This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Climate change adaptation strategy'.

HILLINGDON’S CLIMATE CHANGE STRATEGY 2009 - 
ITEM 3
2012 
 
Cabinet Member 
Councillor Sandra Jenkins  
 
 
Cabinet Portfolio 
Environment 
 
 
Officer Contact 
Kristen Webster, Planning and Community Services, and, Kevin 
Byrne, Deputy Chief Executive’s Office  
 
 
Papers with report 
Hillingdon’s Climate Change Strategy 2009 -2012 
 
HEADLINE INFORMATION 
 

Purpose of report 
To endorse the Borough’s Climate Change Strategy 2009 - 2012 
 
for adoption, as proposed by the Council’s Strategic Climate 
Change Group.    
 
 
Contribution to our 
The Strategy is the overarching framework of priorities and actions 
plans and strategies 
for Hillingdon in relation to the climate change agenda.  
 
The Strategy links in to the following Council plans and strategies:  
Sustainable Community Strategy, Local Area Agreement 2008 –
2011, National Indicator 185, emerging Local Development 
Framework, Local Implementation Plan, Air Quality Management 
Plan, draft Highway Management Network Plan, Waste 
Management Strategy, HIP workstreams on Waste and Energy, 
Housing Strategy, Open Space Strategy. 
 
 
Financial Cost 
There is no direct financial cost to the Council as a result of the 
Climate Change Strategy as it sets out high level priorities rather 
than detailed interventions. Any actions proposed by the Strategy 
will be financially assessed and integrated into the Medium Term 
Financial Forecast process.     
 
 
Relevant Policy 
Residents’ and Environmental Services  
Overview Committee 
 

 
Ward(s) affected 
All 
 
 
RECOMMENDATION 
 
That Cabinet endorses for adoption the Council’s Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 as 
contained in the Appendix to the report. 
 
 
 
 

 
PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS 
 
Cabinet report 16 April 2009 
 
Page 52 

INFORMATION 
 
Reasons for recommendation 

 
As a signatory of the Nottingham Declaration, the Council is committed to addressing the issue 
of climate change at the local level.  Signatories of the Declaration commit themselves to 
producing a Strategy or Action Plan, which sets out how the issue will be tackled by the local 
authority.  A commitment to produce a Climate Change Strategy was also contained within the 
Council’s Local Area Agreement (LAA) 2007-10. 
 
New national indicator 185 requires the Council to report on the carbon emissions arising from 
its own operations and to set a target in 2009 for emissions reductions.  Hillingdon has accepted 
the indicator as a “below the line” target in our LAA 2008-2011, that is one which we regard as 
important and will report on but which does not formally form part of the LAA.  
 
A draft strategy was developed during 2008 across all Council directorates.  Public and external 
stakeholder consultation was undertaken between 15 December 2008 and 20 February 2009.  
Incorporating the comments received where appropriate, officers have made minor 
amendments to the consultation draft and are now seeking Cabinet’s endorsement of the 
Strategy to enable adoption by the Council. 
 
Alternative options considered 

 
Not to endorse the Climate Change Strategy: this would not be in keeping with the Council’s 
commitment as a signatory to the Nottingham Declaration, nor would it acknowledge the 
extensive work being undertaken across Council services to deliver initiatives and projects 
which have contributed to the development of a Climate Change Strategy for the Borough, LAA 
targets and the enhancement of Hillingdon’s environment.   
 
 
Comments of Policy Overview Committee(s).   

 
The following committees are potentially relevant to the proposals; none have requested to 
comment at this stage: 
•  Residents' and Environmental Services Policy Overview Committee  
•  Social Services, Health and Housing Policy Overview Committee 
•  Corporate Services and Partnerships Policy Overview Committee 
•  Education and Children’s Services Policy Overview Committee 
 
 
Supporting Information 

 
1. Context: 
 
1.1  The Council Plan Fast Forward 2010 identifies a clean and attractive Borough as a 
priority theme.  Within the Council Plan a number of ongoing initiatives contribute to 
climate change, including the Hillingdon improvement programme workstream to lead 
on new innovations such as waste and energy and alternative sources of power.  
Developing an overarching climate change strategy for Hillingdon is a key priority for 
 
PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS 
 
Cabinet report 16 April 2009 
 
Page 53 

the Sustainable Community Strategy 2008-2018 and is relevant to a wide range of 
Council strategies and policy documents. 
 
1.2  In January 2008, a corporate Climate Change Steering Group was formed, comprising 
Heads of Service representing all directorates.  This Group has been responsible for 
developing the scope of the Strategy and agreeing the framework and content of the 
document.   
 
2. Key elements: 
 
2.1  Key objectives of the Strategy: 
•  Provide community leadership 
•  Raise awareness 
•  Adapt to impacts 
•  Work towards Borough-wide emission reductions 
  2.2  Hillingdon’s proposed Strategy focuses on three themes of the Council as a community 
leader, estate manager and service provider.  These themes are looked at in the 
context of raising awareness, adapting to impacts and reducing emissions.  With regard 
to reducing emissions, the Strategy has identified interrelated themes within which 
specific actions have been identified.  The themes and their corresponding objectives 
are as follows: 
 
Theme 
Objective 
Transport 
To reduce the emissions in the borough associated with transport 
(particularly road transport) through the borough’s travel planning 
function and its own activities and to encourage residents and members 
of the business community to use more sustainable modes of travel. 
Waste 
To reduce the greenhouse gas emissions in the borough associated with 
waste, through a reduction in the amount of organic waste that is 
landfilled and increasing recycling rates in the borough to a minimum of 
40% by 2010, working towards a target of 50% by 2015. 
Businesses 
To actively engage with the borough’s businesses and encourage them 
to take action to reduce their carbon footprints and adopt 
environmentally sustainable business practices. 
Existing housing 
Reduce the emissions in the borough through improving energy 
efficiency. 
New developments 
Ensure that new developments in the borough mitigate against climate 
change through utilising sustainable design and construction methods 
and incorporating renewable energy. 
Procurement 
To ensure climate change issues are embedded into the council’s 
procurement strategy and processes. 
2.3  A key action of the Strategy is participation in the Carbon Trust Local Authority Carbon 
Management Programme (LACM), which the Council was selected to participate in for 
2008/09.  The programme runs until the end of March 2009 and culminates in an action 
plan of carbon reduction measures for the Council to take forward.  Participation in the 
LACM programme is one of the key actions of Hillingdon’s draft Climate Change 
Strategy. 
 
PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS 
 
Cabinet report 16 April 2009 
 
Page 54 

2.4  Through the LACM programme the Carbon Trust provides councils with technical and 
change management support and guidance to help them realise carbon emissions 
savings. The primary focus of the work is to reduce emissions under the control of the 
local authority such as buildings, vehicle fleets, street lighting and landfill sites.  The 
Carbon Management Plan for the LACM is a companion document to the more high-
level Climate Change Strategy and is also on the agenda for April 16th 2009 Cabinet 
meeting under separate cover. 
 
Consultation Carried out: 

 
Responses to a full public consultation were received from the following organisations: 
•  Civil Aviation Authority 
•  GreenSpeed 
•  Defence Estates 
•  Thames Water 
•  The Coal Authority 
•  British Airways Authority 
•  Foundation for Endangered Species 
•  Natural England 
•  Eastcote Residents Association 
•  Vine Lane Residents’ Association 
 
Three representations were received from individual residents. 
 
In general the responses received were supportive of the Strategy but with some suggestions 
for additions.  Where considered appropriate these amendments have been incorporated.  
 
Financial Implications 
 
None directly.  Future actions agreed will be financially assessed and integrated into the 
Medium Term Financial Forecast process. 
 
EFFECT ON RESIDENTS, SERVICE USERS & COMMUNITIES 

 
What will be the effect of the recommendation? 
 
The Climate Change Strategy offers a vision for responding to climate change issues in 
Hillingdon and, as implemented, will have a positive impact on all residents, communities and 
the environment.     
 
CORPORATE IMPLICATIONS 
 
Corporate Finance 
 
A corporate finance officer has reviewed this report and the financial implications within it, and is 
satisfied that there are no new direct resource implications arising from the recommendations.  
Specific costs and savings to the Council resulting from actions to mitigate and adapt to climate 
change are considered in the Carbon Management Plan presented elsewhere on this Cabinet 
agenda. 
 
 
PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS 
 
Cabinet report 16 April 2009 
 
Page 55 

Legal 
 
The Climate Change Strategy, which is being recommended to Cabinet, is underpinned 
by legislation and Government policy. The Borough Solicitor can confirm that the Strategy is 
compliant in both of these respects. 
  
It is not intended to provide exhaustive details of the relevant legislation within these comments 
but it is nevertheless important to highlight examples of it which appear within the Strategy 
Document itself.  
  
Firstly, the Home Energy Conservation Act 1985 places obligations on local authorities to 
improve the energy efficiency of all housing in their area. The improvements in energy efficiency 
achieved through this Act contribute towards meeting the UK's climate change commitments. 
Local authorities are required to prepare, publish and submit an energy conservation report to 
the Secretary of State on an annual basis which contains a number of prescribed requirements. 
  
Secondly, the Climate Change Bill has recently become law and it commits the UK to a legally 
binding target of 80% CO2 reductions by 2050. Furthermore, there is a legal requirement for 
Hillingdon to meet the European Landfill Directive, which requires significant reductions in the 
level of biodegradable waste that can be sent to landfill between now and 2020. The Council will 
be subject to severe financial penalties in the event that it fails to achieve them. 
 
Relevant Service Groups 
 
N/A. 
 
Corporate Property  
 
The Head of Corporate Property supports the recommendations contained in this report.  
 
BACKGROUND PAPERS 
 
None.  
 
 
PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS 
 
Cabinet report 16 April 2009 
 
Page 56 

link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 19 link to page 19 link to page 20 link to page 20 link to page 21 link to page 21 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 27 link to page 27 link to page 30 link to page 30 link to page 35 link to page 35 link to page 35 link to page 35 link to page 40 link to page 40 link to page 47 link to page 47 link to page 51 link to page 51 link to page 57 link to page 57 link to page 60 link to page 60 link to page 63 link to page 63 link to page 64 link to page 64 link to page 64 link to page 64 link to page 74 link to page 74 London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Contents
1
Foreword
2
2
Executive Summary
3
Hillingdon's plan of action
3
Objectives of the Strategy
4
3
Introduction
7
4
The Climate Change Challenge
8
What is climate change?
8
Why does climate change matter?
8
5
Policy Framework
10
International commitments
10
National policies and targets
10
Regional policies
10
Council policies
11
6
Climate Change in Hillingdon
13
Hillingdon's current emissions
13
Nottingham Declaration
14
Local Authority Carbon Management Programme
15
Achievements and progress to date
16
7
Hillingdon's Plan of Action
19
The council's role
19
Objectives of the Strategy
19
Community leadership
20
Raising awareness
22
Adapting to impacts
25
Reducing emissions
30
Transport
30
Waste
35
Businesses
42
Existing housing
46
New developments
52
Procurement
55
8
Monitoring and Review
58
9
Appendices
59
Summary of actions
59
Glossary
69



London Borough of Hillingdon
2
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
1 Foreword
1.1
Hillingdon prides itself on being one of London’s greenest boroughs. I want to
ensure that it stays that way. Therefore a key objective of our Sustainable Community
Strategy is to 'protect and enhance the environment' in Hillingdon. With the help of our
Foreword
residents, Hillingdon is already delivering on this, and successes to date include the
1
continued improvement in recycling rates, the achievement of 10 Green Flag awards
for our parks and national recognition received for the sustainable design of Ruislip
High School.
1.2
A new challenge for the borough is how we can build on these environmental
achievements and continue to deliver excellent services to our residents as well as
tackling the issues presented by climate change. This is likely to be the most important
issue for the UK this century and presents challenges that the borough needs to take
action on.
1.3
In 2007, the Chief Executive and the Leader of the Council signed the Nottingham
Declaration on Climate Change. This demonstrated the commitment Hillingdon has to
tackling the issue. Since then, we have been looking at the way the council operates
and have been exploring new technologies and processes to ensure that we are working
to reduce our carbon emissions.
1.4
This Strategy sets out what the council has been doing and will continue to do to
protect the environment in Hillingdon from the impacts of climate change, and what
action we will take to mitigate against future changes. Dealing with climate change
presents a challenge, which brings opportunities. This Strategy identifies some of these
opportunities.
Councillor Sandra Jenkins
Cabinet Member for Environment
April 2009

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
3
2
2 Executive Summary
Executive
2.1
The London Borough of Hillingdon signed the Nottingham Declaration in 2007.
Signing the Declaration commits local authorities to actively tackling climate change
within their borough. Recent government reports (including the Stern Review (2006))
have shown it will be much more economic to take steps now to prevent further climate
change rather than attempt to deal with the consequences later.
Summary
2.2
There is general agreement amongst scientists that there is still time to avoid the
most catastrophic impacts of climate change, but to do this we must achieve immediate
and significant cuts in carbon emissions.
2.3
The Council Plan 'Fast Forward 2010' identifies a clean and attractive borough
as a priority theme. Within this a number of ongoing initiatives contribute to the mitigation
of climate change and point to the council's aim to lead on new innovations such as the
conversion of waste to energy and the utilisation of alternative sources of power.
Developing an overarching Climate Change Strategy for Hillingdon is a key priority for
the Sustainable Community Strategy 2008-2018.
Hillingdon's plan of action
2.4
An effective response to the challenge of climate change needs to encompass
action on both mitigation of and adaptation to climate change.
Mitigation Involves seeking to limit and slow down future climate change by
reducing the emission of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane
into the atmosphere.
Adaptation Involves taking steps to ensure that we are able to adapt to the changes
in the climate already occurring and that are projected to continue to occur over
the next 100 years, due to the emissions already in the atmosphere.
2.5
Hillingdon’s Climate Change Strategy seeks to address both mitigation and
adaptation by focusing on the council’s roles and functions as:
An estate manager;
A service provider; and
A community leader.

London Borough of Hillingdon
4
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Objectives of the Strategy
2.6
The following objectives are considered by the council to be key in developing
an effective response to the challenges of climate change. For each of the objectives
the council has developed targets, against which its success will be measured:
Summary
Objective 1
Provide community leadership
To reduce the emissions resulting from the council’s own operations and take
Executive
measures to deal with the current and future effects of climate change, therefore
2
leading by example in encouraging residents and businesses in the borough
to take action.
Targets
Reduce the council's carbon footprint by 40% by 2015; and
Achieve a minimum of a 10% reduction in total energy use by 2012 for council
buildings.
Objective 2
Raise awareness
To develop greater awareness of climate change issues and engagement in
solutions to tackling them amongst council staff, elected Members, those that
live in, work in or visit the borough and businesses operating in the borough.
Targets
Establish a network of 'green champions' by Summer 2009;
Develop climate change pages on the council website by 2010; and
Work with a minimum of 5 of the borough's schools per annum to achieve
carbon reductions and raise awareness amongst Hillingdon's students.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
5
2
Executive
Objective 3
Adapt to impacts
To ensure that Hillingdon will be resilient to the current and future effects of
climate change.
Summary
Target
Complete a Local Climate Impacts Profile by 2010.
Objective 4
Work towards borough-wide emission reductions
To reduce and minimise the emissions in the borough associated with transport
(particularly road transport) through the council's travel planning function and
its own activities and to encourage residents and members of the business
community to use more sustainable modes of travel.
Target
Achieve a modal shift of 15% away from car use for trips to school by 2012
through the council's School Travel Plan programme.
To reduce the greenhouse gas emissions in the borough associated with waste.
Target
Reduce the amount of organic waste that is landfilled and increase recycling
rates in the borough to a minimum of 40% by 2010, working towards a target
of 50% by 2015.
To actively engage with the borough’s businesses and encourage them to take
action to reduce their carbon footprints and adopt environmentally sustainable
business practices.
Target
Compile information for distribution to the borough’s businesses regarding
climate change issues to include sources of information, technical advice and
funding by Summer 2011.

London Borough of Hillingdon
6
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
To reduce the emissions in the borough associated with existing housing
through improving energy efficiency.
Target
Summary
Achieve a 30% improvement in the energy efficiency of the borough's housing
by 2010.
To ensure that new developments in the borough mitigate against and adapt
to climate change through utilising sustainable design and construction methods
and incorporating renewable energy.
Executive
2
Target
Ensure that 100% of all major planning applications submit an energy
statement outlining how energy efficiency has been considered in the design
and renewable energy incorporated.
To ensure climate change issues are embedded into the council's procurement
strategy and processes.
Target
Adopt a Sustainable Procurement Policy by 2010.
2.7
In order to achieve the above objectives an integrated approach is needed. The
council will work to develop such an approach and ensure both mitigation and adaptation
to climate change are considered in an integrated manner in all relevant council policies
and plans. Effort will also be made to ensure that the choices made to reduce climate
change emissions are of benefit to other key challenges for the borough, such as
improving local air quality.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
7
3
3 Introduction
Introduction
3.1
The London Borough of Hillingdon signed the Nottingham Declaration in 2007,
which consolidated the council’s commitment to action on the issue of climate change
at the local level.
3.2
The council has been involved in various initiatives that contribute to action on
the climate change agenda. The development of this Strategy provides an opportunity
to bring together this existing work and set out Hillingdon's aims and priorities for future
action, allowing the council to demonstrate its commitment to community leadership on
tackling climate change.
3.3
An effective response to the challenge of climate change needs to encompass
action on both mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. Hillingdon’s Climate
Change Strategy seeks to address both mitigation and adaptation by focusing on the
council’s roles and functions as an estate manager, service provider and community
leader.

London Borough of Hillingdon
8
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
4 The Climate Change Challenge
What is climate change?
4.1
The world’s climate is changing due to increased levels of gases such as carbon
dioxide in the atmosphere. These 'greenhouse' gases occur naturally in the atmosphere,
Challenge
trapping heat that comes from the sun like the glass in a greenhouse. The 'greenhouse
effect' is a natural occurrence and without it the Earth would be over 30 degrees cooler
and uninhabitable.
4.2
However, due to human activities such as the burning of fossil fuels (oil, gas and
Change
coal) and deforestation, concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere are
rising and making the natural greenhouse effect more pronounced, trapping more of
the sun’s heat and resulting in a rise in the earth’s temperature.
4.3
Various gases contribute to amplifying the natural greenhouse effect. However
Climate
the main contributor to the global warming that we are now seeing is carbon dioxide.
Scientific research has demonstrated that carbon dioxide levels are higher than at any
time in the past 650,000 years, and this has resulted in gradual warming of the world’s
The
climate. The ten warmest years on record have all occurred since 1990.
4
Why does climate change matter?
4.4
Uncontrolled climate change will lead to higher global temperatures, rising sea
levels and more extreme, unpredictable weather conditions across the world. These
events and their knock-on effects, such as drought and its impact on food production,
or the flooding of coastal areas where many people live, will put hundreds of millions
of lives at risk. This is already occurring in the developing world.
4.5
Temperatures in the UK have increased by 0.7°C since 1659. Of this, a rise of
around 0.5°C has occurred in the 20th century. This may not sound like much, and for
inhabitants of countries with cooler climates, temperature increases may sound
desirable.
However, even the slight change in temperature to date has been
accompanied by more extreme weather events, which scientists consider are occurring
as a consequence of the rise in temperature. Further temperature rises are projected
to bring an increase in the frequency and severity of extreme weather events, which
would have potentially catastrophic impacts. The higher the temperature rises, the
greater the impacts.
4.6
Estimates as to how much global temperatures are likely to rise vary. In 2007,
the Fourth Assessment Report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
(IPCC) reported that the likely range of global average warming by the end of this
century is between 1.1°C and 6.4°C, relative to 1980-1999.
4.7
The European heatwave of summer 2003 serves to illustrate the serious impacts
arising from even a moderate rise in temperatures. During the heatwave there were
approximately 35,000 excess deaths across Europe, around 900 of these in London
and over 2000 in the UK. The heatwave of 2003 was one of the ten deadliest natural
disasters in Europe during the last 100 years and the worst in the last 50 years.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
9
4
Temperatures over this time in the UK were between 2 and 3 degrees above average,
The
and current projections consider that these temperatures will be average summer
temperatures by the middle of the century.
Climate
4.8
Climate change can also have a drastic impact on biodiversity. Changes in the
climate disrupt fragile ecosystems as some species thrive in the different conditions
and out-compete others which cannot adapt. This change in the habitat has knock on
effects as food sources dwindle and can lead to extinctions. There are already many
species worldwide that are considered to have become extinct due to climate change.
Change
4.9
Without significant action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, floods from rising
sea levels could displace up to 100 million people, disappearing glaciers could cause
water shortages for one in six of the world’s population, up to 40 per cent of the world’s
wildlife species could become extinct, and droughts could create tens or even hundreds
of millions of 'climate refugees'.
Challenge
4.10
Closer to home, there are likely to be problems in Hillingdon related to flooding,
either from rivers, the Grand Union Canal, sewers or surface water and overheating,
causing evacuation of vulnerable people such as the elderly and school closures during
summer heatwaves. Water shortages London-wide are also a likely reality as summers
continue to get hotter and drier.
4.11
In 2005 the UK government commissioned Lord Nicholas Stern, the then Head
of the Government Economic Service to provide a report to the Prime Minister and
Chancellor assessing the economic challenges of climate change and how they can
be met, both in the UK and globally. The key message of the Stern Review was that it
will be much more cost effective to act on the issue of climate change now than to deal
with its consequences later.

London Borough of Hillingdon
10
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
5 Policy Framework
International commitments
5.1
The UK has ratified the Kyoto Protocol, an agreement made under the United
Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). This commits the UK
Framework
to a legally binding greenhouse gas emissions reduction of 12.5% below the 1990 base
year levels over the 2008 to 2012 commitment period. The gases included are carbon
dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and sulphur
hexafluoride. The UK is on track to surpass its target. The predictions for 2010 are
emissions of greenhouse gases 23.6% below base year levels.
Policy
5
National policies and targets
5.2
However, whilst the UK is performing well against the Kyoto targets which were
developed in 1997, the government is well aware that more drastic carbon emission
reductions are needed in order to avert catastrophic climate change. In 1997 the
government set a more stringent domestic target of reducing CO emissions by 20%
2
below 1990 levels by 2010.
5.3
In addition the 2003 Energy White Paper adopted a longer term goal of 60% CO2
reductions by 2050 and the 2008 Climate Change Bill now commits the UK to a legally
binding target of 80% CO reductions by 2050. These domestic targets are challenging
2
and the government recognises more needs to be done in order for them to be achieved.
5.4
In 2006 the government released a series of planning policy documents to deal
with climate change through the development planning process, including the supplement
to Planning Policy Statement 1 – Planning and Climate Change; the Code for Sustainable
Homes (CSH); and Building a Greener Future, which sets out the government’s ambition
for all new homes to have zero carbon emissions from 2016.
Regional policies
5.5
The Mayor’s London Plan (2008) provides the regional policy framework for
development in the borough and contains an emphasis on ensuring that new
developments in London both mitigate and adapt to climate change. The London Plan
outlines a suite of policies to deliver this, including policies on energy efficiency,
renewable energy, flood risk and sustainable urban drainage systems.
5.6
The Mayor also has the following strategies that consider environmental issues
in London that are interlinked with issues related to climate change:
Air Quality Strategy (2002) – Outlines a set of policies and proposals aimed at
improving London's air quality to meet the objectives set out by the government's
National Air Quality Strategy.
Biodiversity Strategy (2002) - Seeks to ensure that there is no overall loss of
wildlife habitats in London, and that more open spaces are created and made
accessible to all Londoners.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
11
5
Climate Change Action Plan (2007) - The Mayor is committed to preparing London
Policy
for the climate change that is now inevitable (adaptation) and limiting further climate
change by reducing London's carbon dioxide emissions (mitigation). The Climate
Change Action Plan recommends key actions to help London and Londoners tackle
climate change.
Framework
Energy Strategy (2004) - Aims to reduce London's contribution to global climate
change, tackle the problem of fuel poverty and promote London's economic
development through renewable and energy efficient technologies.
Municipal Waste Strategy (2003) - Identifies policies and proposals for recycling
and reducing waste, aimed at dealing with London's growing output of municipal
waste.
Draft Business Waste Management Strategy (2008) - Over 4 million tonnes of
municipal waste is produced in London each year, and yet it accounts for just a
quarter of all the waste produced in London. Therefore, the Mayor has produced
a draft strategy for the remaining three quarters (13.8 million tonnes) of London’s
waste produced by London's businesses.
Draft London Climate Change Adaptation Strategy (2008) - Identifies the key
risks posed by climate change to London and Londoners and prioritises the actions
necessary to manage those risks.
Draft Water Strategy (2007) - Examines how we could use our present water
resources more effectively.
Council policies
Sustainable Community Strategy 2008-2018
5.7
The overarching strategy for the council is the Sustainable Community Strategy.
The Strategy sets out the council’s ambitions for the borough, looking ahead to 2018
and identifies the challenges facing Hillingdon now and predicts what they might be in
the future. It focuses on the actions we need to take collectively to tackle these
challenges, in order to improve the lives of everyone in Hillingdon.
5.8
Within the Sustainable Community Strategy, 'protecting and enhancing the
environment' is identified as a priority theme and within this tackling climate change
through mitigation and adaptation are identified as focus areas.
Other relevant council strategies and policy documents, by service area:
(i) Adult Social Care Health and Housing
Housing Strategy 2007-2010
Learning Disability and Mental Health Modernisation Strategies
Draft Sheltered Housing and Extra Care Strategy
Home Energy Conservation Act (HECA) Strategy

London Borough of Hillingdon
12
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Affordable Warmth Strategy
Plan for Older People 2008-2011
Supporting People Strategy 2005-2010
(ii) Planning and Community Services
Unitary Development Plan Saved Policies 2007-
Framework
Emerging Local Development Framework
Local Implementation Plan 2006-2011
Safer Hillingdon Partnership Plan 2008-2011
Arts Strategy 2005-2010
Policy
Strategy for Sports and Physical Activity 2007-2012
5
(iii) Education and Children's Services
Children and Families Trust Plan 2008-2011
(iv) Finance and Resources
Asset Management Plan 2008-2010
(v) Environment and Consumer Protection
West London Waste Authority Joint Municipal Waste Strategy 2005-2020
Air Quality Action Plan 2004-2010
Green Spaces Strategy 2002-
Joint Allotments Strategy 2003-2008
(vi) Deputy Chief Executive
Sustainable Community Strategy 2008-2018
Council Plan 'Fast Forward to 2010' 2007-2010
Hillingdon's Strategy for a Sustainable Economy 2005-2015
Local Area Agreement 2008-2011

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
13
6
6 Climate Change in Hillingdon
Climate
Hillingdon's current emissions
6.1
In 2008 the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) released
data collated for each of the UK local authorities on their emissions of carbon dioxide
Change
in 2006. The emissions estimates are calculated on an 'end user' basis. This means
that emissions from the production and processing of fuels (including electricity) are
reallocated to users of these fuels to reflect the total emissions relating to that fuel use.
6.2
The end user basis for reporting emissions was chosen by DEFRA because it
fully accounts for the emissions from energy use at the local level and does not penalise
in
local areas for emissions from the production of energy which is then 'exported' and
Hillingdon
consumed in other areas. Included in the figures are end user CO emissions in
2
Hillingdon from:
Business and Public Sector;
Domestic housing; and
Road transport.
6.3
Calculated on a per-capita basis, Hillingdon has the fourth highest carbon
emissions of the thirty-three London boroughs, behind the City of London, Westminster
and Tower Hamlets. The quantity of emissions attributable to each borough varies
greatly across the UK and London, which is mainly due to variations in the level of
commercial and industrial uses located within the local authority area. It should be
noted that emissions from aviation fuel and motorway travel are excluded from the
figures.
6.4
During 2008 the council has examined its own operations and collated data to
calculate its 'carbon footprint'. This includes the emissions associated with the following:
Energy used by council-owned buildings including offices, schools, libraries and
leisure centres;
Water used by council-owned buildings;
Waste arising from council operations that is sent to landfill;
Fleet vehicles such as refuse trucks and road sweepers; and
Commuting by council staff and their business mileage by private car.
6.5
This exercise has helped the council to better understand where the bulk of the
emissions are coming from and therefore where best to concentrate its efforts in terms
of reducing emissions. Additionally by looking at energy, water, fuel and waste disposal
prices and their estimated costs over the next five years it is possible to gain an
understanding of the potential financial savings that can be made by reducing emissions.
6.6
The council's carbon footprint in 2007/08 amounted to 39,360 tonnes. The
following pie chart illustrates the breakdown of the emissions by the categories of council
buildings, schools, streetlighting, transport and waste and water. The borough's schools
are the most significant contributor. The council additionally has a large number of


London Borough of Hillingdon
14
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
buildings in its ownership/management and the emissions associated with building
energy use (electricity and gas) make up the next greatest proportion. The baseline is
the starting point for looking to reduce the council’s carbon emissions and provides the
data against which our emissions going forward will be assessed year on year.
Hillingdon
in
Change
Climate
Hillingdon's carbon emissions in 2007/08
6
Nottingham Declaration
6.7
The Leader of the Council and the Chief Executive formally signed the Nottingham
Declaration on World Environment Day in June 2007, indicating the council’s commitment
to tackling climate change. By signing the Declaration, councils promise to actively
contribute to local delivery of the UK Climate Change Programme and reduce emissions
countrywide. Hillingdon joins around 130 other local authorities in recognising that
climate change will have a major impact locally this century and will have far-reaching
effects on the UK economy, society and environment.
6.8
Signatories of the Declaration pledge to do the following:
Work with central government to contribute, at a local level, to the delivery of the
UK Climate Change Programme, the Kyoto Protocol and the target for carbon
dioxide reduction by 2010;
Participate in local and regional networks for support;
Within the next two years develop plans with partners and local communities to
progressively address the causes and impacts of climate change, according to
local priorities, securing maximum benefit for communities;
Publicly declare, within appropriate plans and strategies, the commitment to achieve
a significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the authority's operations,
especially energy sourcing and use, travel and transport, waste production and
disposal and the purchasing of goods and services;


London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
15
6
Assess the risk associated with climate change, and the implications for council
Climate
services and communities of climate change impacts, and adapt accordingly;
Encourage all sectors in the local community to take the opportunity to adapt to
the impacts of climate change, to reduce their own greenhouse gas emissions and
to make public their commitment to action; and
Change
Monitor the progress of plans against the actions needed and publish the results.
in
Hillingdon
Hillingdon Council Leader, Cllr. Ray
Puddifoot and Chief Executive, Hugh
Dunnachie, signing the Nottingham
Declaration June 2007.
Local Authority Carbon Management Programme
6.9
The council was selected to participate in the Carbon Trust Local Authority Carbon
Management (LACM) Programme for 2008/09. The Programme culminates in an action
plan of carbon reduction measures for the council to take forward over at least 3 years.
Participation in the LACM Programme is one of the key actions of Hillingdon’s Climate
Change Strategy.

London Borough of Hillingdon
16
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
6.10
The Carbon Trust is an independent company set up by government in response
to the threat of climate change, to accelerate the move to a low carbon economy by
working with organisations to reduce carbon emissions and develop commercial low
carbon technologies.
6.11
Launched in 2003, the LACM Programme is designed to deliver improved energy
Hillingdon
management of vehicle fleets and academic, accommodation and leisure buildings.
in
The Programme facilitates the sharing of best practice between participants, enabling
them to learn from each other’s experience, thereby optimising results. The Carbon
Trust is now working with 215 of the UK’s 468 local authorities – around 45 per cent -
to assess the risks and opportunities posed by climate change and develop a robust
strategy to drastically reduce their carbon footprints over a five to ten year period.
Change
6.12
Through the LACM Programme, the Carbon Trust provides councils with technical
and change management support and guidance to help them realise carbon emissions
savings. The primary focus of the work is to reduce emissions under the control of the
local authority such as buildings, vehicle fleets, street lighting and landfill sites.
Climate
6.13
This Programme guides authorities through a systematic analysis of their carbon
6
footprint, the value at stake (the carbon and financial savings to be made through a
reduced emissions scenario projected over a 5 year period as opposed to a business
as usual scenario) and the opportunities available to help them manage carbon emissions
in a strategic manner. The Programme provides an exemplary way for Hillingdon to
lead by example in tackling climate change through working to reduce its carbon
emissions.
Achievements and progress to date
6.14
The council has been involved in various initiatives, which contribute to the
climate change agenda. The objectives and corresponding actions detailed within
Hillingdon's Climate Change Strategy seek to build on our earlier successes, further
develop existing initiatives, and identify new projects. The examples below illustrate
some of the council's achievements and progress to date.
Environmental campaigning and education
Spearheaded a major campaign to oppose the third runway at Heathrow Airport,
to help protect our villages and the quality of life of our residents.
Responded to consultations on a raft of new national policies and legislation
including the UK Climate Change Bill.
Promoted energy conservation, energy efficiency and climate change issues to
households across the borough through presentations, road shows and displays.
A number of projects have also been carried out in local schools.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
17
6
Air quality
Climate
The council has an adopted Air Quality Action Plan, which identifies measures for
Hillingdon-specific action and for partnership action. Reducing emissions of climate
change pollutants, as well as local air quality pollutants, is an integral part of the
Air Quality Action Plan.
Change
Waste and recycling
With the help of our residents, more than a third of Hillingdon’s waste is recycled
or composted, making Hillingdon one of London’s top recycling boroughs.
in
Launched the council’s first ‘swap shop’ at New Years Green Lane waste site in
Hillingdon
Harefield, to help people to recycle equipment that can be re-used.
Energy efficiency
Installed the first solar powered cats eyes in London in Harvil Road, Rickmansworth
Road and Breakspear Road North.
The council has energy efficiency targets to meet as set out in the Home Energy
Conservation Act (HECA) Strategy for the borough. The Act requires Local
Authorities to achieve a 30% improvement in domestic energy efficiency by 2010.
Up to the 31st of March 2007 Hillingdon had improved the energy efficiency of its
housing stock by 22.65% since 1996 and is on track to meet the 30% target.
With the home insulation programme (funded by EDF Energy), the council last
year installed insulation measures to over 2,000 households in the borough through
the Heat Streets scheme.
The council’s Sunrise scheme promotes renewable energy to householders, Housing
Associations and developers. The scheme provides a complete service including
surveys, installation and assistance with grant applications for all technologies such
as wind turbines, solar water heating and photovoltaic panels.
Sustainable Transport
All council vehicles meet new low emission targets and we are one of the first
councils in London to carry out an emissions inventory, identifying when we need
to replace those vehicles.
In the last two years, we have reduced the amount of carbon emissions from school
journeys by 6% by implementing school travel plans making Hillingdon the fourth
best borough in London.

London Borough of Hillingdon
18
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
The council is a member of the BAA Clean Vehicles Programme (CVP). This
Programme helps to reduce vehicle emissions. The CVP helps companies identify
and implement cost-effective measures for improving the environmental performance
of their business and fleet transport operations. The CVP also rewards achievements
through an assessment and certification process.
Hillingdon
A freight audit of the major industrial and business areas in the borough has been
in
undertaken.
The Local Implementation Plan promotes the use of walking, cycling and public
transport and encourages travel plans for businesses in the borough.
The council’s own Travel Plan, which is aimed at all council employees and elected
Change
Members, will improve sustainable transport choices and aims to reduce single
occupancy car trips.
Sustainable design and construction
Climate
6
Received a silver Green Apple award, a national award for excellence in
environmental and sustainable design standards for Ruislip High School.
Open space
Ten of Hillingdon’s parks now have a Green Flag, a national award for excellent
parks and green spaces across the borough, which has sustainability considerations
as key criteria.
Beginning to use locally sourced wood for park furniture and fencing in some parks.
Several parks have on-site composting facilities.
Climate change adaptation
The council has undertaken a Strategic Flood Risk Assessment for the borough
which considers current and future risks of flood to Hillingdon.
Gardens are designed to minimise water use through species selection and
companion planting.
Beginning to use water butts for rainwater harvesting at the borough's allotments
and cemeteries.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
19
7
7 Hillingdon's Plan of Action
Hillingdon's
7.1
This Strategy focuses on actions that will minimise and reduce carbon dioxide
emissions in Hillingdon, as this is the greenhouse gas making the most significant
contribution to climate change. In addition the Strategy also considers how the borough
can deal with the effects of future climate change as well as actions that will decrease
contributors such as methane arising from landfilled waste.
7.2
Hillingdon’s strategy for tackling climate change considers both mitigation of and
Plan
adaptation to climate change.
Mitigation Involves seeking to limit and slow down future climate change by
of
reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Action
Adaptation Involves taking steps to ensure that we are able to adapt to the changes
to the climate already occurring.
The council's role
7.3
The council's role in addressing climate change has three main functions:
Estate Management through the management of operational buildings such as
day centres, leisure centres, offices and housing and the borough's open spaces;
Service Provision through the provision of waste collection and planning functions;
and
Community Leadership in carrying out the above functions and engaging with
residents, businesses and partners.
Objectives of the Strategy
7.4
The following sections outline the council's objectives in developing an effective
response to the challenges of climate change. In order to achieve these objectives an
integrated approach is needed. The council will work to develop such an approach and
ensure both mitigation and adaptation to climate change are considered in an integrated
manner in all relevant council policies and plans. Effort will also be made to ensure that
the choices made to reduce climate change emissions are of benefit to other key
challenges for the borough, such as improving local air quality.

London Borough of Hillingdon
20
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Community leadership
Action
Objective
of
To reduce the emissions resulting from the council’s own operations and take
measures to deal with the current and future effects of climate change, therefore
leading by example in encouraging residents and businesses in the borough to
Plan
take action.
Context:
7.5
The work of a local authority is wide-ranging and visible, therefore giving the
opportunity for local authorities to lead by example and demonstrate good practice.
Hillingdon's
7.6
In demonstrating community leadership, the council seeks to improve its own
7
practices and in particular to reduce and minimise its carbon footprint. A key part of
this is the council’s participation in the Carbon Trust Local Authority Carbon Management
Programme.
7.7
Additionally the council maintains its opposition to airport expansion and has led
a major campaign to oppose proposals to expand Heathrow airport by adding a third
runway. The council will continue to oppose these plans.
Hillingdon's focus on carbon emission reduction:
7.8
Various workstreams in the council have dealt with climate change issues and
emission reduction. There is a need however to bring this work together in a cohesive
manner and look at ways to reduce the emissions associated with the operations of the
council as a whole.
7.9
The council recognises the areas of waste and energy as being key to reducing
the emissions associated with its own estate and operations. Under the council’s
Hillingdon Improvement Plan, a waste and energy workstream has developed the use
of renewable energy and is actively considering options for creating energy from waste
such as on the RAF Uxbridge development.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
21
7
Hillingdon's
Actions
Ongoing
Participate in the Carbon Trust Local Authority Carbon Management
Programme.
Progress the Hillingdon Improvement Programme projects on waste and energy.
Plan
Progress identified projects to improve energy efficiency within council buildings
and utilise renewable energy:
of
Installation of synchronisation equipment, gas fired generator and
Action
investigation of renewable energy options at the civic centre;
Investigate the feasibility of opportunities for hydrogeneration of energy;
and
Investigate the feasibility of the installation of voltage optimisation
equipment.
Short term
Adopt a Sustainable Energy Policy for the council by 2010.

London Borough of Hillingdon
22
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Raising awareness
Action
Objective
of
To develop greater awareness of climate change issues and engagement in
solutions to tackling them amongst council staff, elected Members, those that live
in, work in or visit the borough, and businesses operating in the borough.
Plan
Context:
7.10
Climate change is likely to be the greatest challenge faced by the UK this century.
The issue has received a great deal of publicity over the last few years and there is
increasing awareness amongst the wider population.
Hillingdon's
7.11
The key findings of recent market research on the attitudes of people in the UK
7
demonstrated:
Over 95% of people agree that the climate is changing;
85% consider it is due to human activity;
More than 80% feel it is more important now than they felt it was last year; and
85% said they are willing to help tackle the issue.
7.12
However a willingness to recognise the problem and to help does not always
translate into action and there can be barriers to people’s involvement. There is therefore
a need not only to continue to raise awareness of the issues but to facilitate and remove
barriers to action through active engagement.
Hillingdon’s focus on raising awareness:
7.13
Following several months of activities across the council related to sustainability
and climate change, in June 2007 the Leader of the Council and the Chief Executive
signed the Nottingham Declaration. To demonstrate Hillingdon’s commitment to this
UK pledge of acknowledgement and action, associated events were held on the themes
of:
Energy efficiency;
Sustainable transport;
'Greener living'; and
Climate change.
7.14
On signing the Nottingham Declaration the Leader of the Council confirmed his
commitment by stating "small changes can make a big difference. By signing the
Nottingham Declaration it shows that we take the future of our planet seriously and are
committed to protecting the environment. As one of the greenest boroughs in London,
we should be setting an example to others."

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
23
7
Hillingdon's
Actions
Ongoing
Continue to provide an effective energy advice service that reaches the most
vulnerable and socially excluded members of the community, through both
direct contact and by informing those who regularly come into contact with the
target groups, for example health and social care workers.
Plan
Provide 'energy bingo' sessions during National Warm Homes Week at day
centres across the borough as an effective way of engaging with vulnerable
of
groups to disseminate practical energy advice.
Action
Continue to promote the council’s Energy Advice DVD at relevant events.
Continue to provide and promote the borough's allotments and the benefits of
allotment-holding to our residents.
Short term
Develop a comprehensive set of webpages for the council website with
information on climate change and sustainability, including information about
council initiatives and links to relevant external organisations and initiatives
including grants and funding sources by 2010.
Set up a network of 'green champions' within the council by Summer 2009 and
in the community by 2011 to increase education and engagement on climate
change issues.
Implement the 'At Home with Energy' programme in the borough’s schools,
which uses smart meters and energy efficiency education to encourage energy
conservation at home.
Develop an energy efficiency awareness raising campaign that includes a
mechanism to provide grants information and advice to the general public.
Develop an awareness raising campaign to encourage waste minimisation,
greater use of composting and higher recycling rates amongst borough
residents and businesses.
Longer term
Develop a training and information package to raise awareness of energy and
climate change issues targeted at employees of organisations in the borough.
Engage with council youth workers to organise an environment-themed youth
event.

London Borough of Hillingdon
24
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Promote home water conservation through the use of water saving fittings and
appliances, the use of 'hippos' in toilet cisterns and water butts.
Action
Promote alternatives to air conditioning to combat overheating.
of
Plan
Hillingdon's
7

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
25
7
Adapting to impacts
Hillingdon's
Objective
To ensure that Hillingdon will be resilient to the current and future effects of climate
change.
Plan
Context:
7.15
The United Kingdom Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP) has undertaken
of
detailed modelling to produce projections of what the UK’s climate might look like in
the future, as well as detailed analysis of how our climate has changed since 1914.
Action
7.16
In general, changes to the climate will produce hotter, drier summers and colder,
wetter winters. The impacts of these changes in weather patterns that are already
beginning to be observed in the UK are heatwaves, water shortages and flooding
events. This has impacts on people but also on biodiversity as the changing weather
patterns affect the survival of plants and animals that in many instances are not evolved
to suit the new conditions.
7.17
With regard to adaptation, the important element is not the weather events
themselves but the level of vulnerability of the area to these events. It is therefore
necessary to assess how the likely weather patterns from climate change would impact
the borough.
7.18
A Local Climate Impacts Profile (LCLIP) is a resource that local authorities can
compile which enables them to understand their exposure to weather events. An LCLIP
is based on the evidence of an area’s vulnerability to severe weather events, and in
particular how these events affected the community as well as the local authority’s
assets and capacity to deliver services.
7.19
Cities not only make a significant contribution to causing climate change but are
also vulnerable to the consequences of it. An issue that compounds the problems of
a warmer climate and is unique to cities is the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. The
Urban Heat Island effect describes the increased temperature of urban air compared
to its rural surroundings.
7.20
The following diagram shows an idealised heat island profile for a city, with
temperatures rising from the rural fringe and peaking in the city centre. The profile also
demonstrates how temperatures can vary across a city depending on the type of land
cover; urban parks and lakes are cooler than adjacent built up areas.


London Borough of Hillingdon
26
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Action
of
Plan
Diagram illustrating the Heat Island Effect. (Source:
GLA)
Hillingdon's
7.21
The UHI effect arises as during the day, solar energy is absorbed by the urban
7
fabric and stored. This energy is then released into the atmosphere at night. Urbanisation
and development alter the balance between the energy from the sun used for raising
the air temperature (heating process) and that used for evaporation (cooling process),
because the cooling effect of open areas containing predominantly vegetation is replaced
by concrete and buildings.
7.22
The strength of the Urban Heat Island is measured by the 'Urban Heat Island
intensity'. This describes the maximum difference in temperature between urban and
rural locations over a certain time period. The highest values of the Urban Heat Island
intensity, of around 6-8oC, are frequently reached between about 11 o'clock at night
and 3 o'clock in the morning.
7.23
Urban Heat Island intensities are greater in summer than winter because of the
increased amount of energy received from the sun in summer, which is absorbed by
the urban surface during the day and released at night. The Urban Heat Island keeps
London warmer than surrounding areas in winter; observed through the earlier on-set
of Spring and less frequent settling of snow in London. The UHI effect means that
London is particularly vulnerable to heatwave weather events and the predicted increase
in frequency and intensity of heatwaves as a result of climate change require that
consideration is given to mitigating the Urban Heat Island effect.
7.24
To manage London’s Urban Heat Island most effectively, the alteration of existing
land cover of large areas of central London would be necessary which is not a practical
solution. There are however opportunities to alter microclimates and therefore manage
the UHI effect at the street and neighbourhood scale. Over time the cumulative effects
on the UHI effect of local scale climate modification could be significant. Effective
strategies that can be implemented within existing urban areas and have impacts at
the local level include cool roofs, green roofs, planting trees and vegetation and cool
pavements.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
27
7
Hillingdon’s focus on adaptation:
Hillingdon's
7.25
The council’s civil protection service deals with emergency planning and business
continuity for emergencies and disasters. Historically, neither flooding, heatwaves nor
droughts have frequently or significantly affected the borough. However as these events
are likely to increase in frequency and severity, there is a need for greater understanding
of the threats they would pose to Hillingdon.
7.26
A community risk register has been compiled for North West London, which
Plan
includes the London Borough of Hillingdon and considers the risk of different types of
emergencies and disasters occurring. There has not however been a more detailed
analysis undertaken of the impacts of extreme weather events on the London Borough
of
of Hillingdon as would be undertaken through a Local Climate Impacts Profile.
Action
7.27
In response to the Urban Heat Island effect there is a need to continue to protect
the open spaces and vegetation that the borough already has in recognition of the
increasingly important role that these will have in adapting to climate change.
Actions
Ongoing
Continue to implement relevant London Plan policies relating to adaptation of
climate change.
Continue to protect and enhance the borough’s green spaces and open land
and work to create new green spaces in recognition of their role in adaptation
to climate change as well as their amenity and recreation value and benefits
to biodiversity.
Continue to retain and seek to increase the borough’s level of vegetation,
through tree planting and maintenance.
Encourage new developments to take into account adaptation to climate change
in their design, through minimising the risk of overheating, minimising
impervious surfaces, incorporating sustainable urban drainage systems where
appropriate and including water conservation devices.
Short term
Compile a Local Climate Impacts Profile for the borough by 2010.
Undertake a review of water usage across the council’s estate with a view to
a programme of work to minimise water consumption by 2010.

London Borough of Hillingdon
28
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Prepare and publish on the council's website an advisory note for developers
on best practice in design that is adaptable to climate change including
measures to mitigate the Urban Heat Island effect by Summer 2011.
Action
Promote the use of water butts to residents and increase their use across the
of
council estate where practicable, particularly on the borough’s allotments and
cemeteries.
Plan
What you can do:
Install a water butt in your garden for collecting rain water to use for watering plants
or washing your car.
If you are renovating or building a new home or commercial premises, choose
water-saving devices such as low flow taps and low flush toilets or ideally make
Hillingdon's
use of greywater recycling. This is re-use of shower, bath and wash basin water
7
to flush toilets.
Keep impervious surfaces (those that do not allow water to pass through) such as
hardstanding to a minimum on your property or premises. Impervious surfaces
increase surface water run off which contributes to localised flooding by overloading
drains. Planning permission is required to lay traditional impermeable driveways
that allow uncontrolled run-off of rainwater from front gardens onto roads, because
this can contribute to flooding and pollution of watercourses.
Plant trees on your property or premises and if doing an extension or building
consider installing a green roof. A green roof is one that is partially or completely
covered in vegetation and soil or another growing medium, planted on top of a
waterproof membrane.
When the weather is hot, try and avoid the use of fans and air conditioning by
opening windows and closing blinds and curtains to limit the amount of heat entering
from the sun.
Further Information and support:
Information on future predicted impacts of climate change on the UK and advice
on adaptation:
The UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP) http://www.ukcip.org.uk/
Information about how the effects of climate change might impact your home and
how to minimise them:
English Heritage http://www.climatechangeandyourhome.org.uk/live/
climate_impacts.aspx

Environment Agency information:

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
29
7
Top water saving tips for homes, schools and businesses
Hillingdon's
http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/homeandleisure/drought/31755.aspx
Reusing and harvesting water
http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/homeandleisure/drought/31761.aspx
Flooding
Plan
http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/homeandleisure/floods/default.aspx
Information on how to design a new development to be adaptable to climate change:
of
'Adapting to Climate Change: A Checklist for Development'
Action
http://www.london.gov.uk/lccp/publications/development.jsp
Good practice guidance for permeable paving:
'Guidance on the permeable surfacing of front gardens'
http://www.communities.gov.uk
Information about what to do in a heatwave:
The Department of Health
http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/AboutUs/MinistersAndDepartmentLeaders/
ChiefMedicalOfficer/Features/DH_4135398


London Borough of Hillingdon
30
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Reducing emissions
Transport
Action
of
Objective
To reduce and minimise the emissions in the borough associated with transport
Plan
(particularly road transport) through the council’s travel planning function and its
own activities and to encourage residents and members of the business community
to use more sustainable modes of travel.
Context:
7.28
Transport accounted for approximately 28% of UK greenhouse gas emissions
Hillingdon's
in 2005.
Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas, accounting for about 84% of
7
greenhouse gas emissions in 2005, and road transport is a significant contributor (22%
of the total UK CO produced in 2005). Transportation also affects local air quality as
2
vehicles emit pollutants such as NO and PM which are associated with poor air quality
x
10
and human health impacts.
7.29
Greenhouse gas emissions from aircraft are excluded from both national targets
in the Kyoto Protocol, and from the local authority CO emissions data collated by
2
DEFRA. It should be noted that the aviation sector is regulated by national policy and
whilst the council remains opposed to airport capacity expansion such as that proposed
at Heathrow, these decisions will ultimately be made at a national level.
7.30
In the government’s transport strategy 'The Future of Transport: a network for
2030' (2004) it is made clear that while good transport is central to a prosperous
economy, facilitating better access and greater mobility, there is a need to balance the
increasing demand for travel against our goal of protecting the environment effectively
and improving the quality of life for everyone – whether they are travelling or not.
7.31
The government is currently using fiscal measures to incentivise consumers to
choose more fuel efficient (and therefore lower carbon) vehicles, e.g. fuel and vehicle
excise duty. In the 2008 Budget, further taxes were announced aimed at promoting
environmentally efficient business travel and the take up of cleaner cars.
7.32
One effective means to address the issue is by enabling people to adopt low
carbon behaviours. As well as taxation measures to encourage the use of cleaner
vehicles, the government is working to increase awareness and improve choice.
Investments to improve public transport are being made, as well as awareness
programmes such as 'Act on CO ' which provides tips on how to drive 'smarter' for
2
better fuel efficiency and encourages the purchasing of more fuel efficient vehicles.
The UK planning system also seeks to direct development to sustainable locations that
have good public transport access.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
31
7
7.33
Improvements in public transport and new technologies that produce lower
Hillingdon's
emission cars make a valuable contribution to reducing CO emissions associated with
2
transport. However reducing people's need to travel has multiple benefits; it makes a
positive impact on not only CO emissions from transport, but subsequently on air quality
2
and congestion. The planning system plays a part in transport demand management
but changes in traditional office culture can also assist. Many organisations are reducing
their carbon footprints through increased home working and the use of available
technologies for telephone and video conferencing and internet-based training and
seminars which reduce employee commuting and business mileage.
Plan
Hillingdon’s focus on transport:
of
7.34
Due to its outer London location and lack of good north-south public transport
orbital routes, Hillingdon continues to have one of the highest car ownership rates in
Action
London. This location and the radial national and strategic highway routes in/adjacent
to the borough ( M4, M40/A40, M25, A4, and A312), result in significant road congestion
and associated poor air quality. While the location of Heathrow within the borough’s
boundary does not count towards the borough’s 'carbon footprint', it does raise issues
of surface access and poor air quality as there is a considerable amount of road traffic
associated with the airport. Therefore key to addressing many of the transport related
climate change issues in Hillingdon is a focus on travel demand management.
7.35
In conjunction with Transport for London (TfL), Hillingdon continues to look at
ways of improving the public transport network across the borough. This approach is
complemented by encouraging a reduction in road traffic through increased usage of
sustainable transport modes such as walking and cycling.
7.36
The council’s draft Travel Plan for staff is currently being developed with a view
to being adopted by 2010. The borough is also developing a travel plan programme
for businesses across Hillingdon and other organisations with large numbers of
employees. New major development proposals are now required to produce travel plans
in advance of the development being completed, using TfL detailed guidance.
7.37
Another focus for travel demand management is the borough’s School Travel
Plan programme, which is currently one of the most advanced in London in terms of
the number of schools preparing and implementing travel plans. Nearly 75% of schools
now have a travel plan which over the last few years have been successful in contributing
to a modal shift of 12% away from car use for trips to school. This has resulted in
improvements in local air quality. The benefits to the school pupils in terms of health
as well as to the environment in general need to be maintained and as far as possible
enhanced.
7.38
Within the planning system, other measures are also being implemented to
encourage the reduction of emissions, with higher density residential growth and high
traffic-generating activities (such as retail) being directed to areas with good public
transport accessibility. The provision of on-site car parking in new developments is
restricted, the submission of travel plans is required and car clubs promoted.

London Borough of Hillingdon
32
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
7.39
A fleet emissions inventory has also been undertaken for the council’s vehicle
fleet, and the council is continuing to upgrade its fleet to lower emission vehicles as
replacements are needed. This is particularly relevant following the introduction of a
Action
London-wide Low Emission Zone.
of
Actions
Plan
Ongoing
Bid annually for and implement sustainable transport initiatives across the
borough through the Local Implementation Plan.
Continue to develop and implement a programme of travel plans for existing
businesses and large organisations (such as hospitals and further education
establishments), either individually or area-based in partnership with Transport
Hillingdon's
for London.
7
Annually update the Sustainable Modes of Travel Strategy for schools.
Continue to monitor the effect of School Travel Plans in reducing the volume
of CO emissions against existing baselines.
2
Continue to oppose airport capacity expansion due to the potential adverse
impacts on the highway network and air quality.
Short term
Adopt and implement the council’s Travel Plan by 2010.
Pilot cycle rental schemes at public transport interchanges to encourage greater
'cycle to work' use.
Reduce the number of council business trips made in private vehicles, by
greater use of pool cars by 2011.
Establish a programme of 'walking buses' for schools following on from the
pilot in 2009 and develop a School Cycling Strategy and designated network.
Longer term
Increase the availability of car clubs, especially in new residential developments.
Continue to work with our sub-regional transport partnerships (WestTrans and
SWELTRAC) to seek funding for borough-wide travel surveys to gain a more
in-depth understanding of travel patterns with a view to improving or extending
sustainable transport networks on high demand routes.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
33
7
Improve, create and enhance green spaces and create high quality linkages
Hillingdon's
between them in order to provide a network of green spaces or ‘green
infrastructure’.
Develop a network of 'all weather' paths to allow green spaces to be used in
wet conditions and thereby encouraging walking and/or cycling.
Plan
What you can do:
Walk, cycle or take public transport whenever possible.
of
Action
Try to avoid short haul flying if you can take a train to your destination.
If you need to drive your car to work, try car sharing.
If you are buying a car, choose a car no larger than you need and look for the most
efficient and lowest emission vehicle in that size range. This should save you
money on fuel and road tax as well as reducing your emissions.
Use less fuel to save money and reduce your car's emissions by driving smarter:
Make sure your tyres are pumped up to the correct pressure for your car;
Don't have unnecessary clutter in your car boot (the excess weight makes
your car use more fuel); and
Try to drive smoothly and within the speed limit - revving your car, stopping
and starting and driving over 50mph all use excess fuel.
Information and support:
To find the best route to your destination using public transport, walking or cycling:
Transport for London journey planner www.tfl.gov.uk or the travel information
line 0207 2221234.
Information on cycling and walking in the UK and maps and information on the UK
National Cycle Network:
Sustrans, sustainable transport charity. www.sustrans.org.uk
Advice on buying a fuel efficient or low emission car and driving tips to reduce your
carbon emissions and save on fuel costs:
Department for Transport, Act on CO
www.dft.gov.uk/ActOnCO2/
2
To find others to car share with:


London Borough of Hillingdon
34
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Liftshare www.liftshare.org/
ShareAcar www.shareacar.com/
Action
Chiltern Carshare - Share your journey to the rail station with others making a
of
similar
journey
and
save
on
parking
costs
as
well
as
fuel.
www.chilterncarshare.co.uk
Plan
Hillingdon's
7
Public transport in Hayes Town Centre

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
35
7
Waste
Hillingdon's
Objective
To reduce the greenhouse gas emissions in the borough associated with waste.
Context:
Plan
7.40
Carbon dioxide is one of the key contributors to climate change. However
methane, a gas emitted by decomposition of landfill waste, is also a greenhouse gas
of
and a main contributor to global warming, being 21 times more potent than carbon
dioxide.
Action
7.41
It is problematic for local authorities to control the total amount of waste that is
generated in their area; residents can be encouraged to reduce waste and compost
and recycle, and the provision of good facilities facilitates this, but significant reductions
in waste can only come about through behaviour change.
7.42
One of the key issues with waste - and of relevance to climate change - is the
consumption of resources. Greater consumption affects climate change in two ways;
firstly, increased resource consumption involves carbon emissions through primarily
the manufacture and distribution of goods. Secondly, when the waste breaks down,
carbon dioxide or methane gases are given off, making a further contribution to climate
change.
7.43
For significant reductions in waste and associated emissions there needs to be
a decrease in consumption of resources, greater re-use of products (not just recycling),
and in particular a shift away from disposable products and those that are of poor quality
with a limited lifespan. Additionally a significant source of waste in London comes from
construction and the re-use of buildings can play a crucial part in reducing this.
7.44
There needs to be a shift away from the previous reliance there has been on
landfill in the UK for the disposal of biodegradable waste. Better management of waste
can significantly reduce emissions of greenhouse gases; for example, the composting
of bio-degradable waste gives off carbon dioxide, as the process occurs in the presence
of air.
The methane that this waste would have given off if landfilled is far more
damaging due to its greater strength.
7.45
In terms of the best environmental outcome, there is a hierarchy of how waste
should be dealt with, as shown in the following diagram. The least favourable option
(at the bottom of the pyramid) is landfill disposal, with prevention being the most
favourable.


London Borough of Hillingdon
36
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Action
of
Plan
The Waste Hierarchy
Hillingdon's
7
7.46
Waste prevention and minimisation are at the top of the hierarchy. Preventing
unnecessary waste, such as excessive packaging, not only saves the waste of the
packaging, but also prevents the carbon emissions that would have been associated
with the energy or fuel used to extract the raw materials, and in manufacturing and
transport.
7.47
Re-use of products and materials is almost as effective as waste prevention.
This prevents the return of the carbon within the product to the environment for as long
as possible.
Re-use additionally reduces demand for raw materials and the
environmental impacts from manufacturing and transport.
7.48
Recycling reduces the need for raw materials, and prevents materials being
disposed of and contributing to greenhouse gas emissions. However the process of
recycling one product into another requires energy and therefore involves greater carbon
emissions than prevention, minimisation and reuse. However recycling uses less energy
than creating a product from raw materials.
7.49
Energy recovery takes waste and converts the energy stored within it to useful
energy, reducing fossil fuel use and associated emissions of carbon dioxide and
pollutants.
7.50
Landfill is the least favourable environmental option with regard to greenhouse
gas emissions. By putting waste into landfill, we are limiting the potential for reuse,
recycling or recovery of valuable resources, increasing the demand for new resources
and generating more greenhouse gas emissions.
7.51
Better management of waste can significantly reduce the emissions of
greenhouse gases. Through application of the principles of the waste hierarchy, waste
materials can be turned into resources, reducing the need for increasing the extraction
of raw materials and fossil fuels. Technologies exist that enable materials and energy
to be recovered from waste that would otherwise be landfilled, thus potentially releasing
methane.


London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
37
7
7.52
It is crucial that action is taken to reduce future climate change, and a key
Hillingdon's
mechanism is to reduce the amount of waste produced and the amount of energy we
use. There is an important link between waste management, greenhouse gas emissions
and future climate change, which needs recognition.
Plan
of
Action
Recycling collection in Hillingdon
Hillingdon’s focus on waste:
7.53
Hillingdon has consistently been one of the top 10 boroughs in London for
recycling over the last 5 years. Hillingdon was the first London borough to achieve
statutory recycling targets in 2003/04. Its highly regarded recycling programme now
diverts over 41,000 tonnes of material each year from landfill.
7.54
Hillingdon’s draft waste strategy in 2001 commenced the council’s recycling
enhancement programme from a low base. Up to this point the recycling rate was
approximately 9% and built around a 'bring bank' system. Investment in a pilot kerbside
recycling system was the basis for the council’s current kerbside recycling system which
is borough wide and during 07/08 collected 19,660 tonnes contributing 15.9% to the
borough’s overall recycling rate. This was complemented in 2004 by Hillingdon being
the leading authority introducing garden waste recycling free of charge to 86,000
households. This currently produces just over 8000 tonnes with a recycling rate of
6.7%. These two schemes remain the main focus of the council’s recycling programme
supported by a range of smaller activities e.g., Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment
(WEEE) collection sorting at civic amenity sites. In addition the council has continued
to work with the private sector to develop and expand services e.g. inclusion of glass
with the co-mingled dry recycling collection, and development of Europe’s largest
in-vessel composting site.

London Borough of Hillingdon
38
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
7.55
Recycling remains a key focus area in the borough’s efforts to make Hillingdon
an 'attractive and sustainable place' as outlined in the Sustainable Community Strategy.
The council wants to build on its past success, and meet the challenging recycling
Action
targets agreed as part of the Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy. The council’s
recycling rate for 07/08 was 33.8% and the aim is to reach the government’s target of
of
40% by 2010. Looking ahead, the council has an aspiration to reach 50% recycling by
2015.
These targets are set against a background of high tonnages of household
waste. This is currently on a downward trend but the kilogram per household (kg/hd)
Plan
of household waste stood at 481.72 kgs/hd in 2007/08.
7.56
Whilst recycling is important in minimising the waste going to landfill, there is
also a need to improve composting rates of biodegradable waste and to minimise the
amount of waste created in the first place. Due to the success of recycling in Hillingdon,
the largest proportion of waste left in the general waste stream that goes to landfill is
organic matter such as kitchen waste. It is therefore crucial to encourage residents to
reduce their waste in this area.
Hillingdon's
7
7.57
There is a legal requirement for the borough to meet the European Landfill
Directive, which requires significant reductions in the level of biodegradable waste that
can be sent to landfill between now and 2020. The council will be subject to severe
financial penalties if it fails to achieve this. Therefore there is an additional economic
incentive to waste minimisation and increased composting on top of environmental
concerns and a reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases.
7.58
These targets, in addition to the borough’s aim to minimise its environmental
impacts and tackle climate change, mean that the main focus of Hillingdon’s waste
services will need to be waste minimisation, recycling and composting.
7.59
New initiatives are being built around the council’s ethos of providing customer
friendly waste services which are easy to use, accessible and put service quality and
customer need at the forefront. These include: estate based recycling incorporating
high rise flats, re-engineering of the borough's civic amenity sites, door to door electrical
and textile collection; provision of home composting, recycling of brittle plastics (i.e.
toys, garden furniture) and negotiations with the private sector to further develop jointly
managed civic amenity sites.
7.60
The council recognises that residents still value the traditional weekly refuse
service and has made a public declaration to maintain this position. Hillingdon’s ethos
of 'customer first' has also been extended to the service and private sectors by provision
of free recycling to schools, charities and libraries and a competitively priced trade
recycling service.
7.61
There is potential for exploration of new and innovative technologies that will
help waste targets be met through further reductions in the volumes of landfill waste.
The council is keen to promote and support such technologies. It is recognised that this
will require an integrated approach utilising a range of technologies applicable to
individual sites or developments. An example is the use of waste to create energy;
such schemes can provide power while also significantly reducing the amount of waste

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
39
7
going to landfill. On a smaller scale there are also opportunities for the utilisation of
Hillingdon's
waste products such as chip fat to power vehicles, or waste wood products for biomass
boilers.
Actions
Ongoing
Plan
Develop the council’s Hillingdon Improvement Programme (HIP) waste and
energy initiatives including:
of
Increasing provision of recycling facilities to an additional 100 housing
estates in the borough;
Action
Promoting and increasing awareness of home composting through compost
bin promotion to residents;
Carrying out an educational pilot with residents to increase participation
in recycling;
Developing an outreach project targeting hard-to-reach groups to increase
their recycling;
Working to improve recycling capacity at each of the borough’s civic
amenity sites; and
Investigating the feasibility of energy generation from waste.
Lead on the development of the West London Waste Plan, which will look at
how West London can accommodate the waste it produces in a sustainable
manner.
The Plan will give priority to waste reduction, recycling and
composting.
Short term
Make use of on-site composting in the borough's open spaces and use the
resulting compost on-site to minimise landfill waste and fuel use.


London Borough of Hillingdon
40
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Action
of
Plan
Hillingdon's
7
Recycling bins in Uxbridge High Street
What you can do:
Compost your garden and food waste. For those that cannot compost their own
waste the borough provides a kerbside recycling service for garden waste.
Reduce waste packaging by:
Avoiding buying goods with lots of unnecessary packaging;
Buying 'loose food' instead of packaged food where possible;
Buying products with refillable containers as much as possible;
Buying milk from your milkman using returnable glass bottles; and
Using reusable containers for food instead of using cling film or foil.
Avoid single use plastic bags when out shopping. Most supermarkets and many
other stores now stock longer lasting 'bags for life' or fabric reusable bags which
are a more sustainable alternative.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
41
7
Have goods repaired rather than replaced if economical to do so.
Hillingdon's
Avoid buying disposable products such as throw-away cameras, paper
handkerchiefs and napkins, razors, plastic and paper cups.
Help to sustain and increase the markets for recycled products by buying these
when possible and practical. Some commonly available examples are: recycled
paper and glass products and recycled plastic rubbish bags.
Plan
If you have a baby try re-usable/washable cloth nappies instead of disposables.
Re-use of products is better for the environment than recycling. Use charity shops,
of
or the eBay and freecycle websites to buy or dispose of clothes, household goods,
books and DVDs etc. in a sustainable way.
Action
Stop unwanted mail through the following means:
Stop unwanted mail by contacting Mailing Preference Service (MPS) on 0845
703 4599 or at www.mpsonline.org.uk
Register free online to stop junk mail addressed to previous residents at your
address by logging onto
www.junkmailforwarding.com and selecting the
'Change of Home Register'.
Stop unwanted leaflets and fliers by putting a note on your letter box saying
'no leaflets or fliers'.
Electoral Register - tick the 'edited register' option when completing the annual
form. This will keep your details out of the publicly available register.
Information and support:
For further information, the London Borough of Hillingdon website has a
comprehensive list of waste and recycling weblinks and some tips on reducing
waste:
Waste weblinks
http://www.hillingdon.gov.uk/index.jsp?articleid=9160
Tips on reducing waste
http://www.hillingdon.gov.uk/index.jsp?articleid=9156

London Borough of Hillingdon
42
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Businesses
Action
Objective
of
To actively engage with the borough’s businesses and encourage them to take
action to reduce their carbon footprints and adopt environmentally sustainable
business practices.
Plan
Context:
7.62
The commitment of business and the public sector to tackling climate change
is growing in the UK.
An increasing number of companies and public sector
organisations are recognising and acting upon the benefits to be gained from reducing
greenhouse gas emissions.
Hillingdon's
7
7.63
Businesses and organisations generally take action on climate change for several
reasons. Improved environmental credentials boosts an organisation’s image, and can
better align corporate actions with the environmental concerns of owners, employees,
suppliers, and customers. Action is also taken in order to reduce costs, and can provide
benefits in reducing dependency on uncontrollable or uncertain costs such as fluctuating
energy and fuel prices.
7.64
Two of the main mechanisms of reducing emissions (and therefore tackling
climate change) that are being demonstrated in the business community and the public
sector are improving energy efficiency and using renewable energy.
7.65
Generally any expenditure made to improve energy efficiency or install renewable
energy will pay off in the medium to long term. However for smaller businesses the
initial outlay of more expensive measures can be cost prohibitive, and for larger
companies, shareholders need to be satisfied in the short term, therefore legislation
seems to be the most effective means to facilitate action.
7.66
Economic instruments are being introduced to encourage the reduction of
emissions from the business community and public sector.
Emissions trading
7.67
Emissions trading is a key element of the longer term solution to reducing the
UK’s greenhouse gas emissions. Trading on its own cannot deliver emission reductions.
However it can give companies flexibility to deliver cuts in the most cost effective way
and provides an incentive to seek out and develop new ways of reducing emissions.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
43
7
Carbon Reduction Commitment
Hillingdon's
Announced in the government’s Energy White Paper (2007), the Carbon Reduction
Commitment Scheme (CRC) will apply mandatory emissions trading to cut carbon
emissions from large commercial and public sector organisations. It covers around
10% of the UK economy wide emissions, and will provide incentives for
organisations to save money through energy efficiency.
EU ETS
The UK is included in the EU Energy Trading Scheme (EU ETS), which is one of
Plan
the policies that has been introduced across Europe to tackle greenhouse gas
emissions under the Kyoto Protocol.
The scheme affects heavy industrial
companies such as those involved in:
of
Electricity generation;
Action
Iron and steel;
Mineral processing industries such as cement manufacture; and
Pulp and paper processing industries.
7.68
The scheme operates on a 'cap and trade' basis, meaning the level of emissions
these companies can generate is capped. They are given an allocation of how much
they are allowed to emit. Businesses may use all or part of their allocation and have
the flexibility to buy additional allowances or to sell any surplus allowances generated
from reducing their emissions below their allocation.
Climate Change Levy
7.69
The Climate Change Levy is a tax on the use of energy in industry, commerce
and the public sector, with offsetting cuts in employers' National Insurance contributions
and additional support for energy efficiency schemes and renewable sources of energy.
The aim of the Levy is to encourage users to improve energy efficiency and reduce
emissions of greenhouse gases.
7.70
Climate Change Agreements allow some energy intensive business users to
receive a discount from the Climate Change Levy, in return for meeting energy efficiency
or carbon saving targets.
Businesses in Hillingdon:
7.71
Hillingdon has a strong business community, including large multinationals,
many of which are based in the south of the borough near Heathrow and in the Stockley
Business Park. Additionally there are many smaller businesses in the borough providing
local employment and services.
7.72
There are some examples of good practice in relation to sustainability being
demonstrated in the borough by businesses. However there is a need to engage with
businesses to encourage the sharing of this good practice and to build on existing
successes.

London Borough of Hillingdon
44
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Actions
Action
Ongoing
of
Continue existing work schemes that promote upskilling the borough’s workforce
to decrease the proportion of workers needed from outside the borough to fill
local jobs, thereby reducing commuter travel.
Plan
Continue to work with our sub-regional transport partnerships (WestTrans and
SWELTRAC) to:
Encourage the adoption of travel plans by existing major employers in the
borough; and
Encourage improved fleet management practices as a result of freight
Hillingdon's
audits of businesses in the borough.
7
Short term
Compile information for distribution to the borough’s businesses regarding
climate change issues to include sources of information, technical advice and
funding by Summer 2011.
Longer term
Seek funding to work with businesses in Hillingdon to reduce their carbon
footprint and improve the energy efficiency of their buildings.
Initiate a programme of engagement with businesses to assess sustainability
work being undertaken, share and encourage best practice, and to support
businesses to become more sustainable.
What businesses can do:
When doing refurbishment or maintenance, choose energy efficient options
for computers, lighting and boilers.
Develop and implement a workplace travel plan, to minimise emissions from
business travel and staff commuting.
Ensure that unnecessary lighting is turned off when the business is closed, some
businesses have considerable amounts of lighting on outside of operating hours.
Ensure that staff are made aware of how to play their part and are encouraged to
do so, for example:

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
45
7
Switching off lighting and unused appliances;
Hillingdon's
Only printing when necessary;
Minimising waste; and
Recycling whenever possible.
Have an energy audit of their building/s undertaken to help identify ways to improve
energy efficiency and incorporate renewable energy generation.
Plan
Source goods and services locally where possible and practical to support local
businesses and minimise transport emissions.
of
Information and support:
Action
Advice and support for businesses regarding how they can reduce their carbon
emissions:
The Carbon Trust www.carbontrust.co.uk 0800 085 2005
Advice on how businesses can make their vehicle fleet 'greener':
The Energy Saving Trust
http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/business/Business/Transport-in-business

London Borough of Hillingdon
46
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Existing housing
Action
Objective
of
To reduce the emissions in the borough associated with existing housing through
improving energy efficiency.
Plan
Context:
7.73
The UK contains more than 26 million homes. In 2004 these homes together
emitted a total of 41.7 million tonnes of carbon dioxide (MtCO ), which represents more
2
than 25% of the UK’s total carbon emissions.
7.74
It is estimated that due to the current demand for housing, and projected future
Hillingdon's
growth, in the next 12 years more than 3 million additional homes will need to be built
7
in the UK.
7.75
The government has put in place legislation and policies to achieve its target
for new homes to be zero carbon from 2016. However there is considerable need to
address reducing the carbon footprint of the UK’s existing housing stock. It is estimated
that two thirds of the homes likely to exist in 2050 have already been built and therefore
carbon emissions from existing housing will continue to be a significant contributor to
the UK’s emissions.
7.76
The Home Energy Conservation Act 1995 (HECA) places obligations on local
authorities to improve the energy efficiency of all housing in their area.
The
improvements in energy efficiency achieved through HECA contribute to meeting the
UK’s climate change commitments. Annually, authorities must prepare, publish and
submit to the Secretary of State an energy conservation report that identifies:
Practicable and cost-effective measures to significantly improve the energy efficiency
of all residential accommodation in their area;
An assessment of the extent that carbon dioxide emissions will be reduced as a
result of the measures; and
Progress made in implementing the measures.
7.77
Various grant schemes are being made available from government and
non-government organisations to homeowners for making improvements to their homes
that will make them low carbon.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
47
7
Hillingdon’s focus on existing housing:
Hillingdon's
Private Sector
7.78
In 2008 a comprehensive housing stock condition survey was undertaken which
provides a detailed analysis of the state of the non-council owned housing in the borough,
including the energy efficiency and therefore the carbon emissions. The majority of
dwellings in Hillingdon are houses (79.3%) compared to 20.6% of dwellings that are
flats. The most common house type in Hillingdon is semi-detached (36.6%) followed
Plan
by terraced (25.5%).
7.79
Most dwellings in the borough are owner occupied (84%) with 16% privately
of
rented. Hillingdon has a similar tenure profile to England as a whole but quite different
to the profile of London (Hillingdon has a greater proportion of owner-occupiers and
Action
lower proportions of private tenants). The bulk of the housing stock is post 1919, with
only 4.4% constructed prior to this date. The biggest proportion was built between 1919
and 1944 (48%).
Energy efficiency
Estimated that 53.2% of dwellings in Hillingdon have cavity walls, but of these a
total of 65.1% have no cavity insulation.
92.3% of dwellings have at least some double-glazing, with 71.8% having all
windows double-glazed.
84.6% of dwellings have loft insulation (11.9% have no loft). 68.6% of those with
insulation have 100mm or more and only 4.5% have over 200mm.
7.80
The Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) is the government’s recommended
system for home energy rating based on a scale of 1 to 100, with a high score meaning
a dwelling is more energy efficient. The average SAP rating for private sector dwellings
in Hillingdon is 56, compared with a national average of 49. The most recent estimate
(2003) for London is an average of 51. Hillingdon’s average in 2000 was 50, indicating
an improvement in energy efficiency since then.
7.81
Through its continued programme of work under HECA, the council has made
significant improvements in the energy efficiency of the borough’s housing stock since
the last stock condition survey in 2001, particularly through the insulation of lofts and
cavity walls and the upgrading of boilers.
7.82
Improvements in energy efficiency are not only beneficial in reducing carbon
emissions, but through reduced energy costs help to reduce fuel poverty (generally
defined as when a household needs to spend more than 10% of its income on fuel to
maintain satisfactory heating).


London Borough of Hillingdon
48
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Hillingdon Homes
7.83
Hillingdon’s council housing has been managed since 2003 by its Arms Length
Managing Organisation Hillingdon Homes. Hillingdon Homes commissioned a stock
Action
condition survey that was undertaken in 2007.
of
7.84
The majority of dwellings in the Hillingdon Homes estate are flats (52%) compared
to 48% of dwellings, which are houses. The most common dwelling type is low-rise flats
(27%) followed by semi-detached or large terraced houses (24%). The housing stock
Plan
is generally newer than that of the private sector, with the majority built post-1945.
7.85
The majority of the housing stock is well insulated and there is continued
expenditure to increase the energy efficiency of the stock, primarily through window
improvements and replacement of boilers. The average SAP rating of the housing
stock is 74.5.
Hillingdon's
7.86
Hillingdon Homes aims to ensure good quality housing that takes into account
7
environmental sustainability, and has developed Design and Technical Briefs on
sustainability, and on energy efficiency and affordable warmth for utilisation in the
carrying out of routine maintenance and in the design of new projects to improve the
stock. Where funding allows Hillingdon Homes will seek to use new technologies to
reduce carbon emissions.
Housing associations and Registered Social Landlords (RSLs)
7.87
A number of housing associations and RSLs operate in the borough. In general
the stock owned by these is modern and relatively energy efficient. The focus for these
dwellings is therefore not on making improvements, but on raising the awareness of
tenants about energy conservation and efficiency. Hillingdon continues to work with
housing associations in the borough to encourage improvements where necessary and
raise awareness amongst tenants.
Solar thermal panel for hot water heating on
a house in Hillingdon

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
49
7
Hillingdon's
Actions
Ongoing
Improve the energy efficiency of the council’s own housing, and make use of
grants and other schemes to do the same for private sector housing, prioritising
households affected by fuel poverty.
Plan
Continue the existing work programme of window and boiler replacement
to achieve an average SAP rating of 75 for the council’s own housing
stock by 2010 and 76 by 2011; and
of
Continue to undertake maintenance and improvements in accordance
Action
with the Hillingdon Homes Design and Technical Briefs on Sustainability
and on Energy Efficiency and Affordable Warmth.
Promote the uptake of energy efficiency measures including renewable energy
technologies to all households.
Deliver the council’s Warm Zone scheme to provide grants for home
insulation and heating to various households; and
Work with the London Collaborative to develop new initiatives to address
reducing the carbon emissions of existing housing in the borough.
Continue to seek improvements in energy efficiency to the privately rented
housing stock through liaising with landlords via the Landlords Forum including
promotion of the Warm Zone scheme.
Continue to work with Housing Associations and Registered Social Landlords
in the borough to encourage the delivery of awareness raising programmes
for tenants as well as improvements to the energy efficiency of the housing
stock where necessary.
Provide 'energy bingo' sessions during National Warm Homes Week at day
centres across the borough as an effective way of engaging with vulnerable
groups to disseminate practical energy advice.
Continue to promote the council’s Energy Advice DVD at relevant events.
Short term
Ensure that low income consumers have access to independent advice on the
competitive energy market to avoid mis-selling and allow low income customers
to access cheap energy.

London Borough of Hillingdon
50
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Promote the uptake of energy efficiency measures including renewable energy
technologies to all households.
Action
Develop a programme that provides greater access to advice and
installation of renewable energy technologies including solar thermal,
of
photovoltaic panels and ground source heat pumps.
Develop an awareness raising campaign that includes a mechanism to
Plan
provide grants information and advice to the general public on energy
efficiency.
Implement the 'At Home with Energy' programme in the borough’s schools,
which uses smart meters and energy education to encourage energy
conservation at home.
Hillingdon's
What you can do:
7
There are lots of easy things that together can have a big impact on your home
energy use, for example:
Turn your heating down by 1°C;
Wash your laundry at 30°C;
Always turn off lights when you leave a room;
Use low energy lightbulbs;
Don't leave appliances on stand-by;
Make sure your boiler is serviced regularly, which will ensure it runs efficiently.
If it is in need of replacement, choose a condensing boiler; and
If your house has a loft or walls with cavities make sure these are insulated
to a minimum of 270mm.
Generate some of your own energy through the installation of renewable energy
technologies such as solar thermal or photovoltaic panels.
Information and support:
Information on how to reduce your carbon emissions and save on energy costs in
your home and information on available grants:
Energy Savings Trust http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
51
7
Obtain an energy assessment of your home and suggestions on how the efficiency
Hillingdon's
could be improved, along with the likely cost. The service also offers advice on
commissioning the necessary work and can manage the process with your
agreement:
The Green Homes Concierge http://www.greenhomesconcierge.co.uk/
Plan
of
Action

London Borough of Hillingdon
52
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
New developments
Action
Objective
of
To ensure that new developments in the borough mitigate against and adapt to
climate change through utilising sustainable design and construction methods and
incorporating renewable energy.
Plan
Context:
7.88
Buildings are responsible for approximately 40% of the carbon emissions in the
UK.
The potential carbon emissions associated with buildings can however be
significantly reduced through their design, materials and supply of energy.
Hillingdon's
7.89
In recognition of the significant contribution that housing makes to the UK’s
7
carbon emissions, the government has outlined a target under its policy document
'Building a Greener Future' (2006) that all new homes will be zero carbon from 2016.
7.90
In 2006 the government also launched the Code for Sustainable Homes. The
Code measures the sustainability of a new home against nine categories of sustainable
design, rating the 'whole home' as a complete package. The Code uses a 1 to 6 star
rating system to communicate the overall sustainability performance of a new home
and sets minimum standards for energy and water use at each level.
7.91
There are no specific aspirations or targets for non-residential buildings to date,
but businesses are continuing to recognise the benefits of sustainable and low carbon
design in decreased energy costs, improved workplace environments and the marketing
and reputational advantages available. This is being reflected in the increasing number
of low carbon developments coming forward in the UK.
7.92
Whilst there are no statutory targets to be met, the government is seeking to
improve the energy efficiency of public buildings and to raise public awareness of energy
use. In 2008 the requirement for Display Energy Certificates (DECs) was introduced.
Buildings with a floor area of over 1,000m2 that are occupied by a public authority or
institution providing a public service and therefore visited by the public are required to
have a DEC. DECs show the actual energy usage of a building, and help the public
see the energy efficiency of a building through a rating system from A to G, where A
has the lowest CO emissions (best) and G the highest CO emissions (worst). A DEC
2
2
is also accompanied by an advisory report that lists cost effective measures to improve
the energy rating of the building.
Hillingdon’s focus on new developments:
7.93
The policies outlined in the London Plan are applied to planning applications in
Hillingdon. Within chapter 4A of the London Plan a suite of policies considers mitigation
of and adaptation to climate change through specific policies on, for example, energy
efficiency, renewable energy, flood risk and sustainable urban drainage systems.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
53
7
7.94
Another key aspect of planning with relevance to climate change is travel demand
Hillingdon's
management. This involves mechanisms such as directing higher density residential
growth and high traffic-generating activities (such as retail) to areas with good public
transport accessibility, restricting the provision of on-site car parking in new
developments, requiring submission of travel plans, and promoting car clubs.
7.95
The council is in the process of developing its Local Development Framework
to replace the adopted development plan, the Unitary Development Plan Saved Policies
2007. The Local Development Framework will contain specific policies in relation to
Plan
mitigation of and adaptation to climate change for Hillingdon.
of
Actions
Action
Ongoing
Continue to implement the London Plan policies relating to climate change for
new developments in the borough.
Short term
Specify a minimum Code for Sustainable Homes level for new housing as part
of the emerging Local Development Framework.
Prepare and publish on the council website an advisory note for developers
on best practice in design that is adaptable to climate change by Summer
2011.
Ensure that schools in the Building Schools for the 21st Century programme
and properties within the council’s Asset Management Strategy utilise good
practice in sustainable design and construction.


London Borough of Hillingdon
54
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Action
of
Plan
Hillingdon's
7
Green roofs at Ruislip High School
Information and support:
The Mayor's Supplementary Planning Guidance on Sustainable Design and
Construction sets out how sustainability should be incorporated into new
developments:
http://www.london.gov.uk/mayor/strategies/sds/sustainable_design.jsp
Guidance and information on the Code for Sustainable Homes:
http://www.communities.gov.uk/planningandbuilding/buildingregulations/
legislation/englandwales/codesustainable/


London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
55
7
Procurement
Hillingdon's
Objective
To ensure climate change issues are embedded into the council’s procurement
strategy and processes.
Plan
Context:
of
7.96
Local authorities are large consumers of both products and services. There is
great potential to minimise environmental and climate change impacts, and bring positive
Action
benefits to the social and economic wellbeing of the local and wider community, if these
elements are assessed and incorporated within procurement processes.
7.97
The source and materials of products purchased can have sustainability impacts,
for example buying timber from sustainably managed forests or buying only recycled
paper products.
7.98
Correspondingly the purchasing of services can be undertaken in a more
sustainable way by considering factors such as delivery options and contracts to
encourage suppliers to operate more sustainable policies themselves.
7.99
The government has recognised the importance of procurement in achieving
better environmental and social outcomes. In the UK National Procurement Strategy
for Local Government (2003), it was stated that all councils should build sustainability
into their procurement strategy, processes and contracts.
Additionally, in the UK
Sustainable Development Strategy (2005), the government outlines its ambition to be
recognised amongst the leaders in sustainable procurement across EU member states
by 2009.
Hillingdon’s focus on procurement:
7.100
Some work has previously been undertaken by the council to develop a
Sustainable Procurement Strategy. However this needs to be updated to include a
focus on climate change issues and there is also a need to ensure that this strategy is
reflected in procurement processes and outcomes organisation-wide.
7.101
The council is a signatory of the Mayor’s Green Procurement Code and aims
to attain a higher level of the Code as the council’s sustainable procurement procedures
continue to improve.
7.102
It is acknowledged that there is scope for quick wins to be exploited and these
will be investigated concurrently with further work on the council’s Sustainable
Procurement Strategy.

London Borough of Hillingdon
56
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Actions
Action
Short term
of
Update
the
council’s
Sustainable
Procurement
Strategy
to
include
environmental and climate change policies with the aim of minimising the
environmental impacts of the products and services purchased and to contribute
Plan
to reducing the council’s carbon emissions by 2010.
Include criteria in the council’s tender documents to ensure sustainability is an
integral part of all tender processes by 2010.
Review the procurement of products within the council’s Facilities Management
including Oasis Café and cleaning materials.
Hillingdon's
Make local use of materials through coppicing and other woodland management
7
activities at Ruislip Woods National Nature Reserve and other open spaces.
Review the types of seats, benches and other street furniture used in the
borough and where practicable seek to use furniture from local, recycled or
reclaimed materials.
Reduce the use of peat in the borough’s gardens and open spaces by
purchasing peat-free mulches, soil improvers and fertilisers.
Begin a review process of identified potential quick wins by Summer 2009
including the following:
Waste management: Procurement of recycling and waste black bags.
Investigate if there is a more sustainable, viable alternative;
Water: Replacement of bottled water at the civic centre with filtration
devices in kitchens;
Stationery: Office Depot stationery supplier. Option to activate a 'green
button' on the website, ensuring only recycled and 'green' products are
available to purchase;
Furniture: Undertake analysis of existing suppliers to ensure they have
Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC) certification; and
Clothing: Undertake analysis of current suppliers regarding environmental
sustainability and social responsibility.
Longer term
Ensure all staff are aware of the issues regarding sustainable procurement by
incorporating this into training and induction programmes.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
57
7
What you can do:
Hillingdon's
When shopping, look at where products are made and what materials have been
used. Where possible support local producers and sustainable materials.
Invest in long lasting and durable products over disposable ones.
Help to sustain and increase the markets for recycled products by buying these
when possible and practical. Some commonly available examples are: recycled
Plan
paper and glass products and recycled plastic rubbish bags.
If you have a baby try re-usable/washable cloth nappies instead of disposables.
of
Re-use of products is better for the environment than recycling. Use charity shops,
Action
or the eBay and freecycle websites to buy or dispose of clothes, household goods,
books and DVDs etc in a sustainable way.
Choose wood products such as furniture and tissues that bear the FSC logo – this
means that the wood is from sustainable sources.
If you buy products imported from third world countries, look for the Fair Trade
logo, this means that the producers have been paid a fare wage for their work.
When buying new electrical and white goods, look at the energy efficiency rating
and where possible choose efficient appliances.
Take your own bag when shopping and try and avoid products with excessive
packaging. Buying in bulk when convenient helps to minimise waste packaging
and is often cheaper too.
Information and support:
Free support service for London based organisations committed to reducing their
environmental impact through responsible purchasing:
Mayor of London's Green Procurement Code.
http://www.greenprocurementcode.co.uk/

London Borough of Hillingdon
58
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
8 Monitoring and Review
8.1
This Strategy will be periodically reviewed and updated when considered necessary
to reflect changing government guidance, progress by the council on the identified
Review
actions and technological advances. This will ensure that the Strategy remains relevant
and timely in what is a fast developing area.
and
8.2
Monitoring will also be undertaken to ensure that the Strategy is delivering its
objectives. Targets have been developed that correspond to each of the Strategy's
key objectives and performance against these targets will be measured. The council's
own target of 40% carbon emission reductions from its own operations will be monitored
through the Carbon Trust Local Authority Carbon Management Programme and
emissions reductions will also be quantified year on year through the National Indicator
NI185 (percentage CO reduction from Local Authority operations) which the council
2
Monitoring
has included as a 'below the line' target within it's Local Area Agreement (LAA). Also
8
within the council's LAA is NI 192 (household waste reused, recycled and composted)
and performance against this target will be measured year on year. Additionally it will
be possible to track progress on achieving borough-wide emission reductions through
the data collated annually by DEFRA for the purposes of NI186 (per capita CO emissions
2
in the Local Authority area).

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
59
9
9 Appendices
Appendices
Summary of actions
Actions currently being implemented:
Actions
Community leadership
Participate in the Carbon Trust Local Authority Carbon Management
Programme.
Progress the Hillingdon Improvement Programme projects on waste and energy.
Progress identified projects to improve energy efficiency within council buildings
and utilise renewable energy:
Installation of synchronisation equipment, gas fired generator and
investigation of renewable energy options at the civic centre;
Investigate the feasibility of opportunities for hydrogeneration of energy;
and
Investigate the feasibility of the installation of voltage optimisation
equipment.
Raising awareness
Continue to provide an effective energy advice service that reaches the most
vulnerable and socially excluded members of the community, through both
direct contact and by informing those who regularly come into contact with the
target groups, for example health and social care workers.
Provide 'energy bingo' sessions during National Warm Homes Week at day
centres across the borough as an effective way of engaging with vulnerable
groups to disseminate practical energy advice.
Continue to promote the council’s Energy Advice DVD at relevant events.
Continue to provide and promote the borough's allotments and the benefits of
allotment-holding to our residents.
Adapting to impacts
Continue to implement relevant London Plan policies relating to adaptation of
climate change.

London Borough of Hillingdon
60
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Continue to protect and enhance the borough’s green spaces and open land
and work to create new open spaces in recognition of their role in adaptation
to climate change as well as their amenity and recreation value and benefits
to biodiversity.
Continue to retain and seek to increase the borough’s level of vegetation,
through tree planting and maintenance.
Appendices
9
Encourage new developments to take into account adaptation to climate change
in their design, through minimising the risk of overheating, minimising
impervious surfaces, incorporating sustainable urban drainage systems where
appropriate and including water conservation devices.
Reducing emissions:
Transport
Bid annually for and implement sustainable transport initiatives across the
borough through the Local Implementation Plan.
Continue to develop and implement a programme of travel plans for existing
businesses and large organisations (such as hospitals and further education
establishments), either individually or area-based in partnership with Transport
for London.
Annually update the Sustainable Modes of Travel Strategy for schools.
Continue to monitor the effect of School Travel Plans in reducing the volume
of CO emissions against existing baselines.
2
Continue to oppose airport capacity expansion due to the potential adverse
impacts on the highway network and air quality.
Waste
Develop the council’s Hillingdon Improvement Programme (HIP) waste and
energy initiatives including:
Increasing provision of recycling facilities to an additional 100 housing
estates in the borough;
Promoting and increasing awareness of home composting through compost
bin promotion to residents;
Carrying out an educational pilot with residents to increase participation
in recycling;

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
61
9
Developing an outreach project targeting hard-to-reach groups to increase
Appendices
their recycling;
Working to improve recycling capacity at each of the borough’s civic
amenity sites; and
Investigating the feasibility of energy generation from waste.
Lead on the development of the West London Waste Plan, which will look at
how West London can accommodate the waste it produces in a sustainable
manner.
The plan will give priority to waste reduction, recycling and
composting.
Businesses
Continue existing work schemes that promote upskilling the borough’s workforce
to decrease the proportion of workers needed from outside the borough to fill
local jobs, thereby reducing commuter travel.
Continue to work with our sub-regional transport partnerships (WestTrans and
SWELTRAC) to:
Encourage the adoption of travel plans by existing major employers in the
borough; and
Encourage improved fleet management practices as a result of freight
audits of businesses in the borough.
Existing housing
Improve the energy efficiency of the council’s own housing, and make use of
grants and other schemes to do the same for private sector housing, prioritising
households affected by fuel poverty.
Continue the existing work programme of window and boiler replacement
to achieve an average SAP rating of 75 for the council’s own housing
stock by 2010 and 76 by 2011; and
Continue to undertake maintenance and improvements in accordance
with the Hillingdon Homes Design and Technical Briefs on Sustainability
and on Energy Efficiency and Affordable Warmth.
Promote the uptake of energy efficiency measures including renewable energy
technologies to all households.

London Borough of Hillingdon
62
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Deliver the council’s Warm Zone scheme to provide grants for home
insulation and heating to various households; and
Work with the London Collaborative to develop new initiatives to address
reducing the carbon emissions of existing housing in the borough.
Continue to seek improvements in energy efficiency to the privately rented
Appendices
housing stock through liaising with landlords via the Landlords Forum including
9
promotion of the Warm Zone scheme.
Continue to work with Housing Associations and Registered Social Landlords
in the borough to encourage the delivery of awareness raising programmes
for tenants as well as improvements to the energy efficiency of the housing
stock where necessary.
Provide 'energy bingo' sessions during National Warm Homes Week at day
centres across the borough as an effective way of engaging with vulnerable
groups to disseminate practical energy advice.
Continue to promote the council’s Energy Advice DVD at relevant events.
New developments
Continue to implement the London Plan policies relating to climate change for
new developments in the borough.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
63
9
Short to medium term actions (to be undertaken within 1-3 years):
Appendices
Actions
Community leadership
Adopt a Sustainable Energy Policy for the council by 2010.
Raising awareness
Develop a comprehensive set of webpages for the council website with
information on climate change and sustainability, including information about
council initiatives and links to relevant external organisations and initiatives
including grants and funding sources by 2010.
Set up a network of 'green champions' within the council by Summer 2009 and
in the community by 2011 to increase education and engagement on climate
change issues.
Implement the 'At Home with Energy' programme in the borough’s schools,
which uses smart meters and energy efficiency education to encourage energy
conservation at home.
Develop an energy efficiency awareness raising campaign that includes a
mechanism to provide grants information and advice to the general public.
Develop an awareness raising campaign to encourage waste minimisation,
greater use of composting and higher recycling rates amongst borough
residents and businesses.
Adapting to impacts
Compile a Local Climate Impacts Profile for the borough by 2010.
Undertake a review of water usage across the council’s estate with a view to
a programme of work to minimise water consumption by 2010.
Prepare and publish on the council website an advisory note for developers
on best practice in design that is adaptable to climate change including
measures to mitigate the Urban Heat Island effect by Summer 2011.
Promote the use of water butts to residents and increase their use across the
council estate where practicable, particularly on the borough’s allotments and
cemeteries.

London Borough of Hillingdon
64
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Reducing emissions:
Transport
Adopt and implement the council’s Travel Plan by 2010.
Pilot cycle rental schemes at public transport interchanges to encourage greater
Appendices
'cycle to work' use.
9
Reduce the number of council business trips made in private vehicles, by
greater use of pool cars by 2011.
Establish a programme of 'walking buses' for schools following on from the
pilot in 2009 and develop a School Cycling Strategy and designated network.
Waste
Make use of on-site composting in the borough's open spaces and use the
resulting compost on-site to minimise landfill waste and fuel use.
Businesses
Compile information for distribution to the borough’s businesses regarding
climate change issues to include sources of information, technical advice and
funding by Summer 2011.
Existing housing
Ensure that low income consumers have access to independent advice on the
competitive energy market to avoid mis-selling and allow low income customers
to access cheap energy.
Promote the uptake of energy efficiency measures including renewable energy
technologies to all households.
Develop a programme that provides greater access to advice and
installation of renewable energy technologies including solar thermal,
photovoltaic panels and ground source heat pumps.
Develop an awareness raising campaign that includes a mechanism to
provide grants information and advice to the general public on energy
efficiency.
Implement the 'At Home with Energy' programme in the borough’s schools,
which uses smart meters and energy education to encourage energy
conservation at home.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
65
9
New developments
Appendices
Specify a minimum Code for Sustainable Homes level for new housing as part
of the emerging Local Development Framework.
Prepare and publish on the council website an advisory note for developers
on best practice in design that is adaptable to climate change by Summer
2011.
Ensure that schools in the Building Schools for the 21st Century programme
and properties within the council’s Asset Management Strategy utilise good
practice in sustainable design and construction.
Procurement
Update
the
council’s
Sustainable
Procurement
Strategy
to
include
environmental and climate change policies with the aim of minimising the
environmental impacts of the products and services purchased and to contribute
to reducing the council’s carbon emissions by 2010.
Include criteria in the council’s tender documents to ensure sustainability is an
integral part of all tender processes by 2010.
Review the procurement of products within the council's Facilities Management
including Oasis Café and cleaning materials.
Make local use of materials through coppicing and other woodland management
activities at Ruislip Woods National Nature Reserve and other open spaces.
Review the types of seats, benches and other street furniture used in the
borough and where practicable seek to use furniture from local, recycled or
reclaimed materials.
Reduce the use of peat in the borough’s gardens and open spaces by
purchasing peat-free mulches, soil improvers and fertilisers.
Begin a review process of identified potential quick wins by Summer 2009
including the following:
Waste management: Procurement of recycling and waste black bags.
Investigate if there is a more sustainable, viable alternative.
Water: Replacement of bottled water at the civic centre with filtration
devices in kitchens.
Stationery: Office Depot stationery supplier. Option to activate a 'green
button' on the website, ensuring only recycled and 'green' products are
available to purchase.

London Borough of Hillingdon
66
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Furniture: Undertake analysis of existing suppliers to ensure they have
Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC) certification
Clothing: Undertake analysis of current suppliers regarding environmental
sustainability and social responsibility.
Appendices
9

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
67
9
Aspirational or longer term actions:
Appendices
Actions
Awareness raising
Develop a training and information package to raise awareness of energy and
climate change issues targeted at employees of organisations in the borough.
Engage with council youth workers to organise an environment-themed youth
event.
Promote home water conservation through the use of water saving fittings and
appliances, the use of 'hippos' in toilet cisterns and water butts.
Promote alternatives to air conditioning to combat overheating.
Reducing emissions:
Transport
Increase the availability of car clubs, especially in new residential developments.
Continue to work with our sub-regional transport partnerships (WestTrans and
SWELTRAC) to seek funding for borough-wide travel surveys to gain a more
in-depth understanding of travel patterns with a view to improving or extending
sustainable transport networks on high demand routes.
Improve, create and enhance green spaces and create high quality linkages
between them in order to provide a network of green spaces or ‘green
infrastructure’.
Develop a network of 'all weather' paths to allow green spaces to be used in
wet conditions and thereby encouraging walking and/or cycling.
Businesses
Seek funding to work with businesses in Hillingdon to reduce their carbon
footprint and improve the energy efficiency of their buildings.
Initiate a programme of engagement with businesses to assess sustainability
work being undertaken, share and encourage best practice, and to support
businesses to become more sustainable.

London Borough of Hillingdon
68
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
Procurement
Ensure all staff are aware of the issues regarding sustainable procurement by
incorporating this into training and induction programmes.
Appendices
9

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
69
9
Glossary
Appendices
Adaptation
Involves taking steps to ensure that we are able to adapt to
the changes in the climate already occurring and that are
projected to continue to occur over the next 100 years, due
to the emissions already in the atmosphere.
Carbon Dioxide
One of the greenhouse gases and the gas most commonly
measured as an indicator of climate change.
Carbon emissions
This is an abbreviation of carbon dioxide emissions and is
commonly used in reference to mitigating climate change.
Reducing carbon emissions is used generically to represent
acting on climate change by reducing energy use or fuel use.
Carbon footprint
The sum of the greenhouse gas emissions produced directly
o r
i n d i r e c t l y
b y
t h e
a c t i v i t i e s
o f
a n
individual/business/organisation within a certain timeframe
(often a year) which is usually expressed in equivalent tonnes
of carbon dioxide.
Energy efficiency
Describes reducing energy wastage and can refer to using
technologies such as improving insulation or behaviours such
as ensuring that unused lights and appliances are switched
off.
Fossil fuels
Fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas that are hydrocarbon
deposits formed from the decayed matter of plants or animals
and found in the earth's crust. When burned these fuels
contribute to global warming as they produce greenhouse
gases such as carbon dioxide.
Global warming
The increase in the world's temperature caused by the
increase in the amount of greenhouse gases in the
atmosphere.
Greenhouse effect
A natural phenomenon whereby heat from the sun is trapped
by the gases that form the earth’s atmosphere. The trapped
heat warms the surface of the earth. Without this effect the
earth would be more than 30 degrees cooler and
uninhabitable.
Greenhouse gas
A gas that contributes to the greenhouse effect and therefore
global warming such as methane or carbon dioxide.
Intergovernmental
The IPCC was established to provide the decision-makers
Panel on Climate
and others interested in climate change with an objective
Change
source of information about climate change. The IPCC does
not conduct any research nor does it monitor climate related
data or parameters. Its role is to assess on a comprehensive,
objective, open and transparent basis the latest scientific,

London Borough of Hillingdon
70
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
technical and socio-economic literature produced worldwide
relevant to the understanding of the risk of human-induced
climate change, its observed and projected impacts and
options for adaptation and mitigation. The IPCC is a scientific
intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological
Organization (WMO) and by the United Nations Environment
Programme (UNEP).
Appendices
9
Kyoto Protocol
The Kyoto Protocol is an international agreement linked to
the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate
Change. The major feature of the Kyoto Protocol is that it
sets binding targets for 37 industrialized countries and the
European community for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG)
emissions .These amount to an average of five per cent
against 1990 levels over the five-year period 2008-2012.
The major distinction between the Protocol and the
Convention is that while the Convention encouraged
industrialised countries to stabilise GHG emissions, the
Protocol commits them to do so.
Recognising that developed countries are principally
responsible for the current high levels of GHG emissions in
the atmosphere as a result of more than 150 years of
industrial activity, the Protocol places a heavier burden on
developed nations under the principle of 'common but
differentiated responsibilities.'
The Kyoto Protocol was adopted in Kyoto, Japan, on 11
December 1997 and entered into force on 16 February 2005.
183 Parties of the Convention have ratified its Protocol to
date.
Low carbon
A development that is highly energy efficient and will have
a low level of carbon emissions associated with its operation.
A commonly accepted definition is a development that
achieves a 50% reduction in energy use than an average
development over a year.
Methane
A greenhouse gas around 20 times more potent than CO2
that
is
produced
through
anaerobic
decomposition
(decomposition without oxygen) of waste such as that which
occurs within landfill sites.
Mitigation
Involves seeking to limit and slow down future climate change
by reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases into the
atmosphere.

London Borough of Hillingdon
Climate Change Strategy 2009-2012 FINAL
71
9
Nottingham Declaration The Nottingham Declaration recognises the central role of
Appendices
local authorities in leading society's response to the challenge
of climate change. By signing the Declaration councils pledge
to systematically address the causes of climate change and
to prepare their community for its impacts.
Renewable energy
Energy that is generated from natural sources that can be
replenished such as the sun, wind or water.
Stern Review
The Stern Review was announced by the Chancellor of the
Exchequer in July 2005. The Review set out to provide a
report to the Prime Minister and Chancellor by Autumn 2006
assessing the nature of the economic challenges of climate
change and how they can be met, both in the UK and
globally.
The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change, the
most comprehensive review ever carried out on the
economics of climate change, was published on October 30
2006 and was lead by Lord Stern, the then Head of the
Government Economic Service and former World Bank Chief
Economist.
The key message of the Stern Review was that it will be
more cost effective to act on the issue of climate change now
than to deal with its consequences later.
Sustainable design and Generic term which refers to the incorporation of design
construction
techniques and materials such as the following: reuse of
land and materials; conservation of energy, water and
materials; design that makes the most of natural systems in
and around the building; measures to reduce the impact of
noise and pollution; protection and enhancement of the
natural environment and biodiversity.
Zero carbon
A development where over a year the net carbon emissions
would be zero.

Document Outline