This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Original version of HMIC report into undercover police units'.


 
FINAL DRAFT 
 
Undercover tactics in  
public order and extremism 

 
 
 
 
October 2011 
© HMIC 2011 
www.hmic.gov.uk 
 
 
 
 

link to page 3 link to page 4 link to page 4 link to page 5 link to page 6 link to page 9 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 13 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 18 link to page 20 link to page 23 link to page 25 link to page 27 link to page 28 link to page 29  
FINAL DRAFT 
Contents  
  

Summary 
3 
Scope ......................................................................................................... 4 
A note on the use of Mark Kennedy’s real name ........................................ 4 
Acknowledgements .................................................................................... 5 
Background to this review 
6 
Systems to control and support  undercover officers 
9 
Mark Kennedy 
12 
Selection and training ............................................................................... 12 
Authorisation, review and oversight .......................................................... 12 
Operational supervision ............................................................................ 13 
Psychological reviews .............................................................................. 14 
International rules ..................................................................................... 14 
Exit strategies ........................................................................................... 14 

The overall picture 
15 
Domestic extremism 
17 
History and purpose of the National Domestic Extremism Unit ................ 17 
Definition of ‘domestic extremism’ ............................................................ 18 
A proposed new focus for the National Domestic Extremism Unit ........... 20 
Governance 
23 
Conclusions 
25 
Recommendations 
27 
Annex A: Review terms of reference 
28 
Annex B: Review methodology 
29 
Annex C:  <REDACTED> 
Error! Bookmark not defined. 
 
 

Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Summary  
 
 
This  report  by  Her  Majesty’s  Inspectorate  of  Constabulary  (HMIC)  examines 
the  circumstances  surrounding  the  use  of  Mark  Kennedy,  an  undercover 
police  officer,  in  dealing  with  criminality  associated  with  protest.  Looking 
forward, it also considers the requirements for law enforcement activity in this 
important  arena  and,  specifically,  the  future  purpose  of  the  police  unit 
currently responsible for co-ordinating this kind of work.  
HMIC’s review of current practice in relation to the use of undercover officers 
generally  has  revealed  a  stronger,  clearly  applied  set  of  controls  when 
undercover  police  are  deployed  to  tackle  organised  crime.  In  contrast,  whilst 
the authorisation for Mark Kennedy accorded with legal requirements, overall 
the controls in respect of his deployment were less robust.  
It is fair to say that since 2009 the system of controls applied by the National 
Domestic  Extremism  Unit  has  been strengthened to  a  degree.  But  a 
combination  of  the  breadth  of  ‘domestic  extremism’,  the  brigading  of 
extremism  and  public  order  intelligence  development,  and  the  variable 
capabilities and oversight applied to this work point to structural weaknesses 
over a number of years working in this sensitive territory.  
Much  good  work  has  been  done  by  the  national  units  that  make  up  the 
National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit  to  protect  the  public  from  serious  harm, 
and their successes include the conviction of persons for conspiring to cause 
explosions,  the  possession  of  explosives,  for  arson,  attempted  arson,  and 
serious  intimidation  and  harassment.  Likewise,  Mark  Kennedy  helped  to 
uncover serious criminality, including that by groups intent on committing acts 
of violence against others.  
However, even where those who use extreme methods to pursue their causes 
pose sufficient risk to justify the consideration of intrusive policing tactics, the 
right  organisational  arrangements,  capabilities,  controls  and  governance  to 
oversee such intrusion must exist. 
This  review  suggests  that  the  brigading  of  national  public  order  intelligence 
and extremism should be reconsidered.  While there is some overlap between 
these  areas,  both  are  demanding  in  their  own  right  –  and  both  need  to  be 
tackled  well.  HMIC  also  suggests  that  a  clear  practical  framework  of 
guidelines for the use of intrusive police tactics against extremists is agreed, 
and  we  provide  an  illustration  of  how  such  an  approach  might  look.   Finally, 
we  indicate  where  the  capabilities,  controls  and  governance of  the  National 
Domestic  Extremism  Unit  within  the  Counter Terrorism Network  could  be 
strengthened.  
 

Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Scope 
The  terms  of  reference  for  this  review  (attached  at  Annex  A)  have  taken 
account of the other reviews being undertaken about undercover operations in 
Nottinghamshire,1  and  HMIC  has  focused  on  how  intelligence  is  gathered  to 
support  the  policing  of  protest  involving  criminal  activity  –  including  the 
existing  remit  of  the  national  units,  governance  and  oversight,  whether  the 
right structures and processes are in place, as well as the legal requirements 
and current Association of Chief Police Officer (ACPO) guidance.  
In  addressing  these  tasks,  HMIC  has  looked  at  the  history  of  the  National 
Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit  (NPOIU)  since  its  inception,  the  issues  of 
management and supervision that arise from the case of Mark Kennedy and 
how  these  might  be  strengthened,  and  the  ACPO  definition  of  ‘Domestic 
Extremism’.2 
This  work  has  been  completed  by  the  HMIC  team  against  a  timeframe, 
reviewing available witnesses and documentation where possible. 
Wide  consultation  has  also  been  undertaken  –  not  simply  with  police 
stakeholders and other members of the law enforcement community, but with 
representatives  of  protest  groups,  advocates  of  civil  liberties,  the  Office  of 
Surveillance  Commissioners,  as  well  as  representatives  of  business  and 
industry.  A  list  of  the  groups  consulted  is  included  in  the  Methodology,  at 
Annex B. 
Finally, HMIC’s review has been subject to independent oversight in the form 
of  an  External  Reference  Group.  This  group  comprised  members  of  the 
House  of  Lords,  the  judiciary,  civil  liberties,  academia,  <REDACTED>  and 
elected representatives. 
HMIC has not reviewed undercover work carried out by forces or other units in 
relation to the policing of protest.  
 
A note on the use of Mark Kennedy’s real name 
It is normal practice for the police to neither confirm nor deny the true identity 
of  undercover  officers.  This  is  to  protect  both  the  individual  and  the 
effectiveness  of  the  tactic.  However,  the  case  of  Mark  Kennedy  is  one  of 
exceptional circumstances, including his own revelations; the media interest in 
him and the naming of him by the Court of Appeal on 19 July 2011. Because 
of this, HMIC considers that it is in the public interest on this occasion to refer 
to his true identity in addressing these issues. 
 
1 Including those by <REDACTED>, the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), and Independent 
Police Complaints Commission (IPCC). 
2 See page x 
 

Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Acknowledgements 
HMIC  would  like  to  acknowledge  the  detailed  work  of  <REDACTED>,  which 
was  commissioned  to  review  the  activity  of  Mark  Kennedy  as  well  as  the 
management  of  his  deployment.  <REDACTED>  and  HMIC  have  worked  in 
parallel  and  the  findings  of  <REDACTED>  go  to  underpin  the  findings  of 
HMIC. <REDACTED> 
We would also like to place on record our sincere appreciation to all the police 
forces,  national  and  international  agencies,  and  to  groups  and  private 
individuals  who  have  contributed  greatly  to  this  report  and  who  provided 
valuable information, advice and assistance throughout the review. 
 
 
 

Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Background to this review 
 
 
The police have to balance duties, rights and responsibilities in order to deal 
effectively  with  campaigns  and  protest,  particularly  those  that  involve 
criminality.  The  right  to  protest  is  acknowledged  in  law:  but  it  is  not 
unconditional.3 The key point is that the public right to  peaceful protest does 
not provide a defence for protesters who commit serious crime or disorder in 
pursuit  of  their  objectives.  The  police  must  be  able  to  use  tactics  that  allow 
them to prevent and detect those who engage in criminal acts which endanger 
the public or unduly disrupt people’s lives or businesses. 
The  National  Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit  (NPOIU)  was  created  as  part  of 
the  police  response  to  campaigns  and  public  protest  that  generate  violence 
and  disruption  (particularly  those  focussed  on  animal  rights,  some 
environmental  issues  and  extreme  political  activism).  The  National  Public 
Order  Intelligence  Unit  has  now  been  subsumed  with  other  units  under  the 
National Domestic Extremism Unit (NDEU). 
The National Public Order Intelligence Unit  has used a variety of intelligence 
gathering  techniques  to  build  knowledge  about  groups,  campaigns  and 
individuals,  including  the  deployment  of  undercover  police  officers.  Such 
intrusive tactics can only be authorised by senior police officers. 
Mark  Kennedy  was  deployed  undercover  by  the  National  Public  Order 
Intelligence  Unit  for  a  total  of  nearly  seven  years.  During  that  time  he  was 
tasked  to  gather  intelligence  on  campaigns  about  a  variety  of  issues,  mainly 
linked  to  environmental  concerns.  He  worked  on  operations  throughout  the 
United Kingdom and on deployments to 11 other countries.  
The  authorising  officer4  must  take  into  account  the  risk  of  intrusion  into  the 
privacy  of  persons  other  than  those  directly  implicated  in  the  operation  or 
investigation. Such ‘collateral intrusion’ must be reasonable and justified in the 
specific  circumstances;  and  the  mitigation  of  all  forms  of  collateral  intrusion 
should be planned for and considered.  
There are three main categories: inevitable intrusion (such as into the privacy 
of  intimate  associates  of  the  subject);  foreseeable  intrusion  (such  as  known 
associates); and general intrusion (such as other members of the public who 
 
3 Taken together, articles 9, 10 & 11 of the European Convention on Human Rights (freedom 
of  religion,  expression  and  assembly  respectively)  provide  a  right  of  protest.    Article  11, 
however, is a qualified right, which means that the police may impose lawful restrictions on 
the exercise of the right to freedom of assembly provided such restrictions are prescribed by 
law, pursue one or more legitimate aims and are necessary in a democratic society (i.e. fulfil a 
pressing social need and are proportionate. See HMIC (2009) Adapting to Protest. 
4  Undercover  operations  are  authorised by  Chief  Officers  as  one  tactic  to  deal  with  serious 
crime. An application must be made to them that describes the need or necessity for its use; 
its use is proportionate to the crime; and the consideration of any inadvertent but anticipated 
intrusion, by its use, into the private lives of other people. 

Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
come  into  contact  with  the  subject).  However,  the  sample  of  records 
examined  by  HMIC  could  have  been  more  detailed  in  relation  to 
necessity and as to how the risks of collateral intrusion were considered 
and managed. 

In  April  2009,  114  people  were  arrested  in  Sneinton,  Nottinghamshire  in  a 
police operation to disrupt the unlawful occupation of Ratcliffe-on-Soar power 
station,  which  could  have  brought  power  generation  to  a  halt.    Twenty-six 
people were subsequently charged. In October 2010, an article appeared on 
an  internet  site  exposing  Mark  Kennedy  to  be  an  undercover  police  officer 
who  used  an  alias  of  Mark  Stone  and  who  had  provided  intelligence  in 
advance of the arrests. 
In  December  2010,  20  of  the  defendants  were  found  guilty  of  conspiring  to 
disrupt the power generation at Ratcliffe-on-Soar.  However, in January 2011, 
the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) dropped charges against the remaining 
six people.  Defence lawyers claimed that this was a result of their request to 
the  prosecution  counsel  to  disclose  details  of  an  undercover  officer’s  role.  
This  led  to  significant  media  coverage,  fuelled  by  Mark  Kennedy  telling  his 
story to a national newspaper. 
On  20  July  2011,  the  Court  of  Appeal  quashed  the  convictions  of  the  20 
defendants who had been found guilty, ‘because of the failure of the Crown to 
make  proper  disclosure  of  material  relating  to  the  role  and  activities  of  the 
undercover  police  officer  Mark  Kennedy  as  well  as  materials  which  had  the 
potential to provide support for the defence case or to undermine the case for 
the prosecution.’  
The judgement ruled that: ‘the material that the Crown failed to disclose was 
pertinent to a potential submission of abuse of process by way of entrapment.’ 
It  also  highlighted  some  of  the  boundaries  set  by  Mark  Kennedy’s  handler 
within  which  he  was  expected  to  operate.  Reassuringly  these  do  not  include 
requests  for  him  to  exceed  either  the  law  or  his  remit,  or  to  act  as  an  agent 
provocateur.  
An agent provocateur is someone employed by the state, acting undercover, 
who  incites  others  to  commit  a  crime.  Home  Office  guidance  is  explicit:  ‘No 
member  of  a  public  authority  or  source  (informant)  should  counsel,  incite  or 
procure  the  commission  of  a  crime.’5  This  is  slightly  different  from  the  term 
‘entrapment’,  which  means  that  the  offence  alleged  was  committed  only 
because  of  the  incitement  of  the  undercover  officer,  who  has  therefore 
committed an unlawful act. 
The law does allow for an undercover officer to participate in criminal activity, 
but  this  must  be  authorised  and  the  limits  of  the  authorised  conduct  made 
clear. In addition, specific restrictions must be placed on the behaviour of the 
undercover officer such that: 
 
5 Home Office Circular 97/69. 

Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
  they must not actively engage in planning and committing the crime; 
  they are intended to play only a minor role; and  
  their participation is essential to enable the police to frustrate the crime 
and to make arrests. 
Case law exists to guide the police and the courts in what amounts to such an 
act.  The  test  to  be  applied  is  whether  the  police  merely  provided  the 
defendant with an unexpected opportunity to commit a crime which he or she 
was  already  predisposed  to  commit,  or  whether  they  have  truly  created  a 
crime which would otherwise not have occurred. 
HMIC found that  the  authorising officer had set specific parameters  for  Mark 
Kennedy’s deployment, which included outlining how far he was authorised to 
partake in criminal activities.  
However,  the  Court  of  Appeal  ruled  that  ‘Kennedy  was  involved  in  activities 
which  went  much  further  than  the  authorisation  he  was  given’.  Examples  of 
this included attending an activist briefing, checking an area for police activity 
and  agreeing  to  act  as  a  member  of  a  team  of  climbers.  The  judgement 
continues that this ‘appeared to show him as an enthusiastic supporter of the 
proposed  occupation  of  the  power  station  and,  arguably,  an  agent 
provocateur’.  
In  an  earlier  judgement,  Lord  Hoffman  stated  that  undercover  officers  could 
hardly  remain  concealed  unless  they  showed  some  enthusiasm  for  the 
enterprise.  However,  in  this  case  (and  because  of  the  failure  by  the 
prosecution  to  disclose  information),  the  defence  ‘were  not  in  a  position  to 
advance  submissions  based  on  potential  entrapment  by  a  participating 
informer, or to address these issues’. 
Mark Kennedy has not been found to have entrapped others; but clearly there 
is a danger that undercover officers in situ for long periods may be conferred 
with greater responsibilities by those among whom they are deployed, as the 
group’s trust in them grows. This could signal a shift towards a more leading 
role which may or may not amount to them acting as agents provocateurs.  
However, the chief officer authorisations, the regular reviews and the routine 
checks  of  undercover  officers’  continuing  deployment  should  provide  some 
assurance  (albeit  no  guarantee)  of  behaviour  in  the  field.  Risks  and  signals 
associated  with  undercover  officers  need  clear  identification  and 
comprehensive  control,  with  some  ‘triangulation’  or  corroboration  of  the 
undercover officer’s actions and the accuracy of the information they pass to 
their controllers. 

Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Systems to control and support  
undercover officers 

 
 
Over  the  last  10  years,  the  extreme  methods  used  by  some  parties  against 
both  individuals  and  commercial  interests,  workers,  researchers,  company 
executives  and  shareholders  –  with  the  potential  knock-on  effect  on  the 
economy  –  has  led  to  a  strong  and  understandable  desire  for  good 
intelligence. This helps explain the development both of the different units that 
now  make  up  the  National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit,  and  of  the  tactics 
(including intrusive tactics) used across borders by the National Public Order 
Intelligence  Unit  component.    In  short,  the  extremist  methods  have  taken  on 
an  increasingly  serious  form  and  the  response  needed  to  be  strengthened 
and capable. 
The use of undercover officers by the police is one of the most intrusive police 
tactics and is regulated by law in  the Regulation of Investigatory Powers  Act 
(RIPA) 2000. In practice the tactic is directed against serious crime, because 
in 2003 the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) agreed an operating 
procedure  restricting  the  deployment  of  such  officers  to  serious  crime  (and 
then only on the authorisation of an officer of at least assistant chief constable 
rank).  
This operating procedure prescribes the system by which undercover officers 
are  controlled  and  supported  so  that  the  risks  associated  with  the  tactic  can 
be minimised. The key themes of control are listed below, together with some 
of the apparent risks these are designed to counter: 
  Selection  &  training  –  designed  to  prevent  inappropriate  candidates 
being appointed, harm to the public and the police, and exposure of the tactic. 
 
  Authorisation,  review  and  oversight  –  designed  to  prevent  ethical 
and legal mistakes, breaches of human rights, and wasted cost. 
 
  Operational supervision – designed to support the officer but also to 
prevent  inappropriate  conduct  by  the  officer,  targeting  of  the  wrong  people, 
and harm to the public and the police. 
 
  Psychological reviews – designed to prevent problems going unseen, 
management being unaware of the welfare of officers, and the prospect of the 
officer taking control. 
 
  International rules – designed to prevent ethical and legal mistakes, 
harm to the public and the police, and reputational damage to the UK. 
 

Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
  Exit  strategies  –  designed  to  protect  the  officer  and  to  prevent  the 
inappropriate end to an operation, enabling the safe removal of an officer, and 
minimising the prospect of the officer taking control. 
HMIC  benchmarked  the  use  of  these  controls  with  practice  found  in  police 
forces,  <REDACTED>,  HM  Revenue  &  Customs  (HMRC),  <REDACTED> 
and other agencies such as <REDACTED>. Levels of compliance and robust 
control  were  generally  found  to  be  consistent.  HMIC  accepts  both  that 
undercover work is a high-risk tactic, and the associated risk that undercover 
officers  might  (from  time  to  time)  work  outside  their  remit.  No  absolute 
guarantees can be made: only assurance given, through tight controls. 
HMIC has examined all the undercover operations conducted by the National 
Public Order Intelligence Unit since its creation in 1999. The number is small, 
particularly in comparison with organised crime type operations. The National 
Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit’s  use  of  undercover  officers  also  differs  from 
most  other  law  enforcement  deployments  in  respect  of  the  duration  of 
deployment  and  its  evidential  focus.  Most  undercover  deployments  against 
organised crime are for short periods of time, sufficient either for a transaction 
(such as a drug deal) to take place, or for a serious crime to be planned to the 
point of completion, so providing evidence of criminal conspiracy.  This might 
take a number of months. 
In  contrast,  the  small  number  of  National  Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit  
undercover  operations  since  1999  have  had  a  significantly  longer  lifespan 
(with  many  lasting  years  rather  than  months);  and  their  main  objective  has 
been  gathering  intelligence.  There  appear  to  be  three  main  reasons  for  this 
disparity.   
  Firstly,  the  groups  involved  are  structured  and  operate  differently  to 
many  organised  crime  groups.    Generally,  no  commodity  is  traded; 
therefore  the  crime  against  which  intelligence  needs  to  be  drawn  can 
be  more  difficult  to  define.  Also,  those  involved  are  pursuing  a  cause: 
some  in  lawful  ways,  some  at  the  fringes  of  the  law  and  some,  on 
occasions, outside the law.  Consequently, intelligence development on 
groups  and  trends  is  necessary  prior  to  gaining  clarity  about  criminal 
intentions or actions.  
  Secondly,  as  planning  of  criminal  activity  allegedly  takes  place  in  a 
‘closed atmosphere’, and as access to that is restricted and based on 
trust, it takes time to place undercover officers in a position where they 
will become privy to significant intelligence.   
  Finally,  in  criminal  infiltration,  tactics  are  available  for  undercover 
officers  to  portray  their  criminal  credentials  and  gain  acceptance  in  a 
much  shorter  timeframe  than  it  may  take  an  activist  to  demonstrate 
their  commitment  to  a  cause  and  gain  credibility  and  trust.    Arguably, 
there  is  greater  risk  of  harm  to  an  undercover  officer  in  an  organised 
crime  group  than  in  a  group  of  activists,  and  the  degree  of  harm  the 
10 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
group  is  likely  to  cause  in  terms  of  crime  might  not  be  so  quickly 
identified where issues of protest are the focus.  
That  said,  the  dangers  and  challenges  of  all  undercover  work  should  not  be 
underestimated  and  the  courage  of  officers  so  deployed  must  be 
acknowledged. 
In most undercover organised crime operations, the question of lawfulness of 
the  deployments  rests  first  with  the  authorising  officers,  and  then  with  the 
courts.    The  Crown  Prosecution  Service  was  briefed  on  the  National  Public 
Order  Intelligence  Unit  undercover  deployments  when  intelligence  from 
undercover officers led to arrests. But because the product of National Public 
Order  Intelligence  Unit  undercover  operations,  beyond  Mark  Kennedy,  was 
intelligence  as  opposed  to  evidence,  the  judiciary  has  not  had  the 
opportunity  to  test  the  authorising  officers’  decision-making  in  respect 
of these deployments.  
 
This lack of opportunity for judicial oversight does nothing to strengthen public 
confidence, and whilst the Office of Surveillance Commissioners (OSC) does 
inspect  force  authorities,  the  depth  and  frequency  of  sampling  that  they  can 
reasonably conduct is no substitute for independent judicial examination of all 
the evidence.  In any case, as mentioned above (page 5), there are limitations 
on  the  authorisation  process  as  a  sole  means  of  assurance  unless 
corroboration is sought and found.   
11 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Mark Kennedy 
 
 
There  is  a  long  history  of  using  undercover  officers  as  part  of  law 
enforcement.  Applied  correctly,  this  is  a  lawful  and  ethical  tactic,  as  well  as 
being  a  productive,  and  at  times  vital,  means  of  obtaining  much-needed 
intelligence  and  evidence.  However,  its  use  needs  to  be  necessary  and 
proportionate,  and  the  police  need  to  exert  strong  control  over  both  the  use 
and  conduct  of  the  officer.  Whilst  HMIC  found  the  use  of  Mark  Kennedy 
accorded  with  the  requirements  of  RIPA  (see  above,  page  9),  controls  to 
corroborate  his  activities  were  not  strengthened  until  the  latter  days  of  his 
deployment.  In  short:  the  deployment  went  on  for  too  long,  and  controls, 
combined with challenging reviews, were not delivered by the management of 
the National Public Order Intelligence Unit  for the majority of his deployment. 
The rest of this section looks at how the systems designed to control the use 
of undercover officers (outlined on page 8 above) were applied in the case of 
Mark Kennedy. HMIC invited him to take part in this review, and to read this 
report before publication; he chose to decline both offers.  
 
Selection and training 
HMIC  found  that  the  selection  process  for  undercover  work  appears  robust. 
Candidates can (and do) fail the process. Nationally, between 2006 and 2011, 
26%  of  officers  seeking  selection  for  advanced  undercover  roles  failed  their 
initial  assessment.  Likewise,  Mark  Kennedy  was  unsuccessful  at  his  first 
attempt.  
 
Authorisation, review and oversight 
No single  authorising officer  appeared to have been fully aware of either the 
overall  intelligence  picture  in  relation  to  domestic  extremism,  or  the  other 
intelligence  opportunities  available  to  negate  the  need  for  an  undercover 
officer.  Additionally,  it  was  not  evident  that  the  authorising  officers  were 
cognisant of the extent and nature of the intrusion that occurred, nor is it clear 
that the type and level of intrusion was completely explained to them. 
There  were  two  instances  during  Mark  Kennedy’s  deployment  where  the 
authorisation for his use and conduct under RIPA had lapsed. In 2005, there 
was  a  three-day  period  due  to  poor  administrative  processes.  In  2008  there 
was a five-day period while responsibility for the authorisation moved from the 
Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to Nottinghamshire Police. 
 
12 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Operational supervision 
Whilst  the  National  Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit  had  some  senior  and 
experienced officers, HMIC found there were insufficient checks and balances 
to evaluate and manage Mark Kennedy’s deployment. The measures in place, 
such  as  monitoring  intelligence  reporting  on  the  activities  of  Mark  Kennedy 
whilst  deployed,  proved  ineffective.  Later,  stricter  supervision  did  identify 
problems and firm management action led to the withdrawal of Mark Kennedy 
from his deployment.  
Mark Kennedy claims that he had at least two sexual relationships with female 
protestors,  but  neither  did  he  make  these  claims  to,  nor  were  they  identified 
by,  the  unit  during  the  course  of  his  deployment.  Whilst  undercover  officers 
may  be  carefully  selected  and  well  trained,  there  is  always  a  risk  that  such 
relationships  can  develop.  Officers  remain  human  beings  with  all  the 
temptations  and  choices  this  involves  –  hence  the  need  for  robust  controls, 
including (where possible) the corroboration of reports. 
There  were  indications  that  Mark  Kennedy  was  becoming  resistant  to 
management  intervention.  He  seems  to  have  believed  that  he  was  best 
placed to make decisions about how his deployment and the operation should 
progress. His managers reported that on two occasions he defied instructions 
and  worked  outside  the  parameters  set  by  his  line  manager,  although  the 
activities  still  came  within  the  terms  of  his  authorised  use.  On  the  first 
occasion, he continued to work contrary to the instructions of the authorising 
officer  pending  a  review  to  be  carried  out  as  a  result  of  his  arrest.  On  the 
second, he accompanied a protester on a deployment abroad.  
Mark  Kennedy  could  be  in  the  field  for  long  periods:  on  one  occasion  for 
around  six  weeks  without  a  break  or  return  to  his  family.  A  far  stronger  grip 
and  a  considerably  better  plan  could  have  helped  him  to  be  more  effectively 
managed.  
Day-to-day  supervision  and  support  was  provided  by  a  dedicated  sergeant 
who  worked  closely  with  Mark  Kennedy  for  the  entire  period  of  his 
deployment.  This  supervisor  was  responsible  for  the  undercover  officer’s 
welfare,  as  well  as  for  providing  advice  about  his  deployment  and  reviewing 
the intelligence produced.  A close relationship had built up over nearly seven 
years and the degree of challenge and intrusiveness into the activity of Mark 
Kennedy proved insufficient. 
Regarding  tasking  and  debriefing,  Mark  Kennedy  seems  to  have  been 
productive  in  providing  intelligence,  supporting  the  justification  of 
proportionality  and  necessity.  He  helped  to  uncover  serious  criminality, 
including that by groups intent on committing acts of violence against others. 
He  also  submitted  large  amounts  of  relevant  and  beneficial  material  that 
allowed  the  police  to  prepare  appropriately  and  efficiently  for  planned  public 
disorder and protest involving criminal activity. This intelligence often allowed 
the  police  to  deploy  far  fewer  officers  to  respond  to  events  or  less  intrusive 
forms of policing than they may have otherwise planned.  
13 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
However,  this  focus  on  intelligence  resulted  in  the  presumption  that  the 
deployment  would  not  be  subject  to  scrutiny  before  the  courts  (see  above, 
page 10). In addition, little was done by the National Public Order Intelligence 
Unit  either  to  corroborate  Mark  Kennedy’s  actions  and  the  intelligence  he 
provided, or to develop any investigative strategy for a criminal conspiracy.  
 
Psychological reviews 
All  undercover  officers  must  undertake  regular  psychological  assessments  –
<REDACTED>,  according  to  deployment  status.  Throughout  the  duration  of 
his deployments, the psychologists who saw Mark Kennedy did not raise any 
concerns to the National Public Order Intelligence Unit management or to his 
supervisor. <REDACTED> 
 
International rules 
Mark  Kennedy  was  used  in  or  visited  12  international  jurisdictions  on  more 
than  40  occasions,  including  14  visits  to  Scotland.  The  controls  adopted  for 
his international deployments appear robust, with agreed processes between 
host  nations  and  the  UK,  as  well  as  an  existing  international  liaison  officer 
network to broker and facilitate requests. In each case where Mark Kennedy 
was  deployed  overseas  the  National  Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit  had  an 
authorisation in place under RIPA for his use and conduct, and also obtained 
host nation authorisation for the deployment.  
 
Exit strategies 
With regards to an exit strategy for the officer, the long-term aspects of Mark 
Kennedy’s welfare and personal development were not well provided for. Little 
consideration  was  given  to  an  exit  strategy  to  allow  either  for  short-term 
extraction  during  the  deployment  or  for  his  withdrawal  and  potential 
replacement.  
Training  courses  to  support  Mark  Kennedy’s  long-term  development  as  a 
police officer and to enable reintegration beyond his role in the National Public 
Order  Intelligence  Unit  were  identified.  These  were  not  progressed  until  the 
latter  part  of  his  service  between  2009  and  2010.  This  was  due  to  a  lack  of 
commitment to this on the part of both Mark Kennedy and the National Public 
Order Intelligence Unit.  
 
 
14 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
The overall picture  
 
 
HMIC believes that all other cases examined accorded with the requirements 
of  RIPA.  However,  the  controls  in  respect  of  Mark  Kennedy’s  deployment 
across  time  were  weaker  than  those  applied  in  serious  and  organised  crime 
operations.  
Overall  control  of  undercover  operations  by  the  National  Public  Order 
Intelligence  Unit  was  not  as  strong  as  it  should  have  been.    HMIC  found 
examples  of  insufficient case management,  inadequate  application of control 
mechanisms  (eg  around  corroboration  of  intelligence)  and  insufficient  high-
level operational oversight.  
While  noting  that  there  can  be  no  absolute  guarantees  of  behaviour  in  the 
field, the need to provide assurance through firm use of the system of controls 
is  key:  but  this  was  lacking  in  Mark  Kennedy’s  case.  Systems  of  control  for 
undercover  officers  are  strong  where  organised  crime  is  concerned;  they 
were  not  strong  enough
  in  National  Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit  
deployments,  given  the  sensitivity  of  the  issues.  HMIC  has  made  interim 
recommendations to strengthen these areas, but further work on this and the 
role of the National Domestic Extremism Unit require careful consideration.  
Some  have  argued  that  in  principle  this  intrusive  tactic  should  not  be  left  to 
police  to  regulate;  the  ACPO  President  suggested  that  a  solution  ‘must  take 
the form of some independent pre-authority that is already a common feature 
in  other  areas  of  policing  in  this  country’.6  This  is  an  argument  of  principle, 
and  a  question  of  judgement.    Our  review  did  not  find  widespread  abuse  of 
the  protection  of  privacy:  but  this  does  not  detract  from  a  wider  and  proper 
debate on intrusion. Any authorising process, whether conducted from inside 
or outside policing, will only be as good as the strength of the assessment of 
proportionality, the control of the intervention and the value of the product.  
The  Office  of  Surveillance  Commissioners  is  responsible  for  scrutinising 
authorisations  for  covert  surveillance  by  public  authorities  and  for  providing 
prior approval for authorisations in specific cases. HMIC considers that there 
is  value  in  the  National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit  informing  the  Office  of 
Surveillance  Commissioners  of  all  authorised  undercover  operations  so  that 
the  Office  of  Surveillance  Commissioners  can  inspect  them  when  visiting 
police forces.7 
 
6 Sir Hugh Orde, ACPO President (7 February 2011) Speech to seminar ‘Undercover Policing 
and Public Trust.’ 
7  Currently the Office of Surveillance Commissioners dip samples authorisations from all the 
RIPA  applications  that  the  force  has  made  over  the  preceding  year.  This  may  include  a 
sample of undercover work but does not necessarily include all cases, and will not ensure that 
all domestic extremism deployments are included. 
15 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
HMIC does not believe it is wise to set an arbitrary time limit for deployments 
of  undercover  officers,  but  recommends  that  any  operation  in  excess  of  one 
year  must  be  subject  to  more  stringent  testing  than  is  presently  applied.  In 
such cases, the authorising officer should commission an independent review 
of  the  operation  by  an  operational  security  officer  (OpSy)8,  and  the  senior 
investigating  officer  (SIO)  should  make  a  personal  presentation  to  the 
authorising officer which justifies the continuation of the undercover operation.  
HMIC  supports  the  Chief  Surveillance  Commissioner’s  proposal  that,  to 
provide  additional  assurance,  future  Office  of  Surveillance  Commissioners 
inspections  will  include  a  stocktake  review  of  all  undercover  operations  in  a 
force that last longer than one year. 
  
To  further  enable  authorising  officers  to  improve  the  oversight  and 
management of undercover officers, HMIC recommends specific training and 
accreditation  for  them,  particularly  in  relation  to  the  concepts  of 
proportionality, necessity, collateral intrusion and risk management.9 
The strategy which initially authorises the undercover officer must also include 
details  of  an  exit  strategy  for  them.  That  exit  strategy  must  explain  how  the 
undercover  officer  will  be  extracted  from  the  operation  so  that  sufficient 
opportunity remains for the deployment of either another officer or some other 
covert tactic.  
The  professionalism  of  the  management  of  undercover  officers  could  also 
benefit  from  the  creation  of  a  collective  approach  to  the  review  of  cases, 
comprising  a  properly  trained  police  supervisor,  Crown  Prosecution  Service 
lawyer and police-employed psychologist. This would strengthen the decision-
making process in relation to the risks both to the operational strategy and to 
the welfare of the officers. 
 
8  The  primary  role  of  the  operational  security  officer  (OpSy)  is  to  quality  assure  issues  of 
legality, integrity, ethical conduct and standards of covert operations, while contributing to the 
overall  effectiveness  of  such  operations.  For  example,  an  OpSy  can  independently  and 
objectively  review  the  relationship  between  cover  officers,  support  staff  and  undercover 
operatives.  
 
9  There is formal training for senior staff covering some of  these issues on decision-making 
(critical incident training) and debriefing. There is no formal training provision for  authorising 
officers.  Since  2009  an  input  to  the  Senior  Command  Course  by  the  MPS  has  raised 
awareness  on  some  of  the  key  issues.  Knowledge  of  RIPA  authorities  and  covert  tactics  is 
usually  based  on  experience  gained  in  more  junior  ranks  before  becoming  a  chief  officer; 
however, this opportunity is not necessarily open to all prospective chief officers. 
16 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Domestic extremism  
 
History and purpose of the National Domestic 
Extremism Unit 
Given the concerns that the Mark Kennedy case has raised around protracted 
intrusive  police  intelligence  deployments  against  forms  of  protest,  and  the 
challenges  of  exercising  control  on  sensitive  national  and  international 
deployments,  it  is  useful  to  reflect  on  the  history  and  purpose  of  the  units 
involved.  
Three  national  policing  units  existed  to  support  police  forces  in  dealing  with 
protest,  and  with  the  crime  and  disorder  arising  from  such  protests:  the 
National  Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit,  National  Domestic  Extremism  Team 
and  National  Extremism  Tactical  Coordination  Unit.  These  were  created  at 
different times, by different authorities and for different reasons:  the National 
Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit  gathered  and  coordinated  intelligence;  the 
National 
Domestic 
Extremism 
Team 
coordinated 
and 
supported 
investigations;  and  the  National  Extremism  Tactical  Coordination  Unit 
provided  advice  to  the  police  and  to  the  industries  and  victims  affected.  In 
2010, in response to HMIC’s Counter Terrorism Value for Money Inspection, 
ACPO  and  the  Metropolitan  Police  Service  commenced  a  project  to  merge 
these units into a combined National Domestic Extremism Unit.   
The  focus  for  the  work  of  the  precursor  units  and  for  the  National  Domestic 
Extremism Unit today concerns protest associated with the following themes: 
extreme  methods  used  in  environmental  protest,  animal  rights  and  violent 
political  extremism.  Other  activity  is  also  considered  where  emerging  threats 
are  identified,  and  where  significant  events  create  a  unique  opportunity  for 
activists (such as the 2012 London Olympic Games). 
Over the last 10 years environmental activists have been convicted of a range 
of  offences,  associated  with  protests  against  genetically  modified  crops,  the 
burning  of  coal,  the  expansion  of  aviation  and  other  campaigns.  Notable 
incidents have included the hijacking of a coal train in 2009 and conspiracies 
to disrupt power supplies. 
By 2004, animal rights extremist tactics had largely moved away from serious 
violent  criminality  (such  as  planting  improvised  explosive  devices),  towards 
offences such as intimidation and harassment, 10  However, whilst the severity 
of individual acts had declined, the frequency of criminality had increased, and 
in 2004 peaked with an average of 40–50 company directors and scientists a 
month receiving home visits during which cars and property were vandalised.  
 
10 Further incidents of serious criminality occurred latterly, with individuals convicted in 2007 
for  arson,  attempted  arson,  possessing  explosives  with  the  intent  of  carrying  out  further 
explosions, and in 2009 for conspiracy to commit arson. 
17 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Many  incidents  of  threatening  letters,  hoax  letter  bombs  and  ‘regular 
demonstrations and public disorder’11 were also occurring. 
In addition to this risk of disorder, elements of the extreme right-wing, such as 
Combat 18, have actively pursued violent tactics.  Moreover, the nail bombing 
campaign by David Copeland in 1999, and the conviction in 2010 of Terence 
Gavan  (who  had  assembled  a  large  cache  of  firearms  and  homemade 
bombs),12 highlight the threat that can be posed by right wing extremists who 
are prepared to resort to serious violence. 
The  National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit  retains  the  functions  of  its  precursor 
units,  in  particular  its  role  regarding  intelligence  collection,  investigation 
support and raising awareness of the issues more broadly. HMIC recognises 
the continuing need for a function that can fulfil those responsibilities across a 
range of criminality (as illustrated above).  
Whilst  extremism  has  needed  attention,  the  policing  of  ‘Defence  League’ 
events across the country has also involved the coordination of intelligence by 
the National  Domestic Extremism Unit,  as  has the  period of serious disorder 
in  England  between  the  06  and  10  August  2011.  The  National  Domestic 
Extremism  Unit  has  played  this  role  because  the  National  Public  Order 
Intelligence  Unit  is  currently  subsumed  within  it,  and  whilst  extremist  activity 
and  public  disorder  can  overlap,  the  majority  of  protest  activity  and  public 
events  do  not  involve  ‘extremism’.  HMIC  considers  that  badging  and 
conflating  extremism,  protest,  and  public  order  may  be  confusing  externally 
and unhelpful operationally. 
Within the broader context of threat and risk, and balanced against terrorism 
as  well  as  organised  crime,  these  issues  demand  our  attention.  The 
importance  of  the  work  and  its  relative  standing  amongst  other  threats  has 
arguably been underplayed for some time. This aspect of police business has 
suffered  from  being  an  uncomfortable  adjunct  to  other  mainstream  activity. 
Defining  the  work  or  having  clear  ‘rules  of  engagement’  helps  to  signal  its 
significance. 
 
Definition of ‘domestic extremism’ 
The  term  ‘domestic  extremism’  was  coined  at  some  point  shortly  after  2001, 
but  is  not  legally  defined.  It  is  not  unique  in  this  regard,  as  there  are  many 
colloquial  terms  in  policing  (such  as  domestic  abuse  and  organised  crime) 
which  assist  with  identifying  the  nature  of  the  work,  but  have  no  legal 
definitions.  However,  in this case, the variety of interpretations brings with it 
the  risk  of  profound  consequences.  The  loose  but  severe  description  of  the 
 
11 Setchell, Anton (2007) [communication – letter] 14 January 2007  Unpublished.  
12 Referenced in Secretary of State for the Home Department (2011) PREVENT Strategy (Cm 
8092, 2011). 
18 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
units’ remit has blurred the boundaries of their operations and, over the years, 
encouraged a potential for ‘mission creep’. It has made the units susceptible 
to inclusion of issues or the continuance of operations that may be of limited 
value.  
ACPO use the following definition: 
Domestic extremism and extremists are the terms used for activity, 
individuals or campaign groups that carry out criminal acts of direct 
action in furtherance of what is typically a single issue campaign.  They 
usually seek to prevent something from happening or to change 
legislation or domestic policy, but attempt to do so outside of the 
normal democratic process.
13 
This  could  include  issues  that  many  people  would  support  (for  example,  the 
environment  and  animal  welfare)  because  protest  can  involve  people  with 
many different motives. However, the definition, as it presently stands, allows 
a  very  wide  range  of  protest  activity  to  be  in  scope,  and  over  the  years  the 
work  of  the  units  that  make  up  the  National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit  has 
extended into the consideration of mainstream campaigns. The key issues are 
therefore  that  the  ACPO  definition  fails  to  recognise  that  not  all  extremism 
includes the intent to commit an offence, and that any criminality of any order 
in  support  of  a  given  cause  is  not  in  itself  sufficient  to  warrant  the  title 
‘extremist’.  
ACPO’s definition of domestic extremism has similarities to the legal definition 
of  terrorism,  as  defined  in  the  Terrorism  Act  2000  (as  amended),  and  to  the 
meaning  of  extremism  quoted  in  the  revised  Government  PREVENT 
Strategy
.14 The latter appears below, but it is worth noting that this definition is 
not necessarily criminal or for the police: 
Extremism is defined as the vocal or active opposition to fundamental 
British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty 
and mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs. We 
also include in our definition of extremism calls for the death of 
members of our armed forces, whether in this country or overseas.
15 
 
Neither  definition  is  sufficient  on  its  own  to  set  clear  boundaries  on  police 
action or to provide focus on extremist methods used to pursue causes. The 
PREVENT  Strategy  suggests  that  extremism  cannot  be  looked  at  solely 
through  a  criminal  justice  prism  but  rather  needs  a  ‘whole-Government’ 
approach, as demonstrated by the lead department being that for Community 
& Local Government.  
 
13 ACPO (2006).  
14 The PREVENT Strategy, launched in 2007, seeks to stop people becoming terrorists or 
supporting terrorism. It is the preventative strand of the Government’s counter-terrorism 
strategy, CONTEST
15 Secretary of State for the Home Department (2011) PREVENT Strategy (Cm 8092, 2011). 
19 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
A proposed new focus for the National Domestic 
Extremism Unit 
There  has,  therefore,  been  a  range  of  problem  issues  that  have  generated 
pragmatic responses. Some of these have been successful, but the standing 
of the work has shifted over time, as has the priority attached to it. Presently, 
the work of the National Domestic Extremism Unit amounts to an amalgam of 
public order/crime and extremism intelligence development work. The work of 
units  developing  intelligence  on  sensitive  issues  must  be  carefully  focused. 
The  essence  of  intelligence  is  ‘fore  knowledge’  of  threats  and  sources.  The 
further ‘upstream’ intelligence gathering goes the more intrusive the methods 
required, and this brings major challenges for the police. 
Because of the Mark Kennedy case and the current brigading of the work (see 
above  page  17),  HMIC  has  sought  to  establish  consensus  on  focus,  and  in 
this report we touch on where future work should be housed.  
Within  the  timescales  available,  HMIC  discussed  the  potential  remit  of  the 
National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit  with  practitioners,  policy  makers  and 
others.  It  is  acknowledged  that  the  current  ACPO  definition  of  domestic 
extremism is too widely drawn but, during workshops, it has proved difficult to 
secure  consensus  on  a  more  precise  mission  for  police  purposes. 
Considering the nature of the work, this is understandable. Precise definitions 
can  also  be  counter-productive,  as  the  nature  of  extremist  activity  morphs  in 
the way it operates and draws in others.  
An alternative approach is to recognise the broad definition of PREVENT as a 
starting  point  and  have  guidelines  or  ‘rules  of  engagement’  designed  to 
enable criminal extremism to be addressed in a proportionate way. We have 
therefore looked at critical ingredients or principles that could anchor requests 
for  the  unit  to  develop  intelligence,  and  so  ensure  their  operation  within 
appropriate  boundaries.  Again,  this  has  been  discussed  with  practitioners, 
who,  it  emerged,  use  a  variety  of  reference  points  for  this,  including 
consideration of seriousness of harm caused. 
There  are  some  similarities  in  the  considerations  practitioners  employ  to 
explore  proposed  taskings  for  the  National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit,  but 
there are no commonly acknowledged ‘rules of engagement’. Whilst there is 
consideration of groups and trends over time, some intelligence development 
of this nature will fall outside the remit of the police.  
Ultimately, the focus needs to be on those individuals using extreme methods. 
Practitioners are agreed that crime, or the real prospect of criminality, should 
be their starting point. 
To illustrate what is possible in guiding decision-making in this sensitive area 
of  work,  HMIC  thinks  one  way  is  to  blend  practical  principles  (referred  to  by 
the  practitioners)  with  a  set  of  ethical  principles  for  intelligence.  Decision-
making  must  be  grounded  in  the  legal  requirements  of  the  European 
Convention on Human Rights and RIPA (see above, page x), but people need 
20 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
practical points of reference when dealing with complex and sensitive issues 
(such as the need to  deal  with criminal extremism balanced by  a respect for 
civil liberties). An outline of the proposed principles is set out overleaf. 
  First, there must be sufficient cause for police action. Police should 
only  become  involved  if  there  are  reasonable  grounds  for  suspecting 
that the activity in question is likely to lead to serious criminal acts or to 
disruption  to  the  public  being  planned  or  committed.  Professional 
judgments  about  this  need  to  be  framed  in  reference  points  such  as 
‘criminal  intent’,  ‘motivation’,  ‘impact  on  the  community’,  and  ‘the  type 
of  activity  anticipated’  –  but  they  also  need  to  be  tempered  against 
equally  important  judgements  about  freedom  of  speech  and  rights  to 
protest.  Actions  intended  to  undermine  parliamentary  democracy, 
where  criminality  is  not  clear,  should  remain  the  remit  of  the  other 
agencies. 
  Second,  there  must  be  integrity  of  motive.  The  police  must  make 
their  own  independent  operational  judgement  of  sufficient  cause  and 
not  be  swayed  by  public  opinion  or  other  domestic  or  international 
pressure.  It  is  a  police  decision,  case  by  case,  whether  investigations 
are best carried out by the relevant local force or nationally. 
  Third, there must be proportionality. The degree of intrusion must be 
proportionate to the harm to the public that the actions are intended to 
forestall.  The more serious the potential criminality, the more intrusion 
into the rights of the individuals would be justified. 
  Fourth,  there  must  be  proper  authority.  This  must  be  via  a  clear 
chain  of  command  from  senior  police  officers,  including  appropriate 
legal  approvals  and  warranty,  with  full  oversight  of  activity  and  proper 
records  of  operational  activity.  (We  suggest  some  additional 
considerations on authorities granted below.) 
  Fifth,  there  must  be  a  reasonable  prospect  of  success.  Even  if 
there is sufficient cause and the methods used are proportionate, there 
needs  to  be  a  comprehensive  assessment  of  risk  to  the  police,  their 
sources and to the public (particularly in terms of collateral intrusion). 
  Sixth,  there  needs  to  be  necessity.  Can  the  purpose  be  achieved 
through  non-intrusive  means,  or  can  it  be  resolved  by  other  non-law 
enforcement agencies?16 
In  the  absence  of  a  tight  description,  ACPO  should  use  the  PREVENT 
definition of extremism as a starting point. They, and the Home Office, should 
consider  establishing  a  framework  for  the  proportionality  of  work  on  criminal 
extremism  by  the  National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit  and  others.  So,  too, 
 
16 Adapted with the assistance of Sir David Omand. See (2010) Securing the State, p. 89.  
Hurst & Co. 
21 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
should  chief  police  officers,  as  the  recipients  of  the  operations  that  the 
National Domestic Extremism Unit engages in. 
This approach is helpful in setting boundaries but will not necessarily deal with 
all  the  intelligence,  all  the  vulnerabilities  to  the  public  or  the  medium-term 
threats.  It  may  also  not  provide  sufficient  information  on  trends  to  meet  the 
needs  of  policy  advisers  and  politicians.  Those  responsible  for  policing  will 
need to consider this carefully.  
In addition, since the National Public Order Intelligence Unit is housed within 
the  National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit,  the  coordination  of  intelligence  on 
strategic  public  order  falls  to  them.  This  can  be  a  substantial  task.  Many 
events  deserve  consideration  in  their  own  right,  such  as  previous  fuel 
protests, floods and the 2011 Royal Wedding. The disorder in England of 06 
to  10  August  2011  stretched  the  National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit’s 
capability to the extent that 24/7 cover was provided – but all other work had 
to be put on hold.  
Inclusion of the coordination of protest and public order intelligence as part of 
the remit of the National Domestic Extremism Unit needs to be reconsidered. 
HMIC proposes that we review this key function in our upcoming report on the 
disorder experienced in England in 2011 (due for publication in Winter 2011).  
. 
22 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Governance  
 
 
The  National  Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit  started  with  the  Metropolitan 
Police in 1999, and moved to ACPO in 2006. NETCU was established by the 
Chief  Constable  of  Cambridgeshire  in  2004,  and  NDET  was  created  a  year 
later  by  the  newly  appointed  National  Coordinator  for  Domestic  Extremism 
(NCDE).  Both  NETCU  and  NDET  moved  with  the  National  Public  Order 
Intelligence Unit to ACPO in 2006, under the command of the NCDE.  
Wherever  the  units  have  been  located  they  appear  to  have  operated  in 
isolation from the host organisation, and to have lacked effective governance.  
Consequently,  the  units  took  responsibility  for  operations  when  no  other 
organisation  was  prepared  to  take  the  lead,  and  they  remained  primarily  an 
intelligence-gathering  body  with  no investigative responsibility  –  even though 
their targets have a national effect.  
Within the last nine months the units have returned to the Metropolitan Police 
Service, where they are now called the National Domestic Extremism Unit. 
Initial  governance  arrangements  included  a  Steering  Group  established  in 
1999,  comprising  chief  officers,  Home  Office  representatives  and  other 
stakeholders,  to  try  to  address  some  of  the  issues  described  above;  this 
ceased to meet in 2007. In 2004 the NCDE was appointed, but this post has 
been vacant since 2010, and is yet to be filled by another chief officer.  
Following  reviews  within  ACPO  TAM17  and  HMIC’s  Counter  Terrorism  Value 
for Money Inspection, it was recognised that there was a need to redistribute 
aspects of ACPO TAM’s work into more appropriate lead force arrangements 
(in  a  similar  way  to  those  which  helped  to  establish  the  national  counter 
terrorism network).  The primary concern was that operational units should be 
under  the  governance  of  a  lead  force  and  not  be  run  by  ACPO,  a  private 
limited  company  set  up  for  the  purpose  of  providing  a  strategic  view  on 
policing matters.  Additionally, it was considered that the lead force principles 
enhance effectiveness and efficiency through a single legal/contracting entity 
capable  of  recruiting,  employing  and  administering  staff,  without  excessive 
accommodation, travel and central service allowances. 
The  ACPO  TAM  Board  thus  agreed  that  the  funding  streams  of  the  units 
should  be  merged  to  create  a  single  national  function  under  the  lead  force 
principles, with the MPS invited to provide that lead.   
Historically, one of the features inherent in this kind of arrangement was that 
that  all  staff  were  employed  by  the  lead  force.    However,  the  ACPO  TAM 
Board  considered  that  there  should  continue  to  be  an  opportunity  for  police 
 
17 The Association of Chief Police Officers (Terrorism and Allied Matters) (ACPO TAM) is the 
business area of ACPO which deals with terrorism, extremism and associated issues. 
23 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
officers  from  around  the  UK  to  be  seconded  to  the  National  Domestic 
Extremism  Unit,  to  ensure  that  the  unit  maintains  a  level  of  national 
representation.  The  level  of  secondees  should  reflect  the  operational 
requirement or necessity.  
<REDACTED> 
Despite  these  developments,  the  current  National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit 
mix of responsibilities and remit does not easily fit within any existing policing 
structure, nor is it fully in line with the remit of any pre-existing agency.  This 
has  been  a  recurring  structural  problem  throughout  the  existence  of  the 
precursor  units,  and  is  characterised  by  the  poor  case  management  and 
control  described  earlier  in  this  report.    Notwithstanding  this  difficulty,  it  is 
essential  that  a  long-term  home  be  found  for  the  National  Domestic 
Extremism  Unit  where  robust  governance,  leadership  and  support  can  be 
provided.  There may be other options in the future, but for now a lead force 
connected to the counter terrorism work offers the best prospect.  
The  lead  force  arrangements  that  currently  exist  within  the  MPS  concerning 
counter  terrorism  could  meet  these  requirements,  subject  to  reconsideration 
of  the  public  order  intelligence  component.  Currently,  there  is  clear 
operational oversight of extremism under the Senior National Coordinator for 
counter  terrorism,  and  there  is  a  plan  to  appoint  a  dedicated  chief  officer 
coordinator.  An  operational  steering  group  representing  a  range  of  interests 
and agencies could strengthen the consideration of taskings, priorities, trends 
and  the  standing  of  this  work  within  the  wider  context  of  risk  and  the 
CONTEST Strategy.18 External governance could be provided, using existing 
arrangements similar to those employed by the counter terrorism network.  
 
18 CONTEST, the UK’s counter terrorism strategy, aims to reduce the risk from terrorism to 
the United Kingdom and its interests overseas.  
24 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Conclusions 
 
In  this  review  HMIC  acknowledges  both  the  value  of  intelligence  in  the 
prevention and detection of crime and disorder, and the role of the undercover 
officer  as  a  means  to  gather  evidence  and  intelligence.  We  pay  tribute  to 
these officers’ courage, professionalism and commitment in this high-risk area 
of policing.  
Decision makers engaged in managing such deployments may be faced with 
difficult  and  complex  situations,  and  their  conclusions  will  continue  to  be 
anchored in the fundamental principles of proportionality and necessity.  
The case of Mark Kennedy has brought the use of undercover officers and the 
role  played  by  the  National  Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit  into  the  public 
spotlight.  This  has  naturally  led  to  concerns  about  how  public  protests  are 
policed, the use of intrusive tactics and how Mark Kennedy was managed.  
HMIC has found that the systems to control the use of undercover officers by 
police  are  generally  strong,  but  that  their  application  in  the  case  of  Mark 
Kennedy  was  flawed.  Other  undercover  operations  sampled  within  the 
National  Public  Order  Intelligence  Unit  were  found  to  have  higher  levels  of 
control  than  those  which  existed  for  the  management  of  Mark  Kennedy;  but 
these still fell short of the standards demonstrated by other undercover units.  
Such  important  issues  require  immediate  action.  HMIC  has  made 
recommendations  that  aim  to  strengthen  the  oversight  of  undercover 
operations,  including  training  for  authorising  officers,  formally  presented 
reviews, external oversight by the Office of Surveillance Commissioners, and 
closer working between the functions that supervise undercover operations. 
An  enduring  absence  of  clarity  around  the  remit  of  the  National  Domestic 
Extremism  Unit,  coupled  with  an  historic  lack  of  grip  around  its  governance, 
has had a significant detrimental effect on the running of the unit and  on the 
level of confidence the public now has in the handling of intelligence related to 
protests by the police. HMIC recommends that:  
  the positioning of public order intelligence within the  National Domestic 
Extremism Unit be reconsidered; 
  clearer  guidelines  for  decision-making  regarding  intrusive  tactics  in 
cases of extremism be adopted; 
  national  extremism  intelligence  arrangements  have  a  dedicated  ACPO 
lead; and  
  there  should  be  oversight  by  key  stakeholders,  including  external 
governance of operations through existing CT networks.  
25 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Regarding  protest,  HMIC  has  previously  reported  on  overt  policing  tactics 
(Adapting  to  Protest,  Nurturing  the  British  Model  of  Policing  and  Policing 
Public  Order
)  and  we  view  this  report  as  complementary  to  that  work.  In 
addition,  the  coordination  of  strategic  public  order  intelligence  will  again  be 
considered  in  HMIC’s  report  on  the  public  disorder  of  August  2011  (due  for 
publication in Winter 2011). 
<REDACTED> 
 
 
26 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Recommendations 
 
 
Recommendation 1 
A stocktake should be conducted of all undercover operations that last longer 
than one year. This would complement the Chief Surveillance Commissioner’s 
proposal  that  in  future  Office  of  Surveillance  Commissioners  inspections  will 
include an independent review of all such operations.  
 
Recommendation 2 
Specific training and accreditation  should be provided  for  authorising officers 
to improve the oversight and management of undercover operations.  
Recommendation 3 
Risks to the operational strategy and welfare of undercover officers should be 
considered  by  appropriately  trained  police  supervisors,  nominated  Crown 
Prosecution Service lawyers and police-employed psychologists collectively.  
Recommendation 4 
In  the  absence  of  a  tighter  definition,  ACPO  should  use  the  definition  of 
extremism  agreed  across  Government,  together  with  a  practical  framework 
that ensures proportionality of intrusive operations.19 
 
Recommendation 5 
Subject  to  reconsideration  of  the  public  order  component,  extremism 
operations  should  continue  to  be  managed  within  the  existing  regional 
Counter  Terrorism  Unit  structure,  and  operational  oversight  and  the 
governance  arrangements  applied  to  the  National  Domestic  Extremism  Unit 
should match those existing within the counter terrorism network. 
 
 
 
19  An illustration of such a framework is provided on p.20 above. 
27 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Annex A: 
Review terms of reference 

 
 
To review how intelligence that supports the policing of protest involving 
criminal activity is prioritised, gathered, assessed and managed by the 
National Public Order Intelligence Unit, the National Domestic Extremism 
Team and the National Extremism Tactical Coordination Unit by considering: 
 
1.  the existing remit of these units and whether they are appropriate for 
the future; 
 
2.  the effectiveness of operational oversight and governance 
arrangements for 
these units; 
 
3.  the adequacy and resilience of structures, funding, staffing and 
resourcing of these units and the future requirements; 
 
4.   how intelligence activity associated with these units is authorised in 
accordance with the law including 
 
a) consideration of how the ‘proportionality’ of covert tactics is   
determined, in particular the use of undercover officers for collecting 
intelligence; 
 
b) the process by which covert methods to collect intelligence are    
tasked and coordinated; 
 
c) the process by which covert intelligence is translated into operational 
activity and, where appropriate, tested through a judicial process; and 
 
d) the training, experience and accreditation of all staff involved in the 
process; 
 
      5.  how covert intelligence gathering associated with these units is 
managed, including the use of undercover police officers; 
 
      6.  whether existing legislation, and the guidance provided by ACPO, is     
     
sufficient to maintain public confidence in managing intelligence about 
   
protest activity. 
 
28 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011 

 
FINAL DRAFT 
Annex B: 
Review methodology 

 
The review methodology comprised five stages: 
 Stage 1: Consultation and document review; 
 Stage 2: Scoping, assessment and evaluation; 
 Stage 3: Benchmarking; 
 Stage 4: User perceptions; and 
 Stage 5: Future concept consultation. 
The  report  is  based  on  views  and  comments  obtained  from  a  variety  of 
stakeholders  throughout  England,  Wales,  Northern  Ireland  and  Scotland. 
These  include  representatives  of  business  and  industry,  as  well  as  from  a 
broad  range  of  interested  parties  such  as  protest  groups  and  advocates  of 
civil liberties.  We also used feedback from <REDACTED>, ACPO, the Home 
Office,  police  forces,  HM  Revenue  and  Customs,  the  National  Police 
Improvement  Agency  (NPIA),  the  Office  of  Surveillance  Commissioners,  the 
ACPO  National  Undercover  Working  Group,  and  <REDACTED>,  as  well  as 
representatives of overseas law enforcement agencies based in the UK.   
In addition, the report draws on the results of a questionnaire (which was 
completed by all police forces), a document review and observations by HMIC 
staff.  
The review was subject to independent oversight in the form of an External 
Reference Group.  This group comprised members of the House of Lords, the 
judiciary, civil liberties, academia, <REDACTED>and elected representatives. 
 
More information on the External Reference Group and some of the 
consultation work that took place is available on the HMIC website 
(www.hmic.gov.uk, search for NPOIU).  
 
29 
Undercover tactics in public disorder and extremism – HMIC 2011