This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Hand Hygiene'.

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HAND HYGIENE GUIDELINE 
(AN ELEMENT OF STANDARD INFECTION CONTROL 
PRECAUTIONS) 
 
 
 
GUIDELINE 
V2 
 
REFERENCE 
DATE RATIFIED AND 
February 2008 
 
VERSION NUMBER 
SUBSEQUENT 
 
 
RATIFICATION DATE 
NEW REVIEW DATE 
March 2010 
 
 
 
 
 
ACCOUNTABLE DIRECTOR 
Director of Primary Care, Nursing  
and Integrated Governance 
 
CHIEF EXECUTIVE 
Joan Mager 
 
GUIDELINE AUTHOR 
Infection Control Lead 
 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 1 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
 
 
Record of Amendments 
 
(Amendments made by Head of Infection Control) 
 
Date of 

Version No  
Page No (s) 
Paragraph No(s) 
Amendment 
 
10.02.2009 



10.02.2009 

16,17 
n/a 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 2 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
Consultation List 
 
Clinical Action Team Members 
Chief Pharmacist 
Clinical Governance Facilitator 
Community Hospital Clinical Services Manager 
Associate Director Community Hospital Services 
Professional Lead for Universal Children & Family Services/  
Surrey Children and Family Services Manager 
Head of Health & Safety & Risk 
Middlesex Adult Services Manager 
Director of Community Health Services & Estates 
Surrey Adult Services Manager/ Professional Lead Adult Nursing 
Head of Therapies/ Professional Lead Therapy Services 
Professional Lead for Targeted Children & Family Services/  
Middlesex Children & Family Services Manager 
Community Services Pharmacist 
Associate Director for Older People & Adults 
Clinical Governance Facilitator 
Clinical Effectiveness Facilitator 
 
Health & Safety & Infection Control Committee Members 
Associate Director Performance 
Associate Director Estates & Facilities 
Health Protection Nurse (SWLHPU) 
Dentist, Dental Advisor & LDC Secretary 
Consultant Microbiologist & Infection Control Doctor 
Director of Nursing, Primary Care & Integrated Governance 
Consultant in Communicable Disease Control (SWLHPU) 
Occupational Health Advisor 
 
 
 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 3 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
Contents    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 
 
Record of Amendments 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
Consultation List 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
1.0 

 
Introduction   
 
 
 
 
 

1.1 
 
Rationale 
 
 
 
 
 
 

1.2 
 
Scope and disclaimer   
 
 
 
 

 
2.0 

 
Guideline 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2.1 
 
Why hand hygiene is necessary  
 
 
 

 
3.0 
The underpinning elements to ensure adequate hand  
Hygiene 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6 
3.1 
 
Responsibilities  
 
 
 
 
 

3.2 
 
General good practice   
 
 
 
 

3.3 
 
Incident reporting 
 
 
 
 
 

 
4.0 

 
Care of nails   
 
 
 
 
 

 
5.0 

 
Hand hygiene and jewellery   
 
 
 

5.1 
 
What to do with jewel ery when performing hand hygiene 

 
6.0 
When to perform hand hygiene 
 
 
 

 
7.0 

 
How to perform hand hygiene  
 
 
 

7.1 
 
Correct hand hygiene facilities   
 
 
 

7.1.1   
Factors to look for in hand hygiene facilities 
 
 
10 
7.2 
Hand hygiene products   
 
 
 
 
10 
7.3 
How long should it take to perform hand hygiene 
 
11 
7.4 
Steps to performing adequate hand hygiene at a sink 
 
12 
7.5 
Hand drying 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12 
 
8.0 

 
References 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14 
 
Appendices 
 
Appendix 1 
Hand hygiene procedure 
 
 
 
 
15 
Appendix 2        Hand hygiene at the point of care                                                  16 
Appendix 3 
Level One Equality and Diversity Impact Assessment 
 
18 
 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 4 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
1.0 
Introduction 
 
Hands are the most common way in which microorganisms, particularly bacteria, might be 
transported and subsequently cause infection, especial y to those who are most susceptible 
to infection. 
 
In order to prevent the spread of microorganisms to those who might develop serious 
infections through this route while receiving care, hand hygiene must be performed 
adequately. This is considered to be the single most important practice in reducing the 
transmission of infectious agents during delivery of care. 
 
The hand hygiene procedure being undertaken should consider the potential/ actual hazards 
that have or might be encountered, the subsequent potential/ actual contamination of hands, 
and any risks which may present as a result. The nature of the work - patient/ client 
interaction wil  often determine this. It must however, always be assumed that every person 
encountered could be carrying potential y harmful microorganisms that might be transmitted 
and cause harm to others. For this reason, hand hygiene is one precaution that must be 
applied as standard.  
 
The term hand hygiene used in this document refers to al  of the processes, including hand 
washing and hand decontamination achieved using other solutions, e.g. alcohol based 
products. This guidance was developed for an original guideline devised by Health Protection 
Scotland. 
 
1.1 
Rationale 
 
Hand hygiene is one of the nine elements of Standard Infection Control Precautions which are 
particularly concerned with the spread of organisms that might be present in blood or other 
body fluids. 
 
1.2 
Scope and disclaimer 
 
This guideline is for use by al  PCT directly employed staff. 
 
Disclaimer for RTPCT Policies and Primary Care Practitioners 
 
Richmond  and  Twickenham  Primary  Care  Trust  (PCT)  has  prepared  this  guideline  in  good 
faith for use by the Trust and its directly employed staff. 
 
The statutory legal obligations of the PCT referred to within this guideline do not extend to the 
activities  of  Primary  Care  Practitioners  and  their  teams,  who  have  a  separate  legal  identity 
and remain accountable as such. 
 
It is, however, recommended that where Primary Care Practitioners develop policies for their 
organisation to fol ow that they refer to the Trust guideline for best practice guidance. In doing 
so it must be noted that the Trust cannot be held responsible for the adoption and 
implementation of these local policies. 
 
 
 
 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 5 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
2.0 
Guideline 
 
2.1 

Why hand hygiene is necessary 
 
By  fol owing  al   steps  included  within  the  hand  hygiene  process,  e.g.  preparation  for  hand 
hygiene (care of nails and jewel ery), hand drying and hand care, ensure potential y harmful 
microorganisms are not a factor in the spread of infectious agents. Hand hygiene can reduce 
the spread of healthcare associated infections. 
 
Level 1 
Social Hand Hygiene 
 
To render the hands physical y clean and to remove microorganisms picked up during 
activities considered ‘social’ activities (transient microorganisms). 
 
Level 2 
Hygienic Hand Hygiene 
 
To remove or destroy transient microorganisms and to provide residual effect during times 
when hygiene is particularly important in protecting yourself and others (reduces resident 
microorganisims). 
 
Level 3 
Surgical scrub 
 
To remove or destroy transient microorganisms and to substantial y reduce those 
microorganisms which normal y live on the skin (resident microorganisms) during 
times when surgical procedures are being carried out. 
 
 
3.0 

The underpinning elements to ensure adequate hand hygiene 
 
3.1 
Responsibilities 
 
Al  staff 
 
•  Have a responsibility to ensure that they undertake adequate hand hygiene and to 
encourage others delivering care to do so. This applies to al  disciplines of staff that 
provide care or are associated with care environments/ items within it 
•  Have a responsibility to report any adverse skin reactions/ damaged skin to 
Occupational Health services or GP 
•  Should undertake training and include information on al  of the aspects of hand 
hygiene (i.e. as included in this guideline) 
 
Staff 
 
•  Have the responsibility to ensure posters featuring the steps included in the hand 
hygiene process are displayed in relevant, prominent areas. The Infection control 
Lead can supply these. 
 
Managers 
 
•  Have the responsibility to ensure that local risk assessments related to al  elements 
included within hand hygiene processes are carried out where necessary, that safe 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 6 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
practices are adhered to, including the provision of resources to ensure adequate 
hand hygiene and any incidents that occur in relation to inadequate hand hygiene 
practices, including the lack of resources to do so, are reviewed and subsequent 
actions taken where appropriate. 
•  Have the responsibility to ensure training is available for staff and staff have the 
responsibility to attend such training sessions 
 
3.2 
General good practice 
 
•  Al  of the steps included in hand hygiene processes, as described in this guideline, 
are important and must be considered in order to avoid or reduce the transmission of 
infectious agents 
•  Patient/ client hand hygiene is also essential, and facilities for them to perform this 
must be offered/ made available. When considering the principles of Standard 
Infection Control Precautions (SICP), i.e. exposure to blood or other body fluids, it 
may also be appropriate to offer/ encourage relatives/ visitors to undertake hand 
hygiene when in care settings 
•  The use of particular solutions for performing hand hygiene should be considered to 
ensure they are effective and suitable for the situation and for use by the majority 
(e.g. do not cause skin irritation) 
•  Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) and product data sheets 
should be referred to in order to ensure safe use of / exposure to products being used 
for hand hygiene 
•  Other health and safety issues, related to staff, patients / clients, should also be 
considered in relation to products used for hand hygiene, e.g. drips or spil ages from 
alcohol based products and any risks of slips, fal s or ingestion of products by 
particular patient/ client groups. Risk assessments should be carried out local y to 
highlight/ manage relevant issues. 
 
3.3 
Incident reporting 
 
•  Any incidents where failure in hand hygiene processes have occurred or where 
problems with the products used should be reported. This is important, particularly in 
relation to incidents regarding supplies/ facilities for undertaking hand hygiene, in 
order to ensure that transmission of infectious agents does not occur, health and 
safety is not breached, and that incidents can be avoided in the future, e.g. by having 
adequate and appropriate supplies/ facilities to perform adequate hand hygiene. 
 
 
4.0 
Care of nails 
 
It  has  been  shown  that  nails,  including  chipped  nail  polish,  can  harbour  potential y  harmful 
bacteria. Caring for nails helps prevent the harbouring of microorganisms, which could then 
be  transmitted  to  those  who  are  receiving  care.  The  steps  included  in  the  hand  hygiene 
process must be fol owed in order to ensure nail areas are cleaned properly. 
 
•  Nails must be kept short and clean. 
•  Nail polish should not be worn. If it must be worn, only clear nail varnish should be 
used, and if it becomes chipped it must be removed 
•  Artificial fingernails/ extensions should not be worn when providing care 
•  Nail brushes should not be used 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 7 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
5.0 
Hand hygiene and jewellery 
 
Jewel ery can become contaminated with microorganisms, which can then spread via touch 
contact  and  potential y  cause  infection.  It  has  been  shown  that  contamination  of  jewel ery, 
particularly  rings  with  stones  and/  or  jewel ery  of  intricate  detail,  can  occur  and  should  be 
avoided. 
 
5.1 
What to do with jewellery when performing hand hygiene 
 
Wrist  and  hand  jewel ery  should  be  removed  before  care  is  provided;  where  there  wil   be 
close personal contact with patients/ clients this is essential. 
 
•  Most staff providing care must therefore, remove these at the start of the working day 
•  It  is  acceptable  to  wear  plain  bands,  for  example  wedding  bands,  however,  these 
must be moved/ removed  when hand hygiene  is being performed  in  order to reach 
the bacteria that can harbour underneath them. 
 
 
6.0 
When to perform hand hygiene 
 
The “point of care” is the crucial moment for hand hygiene and represents the time and place 
at which there is the highest likelihood of transmission of infection via healthcare staff whose 
hands  act  as  mediators  in  the  transfer  of  microorganisms.  The  point  of  care  refers  to  the 
patient’s  immediate  environment  in  which  healthcare  staff-to-patient  contact  or  treatment  is 
taking place. In the hospital environment it is usual y at the patient’s bed, but in other contexts 
it could be in a treatment room, chair or a patient’s home for example (appendix 2). 
 
One  of  the  differences  between  social  hand  hygiene,  hygienic  hand  hygiene  and  surgical 
scrub, besides when to apply these techniques, is the solution that can be used to perform 
the decontamination process. These techniques apply to patients/ clients of al  ages. 
 
NB Even  if  gloves  have  been  worn,  hand  hygiene  must  be  performed  as  per 
recommendations  below,  as  hands  may  stil   be  contaminated  beneath  gloves,  or  upon 
removal of these and, therefore, may pose a risk for transmitting microorganisms. Also, 
hand hygiene should be performed between tasks on the same patient. 
 
Level 1  
Social Hand Hygiene 
 
Before 
 
•  commencing/ leaving work 
•  using computer keyboard (in a clinical area) 
•  eating/ handling of food/ drinks (whether own or patient/clients) 
•  preparing/ giving medications 
•  direct patient/ client contact where no exposure to blood, other body fluids, or non 
 
intact skin has occurred 
 
After 
 
•  becoming visibly soiled; 
•  visiting the toilet 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 8 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
•  patient/  client  contact  even  where  no  exposure  to  blood,  other  body  fluids,  or  non-
intact skin has occurred 
•  using computer keyboard (in a clinical area) 
•  handling laundry/ equipment/ waste 
•  blowing/wiping/ touching nose 
•  any contact with inanimate objects (e.g. equipment, items around the patient/ client) 
and the patient/client environment 
 
Level 2  
Hygienic Hand Hygiene 
 
Before/ between 
 
•  aseptic procedures 
•  contact with immunocompromised patients/ clients 
•  caring for those with an actual/ potential infection 
•  leaving rooms where patients/ clients are being cared for in isolation due to potential 
spread of infection to others 
 
After 
 
•  contact  with  blood,  other  body  fluids,  excretions,  secretions,  mucous  membranes, 
non-intact skin, wound dressings, spore forming organisms (suspect and proven) 
•  contact  with  patients/  clients  being  cared  for  in  isolation  due  to  the  potential  for 
spread of infection to others 
•  In high risk areas at al  times, e.g.  
a.  infant nurseries/special care baby units; 
b.  infectious disease units/ intensive/critical care/ therapy units/ burns units; 
c.  wards/departments/units during outbreaks of infection; 
d.  surgical/ invasive procedures 
 
Level 3  
Surgical scrub 
 
This should be performed before surgical/ invasive procedures 
 
 
7.0 
How to perform hand hygiene 
 
7.1 

Correct hand hygiene facilities 
 
Access to appropriate hand hygiene facilities, and associated supplies, is essential to ensure 
adequate  hand  hygiene  can  be  performed.  It  has  been  shown  that  inadequate  facilities  wil  
lead  to  poor  hand  hygiene  performance.  This  not  only  includes  the  type  and  number  of 
facilities, but also where they are situated in relation to where work/ care is carried out. 
 
Specific  information  relating  to  these  aspects  in  healthcare  premises  is  available  from  the 
Department  of  Health  (DH,  2006)  and  is  supported  by  guidance  from  NHS  Estates  (NHS 
Estates, 20032) 
 
 
 
 

First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 9 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
7.1.1  Factors to look for in hand hygiene facilities 
 
The  use  of  ‘hands  free’  tap  systems  is  crucial  in  preventing  re-contamination  of  hands 
fol owing  hand  hygiene  performance  at  a  sink  and  should  be  available  as  far  as  possible, 
particularly  where  personal  care  is  delivered  in  clinical  or  communal  settings.  These  can 
include 
 
•  Wrist, elbow or foot operated taps. Elbow taps are currently most commonly used in 
clinical or communal care areas and, if used properly (e.g. turning taps off utilising the 
elbows), are acceptable 
•  Motion sensor control ed taps (e.g. those that turn on and off when hands are waved 
in  front  of  a  sensor  light  area,  no  touching  of  the  sink/  tap  system  required).  It  is 
essential, however, that these systems provide users with adequate time to wet their 
hands prior to performing hand hygiene and that users are not put off by any delay in 
water delivery 
•  It is preferred that there are no plugs in hand hygiene sinks in order to avoid the fil ing 
of  sinks  with  water  as  this  is  not  an  adequate  way  to  perform  hand  hygiene 
particularly in clinical or communal care areas 
•  Mixer taps are preferred, to provide the correct temperature of water for performing 
hand hygiene as this is an important step in the process 
•  The faucet should not directly expel/ drain water straight down the drain. It should be 
sited  appropriately  to  ensure  water  hits  the  sink  basin  as  it  flows  out,  otherwise 
aerosol from the drainage system can splash back on to the user 
•  Availability of supplies for hand hygiene is essential, including  
o  hand  hygiene  solutions  (soap  or  antiseptic  hand  wash  solution,  preferably 
wal  mounted in easy to use, and easy to clean, holder systems that contain 
single  use,  disposal  cartridge  sets,  particularly  in  clinical  or  communal  care 
areas.  Nozzles  of  solution  bottles/  containers  should  always  be  clean  and 
free  of  any  congealed  product  (bottles  should  not  be  reused,  ‘topped  up’). 
Those working in the community where hand hygiene facilities may not be of 
an adequate standard may need to carry their own hand hygiene solutions 
o  soft,  user  friendly  hand  towels  for  hand  drying,  preferably  stored  in  wal  
mounted,  easy  to  use  and  clean  holders.  Those  working  in  the  community 
where hand hygiene facilities may not be of an adequate standard may need 
to carry their own clean hand towels 
o  hands-free, i.e. pedal operated, waste receptacles, close at hand 
•  Disrepair of hand hygiene facilities, e.g. chipped/cracked enamel, should be reported/ 
repaired  where  necessary.  Hand  washing  sinks  must  conform  to  standards  as 
uneven damaged surfaces may harbour microorganisms 
 
NB  Estates  /  maintenance  staff  are  important  partners  in  ensuring  that  sinks  are  adequate 
and that supplies are mounted appropriately. 
 
7.2 
Hand hygiene products 
 
Level 1 Social Hand Hygiene 
 
•  Plain or antimicrobial soap, preferably liquid soap. Alcohol based products for 
hand hygiene can also be used for social hand hygiene (where hands have not been 
soiled) for ease of use where appropriate 
•  Soap  does  not  need  to  be  antibacterial  or  antiseptic  for  performing  social  hand 
hygiene. 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 10 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
•  Bar soap should not be used, in a clinical setting. Where it is the only option e.g. in 
peoples’ own homes, this should appear clean before use and be held in a rack that 
 
facilitates drainage and ensures the soap is not constantly sitting in fluid. 
•  Alcohol gel can be used to sanitize hands that are visibly clean. 
 
Level 2 Hygienic Hand Hygiene 
 
•  An  approved  antiseptic  hand  cleanser,  e.g.  2-4%  chlorexidine,  5-7.5%  povidine 
iodine, 1% triclosan, or antimicrobial soap from a dispenser. 
•  Alcohol based products can also be used fol owing hand washing, for example when 
performing  aseptic  techniques,  to  provide  further  cleansing  and  residual  effect  and 
may  be  used  with  plain  (liquid)  soap  to  achieve  hygienic  hand  hygiene  where 
necessary. 
 
Level 3 Surgical scrub 
 
•  An  approved  antiseptic  hand  cleanser,  e.g.  2-4%  chlorexidine,  5-7.5%  povidine 
iodine, 1% triclosan from a dispenser. 
•  Persons sensitive to antiseptic cleansers can wash with an approved non-medicated 
liquid soap fol owed by 2 applications of alcohol based product. Skin problems should 
be reported  to  and  discussed  with  GP/  Occupational  Health.  If  hands  have  contact 
before or during a procedure, but are not soiled with any body fluids and, therefore, 
do  not  require  re-hand  washing  with  soap  or  an  antiseptic  hand  cleanser,  alcohol 
based hand solutions can be used, using the same technique/ duration. 
•  Any  soilage/  organic  matter  can  inactivate  the  activity  of  alcohol,  therefore  it  is 
essential that hands are re-washed in these circumstances. 
•  In clinical and communal care settings in particular, it is recommended that solutions 
are stored within a  wal  mounted dispenser that  can  be easily cleaned, have  single 
use,  disposal  cartridge  sets  within  the  dispenser,  and  have  easy-to-use  dispensing 
systems (e.g. a large lever) 
•  Those working in areas such as patients’/ clients’ own homes may have to carry their 
own supplies of solutions 
•  Solutions  used  may  vary  in  local  settings.  The  physical  actions  of  performing  hand 
hygiene, however,  should  always be the  same and are essential in ensuring  hands 
are adequately decontaminated 
•  ‘Topping  up’  of  bottles  that  contain  solutions  should  never  occur  as  the  inside  of 
bottles, even those containing antiseptic solutions, can become a breading ground for 
bacteria over time 
•  The use of antimicrobial impregnated wipes has been considered for use in the hand 
hygiene process, however, it has been shown that such wipes are not as effective as 
hand  washing  or  the  use  of  alcohol  based  products,  therefore  not  considered  a 
substitute 
•  Where infection with a spore forming organism e.g. Clostridium difficile is suspected/ 
proven it is recommended that hand hygiene is carried out with liquid soap and water 
and not alcohol gel, which is ineffective against Clostridium difficile spores. 
 
7.3 
How long should it take to perform hand hygiene? 
 
Level 1 
Social Hand Hygiene 
At least 15 seconds 
 
Level 2 
Hygienic Hand Hygiene 
At least 15 seconds 
 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 11 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
Level 3 
Surgical scrub 
Carry  out  hygienic  hand  hygiene  process  for  2-3 
minutes,  ensuring  al   areas  of  hands  and  forearms 
are covered. 
 
Over-compliance/  excessive-washing  is  not  recommended  as  this  may  damage  the  skin 
leading to increased shedding of skin scales or increased harbouring of microorganisms. 
 
 
 
7.4 
Steps to performing adequate hand hygiene at a sink 
 
Preparation 
 
•  Ensure al  that is needed to perform hand hygiene is at hand 
•  Ensure the sink area is free from extraneous items, e.g. medicine cups, utensils 
•  Ensure jackets/ coats are removed, and wrists and forearms are exposed. Jewel ery 
should have been removed (see section 4.1) 
 
Procedure 
 
•  When performing hand hygiene (for whatever purpose) the tap should first be turned 
on and the temperature of the water checked. Water should be warm 
•  Hands should be wet before applying the chosen solution 
•  Manufacturers’ instructions for the solution being used should give guidance as to the 
volume of solution to be applied. This is usual y in the region of 5mls 
•  A good lather from ‘soap type products’ should be evident for undertaking the steps to 
perform adequate hand hygiene 
•  Al  areas of the hands should be covered in these steps (see images in Appendix 1). 
The physical  action of washing and rinsing hands  is  essential as different  solutions 
wil  have different activity against microorganisms  
•  For surgical scrub, an additional step of cleaning the forearms is required 
•  Hands  (and  forearms  where  applicable)  should  be  rinsed  wel   under  the  running 
water 
•  Taps  should  be  turned  off  using  a  ‘hands-free’  technique,  e.g.  elbows  or  where 
‘hands-free’  tap  systems  are  not  in  place,  paper  towels  used  to  dry  hands  can  be 
used for this.  
 
NB  It  is  not  recommended  that  nailbrushes  are  used  to  perform  social  or  hygienic  hand 
hygiene  as  scrubbing  can  break  the  skin,  leading  to  increased  risk  of  harbouring 
microorganisms or dispersing skin scales that may cause harm to others. Where nailbrushes 
are used for surgical scrub they should be fit for purpose and single use. 
 
NB Where running water is not available, for example during water failure, the use of other 
products such as alcohol based products should be explored (see section 7.2)). 
 
7.5 
Hand drying 
 
•  Hand drying has been shown to be a critical factor in the hand hygiene process, in 
particular, removing any remaining residual moisture that may facilitate transmission 
of microorganisms 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 12 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
•  Hands  that  are  not  dried  properly  can  become  dry  and  cracked,  leading  to  an 
increased risk of harbouring microorganisms on the hands that might be transmitted 
to others 
•  Once  the  taps  have  been  turned  off  using  a  ‘hands-free’  technique.  Use  clean, 
preferably disposable paper towels to dry each area of the hand thoroughly. 
•  This  should  be  done  by  drying  each  part  of  the  hand  remembering  al   of  the  steps 
included in the hand washing process 
•  The  use  of  user-friendly,  disposable  towels,  e.g.  soft,  paper  towels,  should  be 
considered to encourage compliance with the hand hygiene process 
•  Drying fol owing surgical scrub is recommended using an upward motion (i.e. towards 
the elbow) 
•  Disposable towels should immediately be placed into appropriate waste receptacles, 
avoiding recontamination of hands, e.g. foot-operated bins 
•  Recontamination of hands immediately fol owing the hand hygiene process must be 
avoided, e.g. by not touching any contaminated areas in the environment or touching 
own hair or face 
•  Disposable hand towels should always be used in clinical settings. If in other areas 
these  are  not  available  (e.g.  patients’/  clients’  own  homes),  towels  used  must  be 
clean 
and 
dry 
and 
not 
used 
for 
any 
other 
purpose.
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 13 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
8.0 
References 
 
Department of Health (2006) Health Technical Memorandum 64 Sanitary Assemblies
London. The Stationery Office. 
 
NHS Estates (2002) Infection Control in the Built Environment. London. The Stationery Office. 
 
Health Protection Scotland (2007) Hand Hygiene Policy & Procedure  [online] [01.02.08] 
http://www.documents.hps.scot.nhs.uk/hai/infection-control/sicp/handhygiene/mic-p-
handhygiene-2007-02.pdf 
 
National Patient Safety Agency (2008) Clean Hands Save Lives. Patient Safety Alert 2nd ed, 
September 2008 [Online] http://www.npsa.nhs.uk/nrls/alerts-and-directives/alerts/clean-
hands-save-lives/ 
 
 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 14 of 19 


Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
Appendix 1  Hand hygiene procedure 
 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 15 of 19 


Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
Appendix 2: Hand hygiene at the point of care (NPSA, 2008) 
 
 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 16 of 19 


Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
 
 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 17 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
 
Appendix 3: Level One Equality and Diversity Impact Assessment 

 
Name of guideline and date of 
Hand hygiene guideline 
yes  no 
assessment 
06.02.08 
 
Aims, explanation of policy/ service: 
To advise on and assist best practice in   
 
 
infection control 
 
1a. Does the service disregard any 
Black and minority ethnic people 
 
 
particular needs of people in the 
People with disabilities 
 
fol owing groups? 
Carers 
 
 
Age 
 
 
Faith/ Religion 
 
 
Sexual orientation 
 
Gender 
 
Marital status 
 
1b. What is the  evidence?  
Need to consider patient/client’s insight 
 
 
Has it arisen from other sources of 
& understanding, e.g. if English is not 
feedback? 
their 1st language, if have reduced 
State how this guideline is proactive by 
capacity, cultural implications, e.g. 
giving examples.   
some cultures/religions wil  not al ow a 
male to treat a female and vice versa. 
Some wil  only al ow relative to provide 
hands on care.  
 
The Action Plan identifies the remedy. 
 
2a. Is there evidence of direct -
Black and minority ethnic people 
 
 
discrimination/ lack of opportunity/ poor 
People with disabilities 
 
relationships against any of  the fol owing  Carers 
 
groups , from your reading of the 
Age 
 
procedure or function/ service? 
Faith/ Religion 
 
 
Sexual orientation 
 
 
Gender 
 
Marital status 
 
2b. What is the evidence? Has it arisen 
 
 
 
from other sources of feedback? 
3. Is the policy procedure or function 
  Black and minority ethnic people 
 
 
proactive in meeting the needs of the 
People with disabilities 
 
fol owing groups? 
Carers 
 
 
Age 
 
 
Faith/ Religion 
 
Sexual orientation 
 
Gender 
 
Marital status 
 
3b. What is the evidence? Has it arisen 
 
 
 
from other sources of feedback? 
4b. Which of the fol owing sources of 
Demographic profiles 
 
 
evidence been scrutinised?  
Internal research reports 
 
Staff/ patient, public surveys 
 
Benchmarking reports 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 18 of 19 

Richmond and Twickenham Primary Care Trust 
 
Ombudsman cases 
If  other, please specify 
Equality monitoring reports 
 
Research reports (internal/ external 
 
Media reports 
Consultation findings 
Employment tribunal cases 
Complaints, grievances, disciplinary 
cases 
4. Are there sources of feedback that 
 
 
 
indicate examples of discrimination?  
Specify them. 
5.Is the policy/procedure/function/service  5a If it has an adverse impact. Can you 
 
 
likely to have an adverse impact overal ?  justify this impact? e.g., business case, 
 
service need, client need. 
6. Can you justify the adverse impact 
6a If you cannot justify it how do you 
 
 
overal ? 
intend to deal with it? 
 
 
 
7.Is the intention of the policy/procedure 
 
flexible 
function/service rigid or flexible? 
 
7a Is it sufficiently flexible to meet the 
 
 
 
needs of a diverse user/staff group? 
 
8a.  Are there reasons for carrying out a 
 
 
 
more detailed assessment? I.e. level 2 or 
3 as appropriate? 
 
8b. Is there evidence of discrimination? 
 
 
 
    
9. Action plan: 
 
Issue 
Action 
Lead 
Timescale 
Resource 
Comments 
 
required 
person 
 
 
 
 
Issue  
Action 
Lead 
Timescale 
Resource 
Comments 
 
required 
person 
 
 
 
Issue 
Action 
Lead 
Timescale 
Resource 
Comments 
 
required 
person 
 
 
 
First Issue Date: 20.02.08 
 
 
 
 
 
Version No: 2 
File: Hand Hygiene Guideline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 19 of 19