful source of information from the partnership.  
•  Joint participation in Safety and Health Awareness Days (SHADs) and other events has also been 
effective in improving the flow of information and advice between partners. 
Interestingly, although responses were mostly positive to this question, a fairly large proportion of 
respondents thought the partnership had only partially delivered on this commitment, citing the 
following challenges: 
•  Difficulty in using HELex extranet - some Local Authorities and HSE staff reported difficulties 
accessing the extranet in terms of passwords, difficulties in finding information and lack of 
awareness about what is available. 
•  Lack of awareness of the Buddy Inspector scheme within Local Authorities.  
•  Poor communication between different county groups.  
•  Opportunities to raise the profile of health and safety more widely within Local Authorities are not 
being capitalised on.  
2.5.2  Strategic communication is less effective 
Although at an operational level, communication has improved, there is less evidence that it has 
improved above regional group level:  
•  Although there are effective communications channels in place supporting Partnership Team 
activity in the regions (e.g. Annual Report, the LAU newsletter), more could be done to ensure 
regular communications between Partnership Teams and, for example, LACORS.  
22 

 
•  More could be done to ensure that the outputs of HELA meetings are communicated to the regions 
ensuring that decisions made at HELA are more transparent.  
•  The LGP only meets twice a year with the HSE Board meaning little ongoing communication at a 
strategic level.  
2.6 
Providing information, guidance and support 
 
Commitment 4 of the Statement of Intent: Providing information, guidance and support to enforcing 
authorities equitably. 
2.6.1  Local Authorities greatly value the training, guidance and support 
offered by HSE to them, including access to specialist support  
One of the key objectives of the partnership was to ensure the equitable provision of information, 
guidance and support to enforcing authorities. The evaluation has shown that this is one of the most 
highly valued and effective elements of partnership activity. This is provided through access to HSE 
training days, workshops, targeted training in topic areas, such as Fit3,  joint visits and inspections and 
'Partnership Action days' which bring together HSE and LA inspectors to share experience and learn 
from one another.  
Figure 6.  "In terms of getting the information that you required, how useful do you find the support 
offered by HSE Specialist Inspectors and/or the Health and Safety Laboratory?" (Local 
Authority respondents only) 
 
 
3%
 
27%
 
 
70%
 
 
 
Highly valuable/Valuable 
 
Neutral or don't know 
Not valuable 
 
Source: HSE LA evaluation national on-line survey 
23 

 
Local Authorities were particularly positive about increased access to training, guidance and support, 
citing that they are better informed as a result, were more 'confident' in their ability to enforce and able 
to provide an improved service for duty holders through more focused inspections. Technical training 
and topic area training (gas safety, noise, asbestos and dermatitis) were particularly valued.  In 
addition increased contact with HSE has in some cases led to increased knowledge and 
understanding by EHOs of occupational health issues.  
Local Authorities greatly value the degree of informal training and development opportunities that they 
receive as a result of better working relationships with HSE inspectors with more officers talking to 
each other. Following training courses, EHOs have contacted the Health and Safety Laboratory (HSL) 
for help, support and analysis of suspect materials and local EHOs are now more aware of HSL 
contacts and capabilities.  
Increased access to HSL resources has been valued by Local Authorities where specialist expertise 
has been required, such as ergonomists and use of HSE equipment (Kenny device), electrical safety 
and lasers.  Local Authorities have made good use of the specialist support available to them, with 
over 46% having requested specialist support 1-2 times in the last twelve months. A large proportion 
of Local Authority respondents (82%) said that they either found the Science and Technology initiative 
either highly valuable or valuable.  
"Our Dept has used HSE specialists for Work at height, asbestos and slips advice, which has 
enabled us to more efficiently decide action following incidents in these areas. The provision 
of information via the websites (closed site, LACORS and previously accident investigation 
site, ECoshh etc) and the training events have improved our access to focused information 
and training to a very marked degree"  (LA inspector) 
 
However, some HSE survey respondents commented that more could be done to ensure that all Local 
Authorities and particularly EHOs are aware of the support and specialist advice available to them. It is 
also recognised that the governance arrangements for commissioning and management of research 
could be improved, with better monitoring of the outcomes of commissioned research and better 
coordination of research across Local Authorities to avoid duplication.   There are also challenges 
around managing expectations of Local Authorities - although applying findings locally is relatively 
easy, developing research into national guidance is a complex process and there is often a long lead 
time before national guidance is issued as result of a piece of research.  
2.6.2  The flow of operational support is largely one way 
There is some evidence of the transfer of knowledge from Local Authorities to HSE through joint 
inspections and visits, with HSE staff learning how Local Authorities liaise with businesses and take on 
board different ways of working.  However the flow is largely one-sided (from HSE to Local 
Authorities). Whilst this was not perceived to be a problem by HSE, it is important for partnership 
working that there is a two way flow of training, guidance and support in order for a 'true' partnership to 
take place. 
24 

 
Some progress has been made by the partnership in improving the degree to which Local Authorities 
work together, but this is patchy and more could be done to improve Local Authorities providing 
support to one another in key topic areas.  
2.6.3  There is more scope to improve the sharing of information 
between partners  
Currently, Local Authorities and HSE hold separate data on duty holders with Local Authorities often 
holding richer and more detailed information. Improved information flow from Local Authorities to HSE 
about ‘duty holders’, for example, the numbers and types of premises that need enforcement, would 
benefit HSE (with the caveat that the information would have to be useful and meaningful).  
Staff at focus groups also commented that although the partnership had led to some sharing of 
statistical information e.g. through access to the HELex extranet, more could be done to improve 
sharing of regional and local statistics between HSE and Local Authorities. This would mean, for 
example, Local Authorities having better access to the range of statistics that HSE Statistical Unit 
hold, or the Unit taking steps to make LA's more aware of where these statistics are held.  
2.7 
Examining and adapting the institutions and legal 
framework 
 
Commitment 5 of the Statement of Intent : Examining and adapting as necessary the Institutions and legal 
framework which currently underpins the relationship between HSC, HSE and LAs.. 
2.7.1  There is a lack of clarity around high level governance structures  
There remains a lack of clarity amongst both EHOs and Chief Officers in Local Authorities on how the 
decision-making process works above Regional Groups. Many respondents were unaware of how 
decisions are made within HELA or the LGP and how these are communicated 'downwards'.  
Whilst the role of LACORS was seen to be very positive in improving the flow of information to Local 
Authorities, there was confusion over the role of the LACORS Policy Forum and the processes by 
which decisions at the Policy Forum feed into HELA. Although each region has a nominated 
representative for the LACORS Health and Safety Policy Forum, the level of engagement with county 
groups can differ, leading to a dilution of the effectiveness of the process.  
Whilst it is recognised that the LGP as a forum has improved, its profile is still low beyond those who 
are already familiar with it. The LGP has done some positive work in getting 'out and about' and 
visiting for example, the All Wales Group. This has raised its profile, but awareness and recognition of 
its role is limited beyond a national level.  
25 

 
2.7.2  Some smaller Local Authorities would like to see firmer direction 
from HSE  
As outlined earlier in the evaluation, one of the key challenges for Local Authorities in participating in 
the partnership is a lack of dedicated health and safety resource. In focus groups and interviews there 
was a views expressed from smaller Local Authorities, that they had difficulty in persuading Heads of 
Service, Directors and local councillors that resources are required in health and safety.  
Parallels were often drawn with the Food Standards Agency (FSA) where the mandatory nature of the 
food hygiene regime means that resources are provided to EHOs to carry out activities in this area. 
Although the Section 18 Standard does set out what provision should be made in health and safety, 
HSE does not have a statutory audit role to enforce this and there is a view that in smaller authorities it 
can be difficult to justify why resources should be allocated to health and safety rather than areas with 
firmer prescription e.g. food standards.   
Some authorities expressed the view that firmer direction would help them to secure resources for 
health and safety and target this on national priorities. Some Local Authorities cited Fit3 as useful in 
helping them justify resource as it clearly sets out a set of national priorities and outcomes. Although 
these EHOs said they did not want an Food Standards Agency style relationship, clearer direction may 
be useful in dealing with the internal challenge of resource constraints.  
The experience of larger or urban Local Authorities is different. For them, greater resources tend to be 
available for health and safety, although choices still have to be made about the division of resources 
between competing priorities such as food safety. For these Local Authorities, firmer direction from 
HSE was not required or desirable.  
2.7.3  There is evidence that greater flexibility in enforcement 
boundaries can bring positive results  
Current initiatives in Flexible Warranting allow greater flexibility for enforcement by allowing either 
HSE or Local Authorities to enforce health and safety in an area which is not formally under their 
jurisdiction within  Enforcing Authority Regulations. Flexible Warrants (FW) issued under Section 19 of 
the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 allow one Enforcing Authority to appoint another EA's suitably 
qualified inspectors to act within its field of responsibility. Flexible Warranting is seen to bring both 
benefits and also concerns to respondents, reflecting a sense of uncertainty about their role in the 
partnership and how they will develop in the future.  
26 

 
Table 5. Summary of HSE and Local Authorities views on the benefits and concerns about Flexible 
Warranting  
Benefits of flexible warranting 
Concerns about flexible warranting   
•  HSE benefits from having access to people on the 
•  Some LA respondents saw Flexible Warrants as a 
ground who are able to respond to incidents 
way of HSE ‘off-loading’ work onto Local Authorities 
quickly. 
and were skeptical about the actual benefits that 
•  Local Authorities have been able to respond 
flexible warranting might bring. 
effectively to complaints about health and safety, in 
•  HSE respondents felt that HSE may be exposed by 
situations where the HSE would have been unlikely 
allowing Local Authorities to enforce in other areas, 
to get an inspector to the problem quickly enough, if 
as HSE and LA officers are not trained in the same 
at all. 
manner indicating an ongoing level of distrust in 
•  Both HSE and Local Authorities have been able to 
competency of LA staff.  
provide a more responsive service to duty holders 
•  HSE Unions felt that Flexible Warranting may 
through the joint warranting initiative.  
undermine their work and authority.  
•  Many Local Authorities reported that they saw the 
Enforcing Authority Regulations as frustrating and 
getting in the way of good partnership, with Flexible 
Warrants as a positive way of overcoming this 
barrier. 
 
2.8 
Monitoring and auditing 
 
Commitment 6 of the Statement of Intent: Developing arrangements for monitoring and auditing the work 
of the enforcing authorities which properly reflect the status of HSE and LAs as partners. 
2.8.1  Performance management is one of key areas where the 
partnership has not delivered against the Statement of Intent 
One of the aims and objectives of the partnership is to ensure that effective monitoring and auditing 
arrangements are in place. The majority of respondents to the survey within both HSE and Local 
Authorities believed that the partnership has not delivered robust performance management: 
 
27 

 
Figure 7. "To what extent has the partnership delivered the commitment 6 of the Statement of the Intent".  
0%
Exceeded expectations of delivery 
1%
5%
Wholly delivered 
14%
18%
Partially delivered 
44%
12%
Not delivered 
30%
65%
Don’t know or not applicable to my job
12%
HSE 
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
LA 
 
Source: HSE LA evaluation national on-line survey 
There has been some progress in developing the monitoring and auditing arrangements, such as the 
review of the LAE1 form, participation in peer review exercises and completion of Fit3 proformas as 
part of the Fit3 programme. Concerns to highlight are: 
•  Lack of benchmarking information to assess which Local Authorities are delivering effective health 
and safety outcomes. 
•  Lack of a national indicator against which to measure health and safety outcomes. 
•  Perception that self-auditing by Local Authorities is an insufficiently robust auditing mechanism to 
ensure good performance across the board.  
•  LAE 1 form does not accurately reflect outcomes as it is based around the number of inspection 
visits. 
From an HSE perspective, a significant number of respondents to the survey commented that the lack 
of an effective monitoring and auditing regime reduces the benefits of partnership working and leads 
to a sense of frustration that not all Local Authorities are engaged equally in the partnership.  For 
those Local Authorities who participate fully in the partnership, there is also the sense that their 
participation is not rewarded fully as long as those Local Authorities who do not engage are seen to 
'get away with' non compliance. Lack of monitoring and auditing leads to concern for partners that 
there is a lack of consistency in performance in health and safety.  
It is also recognised that Local Authorities are and will be monitored and audited on a wide range of 
other services, for example, through the forthcoming Comprehensive Area Agreements (CAAs) and 
their equivalents in Scotland and Wales. The risk is that additional performance monitoring of health 
and safety will disengage Local Authorities from the benefits that effective health and safety can bring 
to the community. 
28 

 
2.8.2  Section 18 Standard seen as a way to ensure greater compliance  
Section 18 of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974  places a duty on the Health and Safety 
Executive and Local Authorities to make adequate arrangements for enforcement. It applies to all 410 
LAs and the HSE Field Operations Directorate. HSE replaced previous guidance on Section 18  with 
the new Standard to:  
•  reflect that direction given by it is not optional, 
•  reinforce the section as a benchmark for those engaged in health and safety enforcement.  
The standard provides a means to measure health and safety enforcement and cement partnership 
working and significantly, applies to all Local Authorities and HSE FOD.  
At the time of writing, the new Section 18 Standard has been in place for five months with supporting 
toolkits either in place or in development. It is widely recognised that the new standard will address 
many of the issues outlined above. The HELA Task and Finish Group is examining how compliance 
against the Section 18 Standard can be audited to give HSE reassurance that both HSE FOD and 
Local Authorities are making adequate arrangements for enforcement.  
2.9 
Developing regulatory services 
 
Commitment 7 of the Statement of Intent: Contributing effectively to current and future initiatives to 
improve the consistency and coordination of central and devolved government requirements which 
impact on regulatory services, in the context of expectations, priorities, minimum standards, monitoring 
and intervention.  
 
As outlined at the beginning of this report, the partnership faces a number of external influences, such 
as the Hampton Review, the better regulation agenda and the creation of LBRO. The partnership has 
good links in place with colleagues in BRE, CLG and with other regulators. A good relationship exists 
with LBRO but it is too early to evaluate the impact of LBRO on partnership working and how well the 
partnership has contributed to any requirements arising as a result of the Local Better Regulation 
Office's (LBRO) work.  
29 

 
3  Partnership costs and benefits  
The evaluation has shown that there is a high degree of consensus between partners at both 
operational and strategic level that the benefits of the partnership outweigh the costs, through more 
focussed and targeted enforcement, the degree of trust and cooperation that has developed as a 
result of the partnership and in the "softer" benefits that joint working has brought to partners. There is 
evidence that joint working such as joint visits and inspections can bring wider benefits to the health 
and safety system as a whole through greater focus on areas of risk and national priorities, quicker 
resolution of enforcement issues and a better service for duty holders (which contribute to some of the 
benefits identified as important to regulators in the Better Regulation agenda).  As with many 
partnerships, however, it is difficult to prove a causal relationship between changes in output and 
outcome measures i.e. that changes in enforcement notices, prosecutions and injury levels are a 
direct result of the partnership. 
3.1 
Costs of the partnership  
All partners incur some cost in working together: 
HSE  
•  Running of Local Authority Unit. 
•  Funding of the Partnership Teams and Managers in the seven regions.  
•  Partnership communications, including management of the HELex extranet as well as funding 
regional fora and the Annual Partnership Conference. 
•  Time spent by HSE Inspectors on joint visits and inspections.  
LACORS  
•  Employment of policy staff 3. 
Local Authorities  
•  Time for local councillors attendance at the LGP. 
•  Officer time for involvement in partnership meetings and activities. 
 
                                                     
3 LACORS policy staff produce guidance for Local Authorities, act as Secretariat for HELA and LGP, and liaison point with Local 
Authority Unit, representing LAs on HSE programmes and projects, coordination of Policy forum, weekly update emails, 
responding to consultations on behalf of LAs, lobbying on behalf of LAs, promotion and raising the profile of health and safety 
with Councillors, joint planning of annual conferences and regional updates with LAU.  
 
30 

 
It has not been possible within the scope of the evaluation to provide a detailed or accurate 
breakdown of all costs involved in the partnership, however, high level costs have been isolated to 
give an indication of the likely costs of maintaining the partnership in a steady state.  
Table 6.  Main costs associated with working in partnership  
Organisation  
Cost   
Local Authority Unit (HSE)  
Resources used to support partnership assumed to be 66% of total LAU 
resource devoted to partnership working  = 10 FTEs.  
Communications (HSE)  
HELex extranet set up and running costs to be included as part of LAU.  
Partnership Teams (HSE)  
7 Partnership Teams, made up of Partnership Manager, Partnership Liaison 
Officers and Partnership Officer  =  21FTEs.  
Operational Inspectors  (HSE) 
Attendance at County Groups, activities related to buddying = 7FTEs.  
LACORS (LGA)  
2.5  x FTE.  
 
HSE have estimated the costs of the partnership as about £2 million - of which £700,000 for the Local 
Authority Unit and £1.3 million for Partnership Teams4. This accords with our understanding of the 
high level costs of the partnership.   It should be noted that some of these costs would be incurred 
irrespective of the existence of the partnership in that Local Authorities would still be Enforcing 
Authorities and require support and oversight from HSE (through LAU).  We are therefore proposing 
that the direct costs of the partnership are the incremental costs incurred, that is, the partnership 
teams and 2.5 FTE within LACORS.  
Please note that these costs are estimates only and purely indicative.  
3.2 
Benefits of the partnership  
This section outlines some of the key benefits of the partnership and provides analysis of 
stakeholders' perception of whether the benefits of the partnership outweigh the costs.  
3.2.1  Overall, the benefits of the partnership are seen to outweigh the 
costs  
Most respondents to the survey felt very strongly that the degree to which the relationship between 
Local Authorities and HSE has improved since the partnership has been in place outweigh the cost of 
the partnership, and that although these benefits were often intangible, they were extremely valuable. 
                                                     
4 These are reported in the addendum to HSC/06/09  
http://www.hse.gov.uk/aboutus/meetings/hscarchive/2006/140206/c09addendum.pdf    
31 

 
Figure 8.  "Do the benefits of the partnership outweigh the costs?" (combined HSE and Local 
Authorities).  
 
11%
21%
68%
Benefits outweigh costs
Costs and benefits are equal
Costs outweigh benefits
Source: HSE LA evaluation national on-line survey 
There is evidence that where strong relationships exist, there is a sense of quid pro quo - that the 
investment that HSE makes in terms of advice, guidance, information and support, means that Local 
Authorities are more likely to offer resource towards the HSE driven agenda.  
As part of our evaluation stakeholders identified a wide range of benefits that have arisen as a result 
of the partnership - these are summarised in table 7 below: 
32 

 
Table 7. Table showing summary of benefits arising from partnership working  
Benefit 
Description 
More effective joint 
•  Improved operational team working through joints visits and inspections and at a strategic 
working  
level through county and national groups. 
Improved 
•  Better communications between partners at an operational level e.g. more informal joint 
communications  
working and contact on the ground and at a strategic level e.g. between LGP and HSE 
Board.  
•  Improved written communications for duty holders, especially in the LA sector. 
Better customer 
•  More responsive service to duty holders in resolution of enforcement issues.  
service 
•  Improved ability to respond to duty holder demand for information and guidance on a wider 
range of subjects.  
•  Improved response to complaints which involve two duty holders or where there is an issue of 
lack of consistency in enforcement. 
Improved 
•  Training, advice, guidance and support to Local Authorities has increased Local Authority 
confidence of Local 
inspectors' confidence in enforcing health and safety. 
Authority inspectors   •  This has also increased HSE inspectors confidence and respect for LA inspectors.  
Facilitated 
•  Commitment of an estimated 350 LA FTEs  which otherwise might not have been provided.  
delivery of Fit3  
•  Better targeting of Local Authority resource to nationally identified risks and priorities. 
•  Partnership Teams and Managers playing a role in helping to facilitate effective delivery of 
Fit3 through  the production of joint work plans. 
Improved strategic 
•  Closer strategic links strengthened by HSE and LGP meetings. 
links between HSE 
•  Inter Local Authority links strengthened. 
and Local 
Authorities  
Better targeting of 
•  Increased level of dedicated resource focused on nationally agreed health and safety activity. 
resources 
•  Improved understanding by HSE of the Local Authority sector leading to better identification 
towards priorities  
and targeting of risks in LA enforced premises.  
•  Various flexible warranting initiatives which re-directed Local Authority resource to the highest 
risks or made more efficient or effective use of partners resources. 
Better 
•  There is anecdotal evidence of better enforcement outcomes as a result of the partnership in 
enforcement 
that the combination of HSE and Local Authority inspectors working together on site has 
outcomes 
meant better identification of issues, improved consistency of enforcement standards and 
understanding of issues.  
•  More rigorous and consistent enforcement process e.g. improved training and development 
opportunities for Local Authority inspectors. 
•  Quicker resolution of issues by partners. 
 
There is anecdotal evidence that efficiency and effectiveness gains may have flowed from joint 
working on the ground. Although these are anecdotal, they provide some good examples of potential 
33 

 
measures that might be used to assess "hard" benefits of partnership working going forward. There is, 
however limited robust evidence of the more quantitative benefits of partnership working. 
"I can evidence better targeting of resources towards priorities as part of the partnership 
agenda. As a result of Fit3, we have more statistical information about our local area which 
helps us to prioritise our areas of work where the risk is highest"   (LA Inspector) 
 
Furthermore, not all respondents agreed that the benefits outweigh the costs. HSE respondents were 
more likely than Local Authority respondents to state that the costs outweigh the benefits of 
partnership working (of the 11% that said that the 'costs outweigh the benefits' of partnership working, 
over 90% were from HSE). A small minority of HSE inspectors at an operational level commented in 
the on-line survey that they perceived that the resource put into running the partnership was 'not paid 
back' by Local Authorities spending more time on health and safety. These findings indicate that the 
benefits of partnership working may be perceived to fall onto Local Authorities rather than HSE and 
that more needs to be done to improve communications about the benefits of partnership. 
"More awareness within HSE as to exactly what the partnership does would be good - there 
are some staff (administrative and inspectors) who really do not understand the role of the 
PaCT team within the HSE environment and this should be addressed to improve the type of 
work that is completed"  (HSE operational inspector)  
"No doubt there are papers defining what the aims of partnership working are but perhaps a 
briefing would be useful. Just because a paper is available does not mean the purpose of 
partnership working is known to all. People also need to be made aware the organisational 
benefits of partnership working"  (HSE Inspector) 
 
3.2.2  In terms of the impact on the duty holder, the partnership has had 
mixed success 
There is anecdotal evidence of a better service for duty holders as a result of joint working. Joint visits 
and inspections can allow for quicker resolution of an enforcement issue, improved consistency of 
enforcement and a more responsive service.  
"Our partnership agenda has enabled provision of higher quality services to customers, 
because we have provided a cohesive delivery of health and safety services to recipients 
who would otherwise be receiving services in a post code and enforcing authority lottery.  
We have also been able to provide a more responsive service to customers through the joint 
warranting initiative, which allows local authority officers bearing HSE warrants to pick up 
matters of evident concern - this piece of work would not have occurred without the 
partnership working agenda having been developed"  (LA inspector) 
 
34 

 
However many larger retailers still perceive inconsistencies in enforcement and have a strong view 
that HSE should be working more closely with Local Authorities to ensure consistency of inspection 
both within and across Local Authorities. This is particularly important with larger retailers where a 
Health and Safety policy designed at HQ (often taking advice from HSE) is then questioned by a Local 
Authority inspecting one of their smaller stores.  Large retailers also reported duplication of work by 
HSE and Local Authorities and viewed this unfavourably. 
Many of the benefits highlighted elsewhere in this report have a knock on effect in terms of duty 
holders - better informed staff means an improved knowledge base for inspectors, and better trained 
and supported officers means an improved service for duty holders.  These benefits will become more 
apparent as the partnership develops.  
35 

 
4  Next steps  
This section sets out what is required to maintain the partnership in its current state (and ensure that 
the benefits of the partnership are sustained) and a set of key challenges and opportunities which 
partners are asked to consider in order to further develop the partnership.    
4.1 
Maintaining the partnership 
In order to maintain the benefits already achieved by the partnership there is a need to continue to 
fund partnership teams, protect the role of Partnership Manager, communicate more widely roles and 
responsibilities of the existing governance structure and share best practice. These recommendations 
are critical to maintaining the benefits arising from the current partnership. 
4.1.1  Continued funding of Partnership Teams and protection of the 
role of Partnership Manager 
The evaluation has shown the importance of Partnership Teams and their supporting infrastructure. 
The interviews, on-line survey and focus groups all confirmed that without the Partnership Teams in 
place, the partnership would not sustain itself and potentially, the benefits that the partnership has 
brought may be lost. There is a need to maintain the infrastructure that support the teams at a national 
level (LAU and LACORS support) as this will ensure the big picture is maintained. 
The role of Partnership Managers is critical to this and should be maintained and protected to ensure 
a single point of accountability and focus within each region. While there will be scope for Partnership 
Managers to take on additional roles in, for example, stakeholder management, care must be taken to 
ensure that maintaining and delivering the partnership remains their main focus. 
 
Recommendation (1)  Continue to resource Partnership Teams their supporting infrastructure. 
 
Recommendation (2)  Ensure the role of Partnership Manager is protected. 
 
 
36 

 
4.1.2  Communicating the roles and responsibilities of existing 
governance structures 
The evaluation has shown that greater clarity about high-level governance structures would be 
beneficial to partnership working. Although many of the structures and processes are in place for 
robust governance, lack of engagement with, or lack of knowledge of these structures and processes, 
may inhibit successful partnership working.  
 
Recommendation (3) : Clarify and communicate more widely the roles and responsibilities of high level 
governance structures and bodies. 
4.1.3  Greater sharing of best practice and communication of 
partnership successes  
From our evaluation it is clear that more work needs to be done to ensure HSE and Local Authority 
staff receive benefits from the partnership in the short term and that attention is paid to winning 'hearts 
and minds'. As part of our interviews and focus groups a range of options were identified that provide 
concrete actions: 
•  Regular publication in partnership publications of 'successes' of Local Authorities who had actively 
engaged in the partnership.  
•  More publication of what partners have achieved in the form of health and safety outcomes e.g. 
accident reduction, support for work related ill health, contribution to public health and linking this to 
wider community outcomes.  
•  Greater publication of successes of the partnership in the local media to create higher visibility 
amongst the wider community. 
•  Greater communication of the work of the partnership in health and safety to other Local Authority 
departments who may also have an interest in health and safety.    
•  Improved sharing of examples of best practice across regions e.g. where Partnership Teams have 
been particularly successful or innovative. (This happens to some extent in updates provided by 
LACORS, but a more formalised approach would be beneficial.) 
•  Partnership Manager, HELex extranet and LACORS website could all provide useful mechanisms 
to support greater sharing. 
Recommendation (4) Explore ways in which successes could be more widely publicised and how best 
practice can be shared across Local Authorities. 
 
Recommendation (5): HSE and LACORS to examine ways of communicating more effectively with other 
Local Authority services where synergies with health and safety exist. 
37 

 
4.2 
Ensuring the long-term health of the partnership - 
challenges and opportunities  
As part of our evaluation we have identified additional areas where significant opportunities exist for 
the partnership to develop:  
•  Partnership teams. 
•  Governance structures.  
•  Standard setting and performance management.  
•  Planning cycles. 
•  Flow of information and communication. 
•  Training and development opportunities. 
•  Wider stakeholder engagement. 
•  Enforcement allocation. 
These are developed more fully in the following sections and where appropriate recommendations 
provided. 
4.3 
Partnership teams 
4.3.1  Formalisation of the roles and responsibilities of Partnership 
Teams 
Building on our recommendations in section 4.2, it is clear there are additional opportunities to develop 
the role of Partnership Managers and teams.  There are currently seven Partnership Managers with 
teams of, on average, three staff.  As the evaluation has shown, there is a degree of variation in the 
roles and responsibilities of Partnership Managers and teams and in the types of activities they carry 
out. The codification of these roles would provide an effective tool for development of the partnership 
and provide a conduit to deliver on the elements of the Statement of Intent where there has been less 
progress. This formalisation is particularly important as Partnership Teams have also now taken on 
responsibility for wider stakeholder engagement and there may therefore be tension in terms of the 
relative resource allocation.  Clarity around expectations of Partnership Teams would be helpful in 
ensuring that core partnership activities are sustained.  
A formalised role for Partnership Teams and Managers could include:  
•  Description of the scope of Partnership Team roles and responsibilities, including a description of 
the differences in the role of the Partnership Manager and Enforcement Liaison Officer.  
•  Defined skill set for Partnership Managers closely related to partnership activities.  
38 

 
It is also recognised that there is a need to ensure greater sharing of best practice and knowledge 
around "what works" to take place to ensure more consistency across Partnership Teams in the 
regions. This could include:  
•  Standard set of reporting structures upwards (to LAU, LACORS and HELA) and downwards (to 
County Liaison Groups, Task Groups) and improved links between LACORS Policy Forum and 
Regional bodies.  
•  Standard deliverables, such as regional joint work plans. 
 
Recommendation (6)  Formalisation of the roles and responsibilities of Partnership Teams and Managers 
and greater sharing of best practice and knowledge around what currently 'works' in Partnership Teams.  
4.3.2  More structured approach to PLO secondment process 
Currently, PLOs are seconded from Local Authorities typically for a year, although at times for less. 
Feedback from the evaluation has shown that the role of the PLO is invaluable in building bridges 
between HSE and Local Authorities, but that lack of security of funding and the length of time of the 
secondment are challenges to the effectiveness of this initiative. A more structured approach to the 
secondee process would be beneficial, with all secondments lasting at least a year, with this agreed at 
the start of the secondment.  This would allow PLOs to further embed the relationship between HSE 
and Local Authorities and maximise the value from the posting.  
It is accepted that achieving the release of staff from Local Authorities can be difficult and that 
collectively partners need to look at creative solutions to support the secondment process.   
 
Recommendation (7) Examine ways of ensuring a more structured approach to the secondee process, 
with a rolling programme of funding for the role of the Partnership Liaison Officer and communicating 
this to Local Authorities.  
 
Recommendation (8) Examine ways of helping local authorities release staff for secondment to PLO 
roles. 
 
 
39 

 
4.4 
Governance structures 
4.4.1  Improvements to existing governance structures  
Comments emerging from the focus groups supported the need to review or simplify the existing 
governance structures, as well as make improvements to the way they currently operate. Some 
suggested areas to explore are:  
•  A greater profile and role for HELA, LACORS and LGP to influence the strategic direction of the 
partnership. 
•  Capitalise further on the strong 'brand' of HELA amongst Local Authorities.  
•  Enhance the role of HELA as providing independent oversight of the partnership.  
•  Greater visibility of HELA, LGP and HSE Board members in the wider stakeholder community. 
•  Reinforcing and strengthening the HELA/LAU arrangements. 
•  Improved links between LACORS and regional representative groups. 
Recommendation (9) Review the effectiveness and robustness of the existing governance structures and 
look at ways to improve these. 
4.5 
Standard setting and performance management  
As the evaluation has shown, improving performance management and monitoring of the partnership 
was identified as one of the key areas where progress needs to be made and there are a number of 
opportunities for the partnership in this area.  
4.5.1  Performance management  
The HELA Task and Finish Group is currently looking at ways of monitoring and auditing compliance 
with the Section 18 Standard.  It is proposed that this forms the basis for development of performance 
management arrangements for the partnership.  
 
Recommendation (10)  Section 18 Standard to build in new permanent monitoring arrangements, explore 
how compliance with the Section 18 Standard will be monitored, including establishment of peer review 
process and exploring the possibility of benchmarking Local Authority performance. 
 
A number of additional suggestions were made at focus groups on opportunities to improve 
performance management:  
•  A more robust peer review process.  
40 

 
•  Benchmarking performance of Local Authorities:  This would provide a better understanding of how 
well Local Authorities are performing in relation to one another, how well HSE is performing, and a 
greater understanding of the degree of consistency in delivery of health and safety outcomes.  
•  Delivery of support and guidance to under-performing Local Authorities - good performance 
management is not just about having the right targets in place but about ensuring that where 
organisations struggle to deliver, that sufficient support and help is offered to identify the underlying 
causes of failure.  A robust performance management system would mean that those Local 
Authorities who were not performing adequately could then be provided with additional support and 
guidance either from other Local Authorities or HSE. 
 
Recommendation (11) Explore options for the development of a programme of support to be provided to 
Local Authorities where performance is in need of improvement. 
 
4.5.2  Performance targets and indicators 
A variety of discussions took place during the evaluation on the value of performance targets and 
indicators - however there was no definitive conclusion.  The opportunities are highlighted below 
however no recommendations have been made in this area.  
Joint partnership health and safety targets: Provision of joint targets for health and safety for both 
Local Authorities and HSE. Currently HSE has its own Departmental Performance Indicators but these 
are not shared by Local Authorities. Some Local Authorities have health and safety related targets in 
their Local Area Agreements and in Wales, performance indicators exist for health and safety. LA 
specific targets with HSE as well as LA as a collective would help ensure and focus work. This could 
mean creating a health and safety target for Local Authorities, or making it mandatory that health and 
safety forms part of the Local Area Agreements, as it does for food.  
Creation of a national health and safety performance indicator: A national performance indicator 
would be nationally set and would require both HSE and Local Authorities to report against it. A 
performance indicator for health and safety exists in Wales5 and although it is recognised that it does 
help to raise the profile of health and safety and drives up resources into health and safety, it is not 
                                                     
5   The number of high risk businesses liable to a programmed inspection or alternative enforcement activity during the year for 
Health and Safety (2008 target  - 9) 
 The percentage of high risk businesses that were liable to a programmed inspection or alternative inspection activity that were 
inspected/subject to alternative enforcement activity for health and safety (2008 target  - 100%) 
The percentage of new businesses identified during the year which were subject to an inspection for health and safety (2008 
target -  60%) 
The percentage of new businesses identified during the year which submitted a self-assessment questionnaire for health and 
safety (2008 target - 15%). 
41 

 
seen to reflect the outcomes of people on the ground, reflect partnership working outcomes or 
incentivise working towards the health and safety system as a whole.  
4.5.3  Further alignment of planning cycles between partners  
The evaluation has shown that the partnership has made progress in ensuring HSE involve and 
engage Local Authorities early on in the planning process, for example through Fit3 planning. 
However due the nature of planning cycles there are still tensions and further work should be 
undertaken to understand the practical steps that could be taken to minimise these tensions. 
Some areas for consideration of the partnership include:  
•  Greater convergence in HSE and Local Authority local planning cycles - respondents wanted to 
see more joint service planning at a local level, so HSE and Local Authorities work together to 
agree targets, inputs, outcomes and achievements in certain key priority areas.  
•  More formal consolidation of joint work plans where they are already in place.  
•  Improved communications internally within HSE so that HSE operational staff are aware earlier 
than currently of policy changes decided by central HSE to allow them more lead in time with their 
Local Authority contacts.  
 
Recommendation (12) Assess feasibility of mechanisms for engaging Local Authorities further in the HSE 
planning cycle. 
 
Recommendation (13)  Explore how HSE can develop guidance for Local Authorities in line with their own 
planning cycles even if HSE decision-making is incomplete. 
4.6 
Improving the flow of information and communications 
between partners  
Whilst this area was seen to be a very strong aspect of current partnership working, there are still 
ways in which the partnership could improve the way it shares information and communicates 
between partners.  
4.6.1  Improved inter-authority working and collaboration  
The partnership has led in some cases to greater inter-authority working.  For example, HSE has 
worked with several Local Authorities at the same time to conduct joint warranting. Local Authorities 
and HSE are now more keen to collaborate with each other and ‘let go’ of some of the territorial 
aspects of their culture of inspection.  Suggestions included:  
•  Greater sharing of good practice, training and guidance between Local Authorities.  
42 

 
•  Greater partnership working not just between HSE inspectors and Local Authorities but between 
Local Authorities without HSE present. This could lead, for example, to one Local Authority 
providing training, guidance and support to another Local Authority.  
•  Improved means of feeding back information from inspections completed by Local Authorities to 
ensure they can be included in evaluations by HSE of wider initiatives for strategic purposes. Whilst 
more needs to be done, it is recognised that recent work has bridged the gap e.g. last year’s 
release of the Local Authority profiles and Regional Statistical Packs. 
 
Recommendation (14) Explore ways of improving inter-authority collaboration through more sharing of 
good practice and experiences between Local Authorities.  
4.6.2  Marketing the 'image' of health and safety within Local Authorities 
and externally  
One of the key challenges identified for the partnership was the ongoing poor image of health and 
safety within Local Authorities and in the wider community. More could be done to ensure that the 
contribution that health and safety makes to wider community objectives, such as well-being and 
economic regeneration, is fully realised. There are currently a range of ways in which the partnership 
does this e.g. through the LACORS/HSE publication on health and safety for local councillors, but 
there is scope for further improvement:  
•  HSE recognises it needs to engage Local Authorities at a more strategic level and target Chief 
Executives to push health and safety into the wider agenda of community safety, well being and 
economic regeneration. HSE believes that health and safety has something to contribute to all of 
these areas.  
•  More could be done to improve communications centrally from HSE and departments within Local 
Authorities where synergies with health and safety exist - this would help to raise the profile of 
health and safety more widely within Local Authorities.  
 
Recommendation (15) Consider how to further engage local councillors and Chief Executives in the 
health and safety system, looking at existing mechanism such as LGP or new ways of doing this. 
4.7 
Training and development     
A number of other specific suggestions for improvement were made as part of the evaluation and 
these are outlined below.  
43 

 
4.7.1  Wider range of training and development opportunities  
HSE currently provides a range of training to Local Authorities on a variety of topics. The evaluation 
clearly shows that the provision of training and development opportunities by HSE is highly valued by 
Local Authorities and helps improve local skill levels, drive consistency and also support greater time 
spent on Fit3 activities. Joint training provides not only skills benefits but also helps create greater 
links between HSE and Local Authorities which again have a range of beneficial effects, fostering a 
feeling of 'train together, work together' which benefits partnership working.  
A number of options were raised at focus groups and during the in-depth interviews for further 
provision of joint training and development opportunities:  
•  Local Authorities have indicated that they would like access to additional training and development 
opportunities in areas where HSE has expertise, such as legal advice training, investigations of 
fatal accidents (this already happens in some areas), contractor management procedures, and 
court processes. Local Authorities would like HSE to open up its internal training to Local 
Authorities allowing them to attend in line with local priorities.  
•  There is also the option to consider joint training of Local Authority and HSE inspectors both pre 
and post qualification. This would mean that both inspectors attend the same modules of 
accredited training courses, therefore improving consistency of training. It is accepted that joint 
training would be more feasible post qualification through, for example, joint attendance at, or 
training in, health and safety accredited modules. Pre qualification may be more costly to 
implement.  
•  Formalisation and greater transparency of secondments from Local Authorities to the HSE Fatal 
Investigation Teams.   
•  Provision of training by Local Authority inspectors to HSE in terms of informing them about how 
they work with local businesses.  
•  Further increase awareness of the specialist support available to Local Authorities.  
Recommendation (16) Test options for better sharing of Local Authority expertise to HSE and extending 
out HSE training to Local Authorities.  
4.7.2  Increase awareness of the Buddy Inspector scheme within Local 
Authorities  
Several respondents to the on-line survey commented that the Buddy Inspector scheme was 
extremely valuable in improving joint working but that greater awareness of the scheme would be 
beneficial, particularly amongst Local Authorities.  
 
Recommendation (17) Raise awareness of the Buddy Inspector scheme within Local Authorities. 
44 

 
4.8 
Wider stakeholder engagement 
There were a number of suggestions from focus groups and in-depth interviews about ensuring that 
the partnership engages more effectively with its stakeholders at a number of different levels. The 
driver behind these suggestions was that the wider health and safety system incorporates a much 
wider set of delivery partners than just HSE and Local Authorities. Incorporating these wider 
stakeholders would better deliver health and safety outcomes. The following suggestions were made: 
•  Engaging with other regulatory bodies: the evaluation has shown that it is important that health 
and safety regulation is seen as part of the wider remit of the Local Authority regulatory 
responsibilities and in some areas, the partnership has made good progress. For example, SWERF 
in the South West brings together representatives from other regulatory bodies together with HSE 
and Local Authorities to discuss wider regulatory issues in the region. Further development of such 
opportunities across regions would be beneficial.  
•  Extending the 'formal' partnership to other bodies responsible for health and safety 
enforcement: this means formally bringing in other bodies which also have responsibility for health 
and safety, such as the Commission for Inspection and Social Care and the Department for 
Communities and Local Government (CLG) into the partnership.  
•  Engage more fully with health:  Given the recent Dame Carole Black report, " Working for a 
Healthier Tomorrow", which puts a focus on keeping people healthy at work and helping them 
return to work after illness, there is an important opportunity for the partnership to engage more 
fully with health partners. This does happen today with some Local Authorities and HSE already 
having strong links with PCTs, but this is usually dependent on the internal structures of Local 
Authorities and whether health and safety is in the Local Area Agreement. This is an important 
opportunity for the partnership going forward.  
•  Engaging the partnership with larger retailers: in some areas, Local Authorities and HSE have 
worked together with larger retailers on specific projects, such as Royal Mail or Laura Ashley in 
North Wales. It was felt that as the partnership matures and develops, greater engagement with 
larger retailers would mean an improved service to duty holders and potentially, greater 
consistency of enforcement.  
 
Recommendation (18) Explore ways that the partnership can engage more widely with external 
stakeholders.  
45 

 
4.9 
Allocation of enforcement responsibilities 
4.9.1  Further explore the benefits of greater flexibility in existing 
enforcement boundaries between partners  
The Enforcing Authority Regulations set out the division of responsibility in enforcement boundaries 
between HSE and Local Authorities. The HSC's Strategy to 2010 and beyond suggested that there 
was no lasting logic to the current division of enforcement responsibility between HSE and Local 
Authorities and that it did not capture the full potential to work together, and subsequently led to the 
introduction of the Flexible Warranting initiative. This initiative has shown that greater flexibility around 
enforcement boundaries can lead to better use of joint resources (by removing barriers to action), an 
increase in the speed of response to issues of significant risk (because of LA inspectors’ local 
presence) and generally to enhance partnership working (by recognising the equivalence of powers 
and skills between HSE and LA staff). This is reinforced by the Local Authority Construction 
Engagement (LACE) project has shown that greater flexibility surrounding Local Authorities working in 
the construction area is also beneficial.  
However, many staff at focus groups and in the in-depth interviews felt that the on-going division of 
responsibilities still hampered effective partnership working. For example, HSE may have a slower 
response rate to a major incidents than Local Authorities but Local Authorities may not be empowered 
to respond because of the regulations. A review of the current roles and responsibilities in 
enforcement by partners would be helpful and could lead to increased benefits, for example, efficiency 
gains or better customer service. As part of this, the partnership could also explore areas where Local 
Authorities might take on higher risk areas of enforcement.  
 
Recommendation (19) HSE and Local Authorities to work together to examine how the current 
enforcement boundaries could be developed. 
4.9.2  Review the distribution of ‘risk’ across Local Authorities and HSE 
and align of resources accordingly  
For the partnership to deliver fully on its intention to deliver effective enforcement outcomes, resources 
could to be managed more in line with risk and thought then given to the respective roles and 
responsibilities of HSE and Local Authorities. At the moment in the partnership, the distribution of risk 
against resource is not even, leading to the "double-peak" of health and safety enforcement.  
Some opportunities identified in the in-depth interviews for the partnership going forward are:  
•  Better targeting of joint resources around risk based on current roles and responsibilities - this is a 
review of where it is appropriate for Local Authorities to take on enforcement responsibilities.  For 
example, Local Authorities could take on more ‘high’ risk areas of enforcement if appropriate and 
efficiency gains result.  
46 

 
•  Review of the overall distribution of risk between partners - this would assess the current risk 
profile in health and safety and then would allocate roles and responsibilities between HSE and 
Local Authorities accordingly.   
•  The creation of a single health and safety enforcement organisation. Currently, the legal division of 
roles and responsibilities of enforcing authorities is outlined in the Enforcing Authority Regulations. 
HSE are responsible for enforcement in areas such as warehouses, industrial sites, nuclear sites 
whereas Local Authorities are responsible for enforcement in leisure, distribution, retail and office 
sectors. However, it is widely recognised that enforcement responsibilities often overlap and that it 
would be beneficial at times to allow greater flexibility to enforcement between Enforcing 
Authorities where appropriate or even to merge the responsibility for health and safety into a single 
organisation. No recommendation has been suggested for this as it was accepted that if the 
partnership continues to build on its successes, there would be no need to merge the functions into 
one organisation.  
 
Recommendation (20) Review  the distribution of risk in health and safety and explore how partnership 
can ensure that joint resources are better targeted around risk.   
 
4.10  Summary of recommendations 
 
Topic area  
Recommendations  
Maintaining the 
(1) Continue to resource Partnership Teams and the supporting infrastructure. 
partnership  
(2) Ensure the role of Partnership Managers is protected. 
(3) Clarify and communicate more widely the roles and responsibilities of high level 
governance structures and bodies. 
(4) Explore ways in which successes could be more widely publicised and how best 
practice can be shared across Local Authorities. 
(5) HSE and LACORS to examine ways of communicating more effectively with other 
Local Authority services where synergies with health and safety exist. 
Partnership teams 
(6) Formalise the roles and responsibilities of Partnership Teams and Managers. 
(7) Examine ways of ensuring a more structured approach to the secondee process, 
with a rolling programme of funding for the role of the Partnership Liaison Officer and 
communicating this Local Authorities. 
(8) Examine ways of helping local authorities release staff for secondment to PLO 
roles. 
Governance structures  
(9) Review the effectiveness and robustness of the existing governance structures 
and look at ways to improve them. 
47 

 
Topic area  
Recommendations  
Standard setting and 
(10) Build in new permanent monitoring arrangements for the Section 18 Standard 
performance 
and explore how compliance with the Section 18 Standard will be monitored, 
management   
including establishment of peer review process and exploring possibility of 
benchmarking Local Authority performance. 
(11) Explore options for the development of a programme of support to be provided to 
Local Authorities where performance is in need of improvement. 
Improving current 
(12) Assess feasibility of mechanisms for engaging Local Authorities further in the 
planning arrangements  
HSE planning cycle. 
(13) Explore how HSE can develop guidance for Local Authorities in line with their 
own planning cycles even if HSE decision-making is incomplete. 
Enhancing current flow 
(14) Explore ways of improving inter-authority collaboration through more sharing of 
of information and 
good practice and experiences between Local Authorities. 
communications  
(15) Consider how to engage further local councillors and Chief Executives in the 
health and safety system, looking at existing mechanism such as LGP or new ways of 
doing this. 
Training and 
(16) Test options for better sharing of Local Authority expertise to HSE and extending 
development 
out HSE training to Local Authorities.  
(17) Raise awareness of the Buddy Inspector scheme within Local Authorities. 
Wider stakeholder 
(18) Explore ways that the partnership can engage more widely with external 
engagement 
stakeholders. 
Enforcement Allocation 
(19) HSE and Local Authorities to work together to examine how the current 
enforcement boundaries could be developed. 
(20) Review the distribution of risk in health and safety and subsequent redrawing of 
the enforcement roles and responsibilities of HSE and Local Authorities. 
 
Published by the Health and Safety Executive    12/08

Health and Safety  
Executive

Local authorities and HSE in partnership
An evaluation
PA Consulting Group was appointed to undertake 
an evaluation of the Health and Safety Executive 
(HSE) and Local Authority (LA) partnership during 
the summer of 2008. The purpose of the evaluation 
was to enable HSE to take an informed view of 
the contribution that the partnership can and 
should make to a new strategy. The evaluation was 
commissioned by the Local Authority Unit (LAU) 
of HSE and conducted jointly with representatives 
from Local Authorities Coordinators of Regulatory 
Services (LACORS). This report is the output of that 
exercise and aims to answer three key questions: 

to what extent has the partnership delivered 
on the seven commitments in the Statement 
of Intent? 

do the benefits of the partnership outweigh 
the costs? 

what does the partnership need to do going 
forward to ensure its long-term health?
This report and the work it describes were funded 
by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Its 
contents, including any opinions and/or conclusions 
expressed, are those of the authors alone and do 
not necessarily reflect HSE policy.
RR680
www.hse.gov.uk