This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Broadband Report'.


 
Technical  Advice  -  Broadband 
Access  and  Speed  in  Rotherhithe 
SE16 
Southwark Council 
10 March 2015 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
Notice 
This  document  and  its  contents  have  been  prepared  and  are  intended  solely  for  Southwark  Council’s 
information  and  use  in  relation  to  the  study  of  options  for  securing  further  access  to  Superfast  Broadband 
services in Rotherhithe. 
Atkins Limited assumes no responsibility to any other party in respect of or arising out of or in connection with 
this document and/or its contents. 
This document has 41 pages including the cover. 
Document history 
Job number: 5134598 
Document ref: 5134598.05.07.001 
Revision 
Purpose description 
Originated 
Checked 
Reviewed 
Authorised 
Date 
Rev 0.1 
Draft for review 
JDO 
CB 
NW 
NW 
11/11/14 
V1 
Final report 
JDO 
CB 
NW 
NW 
10/03/15 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Client signoff 
Client 
Southwark Council 
 
Project 
Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
Document title 
  
 
Job no. 
5134598 
 
Copy no. 
 
 
Document 
5134598.05.07.001 
reference 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 

 

link to page 5 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 11 link to page 13 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 18 link to page 19 link to page 19 link to page 19 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 23 link to page 29 link to page 31 link to page 31 link to page 33 link to page 34 link to page 38 link to page 40 link to page 40 link to page 10 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 18 link to page 20 link to page 21 link to page 22 link to page 24 link to page 25 link to page 26 Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
Table of contents 
Chapter 
Pages 
Executive summary 
5 
1. 
Target Speeds 
7 
1.1. 
Current Objectives 

1.2. 
Comparison Across the UK 
11 
1.3. 
Comparison Across London 
13 
1.4. 
Comparison with other countries 
14 
1.5. 
Conclusions 
15 
2. 
Current Broadband Availability 
17 
2.1. 
BT Openreach 
17 
2.2. 
IFNL 
18 
2.3. 
Hyperoptic 
19 
2.4. 
Virgin Media 
19 
2.5. 
Overall Coverage 
19 
3. 
Technologies 
22 
3.1. 
Network Architecture 
22 
3.2. 
Telephone Networks 
22 
3.3. 
Broadband Network Access Technologies 
23 
3.4. 
Conclusions 
29 
4. 
Possible Business Models 
31 
4.1. 
Market Led Initiatives 
31 
4.2. 
Community Led Initiatives 
33 
4.3. 
Public Sector Funded Initiatives 
34 
5. 
Conclusions and Recommendations 
38 
Appendices 
40 
Appendix 1: Broadband Availability Checkers 
40 
 
Figures 
Figure 1-1  London Infrastructure Plan 2050 Presentation ........................................................................... 10 
Figure 1-2  Proportion of connections (%) with speeds less than 2Mbit/s, Ofcom Infrastructure Report 2012, 
2013  ........................................................................................................................................... 11 
Figure 1-3  Estimated  current  availability  of  NGA  infrastructure  from  BT  and/or  Virgin  Media,  Ofcom 
Infrastructure Report 2012, 201311 ............................................................................................. 12 
Figure 1-4  Ofcom Fixed Broadband Map 2013 ............................................................................................ 12 
Figure 1-5  Average  broadband  speed  and  Superfast  broadband  availability  across  London,  (CEBR  June 
2014, OFGEM Fixed Broadband Data 2013) .............................................................................. 13 
Figure 1-6  Average  broadband  speed  by  London  borough  (CEBR  June  2014,  OFGEM  Fixed  Broadband 
Data 2013) ................................................................................................................................... 14 
Figure 1-7  Superfast fixed line broadband availability by London borough (CEBR June 2014, OFGEM Fixed 
Broadband Data 2013) ................................................................................................................ 14 
Figure 1-8  Akamai State of the Internet Report Q1 2014 ............................................................................. 15 
Figure 2-1  Density Of EO Lines In The Rotherhithe Area (BT Openreach infrastructure only) ................... 18 
Figure 2-2  Maximum Broadband Speeds Available At Postcode Level ....................................................... 20 
Figure 2-3  Availability of NGA Broadband per Postcode ............................................................................. 21 
Figure 3-1  Service Provider Network Architecture ....................................................................................... 22 
Figure 3-2  ADSL Access Network ................................................................................................................ 24 
Figure 3-3  Fibre to The Cabinet Using VDSL. .............................................................................................. 25 
Figure 3-4  Hybrid Fibre-Coaxial Broadband Network .................................................................................. 26 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 

 

link to page 26 link to page 27 link to page 30 Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
Figure 3-5  Fibre to The Premise Network .................................................................................................... 26 
Figure 3-6  Fixed Wireless Broadband Network ............................................................................................ 27 
Figure 3-7  NGA Options Summary ............................................................................................................... 30 
 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 

 

 
Executive summary 
Southwark  Council  appointed  Atkins  in  September  2014  to  help  them  make  an  informed  decision  on  how 
broadband  access  and  speeds  can  be  improved  in  the  Rotherhithe  area  by  advising  on  the  following  four 
questions: 
1)  Advise the council on what is an acceptable minimum broadband access speed within a metropolitan 
city such as London for both business and residential use. This should focus on current acceptable 
speeds but should also look at what is likely to be acceptable over the next ten years. 
2)  Report on the current infrastructure in the area, what exists, what are its constraints and what is the 
feasibility of improving it to meet current and future (10 year horizon) requirements. 
3)  What cost effective options exist outside the current infrastructure to improve access and speeds. This 
should review both wired (copper and fibre) and wireless options that could replace or enhance the 
current infrastructure. 
4)  Business models currently in use by network operators that could be applied to this situation. 
In response to this scope it was agreed that Atkins would structure this report as follows: 
1)  Put the situation of Rotherhithe in the context of London, the UK and other countries to recommend 
target speeds for the area.  
2)  Paint a picture of the current broadband availability within the area of Rotherhithe; 
3)  Describe  the  technologies,  both  wired  and  wireless,  available  to deliver  broadband  services  to end 
users; 
4)  And give an overview of the options open to the Council to secure coverage of the whole area with 
high speed broadband services. 
In line with the aspirations of the Mayor of London’s office, the vision for London, including Rotherhithe, is to 
achieve world-class high speed connectivity for all. This vision, however, is likely to take some time to realise. 
Comparing Rotherhithe with the rest of the UK and internationally, it is clear that the current situation in the 
area falls well below the expected levels for the UK and other international countries. This has been identified 
in the Mayor’s 2020 vision and the London Infrastructure Plan 2050, which have a vision to improve service 
availability across London and particularly in not-spot areas. 
When looking at the European Union (EU) Digital Agenda targets of 30 Mbit/s available to 100% of premises, 
with 50% of subscribers taking a 100 Mbit/s broadband service by 2020, it becomes clear that the minimum 
speeds offered in the Rotherhithe area must at the very least meet the 30 Mbit/s level. Also, when looking at 
the near future it is apparent that the infrastructure delivered must be capable of delivering much faster speeds 
of 100 Mbit/s and above, and the intention should be to achieve this without significant further investment in 
infrastructure upgrades. 
The  area  of  Rotherhithe,  which  consists  of the  2  wards  of Rotherhithe  and  Surrey  Docks,  is  going  through 
exciting changes with vast areas under redevelopment. Despite benefitting from substantial investment over 
the  recent  years,  the  broadband  infrastructure  has  overall  not  evolved  at  the  same  pace.  Currently  BT 
Openreach, IFNL, Hyperoptic and Virgin Media are known to have broadband infrastructure serving the area, 
UK Broadband, through their service brand Relish, are also known to offer fixed-wireless broadband services 
to parts of London  but their coverage does not appear to  extend to the  Rotherhithe  peninsula. Overall, the 
availability  of  Superfast  Broadband  in  the  peninsula  is  currently  estimated  to  reach  32%  of  premises,  well 
behind  the  89%  availability  for  the  Greater  London  Authority.  In  addition  to  that,  it  is  estimated  that 
approximately 4,000 premises (30% of Rotherhithe) do not get access to a minimum broadband speed of 2 
Mbit/s. 
It  is  widely  accepted  that  the  most  future  proof  technologies  rely  on  deploying  optical  fibre  deeper  into  the 
network  towards  end-users  i.e.Fibre-To-The-Premise/Building  (FTTP/B).  However  the  cost  of  deploying 
FTTP/B is high and to date deployment of these technologies has been limited to targeted clusters of premises 
or  communities.  It  is  likely  that  universal  Next  Generation  Access  (NGA)  coverage  of  the  area  would  be 
achieved  through  a  combination  of  technologies  and  networks,  including  Fibre-To-The-Cabinet  (FTTC), 
Hybrid-Fibre-Coaxial (HFC) and Fibre-To-The-Premise/Building (FTTP/B), deployed by different infrastructure 
providers. However, wireless technologies also have a role to play, at least as an interim solution, to provide 
enhanced services and speeds to areas that are currently poorly served. Current wireless technologies can 
enable the delivery of a high speed broadband service but there are uncertainties as to whether the specific 
implementation  of  these  technologies  (Fixed  Wireless  Access  networks  or  3G/4G  networks)  can  scale  to 
deliver such services to all subscribers, especially when take-up of services increases. 
 
 
 

link to page 34 link to page 31 link to page 36 Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
Ideally,  NGA  infrastructure  would  be  deployed  commercially  especially  in  a  competitive  urban  environment 
such  as  London.  The  current  transformation  that  Rotherhithe  is  going  through  is  likely  to  attract  further 
commercial  investment  in  infrastructure  upgrade  but  it  remains  unclear  how  much  of  Rotherhithe  will  be 
commercially covered. If commercial plans (or privately funded community schemes) do not cover the entire 
area,  Public  Sector  intervention  may  be  required,  which  may  involve  State  Aid.  A  summary  of  State  Aid 
considerations in the context of investment in broadband infrastructure is provided in section 4.3. 
In  the  light  of  the  current  situation,  and  of  the  obvious  renewed  commercial  interest  in  the  area,  Atkins 
recommends the following actions to Southwark Council: 
1.  To  maintain  regular  discussions  with  commercial  infrastructure  providers  and  privately  funded 
community  initiatives  in  order  to  keep  abreast  of  their  aspirations  and  NGA  coverage  plans  for  the 
area. This will allow the Council to gain an early understanding of the areas that will definitely not be 
served by suppliers if possible and of the reasons for their reluctance to extend to those areas, and 
raise awareness of specific problems/areas and advertise the opportunities; 
2.  Take into account feedback from infrastructure providers to support them wherever possible without 
the intervention of State Aid and with a view to facilitate and incentivise further NGA deployment. As 
detailed  in  section  4.1,  this  may  involve  facilitating  sourcing  of  wayleaves  or  adapting  the  planning 
process to favour more competition for broadband provision to new sites; 
3.  Maintain discussions with the Mayor of London’s office to coordinate initiatives and share information 
about similar not spot locations in Greater London; 
4.  Enter  into  early  discussions  with  Broadband  Delivery  UK  (BDUK)  to,  in  the  first  instance,  leverage 
mechanisms  currently  available  to  local  bodies:  at  this  point  in  time  this  may  involve  conducting 
demand stimulation activities for the Connection Voucher Scheme. By raising the awareness of the 
scheme with SMEs in areas of poor broadband, this may lead to some suppliers building on potential 
new connections to extend their rollout on a commercial basis; 
5.  Maintain  discussion  with BDUK on remaining areas of poor broadband and  potential next steps.  In 
particular these discussions could focus on the potential need for additional public intervention, in the 
first instance under a new coherent national scheme covering cities if one is introduced post May 2015.  
6.  If a national scheme is not available then a separate initiative could be envisaged. Any new initiative 
undertaken  by  the  Council  should  focus  on  providing  the  required  infrastructure  and  allow  the 
deployment of future proof technologies. In this case the Council should consider the following when 
framing the initiative: 
a.  Is there sufficient commercial interest to allow the Council to invest purely on market terms 
under the Market Economy Investment Principle (MEIP) to provide the required infrastructure? 
b.  If not,  would it be possible to achieve the desired outcome  by  granting a  de-minimis aid to 
suppliers? and; 
c.  If  it  is  still  not  possible,  consider  making  a  case  for  State  Aid  for  the  minimum  investment 
required by suppliers to achieve coverage of the area.  
 
The four typical business models in use by public sector to invest in broadband infrastructure are summarised 
in  section  4.3.3  namely:  Private  Design  Build  Operate  (DBO),  Joint  Venture  (JV),  Public  Outsourcing,  and 
Public Design Build Operate (DBO). 
It is essential for the Council to build and maintain strong links with infrastructure providers to construct the 
case for public sector intervention and to limit the level of intervention to what is strictly necessary for private 
entities to build a viable business case. In the case where the only viable option is for the Council to establish 
a JV or Public DBO or to seek a Public Outsourcing arrangement, it is essential to secure buy-in from existing 
service providers who would purchase wholesale services over the new infrastructure thus ensuring the long 
term success of next generation broadband provision in the Rotherhithe area. 
 
 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 

 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
1. 
Target Speeds 
1.1. 
Current Objectives 
1.1.1. 
European Objectives 
The  Digital  Agenda  for  Europe  (DAE)1,  launched  in  2010,  was  created  to  assist  Europe’s  citizens  and 
businesses get the  most  out of digital technology and deliver smart, sustainable  and inclusive growth. This 
identifies a number of key target areas and goals, which if met are expected to result in a 5% increase in the 
European GDP, or €1,500 per person over the next 8 years.  
Under Pillar IV of the DAE: Fast and Ultra-fast Internet access of the Digital Agenda for Europe, the European 
Commission’s (EC) ambition is to achieve: 
“Download rates of 30 Mbit/s for all of its citizens and at least 50% of European 
households subscribing to internet connections above 100 Mbit/s by 2020.” 2 

The DAE plans to achieve this by stimulating investment and proposing a comprehensive radio spectrum plan. 
The EC has provided a definition of the Next Generation Access (NGA) networks that should be used to deliver 
these broadband speeds which is: 
“(57) NGA networks are access networks which rely wholly or partly on optical elements 
and which are capable of delivering broadband access services with enhanced 
characteristics as compared to existing basic broadband networks. 

(58) NGA networks are understood to have at least the following characteristics: (i) 
deliver services reliably at a very high speed per subscriber through optical (or equivalent 
technology) backhaul sufficiently close to user premises to guarantee the actual delivery 
of the very high speed; (ii) support a variety of advanced digital services including 
converged all-IP services; and (iii) have substantially higher upload speeds (compared to 
basic broadband networks). At the current stage of market and technological 
development, NGA networks are: (i) fibre-based access networks (FTTx); (ii) advanced 
upgraded cable networks; and (iii) certain advanced wireless access networks capable of 
delivering reliable high speeds per subscriber.” 

(59) It is important to bear in mind that in the longer term NGA networks are expected to 
supersede existing basic broadband networks and not just to upgrade them. To the 
extent that NGA networks require a different network architecture, offering significantly 
better quality broadband services than today as well as the provision of multiple services 
that could not be supported by today’s broadband networks, it is likely that in the future 
there will be marked differences emerging between areas that will be covered and areas 
that will not be covered by NGA networks. 3 

An important element of such Next Generation Access networks is the pricing of these services, such that they 
are affordable and do not  prove to be a barrier to adoption of customers taking an internet service. This is 
particularly important with the priority of providing universal coverage and to enable the use of public services 
online. 
On the area of affordability, the EC provided guidance in their decision on the National Broadband scheme for 
the UK (BDUK)4. In this, access to basic broadband (a minimum of 2 Mbit/s) is considered not affordable if the 
installation cost is £100+ and/or the rental price is £25+. In addition, access to NGA broadband infrastructure 
                                                      
1 http://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en 
2 http://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/pillar-iv-fast-and-ultra-fast-internet-access 
3 http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:C:2013:025:0001:0026:EN:PDF 
4 http://ec.europa.eu/competition/state_aid/cases/243212/243212_1387832_172_1.pdf 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 

 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
is currently considered not affordable if the installation cost is £200+ and/or the monthly rental price is £30-
50+. 
However,  even  within  these  criteria  the  price  for  installation  and  rental  of  a  broadband  service  may  still 
represent a barrier to households on low incomes.  
It  is  worth  noting  that  the  term  Superfast  Broadband  is  defined  by  the  EC  as  broadband  services  with  a 
minimum download speed of 30 Mbit/s.  
1.1.2. 
UK Government Objectives (BDUK) 
Broadband  Delivery  UK  (BDUK),  the  team  within  the  Department  of  Culture,  Media  and  Sport  (DCMS)  is 
responsible for the improvement of the UK’s broadband infrastructure. Its objective is to: 
“achieve a transformation in our broadband access, with everyone in the UK able to 
access broadband speeds of at least 2 megabits per second (Mbit/s) and 95% of the UK 
receiving far greater speeds (at least 24 Mbit/s) by 2017. We are also exploring options 
to extend the benefits of fast broadband to remaining areas.” 5 
In order to achieve this, they have invested £530m to stimulate commercial investment to deliver high speed 
broadband to 90% of UK homes and businesses, and are investing a further £250m to reach the 95% ambition 
which  includes  a  £10  million  competitive  fund  to  explore  approaches  to  deliver  superfast  broadband  to  the 
hardest to reach areas of the country. 
DCMS are also investing £10 million in ‘super-connected cities’ across the UK, in an Urban Broadband Fund 
(UBF), from which a total of 22 cities in the UK will be able to benefit. To date, the UBF has been used to offer 
voucher schemes to cover the connection cost of better broadband connections for small and medium sized 
businesses, and deliver wireless coverage to city centres and public buildings. 
The participating super-connected cities are: 
  Birmingham,  Bristol,  Brighton  and  Hove,  Cambridge,  Coventry,  Derby,  Leeds  and  Bradford  (joint 
proposal), London, Manchester, Newcastle, Oxford, Portsmouth, Salford and York in England; 
  Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Perth in Scotland; 
  Cardiff and Newport in Wales; 
  Belfast and Derry/Londonderry in Northern Ireland. 
The current voucher scheme in London, delivered by the Mayor of London, offers up to £3,000 towards the 
cost of installing a faster broadband connection “usually of 30Mbit/s or more” to eligible Small and Medium-
sized Enterprises (SMEs). 
On 3 December, the Chancellor announced that the Government will make up to £40m available from April 
2015 to March 2016 to support more cities administer The Broadband Connection Voucher Scheme. 
It  is  worth  noting  that  the  report  makes  constant  references  to  the  terms  NGA  broadband  and  Superfast 
Broadband which have been defined by the EC in the first instance and later by BDUK in relation to current 
investment initiatives. For the purpose of this document, the following UK definitions are considered to apply.  
BDUK defines Next Generation Access as including the following characteristics6: 
  Capable of providing speeds in excess of 30 Mbit/s download to end users, and at least 15 Mbit/s 90% 
of the time during peak times, 
                                                      
5 https://www.gov.uk/government/policies/transforming-uk-broadband 
6 https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/379762/State_aid_-
_Guidance_-_Technology_Guidelines.pdf 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 

 

link to page 10 Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
  Typically provides at least a doubling of average access speeds where deployed, i.e. a quantifiable 
“step change”, 
  Must  be  able  to  maintain  capability  and  user  experience  as  take-up  and  demand  for  the  service 
increases. 
BDUK have mirrored the EC definition by defining Superfast Broadband as delivering a minimum of 24 Mbit/s 
but capable of delivering 30 Mbit/s. 
1.1.3. 
Mayor of London 
1.1.3.1. 
2020 Vision 
In June 2013, the Major of London announced his ‘2020 Vision – The Greatest City of Earth’, in which he sets 
out an ambition objective for London ‘to have the fastest connections in any European City’. 
This is to build on the hope that London is set to become a super connected city by 2015 through pervasive 
access to ultrafast fixed broadband services and large areas of public wireless connectivity. 
1.1.3.2. 
London Infrastructure Plan 2050  
In July 2014, the Mayor of London set out a consultation on the infrastructure required for the city’s future to 
prepare and enable London’s growth. In this, the need to improve and build on the current service availability 
is identified. 
The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson said: “The Internet is now considered the fourth utility and if we are to 
remain competitive in the global economy and bolster our reputation as the greatest city on earth we need to 
ensure every Londoner is able to access the very best digital connectivity. By bringing together the great and 
good of the digital community we are today committing to ensuring that London has the infrastructure in place 
to stay ahead of our competitors while enabling businesses and residents to take full advantage of its benefits.” 
This consultation included a proposal; ‘Raising London’s High speed connectivity to World Class levels, where 
the  Mayor  states  that  he  wants  ‘every  resident  and  business  in  London  to  be  able  to  have  affordable  high 
speed internet connectivity, should they choose to access it’.  
In addition, the London SME Connection Voucher Scheme is referenced to enable SME businesses to gain 
access  to  high  speed  connectivity  services  in  areas  where  this  is  unavailable  or  the  installation  cost  is 
prohibitive. 
The proposal acknowledges that some areas of London are left with poor connectivity which, if left to market 
forces, may well remain unconnected, as shown in Figure 1-1 below. The Mayor’s office estimates that there 
are 6,500 properties in ‘not-spot’ areas where speeds are much slower than the average across the city. 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 

 


Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
 
Figure 1-1  London Infrastructure Plan 2050 Presentation7 
In  a  case  study,  Rotherhithe  has  specifically  been  identified  as  an  area  where  many  premises  struggle  to 
receive even basic broadband services (>2Mbit/s) due to its industrial history and legacy infrastructure which 
has not received investment in upgrades such as fibre broadband. 
A coordinated approach is proposed by establishing a Connectivity Advisory Group, comprised of the Greater 
London Authority (GLA), London Boroughs, service providers and other stakeholders to undertake a number 
of exercises. These include undertaking a city-wide mapping exercise to ascertain the existing levels of high 
speed connectivity availability, the barriers to provision in ‘not-spots’ and to identify strategic priorities in these 
areas. They will also investigate and consider ways to aggregate demand and encourage the take-up of high 
speed internet access, and how  the  GLA and local authorities can incorporate connectivity  requirements to 
strategic development plans.  
The  Connectivity  Advisory  Group  are  to  develop  a  strategy  to  better  utilise  existing  infrastructure,  such  as 
utilising Transport for London (TfL) assets or those belonging to local authorities, such as CCTV networks, to 
enable the delivery of improved services. A case study  was provided for Hammersmith and Fulham Council, 
the latter having let out access to their underground ducts for service providers to install fibre optic cabling.  
The issues around the limitations imposed by the London Permit Scheme for Road Works and Street Works 
(LoPS)8, and the resultant local authority traffic management schemes are also under investigation to see if 
this represents a barrier for communications providers, and whether certain installations may be considered 
exempt. 
                                                      
7 https://www.london.gov.uk/priorities/business-economy/vision-and-strategy/infrastructure-plan-2050 
8 http://www.londoncouncils.gov.uk/policylobbying/transport/Publications/roadworksconsultation.htm 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
10 
 

link to page 11 link to page 12
Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
Following publication of the proposal, some of London’s largest internet providers including Virgin Media, BT 
and Telefonica, met the Mayor of London at the first ever ‘connectivity summit’ on the 16th September 20149. 
The purpose of the summit was to encourage them to work with the Mayor’s team to improve connectivity and 
deliver fast and universal access across London. 
1.2. 
Comparison Across the UK 
A number of data sources have been utilised to paint a picture of broadband availability across the UK and to 
provide context to London and Southwark and in particular to the Rotherhithe area. 
1.2.1. 
Ofcom – Availability of Communications Services in UK Cities 
The Ofcom ‘Availability of communications service in UK cities’ report10 published in June 2014 undertook a 
comparison of the availability of services across 11 UK cities, following from a similar study across the UK as 
a whole in May 2014, which primarily concentrated on the variation between urban and rural areas. 
This report focuses on the current availability in built-up urban areas, which accounts for the vast majority of 
the UK population, and found that there was a significant variation between the level of Basic Broadband and 
Superfast Broadband coverage across the 11 cities chosen for comparison. 
For  Basic  Broadband,  an  overall  average  of  4.1%  of  premises  surveyed  could  not  receive  a  minimum  of 
2Mbit/s. This was highest in Derry-Londonderry (9%) and lowest in Cambridge at (3%). London, as a whole, 
was found to be at the average level of around 4%. This represented an improvement from the coverage in 
2012, with the likely reason for the increase in coverage due to the rollout and take-up of NGA services in the 
cities. The coverage results are shown on Figure 1-2. 
 
Figure 1-2  Proportion of connections (%) with speeds less than 2Mbit/s, Ofcom Infrastructure Report 
2012, 2013 11 
For  NGA  broadband,  the  average  availability  was  87%  of  premises,  with  the  majority  of  cities  close  to  or 
exceeding 90%. Across the whole of London, the expected coverage of NGA is 88%. The high coverage in 
Derry-Londonderry  and  Bangor  are  likely  to  have  benefitted  somewhat  from  Public  Sector  intervention  to 
deliver NGA services within the city boundary. The relative coverage levels are shown below in Figure 1-3. 
                                                      
9 https://www.london.gov.uk/media/mayor-press-releases/2014/09/mayor-and-internet-providers-pledge-to-
improve-london-s-digital 
10 http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/market-data-research/market-data/cities-summary-14/ 
11 http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/research/infrastructure/UK_cities.pdf 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
11 
 

link to page 11 link to page 12

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
 
Figure 1-3  Estimated current availability of NGA infrastructure from BT and/or Virgin Media, Ofcom 
Infrastructure Report 2012, 201311 
1.2.2. 
Ofcom ‘UK Fixed Broadband Map 2013’ 
According  to  the  Ofcom  fixed  broadband  mapping  (dated  October  2013),  across  London  the  average 
broadband sync speed is 20.4 Mbit/s, with Superfast Broadband availability of 89.1%. Overall broadband take-
up is 82.90%, of which 24.9% is Superfast.  
Across the UK districts, this puts London in 17th place in terms of the percentage of premises not receiving 
2Mbit/s.  
Across London as a whole, the availability of Superfast broadband is good at 89%, whilst London is ranked 
second for total broadband take-up (regardless of speed) at 82.9%, as shown below in Figure 1-4. 
 
Figure 1-4  Ofcom Fixed Broadband Map 201312 
                                                      
12 http://maps.ofcom.org.uk/broadband/. Data dated October 2013 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
12 
 

link to page 13 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
1.3. 
Comparison Across London 
1.3.1. 
Centre for Economics and Business Research 
As  part  of  a  report  commissioned  by  the  4G  broadband  supplier  Relish13,  the  Centre  for  Economics  and 
Business  Research  (CEBR)  highlighted  that  broadband  speeds  varied  significantly  across  London’s  32 
boroughs  and  the  City  of  London.  The  outcome  was  that  the  central  and  east  sub-regions  have  the  worst 
average speeds, with the City of London recording the slowest average speed of 11.8 Mbit/s, compared to the 
highest of 24.8 Mbit/s in Kingston-upon Thames. Similarly, the availability of Superfast broadband was also 
found to be the lowest in central and east London. This is shown below in Figure 1-5. 
 
 
Figure 1-5  Average  broadband  speed  and  Superfast  broadband  availability  across  London,  (CEBR 
June 2014, OFGEM Fixed Broadband Data 201314) 
When comparing the Average broadband speed and Superfast fixed broadband availability by London borough 
and the City of London, Southwark is placed in 29th place and 30th place respectively as shown below in Figure 
1-6 
and Figure 1-7.This demonstrates that Southwark (including Rotherhithe) does fall significantly below the 
London average in both these categories. 
This result is likely the primary cause for business dissatisfaction with the reliability of their broadband speed 
being  highest  in  east,  north  and  central  London,  with  21%  of  those  businesses  surveyed  in  East  London 
dissatisfied with their broadband speed. 
                                                      
13 http://www.cebr.com/reports/the-london-broadband-report/ 
14 http://www.cebr.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Cebr-London-broadband-report-FINAL_v3.pdf 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
13 
 

link to page 15

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
 
Figure 1-6  Average  broadband  speed  by  London  borough  (CEBR  June  2014,  OFGEM  Fixed 
Broadband Data 2013)  
 
Figure 1-7  Superfast fixed line broadband availability by London borough (CEBR June 2014, OFGEM 
Fixed Broadband Data 2013)  
1.4. 
Comparison with other countries 
1.4.1. 
Akamai ‘State of the Internet’ 
The Akamai State of the Internet Report Q1 2014 places the UK in 15th place globally and 10th place in Europe 
the Middle-East and Africa (EMEA) region for the average connection speed, with an average of 9.9 Mbit/s.  
In terms of average peak connection speed, the UK ranks 14th globally and 7th in the EMEA with a result of 
42.2 Mbit/s, showing a 20% increase in comparison with the previous year (see Figure 1-8).  
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
14 
 



Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
Similarly, this reports than in the UK, 32% of connections are above 10Mbit/s, 80% are above 4 Mbit/s and 
17% are above 15 Mbit/s. 
 
Figure 1-8  Akamai State of the Internet Report Q1 2014  
1.5. 
Conclusions 
From  the  information  gathered  above, it  has  been  shown  that even  in  dense  urban  locations  there  are  still 
areas that are subject to poor broadband availability and speed. The reasons for this are varied and can be 
due to the legacy nature of infrastructure in re-developed brownfield areas or the prominence of businesses 
relying on leased-line connectivity.  
The research by the CEBR shows the central and east areas of London are particularly poorly served with a 
high level of residential and business dissatisfaction with the current provision. When comparing the average 
broadband speeds and superfast broadband availability in Southwark, these are both significantly below other 
boroughs and the London average.  
Comparing Rotherhithe with the rest of the UK and internationally, it is clear that the current situation in the 
area falls well below the expected levels for the UK and other international countries. This has been identified 
in the Mayor’s 2020 vision and the London Infrastructure Plan 2050, which have a vision to improve service 
availability across London and particularly in not-spot areas. 
When  looking  at  the  EU  Digital  Agenda  targets  of  30  Mbit/s  available  to  100%  of  premises,  with  50%  of 
subscribers taking a 100 Mbit/s broadband service by 2020, it becomes clear that the minimum speeds offered 
in the Rotherhithe area must at the very least meet the 30 Mbit/s level. However, when looking at the near 
future it is apparent that the infrastructure delivered must be capable of delivering much faster speeds of 100 
Mbit/s  and  above,  and  the  intention  should  be  to  achieve  this  without  significant  further  investment  in 
infrastructure upgrades. 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
15 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
 
 
In addition to delivering the required speeds, the choice of services offered must include affordable options to 
residents and it should be ensured that packages are offered that fall within the affordable pricing criteria set 
out by the EU. This includes suitably priced basic broadband services to ensure that basic internet access is 
available to all residents, regardless of income.  
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
16 
 

link to page 22 Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
2. 
Current Broadband Availability 
Before considering options for Rotherhithe, it is important to understand the status of broadband availability in 
the  area  and,  where  possible,  of  broadband  infrastructure  provision.  In  this  analysis  we  have  focused  on 
understanding  the  capability  of  broadband  infrastructure  networks  serving  residential  and  SME  users  (i.e. 
users  relying  on  business  broadband  packages  delivered  over  the  same  broadband  infrastructure  as 
residential users). There are a number of telecommunications companies, offering fibre based retail services 
to large enterprises and corporate organisations or wholesale services to other telecommunication companies, 
which have fibre infrastructure in the vicinity of Rotherhithe. Examples of such suppliers are: BT Openreach, 
Vodafone, Virgin Media, Colt, Zayo, Interoute, Easynet, etc. This infrastructure, and the associated services it 
enables,  are  considered  to  address  a  different  market  and  are  therefore  considered  out-of-scope  of  this 
analysis. 
All known broadband infrastructure owners with potential presence in the area were contacted to enquire about 
the level of infrastructure in the area and/or the availability of broadband services within Rotherhithe depending 
on their position on the market and their willingness to share information. Where suppliers were amenable to 
sharing information, a list of postcodes covering  the area  of  Rotherhithe  was communicated to suppliers to 
guide their response. Coverage information was received from  Independent Fibre Networks Limited (IFNL), 
Hyperoptic  and  Virgin  Media,  and  assumptions  were  made  on  the  extent  and  status  of  the  BT  Openreach 
infrastructure based on our knowledge of their network. To our knowledge, no other fixed infrastructure supplier 
serving  the  residential  and  SME  markets  have  presence  in  the  area.  UK  Broadband,  through  their  service 
brand Relish, are known to offer fixed-wireless broadband services to parts of London. From coverage maps 
available online and local intelligence, our understanding is that Relish’s coverage extends from the City to the 
edge of Rotherhithe in the west and does not currently extend to the peninsula. Relish have been contacted 
for more information about their current and future coverage within Rotherhithe but to date no data has been 
made available. 
It is important to note that  Internet Service Providers  (ISPs),  such as TalkTalk, Sky or Plusnet  who provide 
services across the BT Openreach infrastructure, or See The Light carried over IFNL infrastructure, were not 
contacted as this study was primarily focused on estimating the capability of the underlying infrastructure rather 
than on studying the availability of commercial offerings from ISPs carried over wholesale infrastructure.  
Some  suppliers  indicated  that  the  information  provided  was  commercially  sensitive  and  as  such  the  maps 
provided  to  support  this  section  only  present  an  aggregated  view  of  broadband  availability  throughout 
Rotherhithe without identifying specific suppliers’ presence. Individuals and businesses willing to investigate 
availability of broadband services to their premise should enquire  with ISPs directly using online availability 
checkers  (see Appendix 1  for a list of broadband availability checkers for suppliers known to  be present in 
Rotherhithe). 
2.1. 
BT Openreach 
BT  Openreach  as  the  incumbent  telecommunications  infrastructure  provider  in  the  UK  possess  the  most 
pervasive network coverage throughout the country, serving all types of premises, from residential, through 
SMEs to large corporate users. As a purely wholesale  provider, BT Openreach do not offer services to end 
users but allow ISPs and suppliers to buy connectivity services to deliver their own services to end-users over 
this infrastructure. 
Broadband services to residential and SME users are delivered by BT Openreach either over copper cabling 
served from the local exchange, or where available from the local street cabinet (FTTC), or as a more recent 
development directly over Fibre-To-The-Premise (FTTP). Reader shall refer to section 3 for more details on 
the  technologies  available  to  deliver  broadband  services.  Both  FTTC  and  FTTP  technologies  are  currently 
considered NGA broadband technologies, however it is believed that FTTP has not been rolled out to any of 
the Rotherhithe premises to date. Due to the distance limitation of broadband speeds over copper cabling, the 
speeds achievable in Rotherhithe (download) vary between a maximum of 80 Mbit/s for premises located very 
close  to their  serving  cabinet to less  than  1  Mbit/s  for  premises  located  several  kilometres  away  from  their 
serving infrastructure (exchange or cabinet depending on the technology available). 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
17 
 


Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
Premises in the Rotherhithe area (assumed to consist of the 2 wards of Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks) are 
served from the Bermondsey exchange located on Lynton Road approximately 1.3 km away from Lower Road 
(straight  line  distance)  which  can  be  considered  as  the  south  west  limit  of the  peninsula, or  the  Southwark 
exchange located on Great Dover Street, over 2.5km away from the peninsula.  
Due to  the  industrial  heritage  of  the  area  with its  large  shipping  docks,  the  copper  telephone  infrastructure 
mainly consists of “Exchange Only“ lines (EO) directly served from the Bermondsey exchange with very few 
street cabinets installed as Primary Connection Points. To put this into perspective, from publically available 
sources we estimate that out of the approximately 14,000 copper lines in use within the 2 wards of Rotherhithe 
and  Surrey  Docks,  73%  of  those  lines  are  exchange-only  and  24.7%  are  served  from  street  cabinets  (the 
status of the remaining circa 2% of lines being unknown). The approximately 3,400 cabinet-fed lines are served 
mainly  from  14  cabinets,  12  of  which  are  NGA  enabled.  These  12  enabled  structures  serve  approximately 
3,070 lines giving a Next Generation Access (NGA) broadband coverage of 23%. It should be noted that the 
vast majority of these lines (approximately 2,950 out of 3,070) also get access to Superfast Broadband services 
defined as a minimum of 24 Mbit/s over NGA enabled infrastructure. 
 
Figure 2-1  Density Of EO Lines In The Rotherhithe Area (BT Openreach infrastructure only) 
2.2. 
IFNL 
Independent Fibre Network Limited (IFNL) are an infrastructure supplier focusing on new build developments. 
IFNL tender with property developers for the installation, at the build stage, of an open access Fibre-To-The-
Premise (FTTP) infrastructure to all premises on a new build site. This infrastructure is connected to a central 
UK location in  the  Docklands,  where service providers can connect  to offer services to all premises on  the 
IFNL network UK-wide.  
Within Rotherhithe, IFNL are present in Maple Quays and cover just over 900 premises over 18 postcodes. 
It is worth noting that IFNL do not offer services themselves but have an ISP called See-The-Light from which 
users can procure services. Also given the open access nature of the infrastructure, any other ISP, whether 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
18 
 

link to page 20 link to page 21 Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
local or national, can also connect and offer services. See The Light currently offer services of varying speeds 
(and budgets) up to 300 Mbit/s.  
2.3. 
Hyperoptic 
Hyperoptic are another supplier who focus on bringing connectivity to apartment blocks of at least 50 units. 
They provide fibre connectivity to the building and rollout copper cabling (Cat5) within the block from a central 
distribution point to all premises. Hyperoptic are the infrastructure owner and operate as their own ISP offering 
a range of services and speeds up to 1 Gbit/s (1000 Mbit/s); it is therefore not “open access”. 
Hyperoptic  are  currently  installing  or  offering  services  in  the  following  developments:  Pacific  Wharf  (SE16 
5QF), Water Gardens Square (SE16 6RF), Woodland Crescent (SE166YF), Trinity Wharf (SE16 5EQ), King 
& Queen Wharf (SE16 5SJ), Canada Wharf (SE16 5ES), Basque Court (SE16 6XD), Rainbow Quay (SE16 
7TQ), Princes Riverside (SE16 5RD), Gabriel House (SE16 7HQ), Cabot Court (SE16 7WE), Swedish Quays 
(SE16 7TF), South Dock Marina (SE16 7SZ), Greenland Passage (SE16 7TA), Walker House (SE16 7HD), 
New Caledonian Wharf (SE16 7TN), Sovereign View (SE16 5XP) and Brunel Point (SE16 5GB). 
2.4. 
Virgin Media 
Virgin  Media  is  the  only  telecommunications  company  in  the  UK  which  operates  a  national  cable  network. 
Virgin  Media  serve  the  residential  and  SME  markets  through  their  cable  network  services  but  also  offer, 
through  Virgin  Media  Business,  dedicated  bandwidth  services  to  businesses  and  public  sector  clients.  The 
latter services are delivered over fibre all the way to clients’ premises and may incur additional construction 
fees for any civil work required to connect them. Virgin Media have agreed to share postcode level coverage 
information for both their cable-broadband services (also referred to as HFC for Hybrid Fibre Coaxial network) 
and their fibre services. However, as described above, this study focusing on the residential and SME markets, 
only the coverage from the HFC network has been considered. 
Virgin  Media  own  and  operate  their  own  infrastructure  throughout  the  UK  and  act  also  as  their  own  ISP. 
Services  to  be  delivered  over  their  infrastructure  can  only  be  purchased  from  Virgin  Media,  the  network  is 
therefore not “open access”.  
Currently users served from the infrastructure can all receive broadband speeds up to 152  Mbit/s but have a 
choice of packages starting from 50 Mbit/s. 
While Virgin Media have a strong presence in London in general and more specifically in the areas of Deptford 
and Bermondsey, their current coverage is limited in the Rotherhithe peninsula to a few recent developments 
and some businesses and public buildings. Virgin Media explained that one possible reason for this was the 
private past ownership of the land in the peninsula which may have limited the extension of the local cable 
network operator at the time. 
Virgin  Media  have  recently  announced  plans  to  invest  £3bn  in  extending  their  coverage  in  the  UK  to 
approximately 4 million premises15. It is however too early to know the extent to which the area of Rotherhithe 
will benefit from this investment.  
Virgin Media’s coverage has been aggregated with other suppliers’ coverage, the result of which is shown on 
Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-3. 
2.5. 
Overall Coverage 
 
The following maps (also available as separate pdf documents) illustrate the current broadband availability in 
Rotherhithe. These maps present an aggregated view between suppliers. 
                                                      
15 http://about.virginmedia.com/press-release/9467/virgin-media-and-liberty-global-announce-largest-
investment-in-uks-internet-infrastructure-for-more-than-a-decade 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
19 
 

link to page 20 link to page 21
Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
2.5.1. 
Maximum Broadband Speed 
Figure  2-2  shows  the  maximum  broadband  speed  available  in  each  postcode.  This  map  illustrates  the 
capability of the broadband infrastructure available from all suppliers in the postcode. Please note that not all 
premises in the postcode will receive the speeds indicated on the map, in particular some premises in these 
postcodes will receive lower speeds due to the distance dependent performance of some serving broadband 
infrastructure. For low speeds (<2 Mbit/s) the estimates available are not accurate, these areas have therefore 
been shown in an aggregated “sub 2 Mbit/s” category. 
It is also worth noting that where large businesses or public sector buildings are shown to have access to very 
low speeds, these premises may in reality receive dedicated bandwidth services delivered over infrastructure 
not considered as part of this study. Many service providers and infrastructure owners that serve this market 
are active in London and have not been contacted/assessed as part of this work. 
 
Figure 2-2  Maximum Broadband Speeds Available At Postcode Level 
In  particular  it  is  important  to  note  that  in  the  2  wards  highlighted,  we  estimate  that  approximately  4000 
premises (30% of the area) do not have access to a 2 Mbit/s service. 
2.5.2. 
NGA Broadband Availability 
Figure 2-3 below shows an aggregated view of areas where NGA broadband is available from at least one 
supplier, i.e. IFNL (FTTP), BT Openreach (FTTC), Hyperoptic (FTTB) and/or Virgin Media (HFC). These areas 
are shown in blue. However, it should be noted that some suppliers may be serving only parts of a postcode. 
For this reason this map also shows in a separate colour (red) the postcodes where some premises do not yet 
have access to NGA broadband. Where only part of the premises in a postcode have been upgraded to NGA 
broadband, the postcodes appears highlighted in both colours. 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
20 
 


Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
 
Figure 2-3  Availability of NGA Broadband per Postcode 
 
Taking into account the coverage from all suppliers, it is assumed that 4,455 premises have access to NGA 
broadband with 4,340 of those having access to Superfast Broadband (implied over NGA infrastructure) within 
the Rotherhithe area. This gives a NGA Broadband availability of 33% and a Superfast Broadband availability 
of 32% to be compared with 89% Superfast Broadband availability for the Greater London Authority area16. 
 
 
 
 
                                                      
16 Ofcom UK Fixed Broadband Map 2013 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
21 
 


Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
 
3. 
Technologies 
3.1. 
Network Architecture 
In  general  communications  networks,  including  Internet  Service  Provider  networks,  comprise  three  main 
sections or tiers: 
1. 
Core: The highest level of aggregation in a network, which in the case of ISPs will often constitute 
the main high-capacity links between cities and gateways to the wider Internet. 
2. 
Distribution: the link between the core network and the portions serving end users; can be likened 
to the branches of a tree extending out from the trunk. An example of this is the connections linking 
BT  Openreach’s  telephone  exchanges  to  their  nationwide  (core)  data  network;  other  providers 
have similar “central office” locations that are connected to their core network through a distribution 
network. The distribution network carries bandwidth to and from a large number of users therefore 
also requires high capacity connections. This may also be known as the “backhaul” portion of the 
network. 
3. 
Access: the final connections to subscribers, for example the telephone line infrastructure (“local 
loop”) in the case of ADSL/VDSL networks, or the cable TV network. In broadband networks this 
is often referred to as the “last mile”. 
 
 
Figure 3-1  Service Provider Network Architecture 
Many providers have core network infrastructure located in London, alongside the gateways between different 
service providers which form the nodes of the Internet itself. Active equipment forming these nodes (e.g. core 
routers and switches) is often located in large data centres in or close to central London  – for example the 
Telehouse  North data centre in  Docklands  -  with distribution networks extending from these points towards 
local access networks. 
3.2. 
Telephone Networks 
Telephone  networks,  which  are  often  also  used  as  broadband  access  networks  in  the  UK,  consist  of  the 
following infrastructure: 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
22 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
• 
Telephone exchange: the location where individual telephone lines are terminated and connected 
to other exchanges in order to form the nationwide telephone network. 
• 
Street cabinet/Primary Connection Point: an intermediate connection point where telephone lines 
from the exchange are “split off” to individual premises in the neighbourhood. These are generally 
installed as street furniture and painted green. A cabinet can serve fewer than a hundred to around 
one thousand subscribers. It does not perform any sort of signal amplification or call switching; its 
function  is  to  aid  network  installation  and  maintenance  by  providing  a  flexibility  point  between 
individual premises and the main feeder cable from the exchange. Most exchanges serve multiple 
cabinets. In urban areas, the final connection from the cabinet to the premise is, on average, less 
than a few hundred metres in length. 
Some  premises  are  cabled  directly  to  the  exchange  without  passing  through  a  street  cabinet.  This  type  of 
connection is known as an “Exchange Only line” (EO line). There is a high concentration of EO lines in Surrey 
Quays and Canada Water; due to the district’s former status as industrial docklands and its relatively recent 
redevelopment into a residential area, telephone lines were often run directly from the exchange to facilitate 
fast deployment when housing development in the area began taking place in the 1980s/90s. 
This infrastructure is owned and operated by BT Openreach. Broadband services over this infrastructure are 
provided by multiple ISPs such as BT Retail, TalkTalk, Sky, Zen, Plusnet, EE, etc. either using their own core 
and distribution networks or connecting to BT’s network on a wholesale basis. In any case, the telephone line 
connection between the premise and the provider’s network is rented from BT Openreach with this cost borne 
by the subscriber in the form of line rental charges. 
3.3. 
Broadband Network Access Technologies 
In general the access portion of a provider’s network can represent a potential bottleneck, as multiple users 
share a finite amount of bandwidth and traditionally the copper medium used in the access network is capable 
of carrying  less  data  than  other  network  portions.  Next  Generation  Access  technologies  aim  to  reduce  this 
effect by deploying high-capacity media (e.g. fibre optic) more deeply into the access network therefore closer 
to subscribers. Fibre optic works using light transmitted down a thin strand of glass or plastic, giving it a higher 
bandwidth capacity than traditional access network mediums such as copper telephone lines, cable TV cables, 
wireless connections, etc. 
As  defined  earlier  in  the  report,  BDUK  has  defined  Next  Generation  Access  as  including  the  following 
characteristics: 
• 
Capable of providing speeds in excess of 30 Mbit/s download to end users, and at least 15 Mbit/s 
90% of the time during peak times, 
• 
Typically provides at least a doubling of average access speeds where deployed, i.e. a quantifiable 
“step change”, 
• 
Must be able to maintain capability and user experience as take-up and demand for the service 
increases. 
In contrast, technologies not meeting the above criteria but providing over 2 Mbit/s download bandwidth are 
defined  as  Basic  Broadband.  The  term  “broadband”  itself  implies  a  connection  with  substantially  better 
performance  than  “first-generation”  Internet  connections  such  as  dial-up  modem  (56  kilobits  per  second), 
alongside other characteristics such as being permanently connected to the Internet. 
Multiple technologies exist to provide broadband to end users, mostly varying depending on the type of access 
network used. The following technologies are available in the borough of Southwark to varying extents. 
3.3.1. 
ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line) 
ADSL is one of the most common broadband technologies worldwide and has enjoyed widespread deployment 
and popularity since the early 2000s, with the vast majority of premises in the UK able to subscribe to an ADSL 
connection. This is largely due to the fact that ADSL works using existing copper telephone lines which are 
near-ubiquitous in UK residential and business properties. 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
23 
 


Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
 
 
Figure 3-2  ADSL Access Network 
A piece of equipment called a DSL Access Multiplexer (DSLAM) is located in the local telephone exchange. 
This transmits the  ADSL signal onto the telephone lines that  the exchange serves, and links to the service 
provider’s distribution network to provide Internet connectivity. Because ADSL uses digital signals transmitted 
at a higher frequency than voice services, the telephone line can still be used to make and receive calls while 
connected to the Internet unlike with dial-up services. “Asymmetric” refers to the fact that more bandwidth is 
allocated for the downstream direction (towards the user) than upstream, a pattern which reflects traditional 
home Internet usage whereby users tend to mostly download rather than upload data . 
With the ADSL2+ standard, ADSL can provide downstream bandwidths of up to 24 Mbit/s. However due to the 
physical limitations of the  electrical cabling used for telephone lines, the bandwidth  possible through  ADSL 
decreases as line length increases; premises with a line distance of over 5km to the exchange are unlikely to 
receive more than 2 Mbit/s download. ADSL performance can also be compromised by other factors such as 
the  quality  of  the  line  and  its  material  (for  example  some  telephone  lines  are  known  to  be  made  of  less 
conductive metals such as aluminium, rather than copper). 
Due  to  its  theoretical  maximum  bandwidth  of  24  Mbit/s  downlink,  which  is  rarely  achieved  in  real-world 
conditions, ADSL is considered as a Basic Broadband technology. 
3.3.2. 
Fibre  to  the  Cabinet  (FTTC)  /  VDSL  (Very  high  bit  rate  Digital 
Subscriber Line) 

VDSL2  is  a  Next  Generation  Access  technology  similar  to  ADSL  but  with  technical  improvements  making 
possible  bandwidths  of  80  Mbit/s  downstream  and  20  Mbit/s  upstream  over  copper  telephone  line.  Further 
speed enhancements to VDSL2 may be possible with emerging technologies such as G.Fast and Vectoring. 
As  a  DSL  technology,  VDSL2  is  still  subject  to  distance  limitations;  to  take  advantage  of  the  increased 
bandwidth of VDSL2, a line length of under one kilometre is optimal as downlink bandwidth tends to fall below 
24 Mbit/s beyond this, and perform similarly to or potentially worse than ADSL for runs of several kilometres.  
VDSL2 therefore tends to be deployed as a “Fibre to the Cabinet” (FTTC) technology meaning that rather than 
it being located in the telephone exchange as with ADSL, the DSLAM is installed in a street cabinet and fed 
by  optical  fibre  cabling  from  the  distribution  network.  This  means  that  only  the  link  from  the  cabinet  to  the 
premise  consists  of  copper  telephone  wiring,  ensuring  users  can  take  advantage  of  the  higher  bandwidths 
VDSL allows. In practice FTTC deployment usually entails a new street cabinet, designed to connect to the 
electrical power supply and accommodate the DLSAM, being built adjacent to and connected to the existing 
passive cabinet. 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
24 
 


Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
 
 
Figure 3-3  Fibre to The Cabinet Using VDSL. 
FTTC/VDSL2 is one of the chief technologies providing superfast broadband in the UK: as of 2013, 46.9% of 
UK premises were able to subscribe to a VDSL2 connection. More are set to benefit from current commercial 
and state-funded rollouts. FTTC/VDSL2 is often marketed simply as “fibre optic broadband”, although there is 
still a length of copper telephone line involved in the final portion of the access network which diminishes the 
potential bandwidth compared to an entirely fibre optic connection. 
Premises  connected  to  Exchange  Only  (EO)  lines  are  unable  to  benefit  from  FTTC/VDSL2  through  a 
straightforward cabinet upgrade. Although there are options to mitigate this including re-routing telephone lines 
to cabinets (“Copper Rearrangement”) and the construction of new cabinets, these incur extra infrastructure 
costs compared to upgrading existing cabinets therefore EO premises can remain compromised in FTTC roll-
outs.  
3.3.3. 
Cable Broadband / Hybrid Fibre Co-axial 
An alternative to using telephone lines to provide broadband to homes and businesses is to make use of cable 
television networks. As with VDSL2, optical fibre is deployed to the extent of neighbourhood street cabinets. 
However  the  remaining  connection,  rather  than  using  telephone  cable,  uses  the  co-axial  cable  networks 
installed by cable television providers. Virgin Media is the major provider offering this service in the UK; prior 
to their merger and rebranding, the cable TV providers NTL and Telewest offered broadband connections over 
their networks alongside television channels. More recent technical advances and increased fibre deployment 
have since allowed superfast speeds over cable therefore making HFC cable broadband a Next Generation 
Access technology. 
Co-axial  cables  are  designed  to  carry  high  frequency  signals  over  a  longer  distance  than  standard  copper 
wiring, for uses such as television broadcasting and connections to radio antennas. Therefore HFC networks 
are  capable  of  providing  higher  and  less  distance-dependent  bandwidth  than  telephone  lines.  In  the  UK, 
downstream bandwidth of up to 152 Mbit/s is available to homes and businesses through HFC and this tends 
to  be  a  reliable  connection  speed  rather  than  the  “up  to”  bandwidth  offered  in  ADSL  or  VDSL2  packages. 
Future developments to the DOCSIS standard for cable broadband are ongoing and it is anticipated that higher 
speeds will soon be possible over cable. 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
25 
 



Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
 
 
Figure 3-4  Hybrid Fibre-Coaxial Broadband Network 
Due to the fact that for technical and commercial reasons cable TV networks were not installed universally in 
the  UK,  and  that  over  the  last  few  years  new  cable  TV  network  roll  out  tended  to  be  limited  to  new  build 
premises, less than 50% of UK homes are currently able to benefit from HFC-based broadband and coverage 
is often patchy even in dense urban areas such as Southwark and other London boroughs. 
3.3.4. 
Fibre to the Premise (FTTP) / Fibre to the Building (FTTB) 
In  a  Fibre  to  the  Premise  connection  the  entire  access  network  comprises  optical  fibre  which  has  a  near-
unlimited bandwidth capacity; depending on the architecture of the FTTP network, suppliers currently offer up 
to 1 Gbit/s of symmetrical bandwidth (both in the downlink and uplink directions) over FTTP. Due to the high 
deployment cost associated with building an optical fibre access network all the way to end user premises in 
comparison to running it only to exchanges or street cabinets, FTTP networks are relatively uncommon in the 
UK (0.7% of premises passed by FTTP as of 2013) although they are being deployed in some urban and rural 
areas by various providers. 
 
 
Figure 3-5  Fibre to The Premise Network 
A similar technology is Fibre to the Building, whereby a fibre cable is terminated at an entry point to a high 
density  building  such  as  a  large  block  of flats.  Ethernet  wiring  or  short-range  fibre  optic  cable  is  then  used 
internally  between  the  fibre  termination  point  and  the  individual  dwellings  therefore  Gigabit  speeds  are  still 
possible. FTTB is being rolled out to some blocks in London and other UK cities; it is often deployed as a result 
of sufficient demand from residents and property owners to ensure cost-effectiveness for the supplier. 
FTTP/FTTB networks provide the most future-proof form of Next Generation Access due to fibre’s favourable 
bandwidth and distance capabilities. 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
26 
 


Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
3.3.5. 
Fixed Wireless Broadband 
An alternative to fixed line technologies such as xDSL, HFC or FTTP/FTTB is Fixed Wireless, where the access 
link to premises uses a wireless signal (similar to a Wi-Fi connection) rather than a cable. In the most common 
form of fixed wireless network – point to multipoint - a connection is established between a subscriber unit, 
often taking the form of an antenna mounted on the building exterior similar to a satellite dish, and a centrally 
located access unit serving multiple users and connecting back to the provider’s distribution network. The civil 
engineering  costs  that  form  the  bulk  of  the  expense  of  installing  wired  networks  are  mostly  avoided  when 
wireless is used, typically making it a more affordable technology to deploy.  
Wireless broadband enjoys popularity in some rural areas due to this relative ease and cost-effectiveness of 
deployment in regions of lower premise density and/or challenging terrain; providers are also rolling it out in 
cities as an alternative to wired technologies. For example, one provider offers a self-install, indoor antenna 
based solution advertised as being capable of up to 50 Mbit/s download in some parts of London. 
 
 
Figure 3-6  Fixed Wireless Broadband Network 
The bandwidth achievable with wireless depends not only on the link distance (as with fixed lines), but also on 
issues that affect radio signals including interference and obstacles such as buildings, terrain and foliage that 
can potentially attenuate or block signals. As with wired connections, many users may be sharing a set amount 
of bandwidth. 
Bandwidth  to  subscribers  in  excess  of  30  Mbit/s  is  possible  with  current  equipment,  therefore  if  a  Fixed 
Wireless access network’s design criteria and implementation facilitate this (e.g. number of users assigned to 
each access unit, the amount of overall bandwidth capacity in the network, adequate locations and numbers 
of access units, dimensioning plans in place for when the subscriber base increases, etc.) it could qualify as 
Next  Generation  Access.  This  may  involve  fibre  optic  cable  and/or  high-capacity  wireless  links  feeding  the 
wireless access network. 
Fixed wireless networks often use so-called “unlicensed spectrum” – frequency bands such as 5.4 GHz which 
do  not  require  a  specific  radio  licence  from  Ofcom  to  be  used,  or  “lightly-licensed  spectrum”  which  require 
online registration and notification such as 5.8 GHz. Other wireless equipment also uses these bands including 
home Wi-Fi networks, baby monitors and cordless landline telephones.  
3.3.6. 
Mobile Broadband 
3G  and  4G  mobile  telephone  and  data  networks  capable  of  broadband  speeds  are  now  widespread  in  UK 
towns  and  cities.  Similarly  to  fixed  wireless  broadband,  the  connection  is  achieved  through  a  wireless  link 
between users’ equipment and the mobile base station; however mobile networks also incorporate features to 
enable  mobility,  allowing  users  to  move  between  different  base  stations  while  maintaining  voice  and  data 
connections.  Mobile  networks use lower frequency  bands than 5 GHz range fixed  wireless equipment,  and 
therefore can deliver greater coverage from each base station. 
Through  the  use  of  dongles  (mobile  antennas  that  attach  to a  computer  using  a  USB  connector  to provide 
Internet access) or tethering (sharing a mobile phone’s Internet connection with other devices such as laptops), 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
27 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
a mobile broadband connection may be used as a substitute for a wired or fixed wireless connection. Mobile 
contracts  however  tend  to  be  subject  to  stricter  monthly  data  usage  allowances  than  fixed  broadband 
packages, with some prohibiting tethering; despite this, it is becoming more common to see contract or pre-
paid packages aimed at primarily at mobile data use rather than calls and texts. 
Up to 60 Mbit/s (both downlink and uplink) can be achieved through 4G in the UK. Despite this, as 4G is aimed 
at  mobility  rather  than  providing  fixed  broadband  connections  and  that  it  may  not  be  dimensioned  like  a 
broadband access network in terms of guaranteeing bandwidths to subscribers etc., it typically does not qualify 
as a Next Generation Access technology. 
3.3.7. 
Wi-Fi 
The amount of public Wi-Fi connections is increasing, with initiatives such as wireless access points installed 
in street furniture to provide subscription-based or free public services becoming more commonplace. Unlike 
fixed wireless access these are mostly aimed at footfall in the area e.g. on-the-move pedestrians/travellers, 
tourists, and light users. The most modern widely implemented Wi-Fi standard, 802.11n, can provide downlink 
bandwidth up to a theoretical maximum of 300 Mbit/s depending on distance to the access point, the frequency 
band used, and the capabilities of users’ devices. If the network is configured to also support previous Wi-Fi 
standards, connecting older equipment not using 802.11n to the network will compromise speeds for all users. 
Equipment manufacturers have started releasing equipment complying with the latest Wi-Fi standard 802.11ac 
which offers the potential of theoretical headline bandwidths in excess of 1Gb/s. 
Although the wireless signal may spill over to nearby properties, it is unlikely to be ideal as a primary Internet 
connection due to the shared, limited bandwidth amongst users and the requirements that some public wireless 
access points implement such as registering for or logging into the service upon each usage session. Due to 
these  characteristics  and  the  lack  of  determinism  with  the  bandwidth  each  user  receives  (i.e.  it  is  highly 
dependent on distance and other devices connected to the network), public Wi-Fi is not typically considered a 
Next Generation Access technology. 
3.3.8. 
Leased Line 
For  business  customers  in  particular,  an  alternative  to  a  broadband  connection  is  a  leased  line.  This  is  a 
dedicated connection for the subscriber, meaning that access network capacity is not shared among multiple 
users therefore the advertised bandwidth and a higher level of service quality and  customer support can be 
provided reliably. It takes the form of a permanent connection between two sites, normally the subscriber’s 
premise and the service provider’s Point of Presence (a node of their distribution network), or between two of 
a business’s locations – for example to form part of a larger corporate network. 
Optical fibre is a common leased line technology, although dedicated services are also available through other 
media including copper and the term does not have to imply any particular technology. The installation and 
subscription cost of a leased line is much higher than a broadband package because it is a dedicated, specially 
provisioned connection to the user rather than a service provided over existing infrastructure that the provider 
has already invested in. Leased lines can be provided to any UK residential or business location within reason, 
although normally the subscriber pays for the connection between their premise and the provider’s Point of 
Presence including the cost of any civil engineering work that this entails. 
Some  small  businesses  can  be  adequately  served  by  a  standard  broadband  connection,  and  broadband 
providers  often  offer  business-orientated  packages  including  features  such  as  fewer  users  sharing  access 
bandwidth  and  improved  customer  support  and  fault  resolution.  However,  for  many  medium  to  large 
businesses,  a  leased  line  is  a  worthwhile  expense  due  to  the  need  for  reliable  bandwidth  and  availability 
regardless of location. This is especially true where business requirements such as accessing remote servers 
and  network  drives,  connecting  multiple  branch  offices  and/or  home  workers,  and  fast  upload  speeds  are 
considered. 
Although  it  can  supply  high  bandwidths  and  guaranteed  levels  of  performance  and  support,  leased  line 
technology is not considered part of the Next Generation Access market due to its high cost compared to the 
“affordable NGA” definition and its specialist nature. 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
28 
 

link to page 30 Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
3.4. 
Conclusions 
Taking  into  consideration  the  recommendation  that  the  infrastructure  deployed  in  Rotherhithe  should 
immediately enable speeds of 30 Mbit/s to subscribers, and 100 Mbit/s and above in the coming years without 
further  significant  upgrades,  it  is  clear  that some  of  the  above  technologies  may  be  more  appropriate  than 
others in achieving this goal. 
Ideally the infrastructure should be Next Generation Access, and of a form sufficiently future-proof that reliable 
delivery of 100 Mbit/s to subscribers is either already possible or is likely in the near future. Fixed line (wired) 
technologies in particular meet this criteria due to their more deterministic nature. This could take the form of 
an extension to an existing provider’s coverage in the Southwark area, or infrastructure deployed by a company 
new to the region and/or overall market. However, wireless technologies also have a role to play, at least as 
an interim solution, to provide enhanced services and speeds to areas that are currently poorly served. Current 
wireless technologies can enable the delivery of a high speed broadband service but there are uncertainties 
as to whether the specific implementation of these technologies (FWA networks or 3G/4G networks) can scale 
to deliver such services to all subscribers, especially when take-up of services increases.  
The following NGA technologies in particular could be considered: 
FTTC/VDSL 
With  current  capabilities  of  up  to  80  Mbit/s  downlink  and  higher  speeds  on  the  horizon  with  technological 
advances,  FTTC/VDSL2 could be a viable option for  improving  broadband access in Rotherhithe.  However 
due to the distance limitations of signals on copper lines (which will remain an inherent limiting factor even as 
the technology progresses) and the high proportion of Exchange Only lines in the area, a number of new fibre 
cabinets/nodes will need to be deployed to keep copper line lengths minimal and not compromise substantial 
numbers of premises. 
HFC 
With the  main  commercial  provider  already  offering  152  Mbit/s  downlink  to customers  nationwide  including 
some coverage in Southwark, HFC could be a strong contender for reaching premises in Rotherhithe. Due to 
the cable type used, HFC is not as limited as FTTC/VDSL in terms of line length and it is likely that even higher 
bandwidths will become possible as technology matures. Material and civil engineering costs could be high for 
those areas where no cable TV infrastructure already exists. 
Fibre to the Building/Premise 
As the most future-proof  NGA solution available, supplying fibre to the building or individual premise  would 
guarantee the possibility of ultrafast bandwidths for years to come. Providers are already offering symmetrical 
100 Mbit/s  to 1  Gbit/s connections to subscribers over  FTTP/FTTB networks.  Full fibre may  not be  as cost 
effective  as  FTTC  and  is  less  feasible  as  an  extension  to  an  existing  infrastructure;  however  increasing 
bandwidth requirements can be satisfied with less likelihood of costly future upgrades, and Southwark’s urban 
character  and  high  premise  density  make  fibre  deployment more  straightforward  than  it  would  be  in  a  low-
density rural area with challenging terrain, lack of existing cable ducts, etc. 
Figure 3-7 below summarises some key features of these technologies. 
In addition to the requirements for immediately available speeds of 30 Mbit/s over the new infrastructure, and 
100  Mbit/s  and  above  going  forward,  there  is  also  the  need  for  all  residents  to  be  able  to  benefit  from  an 
affordable  basic  broadband  service.  As  well  as  existing  and/or  improved  ADSL  coverage,  Fixed  Wireless 
Access technology could help to enhance coverage at minimal infrastructure cost. In addition to this, there is 
the potential to provide lower-speed packages over Next Generation Access infrastructure. This would ensure 
that those who desire the high bandwidths that the technology can offer are able to take advantage of it, while 
all residents can subscribe to a basic service to get online at minimal cost. 
 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
29 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
Technology 
Bandwidth  (Mbit/s  down  /  Advantages 
Disadvantages 
Examples of suppliers 
up) 
FTTC (VDSL2) 
Up to 80 / 20 currently offered  Some 
access 
infrastructure  Bandwidth 
dependent 
on  Infrastructure  installed/owned 
(distance 
dependent),  already  in  place  e.g.  telephone  distance; 
short 
line 
length  by Openreach. 
potential future increases 
lines  and  some  street  cabinets;  required for > 30 Mbit/s 
local  coverage  already  exists  to 
 
some extent. 
 
ISPs:  BT  Retail,  TalkTalk, 
 
High  proportion  of  EO  lines  in  Plusnet, Sky, Zen, EE, etc. 
SE16  makes  deployment  less 
 
straightforward or cost-effective 
Hybrid 
Fibre-
Up  to  152  /  12  currently  Access  infrastructure  located  High deployment cost associated  Virgin Media 
Coaxial 
offered 
(deterministic),  nearby,  local  coverage  already  with  installing  coaxial  cable  to 
potential future increases  
exists to some extent 
currently unserved premises 
>100  Mbit/s  bandwidth  already  Limited  uplink  speeds  available 
available to users 
(asymmetrical) currently  but can 
be improved 
 
Fibre 
to 
the  Up  to  1000  /  1000  currently  Fastest  and  most  future-proof  Highest  deployment  cost  as  Hyperoptic  (FTTB,  focused  on 
Premise/Building  offered (deterministic), higher  technology 
majority  of  premises  would  large blocks of flats) 
bandwidths 
possible  over 
require new fibre connection 
fibre 
 
Cityfibre 
Gigabit speeds already available 
IFNL / SeeTheLight 
to users 
Gigaclear (mostly rural areas) 
Figure 3-7  NGA Options Summary 
 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
30 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
4. 
Possible Business Models 
As described above the majority of the area of Rotherhithe is poorly served with broadband services due to an 
almost complete reliance on BT Openreach copper cabling infrastructure from the incumbent operator and in 
particular  on  the  extensive  use  of  Exchange  Only  lines  to  serve  premises  directly  from  the  Bermondsey 
exchange. It is unusual to see such a large contiguous area of poor coverage so close to the City of London 
and surrounded by areas of strong broadband infrastructure competition. 
Discussions with suppliers indicate that there are other infrastructure providers active in the area who currently 
serve  only  a  small  number  of  premises  commensurate  with  the  suppliers’  specific  business  models. 
Nonetheless, over the last few years, 2 new suppliers have entered the Rotherhithe area, addressing different 
premise types, which may indicate some renewed commercial interest for the area. 
The plans for the regeneration of Rotherhithe are truly exciting and illustrate the urban regeneration of the area 
from  the  previous  industrial  land  use.  In  order  to  retain  and  further  attract  to  the  area  the  residential  and 
business demographic needed to fulfil these plans, the infrastructure must evolve to cater for the future needs 
of the population. Broadband has become the 4th utility and a reliable and high performance service has now 
become expected by all.  
The  paradox  of  Rotherhithe  is  the  poor  availability  of  broadband  despite  its  central  location  in  the  heart  of 
London.  This  has  led  to  a  number  of stakeholders  engaging  with various  public  and  commercial  entities  to 
raise the profile of the broadband issue and to seek a solution. In particular  local residents, some of whom 
having formed the Rotherhithe Broadband Group, supported by local politicians have carried out research and 
engaged with suppliers to understand their future plans. Discussions led by the Mayor of London’s office with 
suppliers  have  also  contributed  to  raising  the  profile  of  Rotherhithe  and  other  similar  not-spots  within  the 
Greater London Authority.  
To accompany its regeneration plans,  Southwark Council is keen to understand the issues surrounding the 
delivery of broadband services better and to investigate options to ensure all premise users gain access to 
broadband services that meet their current and future needs. 
In this section we present the possible avenues open to all stakeholders to fill the coverage gap in Rotherhithe 
and in particular the options open to the Council to secure coverage of the whole area with NGA broadband. 
Overall the options can be grouped into 3 main categories: market led initiatives, community led initiatives and 
public sector funded initiatives. 
4.1. 
Market Led Initiatives 
The most preferable option for all stakeholders  is for commercial providers to extend their footprint to cover 
the area of Rotherhithe as this would allow: 
  The capture of additional market share and the early market positioning in rapidly developing area by 
suppliers; 
  The shortest lead times to service availability as the processes associated with the sourcing of funding 
and/or the legal clearance of community or public sector led initiatives are all likely to be lengthy; 
  The availability of service packages in line with other areas of London and the UK for end-users to 
choose from; 
  The  immediate  availability  of  tried  and  tested  delivery  and  support  services  as  an  extension  of 
commercial arrangements available from suppliers for other areas of the UK; 
  The non-reliance on public resources and in particular public finances. 
When engaging with suppliers we asked about details of their current presence in Rotherhithe but also about 
their future plans for the area. The responses varied in precision and detail but can be summarised as follows: 
  BT Openreach did not provide any detail on their future plans, mainly because discussions on the 
extent of further rollout are currently ongoing internally.  A decision was expected to be taken by BT 
Openreach about their future plans in Rotherhithe in Q3 2014 but no confirmation of a decision has 
been obtain from BT to date. However it seems evident that there is commercial interest in extending 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
31 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
the  reach  of  NGA  broadband  further.  Considering  that  most  of  the  existing  structures  have  been 
upgraded, further penetration of NGA broadband would have to be achieved through the introduction 
of  new  structures  (street  cabinets)  and  capacity,  and  may  involve  the  rollout  of  FTTP  to  targeted 
clusters should the cost of copper cabling rearrangement prove too expensive. 
  Hyperoptic have indicated that, in addition to the new developments that have been announced, they 
were  currently  considering  and  surveying  additional  sites  in  Rotherhithe.  However  any  future 
development  will  consist  of Multi  Dwelling  Units  (MDUs)  of  approximately  50+  apartments.  Smaller 
developments  may  be  considered  should  a  local  arrangement,  or  an  alternative  technology  (e.g. 
wireless), be identified to lower the cost of connecting the development to the Hyperoptic network. 
  IFNL  advised  that  they  were  interested  in  opportunities  to  deploy  to  new  build  areas.  The 
developments they cover  are identified  by successfully  bidding to the  property  developers to install 
infrastructure at the build stage. At this point in time IFNL are not involved in other developments in 
Rotherhithe. 
  Since their recent acquisition, Virgin Media had displayed a greater appetite to invest in extending their 
current  network.  This  was  confirmed  recently  by  the  announcement  of  a  £3  billion  investment  to 
connect approximately 4 million premises. Until recently newly connected developments tended to be 
new builds with some limited connectivity to infill premises where the opportunity appeared to match 
their business case. Prior to the recent announcement Virgin Media had indicated a few developments 
to  be  rolled  out  to  in  the  near  future  in  Southwark  and  Bermondsey  but  none  within  the  wards  of 
Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks. It is unclear at this stage how much the area of Rotherhithe may benefit 
from  the  recent  funding  announcement.  Virgin  Media  however  would  welcome  the  opportunity  to 
consider any future new build developments in Rotherhithe. 
The recent lobbying from local residents, community champions, local politicians and the Council  appear to 
have met with some success as it would appear that there is commercial interest to extend the rollout of NGA 
infrastructure further. The extent of future coverage remains unclear at this stage, however from discussions 
with suppliers, including BT, it is unlikely that 100% of the area would get access to NGA broadband through 
purely commercial investment. 
The Council is also in discussion with suppliers to identify options to secure broadband coverage of their social 
housing  stock.  One  specific  requirement  of  this  initiative  is  the  availability  of low  cost  broadband  packages 
providing  access  to  basic  services  for  households  on  low  income.  As  more  and  more  public  services  are 
moving online, it is becoming essential for all citizens, regardless of their income or employment status, to be 
able to gain access to online content and interact with these services. The Council has held discussions with 
a number of suppliers who focus on this type of premises and/or demographics and there would appear to be 
commercial interest in covering a number of social housing blocks. Such an initiative would be purely market 
led, only requiring wayleave access to be secured from the Council as landlord. Provided that the wayleave is 
non-exclusive allowing any other supplier to install their own infrastructure at any point in the future, should it 
make commercial sense for the supplier to do so, and that free or low cost packages are available from ISPs 
active over this infrastructure for households to purchase from, we believe it would be beneficial for the Council 
to support and accelerate further commercial deployment in the area. 
Alongside their initiative on social housing, the  Council can play a key role in advertising the opportunity in 
Southwark and  Rotherhithe  specifically to promote developments or areas in the eyes of market players  to 
secure early coverage.  In particular, at the planning application stage, the Council could help by requesting 
the developer’s proposal for communications infrastructure provision, and in particular that all or a range of 
known broadband infrastructure suppliers have been contacted by the developer to maximise competition and 
secure a future-proof solution that meets the long term aspirations of the Council. This may require a change 
in local planning policy to reflect the growing importance of broadband to citizens and to the economy. 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
32 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
4.2. 
Community Led Initiatives 
 
In areas of the UK where commercial deployment was not considered to be cost effective, communities have 
acted to either source a solution from the market or to setup an entity to deliver. Community initiatives have a 
number of advantages over commercial initiatives in that they involve, and rely on, local community members 
to achieve the end result. It can therefore be expected that commitment would convert into take-up leading to 
a higher demand. 
4.2.1. 
Privately Funded Infrastructure 
 
One  possible  business  model  would  be  what  BT  have  termed  ”build  and  benefit”  or  “privately-funded 
broadband” (http://www.superfast-openreach.co.uk/rural-broadband/Fibre-roll-out.aspx).  Under this scheme, 
the  community  would  raise  private  funding  from  either  local  private  investors  or  community  members 
themselves, to pay for the upgrade or new installation of infrastructure by one provider to serve the area. This 
model aims to lower the barrier of entry for a supplier to allow him to make a positive return on investment: this 
is equivalent to the gap-funded model used on the BDUK rural broadband scheme but using privately sourced 
funding. The infrastructure paid for under this scheme would be owned and operated by the supplier. To date 
BT have used this model in rural areas  where  the  distances are large and the competitive landscape  quite 
different from Southwark. It is difficult to imagine this model being utilised in such an urban environment but it 
may  still  represent  an  option.  One  key  advantage  of  this  scheme  is  that  there  is  no  long  term  commitment 
required from community members as the support and operation of the network would revert to the supplier 
post installation. 
It  is  worth  highlighting  that  this  scheme  is  not  restricted  to  BT  and  that  other  suppliers,  including  those 
mentioned in this study, may be interested in such a model. However, this model relies on community members 
contributing financially for the future of a relatively small geographic area. While this can be easily envisaged 
in rural areas where local residents, including farmers, tend to remain attached to their land, it is more difficult 
to achieve such commitment in an urban environment with higher churn rate. 
4.2.2. 
Community Project 
 
Local  residents  and  members  of  the  Canada  Water  Consultative  Forum  established  the  Rotherhithe 
Broadband  Group  in  November  2013.  After  some  initial  research  and  discussions  with  many  stakeholders 
including suppliers, the broadband group have become convinced that the market will not deliver to the whole 
of  Rotherhithe  and  that  the  deployment  of  a  community  FTTP  network  throughout  the  peninsula  would 
represent the most future proof solution to achieve 100% broadband coverage.  
There are examples of similar community funded projects elsewhere in the country but these tend to be in rural 
areas where the broadband infrastructure competitive environment is very limited: in these areas the distances 
involved are so large that the cost of rollout is high and the  likely return on investment low (for a maximum 
investment period considered by the supplier). Suppliers therefore tend to either not cover these areas, or to 
consider them low priority even when benefiting from public sector gap funding. Community projects that are 
successful  tend  to  require  the  community  to  raise  important  levels  of  private  funding  and  also  require  a 
substantial  level  of  commitment  in  terms  of  time  and  effort,  sustained  over  a  period  of  several  years,  from 
community members to support the project. 
While this is an exciting vision for Rotherhithe and the community, there are typically a number of issues that 
the broadband group would need to address in the near future to bring this project to fruition. In particular these 
include:  the  identification  of  the  required  funding,  the  sourcing  methodology  for  securing  this  funding,  the 
geographic areas to be the focus of the deployment in particular if State Aid is to be involved, the partnerships 
that  would  be  required  for  the  implementation  and/or  operation  of  the  infrastructure,  and  the  level  of 
commitment  (financial  or  other)  that  will  be  required  from  members  of  the  community  to  achieve  financial 
viability  of  the  venture.  We  understand  that  the  Rotherhithe  Broadband  Group  are  currently  working  on 
developing their business case for the project therefore some of these elements may be clarified in the near 
future. 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
33 
 

link to page 33 link to page 33 link to page 34 Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
It  is  worth  noting  that  both  business  models  described  in  4.2.1  and  4.2.2  are  listed  under  Community  Led 
Initiatives as they rely on privately sourced funding. Should the intended funding be sourced from the Council, 
these initiatives would then be considered led by the Public Sector (section 4.3)
4.3. 
Public Sector Funded Initiatives 
 
As mentioned above there are many ways in which Public Sector bodies and in particular Southwark Council 
can help support commercial providers, including potential community project, in identifying new opportunities 
or in facilitating the extension of their footprint. However, in the event where privately funded initiatives do not 
extend  to  cover  100%  of  premises  in  the  area  (through  suppliers  commercial  plans  and/or  any  community 
solution), it is possible that the only solution to ensure provision of Superfast Broadband to all premises will 
involve the investment of public sector funds.  In this section  we describe the conditions under  which public 
sector  funds  can  or  cannot  be  invested,  the  available  mechanisms  for  use  of  public  funds,  and  possible 
business models to be considered in the future for further investment of public funds. 
4.3.1. 
Introduction to European Commission State Aid Rules 
 
In its treaty, the European Commission (EC) has introduced legislation aiming to protect the interest of private 
investors against unfair competition from the investment of Public Sector funding. By default article 87(1) of 
the treaty states that any aid, through State resources (funding or other), that favours certain undertakings but 
not all would be incompatible with the common market. 
However the treaty also lists possible exceptions to this general ban on State Aid for specific aid categories 
that the Treaty declares compatible (Article 87(2)), aid categories that may be considered compatible (Article 
87(3), or for specific purposes.  
In a very generic sense, Article 107(1) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) identifies 
4 characteristics that must be met for the aid to represent State Aid: 
  The aid must be granted by the State or through State resources; 
  The aid must favour certain undertakings but not all; 
  The aid must distort or threaten to distort competition; 
  And it must affect trade between Member States. 
If all 4 characteristics are not met the aid is not considered to represent State Aid and the aid can therefore be 
granted. There are also circumstances under which the aid is not considered State Aid within the meaning of 
Article  87(1),  in  particular  the  following  2  scenarios  have  been  involved  in  the  deployment  of  broadband 
networks: 
1)  If public funds are invested in accordance with the Market Economy Investor Principle (MEIP), where 
the State (meaning here the investor of public funds) operates on genuinely commercial terms in an 
undertaking, as a main shareholder for instance. This would involve, among other things, that public 
funds are invested alongside other private funds, and that the balance of risks and rewards between 
investors is shared equally. 
2)  If public funds are invested for the provision of a Service of General Economic Interest (SGEI) which 
is for a service that the market does not provide, or at a quality which the state requires, and which is 
in the general interest and not limited to certain individuals/end-users. 
 
It  is  also  possible  that  in  spite  of  representing  State  Aid,  the  EC  may  validate  the  use  of  the  aid  as  being 
compatible in the common interest of the EU. Indeed, in its Communication on State Aid Modernisation (SAM) 
on the specific subject of deployment of broadband networks, the EC points out that “State aid policy should 
focus on facilitating well-designed aid targeted at market failures and objectives of common European interest. 
(…) In particular, a well- targeted State intervention in the broadband field can contribute to reducing the ‘digital 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
34 
 

link to page 35 Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
divide’ between areas or regions where affordable and competitive broadband services are on offer and areas 
where such services are not”17.  
There may therefore be valid reasons why Public Sector investment is required to enable the deployment of 
broadband  infrastructure,  but  the  right  mechanisms  and  processes  must  be  followed.  Where  State  Aid  is 
involved, it must be notified to the EC unless a specific notification exemption regulation is in place  (typically 
block exemption regulation or De-Minimis regulation). 
To identify areas where State Aid may be invested to support the expansion of NGA broadband, the EC has 
introduced the categorisation of areas in White, Grey and Black depending on the availability and capacity of 
the  available broadband infrastructure.  In its  State  Aid decision for the  National  Broadband scheme for  the 
UK18, the EC defined “white NGA areas” as areas where NGA broadband services at an access (download) 
speed of more than 30 Mbps are not available at affordable prices and there are no private sector plans to 
deliver such services in the next three years. A “grey NGA area” is an area where one infrastructure provider 
is available and a “black NGA area” an area where at least 2 infrastructure suppliers are available. In the UK, 
areas are usually defined at 7-digit postcode level. 
In general to maximise the chances of an application gaining State Aid clearance from the EC, the initiatives 
shall: 
  Focus  entirely  on  “white”  areas  as  demonstrated  by  thorough  market  engagement  and  mapping 
activities to understand in detail where broadband services are or are planned to be available (usually 
considered  to  be  within  a  minimum  of  3  years)  from  all  commercial  providers,  and  validated  by 
conducting a formal Public Consultation exercise to allow all commercial providers to comment and 
provide coverage plans; 
  Demonstrate strong level of demand, or even commitment, from end-users; 
  Be fully transparent as a means of limiting the aid to elements to the strict minimum incentive required 
from commercial providers, and ensuring value for money; 
  Focus aid on passive infrastructure which may be preferable to stimulate market competition on the 
competed active and retail layers; 
  Enable access to the infrastructure on a wholesale basis to all suppliers without discrimination (open-
access); 
  Select a private partner through an open and competitive procurement process. 
4.3.2. 
Super Connected Cities Programme 
 
A  country-wide  State  Aid  umbrella  scheme  was  negotiated  by  the  UK  government  with  the  EC  in  2012  to 
authorise,  under  certain  circumstances,  the  use  of  Public  Sector  funding  for  the  local  and  community 
deployment  of  Superfast  Broadband18.  Given  the  large  number  of  local  and  community  projects  expected 
under the scheme, the decision was taken by the EC to devolve the operation and monitoring of the scheme 
to Broadband Delivery UK (a unit within the Department of Communications Media and Sports) as the National 
Competency Centre. This is an example of an existing scheme under which projects do not have to be notified 
to the EC as long as projects are designed to fit the conditions of the scheme.  
This  scheme  however  cannot  be  used  for  any  urban  broadband  projects.  After  initial  notification  and 
negotiations with the EC, BDUK decided not to pursue a similar State Aid umbrella scheme for the cities due 
to timing constraints on the availability of committed national funding. Without such a scheme, projects that 
would  seek  the  investment  of public  funds  and  cannot  be  structured  under  existing  block  exemption  or  de-
minimis regulations would have to be notified to the EC to seek State Aid clearance. This was the purpose of 
the  notification  from  the  City  of  Birmingham  for  the  deployment  of  ultra-high  speed  broadband  network 
infrastructure in a Digital District in 2012. Following an initial clearance of the project by the EC, the decision 
was challenged by  both  BT and  Virgin Media. No final decision has been  made on this issue as no further 
action is being taken with the City of Birmingham pursuing other avenues. This case illustrates the difficulty of 
building a Public Sector funded project in a dense urban environment. 
                                                      
17 http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:C:2013:025:0001:0026:EN:PDF 
18 http://ec.europa.eu/competition/state_aid/cases/243212/243212_1387832_172_1.pdf 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
35 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
At this point in time the only mechanisms available to support the availability of broadband in cities are demand 
led initiatives through: 
1)  The granting of Connection Vouchers to eligible SMEs of up to £3,000 towards the installation cost 
(and not the running costs) of a Superfast Broadband service; 
2)  The use of funds for demand stimulation for Superfast Broadband services with a view to incentivising 
commercial providers to extend further their footprint/service availability. 
These current initiatives are being run by BDUK and Southwark Council should enter in discussion with BDUK 
to pursue them. These initiatives were due to run until May 2015 after which there is currently no commitment 
from central government to look at options to address the remaining White areas in cities. On 3rd December 
2014, the Chancellor announced that the Government will make up to £40m available from April 2015 to March 
2016 to support more cities administer The Broadband Connection Voucher Scheme. 
Some maps have been  published to illustrate the White/Grey/Black status of areas  within London but such 
analysis must be done as close as possible to a potential procurement (involving Public funding) going ahead 
in  order  to  provide  the  most  accurate  and  up-to-date  view  from  the  market  of  the  areas  that  are  currently 
covered or are planned to be covered within a certain time frame (usually considered to be 3 years). This is to 
ensure  that  public  funding  is  not  being  invested  in  areas  where  the  market  is  planning  to  invest.  The 
identification of the White areas would therefore have to be carried out in a timely manner and with suitable 
public consultation. 
Assuming  such  analysis  has  been  carried  out  and  adequate  State  Aid  clearance  has  been  obtained,  the 
following sections illustrates the range of possible business models that have been used elsewhere to support 
the deployment of NGA broadband infrastructure and which may applicable to Southwark Council. 
4.3.3. 
Future Business Models 
 
In  some  circumstances  there  may  be  limitations  as  to  the  areas  that  infrastructure  providers  are  willing  to 
deploy to using purely their own private funds due to the challenge of building a viable business case with high 
capital costs and/or low demand. In these circumstances public funding will be required from local, national, 
and/or European sources to combine with private funds in order to render a business case viable for a supplier. 
Public  Private  Partnerships  (PPP)  are  an  alternative  means  of  procurement  that  allow  the  public  sector  to 
secure the infrastructure it requires while at the same time sourcing private finances, transferring some of the 
risks  to  the  private  sector,  and  securing  invaluable  technical  and  commercial  expertise  in  broadband  that 
ensure projects are delivered as efficiently as possible. 
It is worth noting here that all the models described below could involve a non-for profit community organisation 
in  place  of  a  private  supplier.  However,  some  commercial  supplier  involvement  would  most  likely  still  be 
required to provide the necessary technical and commercial expertise and potentially to provide the day-to-
day running of the project. 
There  are  typically  4  models  of  PPP  considered  to  be  in  use  for  the  deployment  of  NGA  broadband 
infrastructure: 
  Private Design Build Operate (DBO); 
  Joint Venture (JV); 
  Public Outsourcing; 
  Public Design Build Operate (DBO). 
Under a Private DBO the public sector selects a private sector partner to part fund, design, build and operate 
a NGA network infrastructure. All infrastructure is owned by the private partner and the role of the public entity 
is restricted to part-funding the infrastructure, typically through a grant or gap-funding but with some level of 
control  over  the  deployment (e.g.  coverage  targets,  financial  reporting)  and  operation  (e.g.  monitor  level  of 
take-up). This is the approach chosen by BDUK for the rural broadband scheme. It is worth noting that under 
this model the public sector can also put clauses to recoup part of the funds invested should the venture prove 
more profitable than anticipated at the tender stage, through a “claw-back” mechanism. 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
36 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
An alternative to this is the Joint Venture model. Under this model the public sector selects a private partner 
to co-invest in a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) which will own the infrastructure. Usually the private sector 
not only part-owns the infrastructure but is also in charge of the construction and operation of the network. The 
public sector, though its shareholding of the SPV also owns part of the infrastructure and can influence the 
decisions made by the SPV, particularly during the build phase but also during the operation. An example of 
such an arrangement in the UK is FibreSpeed, a joint venture between the Welsh Assembly Government (now 
Welsh Government) and Geo Networks Limited (now Zaio Group) to provide wholesale broadband services 
on an open access basis in a number of business parks in north Wales. Another example of a similar initiative 
but  in  a  city  environment  is  the  investment  of  the  city  of  Amsterdam  into  a  Joint  Venture,  Glasvezelnet 
Amsterdam, which owns the passive (duct and fibre) FTTP infrastructure throughout the city. It is important to 
note  however  that  this  investment  was  made  under  the  Market  Economy  Investment  Principle  (MEIP)  and 
hence did not constitute State Aid. In terms of coverage this Joint Venture is therefore not limited to the white 
areas of the city and could extend operations into grey and/or black areas shall it make commercial sense. 
Another alternative business model is the Public Outsourcing model under which the public sector funds and 
owns an infrastructure in its entirety and selects a private partner to manage and operate this infrastructure for 
a given period. There are various variants of this model depending on the commercial arrangements between 
the contracting parties (e.g. concessions, leases/affermage, Build Design and Transfer). This model has been 
used extensively in Europe for the deployment of NGA networks in rural areas; one of the earliest adopter of 
this model was the Pau Broadband Country, the first “Delegation de Service Public” setup in France for the 
long term exploitation of a communal FTTP network. 
The fourth model available is the Public DBO under which the public sector completely  funds and manages 
the  design,  build  and  operation  of  a  broadband  infrastructure  to  be  offered  on  a  wholesale  basis  to  other 
suppliers. This option provides the most control to the public sector but is also the one that provides the most 
exposure and  risks. The most relevant  example  of such an implementation is Stokab, a municipally  owned 
passive fibre network created by the City of Stockholm in 1994 with a view to lowering its costs and increasing 
competition for the delivery of telecommunications services.  
The selection of the right model will depend on a number of factors: 
  The reason for investment; 
  The State Aid classification of the areas to be invested in; 
  Local market interest; 
  The level of local demand; 
  The Council appetite to own/maintain/operate infrastructure; 
  The amount of funding available. 
Where a private partner needs to be selected, this selection must be done through an open and fair competitive 
process.  Given  the  number  of  possible  commercial  models  that  can  be  envisaged  and  the  uncertainty 
surrounding  the  infrastructure/technologies  to be  invested  in, a  competitive  procedure  would  most  likely  be 
required  to  provide  the  necessary  opportunities  to  negotiate.  For  example  the  OJEU  Competitive  Dialogue 
procedure includes the following stages: 
  market warming; 
  pre-qualification questionnaire (PQQ); 
  invitation to participate in dialogue (ITPD); 
  dialogue process; 
  invitation to tender (ITT); 
  contract award. 
 
 
 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
37 
 

link to page 35 Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
5. 
Conclusions and Recommendations 
The  area  of  Rotherhithe,  which  consists  of the  2  wards  of Rotherhithe  and  Surrey  Docks,  is  going  through 
exciting changes with vast areas under redevelopment. Despite benefitting from substantial investment over 
the recent years, the broadband infrastructure has overall not evolved at the same pace. The availability of 
Superfast Broadband in the peninsula is currently estimated to reach 32% of premises, well behind the 89% 
availability  for  the  Greater  London  Authority.  In  addition  to  that,  it  is  estimated  that  approximately  4,000 
premises (30% of Rotherhithe) do not get access to a minimum broadband speed of 2 Mbit/s. 
In line with the aspirations of the Mayor of London’s office, the vision for London, including Rotherhithe, is to 
achieve world-class high speed connectivity for all. This vision, however, is likely to take some time to realise. 
In  the  first  instance  the  objective  should  be  to  secure  access  to  NGA  broadband  infrastructure  delivering 
speeds of at least 30 Mbit/s for all premises with the capability to deliver 100 Mbit/s in the near future without 
major additional infrastructure upgrade. 
It  is  widely  accepted  that  the  most  future  proof  technologies  rely  on  deploying  optical  fibre  deeper  into  the 
network towards end-users i.e. FTTP/B. However the cost of deploying FTTP/B is high and to date deployment 
of these technologies has been limited to targeted clusters of premises or communities. It is likely that universal 
NGA coverage of the area would be achieved through a combination of technologies and networks, including 
Fibre-To-The-Cabinet  (FTTC),  Hybrid-Fibre-Coaxial  (HFC)  and  Fibre-To-The-Premise/Building  (FTTP/B), 
deployed by different infrastructure providers. However, wireless technologies also have a role to play, at least 
as  an  interim  solution,  to  provide  enhanced  services  and  speeds  to  areas  that  are  currently  poorly  served. 
Current  wireless  technologies  can  enable  the  delivery  of  a  high  speed  broadband  service  but  there  are 
uncertainties  as  to  whether  the  specific  implementation  of  these  technologies  (FWA  networks  or  3G/4G 
networks) can scale to deliver such services to all subscribers, especially when take-up of services increases. 
Ideally,  NGA  infrastructure  would  be  deployed  commercially  especially  in  a  competitive  urban  environment 
such as London. The current transformation that Rotherhithe is going through will attract further commercial 
investment  in  infrastructure  upgrade  but  it  remains  unclear  how  much  of  Rotherhithe  will  be  commercially 
covered. If commercial plans do not cover the entire area, Public Sector intervention may be required, which 
may involve State Aid. 
In general, when State Aid is expected to be involved, the following options are recommended: 
1)  Consider altering the aid to remove or limit the element of State Aid (see above recommendation to 
support suppliers in general to incentivise further commercial broadband rollout); 
2)  Design the proposed aid to fit within the terms of an approved State Aid scheme for the UK (see section 
4.3.2); 
3)  Design  the  proposed  aid  to  fit  a  general  notification  block  exemption  regulation  which  allows 
investment for specific aid and specific recipients (the General Block Exemption Regulation – GBER 
– has recently been updated to include broadband); 
4)  Design the proposed aid to fit a general group exemption mechanism (typically MEIP or SGEI); 
5)  Design the proposed aid to be De Minimis (grants below € 200,000); 
6)  Design the proposed aid to be in line with other published guidelines, framework or notices which may 
be compatible within the common interest of the EU (project own State Aid application). 
 
With this in mind Atkins recommend the following actions to Southwark Council: 
1.  To  maintain  regular  discussions  with  commercial  infrastructure  providers  and  privately  funded 
community  initiatives  in  order  to  keep  abreast  of  their  aspirations  and  NGA  coverage  plans  for  the 
area. This will allow the Council to: gain an early understanding of the areas that will definitely not be 
served by suppliers if possible and of the reasons for their reluctance to extend to those areas, and 
raise awareness of specific problems/areas and advertise the opportunities; 
2.  Take into account feedback from infrastructure providers to support them wherever possible without 
the intervention of State Aid and with a view to facilitate and incentivise further NGA deployment. As 
discussed earlier this may involve facilitating sourcing of wayleaves or adapting the planning process 
to favour more competition for broadband provision to new sites; 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
38 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
3.  Maintain discussions with the Mayor of London’s office to coordinate initiatives and share information 
about similar not spot locations in Greater London; 
4.  Enter  into  early  discussions  with  BDUK  to,  in  the  first  instance,  leverage  mechanisms  currently 
available to local bodies: at this point in time this may involve conducting demand stimulation activities 
for the Connection Voucher Scheme. By raising the awareness of the scheme with SMEs in areas of 
poor broadband, this may lead to some suppliers building on potential new connections to extend their 
rollout on a commercial basis; 
5.  Maintain  discussion  with BDUK on remaining areas of poor broadband and  potential next steps.  In 
particular these discussions could focus on the potential need for additional public intervention, in the 
first instance under a new coherent national scheme covering cities if one is introduced post May 2015. 
BDUK as the National Competency Centre for the rural programme, will also be expected by the EC 
to manage or at least oversee the State Aid element of any new project. 
6.  If a national scheme is not available then a separate initiative could be envisaged.  Any new initiative 
undertaken  by  the  Council  should  focus  on  providing  the  required  infrastructure  and  allow  the 
deployment of future proof technologies. In this case the Council should consider the following when 
framing the initiative: 
a.  Is there sufficient commercial interest to allow the Council to invest purely on market terms 
under MEIP to provide the required infrastructure? 
b.  If not,  would it be possible to achieve the desired outcome  by  granting a  de-minimis aid to 
suppliers? and; 
c.  If  it  is  still  not  possible,  consider  making  a  case  for  State  Aid  for  the  minimum  investment 
required by suppliers to achieve coverage of the area.  
It  is  therefore  essential  for  the  Council  to  build  and  maintain  strong  links  with  infrastructure  providers  to 
construct the case for public sector intervention and to limit the level of intervention to what is strictly necessary 
for private entities to build a viable business case. In the case where the only viable option is for the Council 
to establish a JV or Public DBO or to seek a Public Outsourcing arrangement, it is essential to secure buy-in 
from  existing  service  providers  who  would  purchase  wholesale  services  over  the  new  infrastructure  thus 
ensuring the long term success of next generation broadband provision in the Rotherhithe area. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
39 
 

Technical Advice - Broadband Access and Speed in Rotherhithe SE16 
  
 
Appendices 
Appendix 1: Broadband Availability Checkers 
 
Below  are  links  to  broadband  availability  checkers  for  broadband  suppliers  known  to  offer  services  in 
Rotherhithe. Please note that, where possible, the link provided refers to Internet Service Providers that end 
users would contact to purchase services. Where a number of ISPs are served from the same infrastructure a 
link to all existing ISPs is provided. 
BT Openreach 
http://www.superfast-openreach.co.uk/buy-it-now/ 
Hyperoptic 
https://www.hyperoptic.com/web/guest/availability-check 
Relish 
https://www1.relish.net/athome#inyourarea 
See The Light 
https://www.seethelight.co.uk/ 
Virgin Media 
http://www.virginmedia.com/ 
  
 
 
 
 
  
Atkins
   Version 1 | 10 March 2015 | 5134598 
40 
 


 
Jean-Donan Olliero 
Atkins 
200 Broomielaw 
Glasgow 
G1 4RU 
 
xxxxxxxxxx.xxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx 
0141 220 2271 
© Atkins Ltd except where stated otherwise. 
 
The Atkins logo, ‘Carbon Critical Design’ and the strapline 
‘Plan Design Enable’ are trademarks of Atkins Ltd.