This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Public Rights of Way GIS Data'.



My ref: 
FOI 4460 
 
Your ref: 
 
Date: 
27 March 2015 
Contact: 
Jo Withey – Information Governance Officer 
 
Direct dial: 
01223 699137 
E Mail: 
[Cambridgeshire County Council request email] 
  
 
 
Customer Service and Transformation 
 
Corporate Director, Sue Grace 
Mr Robert Whittaker 
 
 
Information Governance Team 
By email: 
 
[FOI #227357 email] 
SH1001 
 
Cambridgeshire County Council 
 
Shire Hall 
 
Cambridge 
 
CB3 0AP 
 
 
 
 
Dear Mr Whittaker 
 
Re: Environmental Information request Ref FOI 4460 – Internal Review 
 
I write in response to your email of 22 October, in which you expressed dissatisfaction 
with  the  Council’s  response  to  your  request  regarding  rights  of  way  data.    Please 
accept my sincere apologies for the delay in the Council’s response. 
 
I  have  considered  the  handling  of  your  request  as  an  Internal  Review  under  the 
Environmental Information Regulations and shall deal with the technical handling and 
each of the points you raise individually.  Where reference is made to specific pieces 
of the legislation, you can find them appended to this letter for ease of reference. 
 
1. Technical handling 
 
You submitted your original request on 28 August 2014 and requested GIS data held 
by the Council on Public Rights of Way in Cambridgeshire, under either the Freedom 
of  Information  Act  (the  Act)  or  the  Environmental  Information  Regulations  (the  EIR), 
as appropriate. 
 
Whist  section  1(1)  of  the  Freedom  of  Information  Act  provides  a  right  of  access  to 
recorded  information  that  is  held  by  a  public  body  at  the  time a  request  is  received, 
section 39(1) of the Act states that where an authority is obliged by the Environmental 
Information  Regulations  to  make  environmental  information  available  to  the  public, 
then that environmental information is exempt from the provisions of the Freedom of 
Information Act. 
 
 


The Council has considered your request and is satisfied that the information that you 
have requested falls within the definition of environmental information provided under 
Regulation 2(1) of the EIR and therefore, that EIR is the appropriate legislation under 
which to respond to your request. 
 
Regulation 5(1) and (2) provide that an authority must make available environmental 
information  upon  request  and  no  later  than  twenty  working  days  after  the  date  of 
receipt. 
 
In  this  instance,  the  Council  failed  to  meet  its  obligations  under  Reg  5(2);  for  this, 
please accept my apologies.  The reason for the Council’s delay was as explained to 
you  at  the  time  –  significant  numbers  of  requests  were  being  received  and, 
unfortunately, it took longer than anticipated to finalise the Council’s response. 
 
The Council responded to your request on 21 October 2014. 
In the Council’s response, question one (1/ The name of database/file format used for 
your Rights of Way Database. (Here, I'm looking for an answer such as "a KML file", 
"a  MySQL  database",  "an  ARCInfo  database  with  PostgreSQL  storage".)  If  multiple  
databases exist in more than one format, please list all of them.
) was answered in full; 
And  a  spreadsheet  was  provided  for  question  two  (2/  A  copy  of  the  database 
definition / schema for your Rights of Way Database. (Depending on the format from 
1, this could be a file specification, the relevant SQL table definitions, or simply a list 
of the tables, their relationships, and the fields they contain.) If it is not obvious from 
any  of  the  field  names  what  information  they  contain,  please  provide  a  brief 
description.
) which showed a list of the fields and a brief description of the information 
contained therein. 
For  question  three  (3/  A  full  copy  or  data-dump  of  the  information/data  contained  in 
your  Rights  of  Way  Database.  (This  should  include,  at  a  minimum,  each  Right  of 
Way's 

name, 
parish, 
reference 
number, 
any 
internal 
ids, 
and 
the 
geographic/positional  data  necessary  to  define  the  route  --  probably  in  the  form  of 
way  segments  and  coordinates.)
),  you  were  advised  that  some  information  was 
already  published  by  the  Council  and  was  therefore  reasonably  accessible  via  the 
online map. 
It  was  confirmed  to  you  that  the  EIR  permit  access  to  information  rather  than  to 
specific documents and that where information is readily accessible in one format, the 
EIR do not oblige an authority to provide them in an alternative. 
Regulation  6(1)  governs  the  form  or  format  in  which  environmental  information  is 
made  available  and  regulation  6(1)(b)  specifically  states  that  where  information  is 
already publicly available, there is no obligation on an authority to provide it in another 
way. 
The  Information  Commissioner’s  guidance  states  that  where  a  requestor  requires 
information to be  provided  in  a particular format or form,  a  public  authority  does  not 
 


have  to  comply  with  the  preference  if  it  is  reasonable  to  make  the  information 
available  in  another form  or format,  or  if  the information  is  already  publicly  available 
and  accessible  in  another  form  or  format.    If  a  public  authority  considers  that  the 
information is publicly  available elsewhere, it must be able to direct the requestor to 
the  information  can  be  obtained.    The  EIR  do  not  contain  specific  provisions  that 
relate to datasets where a requestor asks that they be provided in a re-usable form, 
the authority should consider this as a preference for a particular form or format. 
In this instance, the majority of the information that falls within the scope of question 
three  is  publicly  available  and  has  been  provided  in  the  spreadsheet  that 
accompanied  the  Council’s  initial  response.    In  addition  to  this,  it  is  also  easily 
accessible on the Council’s online map. 
In  respect  of  this  easily  available  and  already  published  information,  and  with 
consideration to the provisions of Regulation 6(1) and the relevant guidance from the 
Information  Commissioner,  the  Council  has  correctly  applied  the  provisions  of 
Regulation 6(1). 
In  the  Council’s  initial  response,  you  were  advised  that  there  were  three  fields  of 
information  included  in  the  Council’s  GIS  tool  that  were  not  already  published  and 
were  not  accessible  via  the  online  map.    These  three  pieces  of  information  are 
information  that  has  been  recorded  under  the  “CCC_Maintainable”  field,  information 
recorded  under  the  “Last  checked”  field  and  information  recorded  under  the  “Notes” 
field. 
In  respect  of  the  first  two  pieces  of  information,  i.e.  “CCC_Maintained”  and  “Last 
checked”  fields,  the  Council  relies  on  the  exceptions  found  under  both  Regulation 
12(4)(d) and Regulation 12(4)(e) of the EIR. 
Regulation  12(4)(d)  provides  an  exception  to  disclosure  where  information  is 
unfinished  or  incomplete.    The  exception  exists  to  protect  work  that  is  currently  in 
progress  by  delaying  disclosure  until  a  final  and  complete  version  can  be  made 
available.   
In this instance, information recorded under these fields is incomplete and still in the 
course  of  completion  for  the  purposes  of  the  exception.    It  consists  of  internal  note 
fields  that  have  been  added  as  part  of  an  ongoing  project  to  review  the  Definitive 
Map.    Work  is  currently  happening  with  partner  organisations  to  create  a  single 
accurate  record  and  it  is  anticipated  that  details  relating  to  the  “CCC_Maintainable” 
field will be added to the online map once work has been completed and the accuracy 
of this information has been established. 
 
The public interest test has been considered in respect of the Council’s application of 
Regulation  12(4)(d).    The  following  arguments  were  considered  in  favour  of  release 
as part of the public interest test: 
 
i. 
Release of the information would inform public debate of the day; 
 


ii. 
Release  will  provide  and  promote  transparency  regarding  the 
information  recorded  internally  around  Rights  of  Way  GIS  Data,  the 
processes followed and the issues encountered; 
iii. 
Release will allow consideration of the current funding that goes to the 
team  responsible  for  maintaining  Rights  of  Ways  and  there  will  be 
issues included in the notes, such as legal matter that will refer to spend 
or potential spend on those matters; and 
iv. 
Release will provide additional information on the management of rights 
of  ways  and  ongoing  issues  that  may  help  in  understanding  rights  of 
way and how they can be used. 
 
The following arguments were considered in favour of maintaining the exception: 
 
i. 
The  Council  is  obliged  under  EIR  to  provide  accurate  information.  The 
‘CCC_Maintained’  data  is  currently  incomplete  and  in  some  cases 
entries may be inaccurate.  Disclosing the information in its current state 
will not allow the correcting of the data by members of the public as they 
are  unlikely  to  have  access  to  the  information  required  to  check  the 
data. 
ii. 
There  is  an  ongoing  project  including  other  organisations  (District 
Councils  etc)  to  collate  and  update  this  information.    Disclosing  draft 
data at this stage will cause confusion and delays if people referring to 
that data direct queries and / or complaints to the wrong place.  People 
will  be  unable  to  rely  on  the  accuracy  of  the  data.    There  will  be  an 
additional  burden  on  organisations  in  dealing  with  queries  and  /  or 
complaints  relating  to  the  data  and  this  will  slow  down  progress  on 
compiling  and  publishing  the  accurate  data  by  taking  essential 
resources away from the task. 
iii. 
Problems will also be caused by disclosure of inaccurate information as 
old and inaccurate copies of data on the internet will be uncontrollable. 
 
Having  given  careful  consideration to  the above,  at  this  time,  the public  interest  test 
has found in favour of maintaining the exception under Regulation 12(4)(d) in relation 
to information under these two fields.  It was felt that allowing inaccurate information 
to be published and then to remain in the public domain where it could be relied on 
incorrectly, outweighed the public interest in release.  Given the other information that 
has  already  been  published  and  that  is  available  via  the  online  map,  the  withheld 
information  in  these  two  fields  would  do  little  to  contribute  to  the  transparency  and 
consideration elements outlined in the arguments in favour of disclosure. 
 
Regulation 12(4)(e) has also been considered in relation to the information contained 
in the “CCC_Maintained” and “Last checked” fields, as well as information contained 
in the third undisclosed field, “Notes”. 
 
The “Notes” field is used by the team to makes notes for referral to by colleagues and 
they  contain  a  variety  of  information,  including  contact  details  for  gate  key  holders 
 


(which  is  personal  information  relating  to  individuals),  references  to  ongoing  legal 
matters and general internal reference comments, for example, see consolidation file. 
 
The internal field entries are often written in shorthand which would be understood by 
the team but would make very little sense to anyone outside of the team.  This would 
contribute greatly to the confusion and misinterpretation that would arise as a result of 
release and providing clarification for each entry would be likely to make the request 
manifestly unreasonable for the purposes of Regulation 12(4)(b). 
 
Regulation 12(4)(e) provides an exception to release where information concerned is 
internal information.  It exists to allow authorities to discuss proposals and decisions 
without outside interference and space to think in private whilst reaching decisions.  It 
can  also  apply  to  competed  documents.    The  definition  of  communication  for  the 
purposes  of  Regulation  12(4)(e)  is  broad  and  will  include  information  that  has  been 
placed on a file to allow others to consult it. 
 
Regulation  12(4)(e)  is  a  class  based  exception  which  means  that  there  is  no 
requirement  to  consider  the  sensitivity  of  the  information  in  order  to  engage  the 
exception. 
 
The public interest test has been considered in respect of the Council’s application of 
Regulation  12(4)(e).    The  following  arguments  were  considered  in  favour  of  release 
as part of the public interest test: 
 
i. 
Release of the information would inform public debate of the day; 
ii. 
Release  will  provide  and  promote  transparency  regarding  the 
information  recorded  internally  around  Rights  of  Way  GIS  Data,  the 
processes followed and the issues encountered; 
iii. 
Release will allow consideration of the current funding that goes to the 
team  responsible  for  maintaining  Rights  of  Ways  and  there  will  be 
issues included in the notes, such as legal matter that will refer to spend 
or potential spend on those matters; and 
iv. 
Release will provide additional information on the management of rights 
of  ways  and  ongoing  issues  that  may  help  in  understanding  rights  of 
way and how they can be used. 
 
The following arguments were considered in favour of maintaining the exception: 
 
i. 
There is a reduced interest in releasing internal notes in many cases as 
the  shorthand  notes  will  not  add  any  great  value  to  peoples’ 
understanding  of  RoW  as  they  will  not  make  much  sense  without 
additional clarification and  context. 
ii. 
The  lack  of  such  clarification  and  context  is  likely  to  lead  to 
misinterpretation of the data and an increase in workload in dealing with 
queries / complaints / legal disputes arising from this, compromising the 
Council’s ability to complete other RoW tasks and responsibilities. 
 


iii. 
Providing  the  necessary  clarification  and  context  would  require 
substantial work that would be ‘manifestly unreasonable’ under EIR.  
iv. 
Additionally  the  notes  include  information  such  as  personal  data  and 
references  to  ongoing  legal  disputes  /  queries.    It  would  not  be  in  the 
public  interest  to  disclose  such  information  widely  into  the  public 
domain,  breaching  the  Data  Protection  Act  and  potentially  prejudicing 
future legal proceedings – exceptions that have not been considered at 
this stage because of the application of Regulation 12(4)(e). 
 
Having  given  careful  consideration to  the above,  at  this  time,  the public  interest  test 
has found in favour of maintaining the exception under Regulation 12(4)(e) in relation 
to  information  under  the  three  withheld  fields.    Given  the  other  information  that  has 
already  been  published  and  that  is  available  via  the  online  map,  the  withheld 
information  in  these  fields  would  do  little  to  contribute  to  the  transparency  and 
consideration elements outlined in the arguments in favour of disclosure. 
 
Having reviewed in full the Council’s technical handling of your request, the outcome 
is summarised below: 
 
•  That  the  Council  was  correct  to  deal  with  your  request  under  the  EIR  rather 
than Freedom of Information; 
•  That the Council failed in its obligations under Regulation 5(2) in that the final 
response was provided outside of the twenty working day deadline; 
•  That the Council acted within the provisions of Regulation 6(1) in refusing to 
provide  information  in  an  alternative  form  and  format  where  it  was  already 
publicly available and easily accessible by other means; 
•  That  the  Council  was  correct  to  rely  upon  the  exception  under  Regulation 
12(4)(d)  in  respect  of  the  “CCC_Maintained”  and  “Last  checked”  fields  and 
applied the public interest correctly; 
•  That  the  Council  was  correct  to  rely  upon  the  exception  under  Regulation 
12(4)(e) in respect of the above two fields and the “Notes” field and applied the 
public interest test correctly. 
 
I therefore uphold the part of your complaint in respect of the failure by the Council to 
respond within twenty working days and I uphold the Council’s initial application of the 
exceptions contained under Regulation 12(4). 
 
2. “First, I believe that your response is incomplete. While your answers to requests 2 
and 3, deal with all the meta-data about each Right of Way, they omit any mention of 
the geographic and presentational information that must also be stored in the MapInfo 
files.  I  believe  it  was  clear  from  my  request  that  I  also wanted  details  and  copies  of 
what geographic information you hold…  For question 2, I would expect details of how 
each  right  of  way  is  stored  --  e.g.  is  each  a  single  MapInfo  object,  what  type  of 
object(s)  are  used,  what  coordinates  are  stored  (OSGB  grid  references,  WGS84 
lat/lon, etc.), and what other information (if any) is present?...  For question 3, I would 
expect  you  to  consider  providing  me  a  copy  of  (the  information  in)  the  .map  and  .id 

 


files  you  have.  (As  I  explained  in  my  original  request,  the  precise  geographic 
information is not accessible via your online map.)”
 
 
Your  request  was  seeking  details  regarding  the  “Rights  of  Way  database”  and 
clarified this as “taken to just refer to those parts or tables that hold Public Rights of 
Way data”. 
 
Each Right of Way is created individually and stored as a linear object in a table.  This 
information  is  published  on  the  Council’s  online  map,  or  not,  as  per  the  explanation 
given in the Council’s original response. 
 
The MapInfo file table contains five components: .TAB, .DAT, .IND, .MAP, .ID.  
 
Where  this  information  is  not  publicly  available,  the  Council  considers  it  to  be 
excepted from disclosure under Regulation 12(4)(d) as they “relate to material which 
is  still  in  the  course  of  completion,  to  unfinished  documents  or  to  incomplete  data”.  
Please see the response given to “Technical handling” above for further details about 
the application of the exceptions. 
 
The Definitive Map Review Project is currently ongoing to update the Definitive Map 
and Statement to provide an accurate and reliable legal record of registered paths for 
the modern county of Cambridgeshire. 
 
The legal documents the team currently work with were inherited from previous local 
authorities  and date from the  1960s-1970s.   The new  Definitive  Map and  Statement 
will take account of the modern development of the County.  It will be available online, 
although  the  actual  legal  original  will  be  a  sealed  hard-copy  kept  in  the  County 
Council  archive.   When  outstanding  legal  errors  have  been  resolved  the  documents 
will be printed, sealed and adopted as the new Definitive Map and Statement for the 
County of Cambridgeshire.  This will be legally updated on an annual basis to ensure 
that it remains accurate and up-to-date. 
 
Rights of Way data is on the Council’s GIS as a working tool.  For several years the 
Council  has  decided  to  go  beyond  its  legal  obligations  in  making  this  version  of  the 
information available to view online, but it is not made available for download.  This is 
due to the incompleteness of the GIS data and the legal inaccuracies contained in the 
data that makes it important that the Council is able to ensure that this version is only 
available  with  suitable  caveats  that  it  should  not  be  relied  on  for  determining  the 
position or alignment of any public right of way, and that it is presented in a way so 
that anyone who has a query can refer it to the appropriate team. 
 
3. “Secondly, I must disagree with your application of EIR 6(1)(b). While it is true that 
the information is "publicly available", and that the information for any individual Right 
of  Way  is  "easily  accessible"  via  your  online  map  (assuming  you  already  know 
roughly  where  it  is  located),  I  do  not  agree  that  the  complete  set  of  information  I 
requested taken as a whole and covering all the rights of way is "easily accessible" as 
required  by    6(1)(b).”  For  me  to  access  the  requested  information  for  every  right  of 

 


way  through  your  online  map,  I  would  need  to  manually  click  on  each  route  on  the 
map individually. This would involve lots of zooming and scrolling around, as there are 
a lot of Rights of Way. I'd probably also get many duplicates, increasing the effort still 
further, since it it not always obvious from the map where one right of way stops and 
another  starts. Since I  do  not  even  know the  total  number  of  Rights  of Way,  I  could 
never  be  sure  that  I  hadn't  missed  a  small  section  with  a  different  number 
somewhere.
 
 
The Council has assessed this and I can confirm that the fact that you would need to 
look at individual entries manually does not prohibit it from being “easily accessible”. 
The  information  held  by  the  Council  in  relation  to  your  request  amounts  to  the 
individual rights of way that are recorded and this information is publicly available via 
the map. 
 
The  fact  that  you  wish  to  re-use  the  information  in  a  way  that  allows  you  to  import 
details of every right of way into another system does not affect this point.  
 
The  question  is  whether  the  information  itself  can  be  accessed,  as  EIR  is  solely 
concerned with the matter of making environmental information available.  Regulation 
6  does  not  impose  an  obligation  on  a  public  authority  to  provide  information  in 
different  ways  dependent  on  the  precise  requirements  of  how  every  individual 
requestor wishes to use the information. 
 
Indeed,  this  situation  is  covered  by  Regulation  6  focusing  on  whether  it  is 
“reasonable”  to  make  it  available  in  another  way.    The  Council  has  made  the 
information  available  via  the  online  map,  in  addition  to  the  requirement  to  make  the 
information available for inspection, in a way that meets the needs of the vast majority 
of  people  interested  in  this  information.    The  Council  therefore  maintains  that  the 
information is available and is under no obligation to provide it in alternative form or 
format. 
 
4. “For the "Width" column, you state that it will be added to the online map shortly. If 
it  is  not  currently  available,  then  6(1)(b)  does  not  apply.  Please  provide  this 
information in a reusable electronic format, together with a way to identify which path 
each width belongs to.” 
 
In respect of the width data, you have contested the Council’s response that it will be 
available online soon does not make it currently available.  The information was –and 
is - published on the online map.  The Council’s initial response had been drafted on 
the basis that this data was not viewable and this was not corrected prior to sending 
the  Council’s  original  response.    I  apologise  for  this  oversight.  For  clarity,  I  can 
confirm the Council’s position is that the information was published on our online map 
and therefore Regulation 6(1)(b) does apply. 
 
 
5.  “Finally,  I  note  that  you  have  also  failed  to  respond  to  my  request  to  reuse  the 
information  you  have  provided.  As  6(1)(b)  is  not  an  exemption  to  providing 

 


information, I believe my re-use request covers the information you state is available 
in  your  online  map.  Please  respond  to  this  request  as  you  are  required  to  do under 
the Reuse of Public Sector Information Regulations. 
 
When  a  request  is  received  to  re-use  public  sector  information  under  the  Re-use  of 
Public  Sector  Information  Regulations  2005,  Regulation  7(1)  provides  that  a  public 
sector body may (my emphasis) permit re-use. 
 
This does not convey a legal obligation upon an authority to permit information to be 
re-used  simply  because  it  has  been  requested.    Therefore,  the  Council  does  not 
agree to allow re-use of the information at this time. 
 
6.  “Section  19(2A)  of  the  Freedom  of  Information  Act  requires  Public  Authorities  to 
include  a  requirement  in  their  publication  scheme  to  publish  certain  datasets  in  a 
reusable  format…I  therefore  expect  you  to  make  the  requested  data  available  in  a 
reusable format without further delay.” 
 
Section 102 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 adds new provision to sections 
11  and  19  of  the  Freedom  of  Information  Act  in  respect  of  datasets.    Of  particular 
relevance is section 102(4) which adds the section you refer to above. 
 
Whilst  the  provisions  of  section  19(2A)  apply  to  datasets  that  have  been  requested, 
regardless  of  whether  they  are  exempt,  and  therefore  do  incorporate  datasets  that 
comprise  environmental  information,  the  obligation  on  the  authority  is  to  consider 
whether it would be reasonable and appropriate to make the dataset available for re-
use. 
 
The Council has considered this and its decision is that, due to the inaccurate nature 
of  the  datasets  and  the  inherent  problems  that  allowing  re-use  of  this  information 
would create, at this time, this information is not going to be published in a re-usable 
format. 
 
The  Council’s  review  of  your  environmental  information  request  is  now  complete.  If 
you  remain  dissatisfied  you  are  entitled  to  refer  the  matter  to  the  Information 
Commissioner’s  Office  (ICO).  Details  on  submitting  a  complaint  to  the  ICO  can  be 
found 
on 
their 
website 
at 
the 
following 
address: 
http://www.ico.org.uk/complaints/getting  
 
Alternatively they can be contacted by post at the following address: The Information 
Commissioner’s Office, Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire SK9 5AF. 
 
Yours sincerely 
 
 
Jo Withey 
Information Governance Officer 
 
 


Appendix 1 – relevant legislation 
 
 
Freedom of Information Act 2000 
 
1 General right of access to information held by public authorities. 
(1)Any person making a request for information to a public authority is entitled—  
(a) to be informed in writing by the public authority whether it holds information 
of the description specified in the request, and  
(b) if that is the case, to have that information communicated to him. 
 
 
39 Environmental information. 
(1)Information is exempt information if the public authority holding it—  
(a) is obliged by environmental information regulations to make the information 
available to the public in accordance with the regulations, or  
(b) would be so obliged but for any exemption contained in the regulations. 
 
Environmental Information Regulations 2004 
Interpretation 
2.—(1) In these Regulations—  
“environmental information” has the same meaning as in Article 2(1) of the Directive, 
namely any information in written, visual, aural, electronic or any other material form 
on—  
(a) the state of the elements of the environment, such as air and atmosphere, water, 
soil, land, landscape and natural sites including wetlands, coastal and marine areas, 
biological diversity and its components, including genetically modified organisms, and 
the interaction among these elements;  
(b)  factors,  such  as  substances,  energy,  noise,  radiation  or  waste,  including 
radioactive  waste,  emissions,  discharges  and  other  releases  into  the  environment, 
affecting or likely to affect the elements of the environment referred to in (a);  
(c) measures (including administrative measures), such as policies, legislation, plans, 
programmes, environmental agreements, and activities affecting or likely to affect the 
elements  and  factors  referred  to  in  (a)  and  (b)  as  well  as  measures  or  activities 
designed to protect those elements;  
(d) reports on the implementation of environmental legislation;  
(e)  cost-benefit  and  other  economic  analyses  and  assumptions  used  within  the 
framework of the measures and activities referred to in (c); and  
(f) the state of human health and safety, including the contamination of the food chain, 
where relevant, conditions of human life, cultural sites and built structures inasmuch 
as  they  are  or  may  be  affected  by  the  state  of  the  elements  of  the  environment 
 


referred to in (a) or, through those elements, by any of the matters referred to in (b) 
and (c);  
 
Duty to make available environmental information on request 
5.—(1) Subject to paragraph (3) and in accordance with paragraphs (2), (4), (5) and 
(6) and the remaining provisions of this Part and Part 3 of these Regulations, a public 
authority that holds environmental information shall make it available on request.  
(2) Information shall be made available under paragraph (1) as soon as possible and 
no later than 20 working days after the date of receipt of the request.  
 
Form and format of information 
6.—(1) Where  an  applicant  requests  that  the  information  be  made  available  in  a 
particular form or format, a public authority shall make it so available, unless—  
(a)  it  is  reasonable for  it  to  make  the  information  available  in  another  form  or 
format; or  
(b)  the  information  is  already  publicly  available  and  easily  accessible  to  the 
applicant in another form or format. 
(2) If the information is not made available in the form or format requested, the public 
authority shall—  
(a)explain the reason for its decision as soon as possible and no later than 20 
working days after the date of receipt of the request for the information;  
(b)provide the explanation in writing if the applicant so requests; and  
(c)inform  the  applicant  of  the  provisions  of  regulation  11  and  of  the 
enforcement and appeal provisions of the Act applied by regulation 18. 
 
Exceptions to the duty to disclose environmental information 
12.—(1) Subject  to  paragraphs  (2),  (3)  and  (9),  a  public  authority  may  refuse  to 
disclose environmental information requested if—  
(a) an exception to disclosure applies under paragraphs (4) or (5); and  
(b)  in  all  the  circumstances  of  the  case,  the  public  interest  in  maintaining  the 
exception outweighs the public interest in disclosing the information.  
(4) For  the  purposes  of  paragraph  (1)(a),  a  public  authority  may  refuse  to  disclose 
information to the extent that—  
 
(b)the request for information is manifestly unreasonable; 
(d) the request relates to material which is still in the course of completion, to 
unfinished documents or to incomplete data; or  
(e) the request involves the disclosure of internal communications. 
 
 


Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2005 
Permitting re-use 
7.—(1) A public sector body may permit re-use.  
(2) Where  a  public  sector  body  permits  re-use,  it  shall  do  so  in  accordance  with 
regulations 11 to 16.  
 
 
Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 
 
102Release and publication of datasets held by public authorities 
 
(1)The Freedom of Information Act 2000 is amended as follows.  
(4)In section 19 (publication schemes)—  
(a)after subsection (2) insert—  
“(2A)A publication scheme must, in particular, include a requirement for 
the public authority concerned—  
(a)to publish—  
(i)any dataset held by the authority in relation to which a person 
makes a request for information to the authority, and  
(ii)any up-dated version held by the authority of such a dataset,  
unless the authority is satisfied that it is not appropriate for the dataset 
to be published,  
(b)where reasonably practicable, to publish any dataset the authority publishes 
by virtue of paragraph (a) in an electronic form which is capable of re-use,  
(c)where any information in a dataset published by virtue of paragraph (a) is a 
relevant copyright work in relation to which the authority is the only owner, to 
make the information available for re-use in accordance with the terms of the 
specified licence.