This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Mercury amalgam used by the NHS in 1996 as a restorative material in dental surgical procedures.'.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Via Email to:  [FOI #198268 email] 
 
03/06/2014 
 
FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA): REQUEST FOR INTERNAL 
REVIEW (CASE REFERENCE: IR843237)
 
 
Dear Madam, 
 
Thank you for your email dated 5 May in which you requested an Internal 
Review into the above mentioned request. 
 
Chronology 
 
You  originally  wrote  to  the  Department  of  Health  (DH)  on  18  February  2014 
with  a  Freedom  of  Information  request.  You  requested  the  following 
information:   
 
“Dear Department of Health, 
 
Please provide details about the physical and chemical/metal/alloy properties 
of  Mercury  amalgam  used  by  the  NHS  in  1996  as  a  restorative  material  in 
dental surgical procedures. 
 
Please  include  data  about  NHS  use  of  biocides  as  sealer's  when  mercury 
amalgam was used in 1996: 
 
1.The name of manufacturer(s) 
2.The name of each substance in the product including the name of it's active  
substance and the amount of each substance as a percentage of the whole. 
3.The classification of the biocidal/heavy metal/alloy product. 
4.Particulars of any likely direct or indirect adverse side effects. 
5.Procedures to be followed and measures to be taken in the case of spillage 
or leakage of the biocidal product and the active substance contained in that  
biocidal product. 
 
Is the NHS currently using mercury amalgam as a restorative material for pulp  
cavity fillings. 
 
Yours faithfully, 
 
Granito” 

 

 

DH replied to you on 13 March as follows: 
 
“Section 8 of the Freedom of Information Act permits a public body to refuse a 
request for information if a valid name is not supplied with the request. Please 
note that future requests may be refused if you do not supply a full name.  
   
I  can  confirm  that  the  Department  does  not  hold  the  information  you  have 
requested.  
   
It  is  up  to  individual  providers  to  ensure  that  the  materials  they  use  comply 
with  all  national  standards  and  are  fit  for  purpose.  Dental  amalgam  is  an 
acceptable material for use in NHS Dentistry; however, the dental regulations 
do not state the clinical situations where it can be used. The Department does 
not collect information on the use of dental amalgam as a restorative material 
for pulp cavity fillings.  
   
However, you may wish to contact any relevant NHS authority directly.   
   
Contact  details  for  all  NHS  authorities  can  be  found  on  the  NHS  Choices 
website:  
   
http://www.nhs.uk/nhsengland/thenhs/about/pages/authoritiesandtrusts.aspx” 

 
You  subsequently  wrote  again  on  5  May  to  request  an  Internal  Review  as 
follows: 
 
“Dear Department of Health, 
 
Please  pass  this  on  to  the  person  who  conducts  Freedom  of  Information 
reviews. 
 
I am writing to request an internal review of Department of Health's handling 
of my FOI request: 
 
'Mercury  amalgam  used  by  the  NHS  in  1996  as  a  restorative  material  in 
dental surgical procedures.'. 
 
[  complaint  of  lack  of  accountability  and  responsibility  by  government 
agencies to behave transparently and honestly. ]  
 
A  full  history  of  my  FOI  request  and  all  correspondence  is  available  on  the 
Internet at this address:  
https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/mercury_amalgam_used_by_the_
nhs 
 
Thank you for your time 
 
Granito a concerned woman” 

 
Following your request for an Internal Review, you wrote again on 5 May as 
follows: 
 
“Dear Department of Health, 
 


 

1.  It  appears  that  nobody  or  any  government  agency  has  the  information  I 
requested  nor  is  it  collected  and  recorded.  This  is  both  shocking  and 
disturbing. 
 
2. So who or what is collecting data to find out how all these toxic materials 
and metals are impacting on public health & safety?  For example the national 
register that is currently being set up by Dr Poulter & Jeremy Hunt to record 
instances where faulty breast implants have caused chronic ill health. 
 
Thank you for your time 
 
Granito a women concerned.” 

 
 
The Review 
 
DH  has  undertaken  an  Internal  Review  into  the  handling  of  your  original 
request (DE00000843237).   
 
In particular, the Department has reassessed whether it holds the information 
requested. 
 
Having conducted a thorough search of the Department’s records, I can again 
confirm  that  the  Department  does  not  hold  the  specific  recorded  information 
requested.  As  background,  dental  services  are  provided  locally  by 
independent  contractors,  and  they  will,  as  part  of  their  contracts,  be 
responsible for the safety of materials used. The Department is not aware that 
the information you have requested has ever been collated centrally. 
 
However,  considerate of  our  duty  under  Section  16(1)  of the  FOIA  to  advise 
and assist, the relevant policy unit has provided the following context to your 
request. 
 
Guidance  on  the  spillage  of  substances  hazardous  to  health  generally  (not 
specifically  biocidal  products)  is  covered  in  the  Health  Technical 
Memorandum  01  05  which  you  may  find  helpful  and  can  be  found  in  the 
following link: 
 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/
170689/HTM_01-05_2013.pdf 
 
Public  Health  England  (PHE)  and  the  Centre  for  Radiation,  Chemical  and 
Environmental  Hazards  (CRCE)  carries  out  various  research  projects  on  the 
exposure  and/or  health  effects  of  environmental  chemicals  in  general  which 
may include constituents of Dental amalgam. However, they are not currently 
monitoring specifically for any health effects of dental amalgam. 
 
If you wish to contact them directly, details on how to do so can be found on 
the following website: 
 
https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/public-health-england 

 

 
As  made  clear  in  the  initial  response  to  you,  Section  8(1)(b)  of  the  FOIA 
stipulates that an FOI request must state the name of the applicant.  Although 
the Department strives to answer any and all FOI requests equitably, you may 
wish to take this on board in future correspondence with the Department, as 
not  doing  so  may  open  you  to  challenge  and  may  jeopardise  future 
applications to the regulatory authority.  
 
The review is now complete. 
 
If  you  are  not  content  with  the  outcome  of  your  complaint,  you  may  apply 
directly  to  the  Information  Commissioner  (ICO)  for  a  decision. Generally,  the 
ICO  cannot  make  a  decision  unless  you  have  exhausted  the  complaints 
procedure provided by the Department. The ICO can be contacted at: 
 
The Information Commissioner's Office 
Wycliffe House 
Water Lane 
Wilmslow 
Cheshire 
SK9 5AF 
 
Yours sincerely,  
 
Jamie Scott 
 
Senior Casework Officer  
Freedom of Information Team 
 
[email address]