This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Centre of life guidance for Surinder Singh'.

From: 
 
European Operational Policy Team 
 
Subject: 

 
Regulation 9 (Surinder Singh Cases) 
 
Date:   

 
01 January 2014 
 
Issue Number: 

02/2014 
 
 
Purpose of Notice 
 
1.  This notice must be read alongside notice 05/11 and section 5.5 of chapter 5 
of  the  ECIs.  This  notice  provides  guidance  to  case  workers  on  how  to 
consider  applications  from  the  non-EEA  national  spouse  or  civil  partner  of  a 
British citizen who has exercised Treaty rights in another EEA member state. 
 
Background 
 
2.  The Immigration (European Economic Area) (Amendment) (No.2) Regulations 
2013  were  amended  on  01  January  2014  to  include  a  new  threshold  test  to 
tighten the circumstances in which family members of British Citizens can rely 
on  the  Court  of  Justice  of  the  European  Union  (ECJ)  judgment  in  Surinder 
Singh  
C-370/90).  The  Surinder  Singh  judgment  was  implemented  into  the 
2006 Regulations by way of regulation 9.  
 
3.  The new requirement at regulation 9(2)(c) and 9(3) requires the British citizen 
to  have  transferred  the  centre  of  their  life  to  another  EEA  member  state, 
where they resided as a worker or self-employed person with their spouse or 
civil partner before returning to the UK.  
 
4.  This  change  was  made  to  ensure  that  a  British  Citizen  engages  in  genuine 
and  effective  use  of  the  rights  conferred  by  EU  free movement  law  before a 
right  to  reside  in  the  United  Kingdom  is  conferred  on  a  non-EEA  family 
member.    The  principle  behind  Surinder  Singh  is  the  need  to  ensure  that 
nationals  of  a  Member  State  are  not  deterred  from  exercising  Treaty  rights 
through  not  being  able  to  return  to  their  Member  State  of  origin  with  third 
country family members. 
 
5.  These amendments came into force on the 01 January 2014 and apply to all 
applications for documentation on or after that date, however, see Annex A for 
details of the transitional arrangements.  
 
Consideration 
 

6.  Regulation  9(2)(c)  requires  a  British  citizen  to  demonstrate  that  they  have 
transferred  the  centre  of  their  life  to  another  EEA  member  state  where  they 
were residing as a worker or self employed person.  
 

7.  Regulation 9(3) specifies the factors to be considered when deciding whether 
a  British  citizen  has  transferred  the  centre  of  their  life  to  another  member 
state. These include, but are not limited to: 
 
a.  the  period  of  residence  in  another  EEA  member  state  as  a  worker  or 
self-employed person; 
b.  the location of the British citizen’s principal residence; and 
c.  the degree of integration of the British citizen in the host member state. 
 
The criteria are indicative and it is not necessary to meet all three. 
 
Period of residence in another EEA member state 
 
8.  In general, the longer the British citizen has resided in another EEA member 
state as a worker or self-employed person, the more likely it is that they have 
transferred the centre of their life to that member state.  
 
9.  For  example,  a  British  citizen  who  has  lived  and  worked  in  another  member 
state  for  a  period  of  two  years  is  more  likely  meet  the  requirement  of 
regulation 9(2)(c) than a British citizen who was employed  in another Member 
state for a period of four months.  
 
Principal residence 
 
10. The principal residence is the place and country where the British citizen’s life 
is primarily based.  
 
11. For example, a British citizen worked in France for three months, staying in a 
hotel  during  the  week  and  returning  to  their  main  home  in  the  UK  at  the 
weekends.  In  this  case  they  are  unlikely  to  meet  the  requirements  of 
regulation  9(2)(c)  as  their  principal  residence  would  be  considered  to  be  the 
UK. 
 
Degree of integration 
 
12. When  considering  the  degree  of  integration  in  another  EEA  member  state, 
relevant factors may include:  
 
a.  Does  the  British  citizen  have  any  children  born  in  the  host  member 
state?  If  so,  are  the  children  attending  schools  in  the  host  member 
state? 
b.  Does the British citizen have any other family members resident in the 
host member state?  
c.  Has the British citizen immersed themselves into the life and culture of 
the  host  member  state?  For  example,  have  they  bought  property 
there?  Do  they  speak  the  language?  Are  they  involved  with  the  local 
community?  
 
The  more  of  these  factors  that  are  present  on  a  case,  the  more  likely  the 
British citizen is to be considered as having transferred the centre of their life. 

 
13. For example, a British citizen is working in France, is fluent in French and has 
bought a house there. Their children were born in France and are educated in 
a  French  school  where  the  British  citizen  sits  on  the  school  council.  In  this 
example it is likely that the British citizen has moved the centre of their life to 
France.  Contrast  with  the  example  of  a British  citizen  who  will  be  working  in 
France for three months, who resides in a hotel and returns to the UK every 
weekend.  They  don’t  speak  the  language  and  educate  their  children  in  a 
school in the UK. In this second example  they are less  likely to have moved 
the centre of their life to the UK.  
 
14. It  should  be  noted  that  the  factors  set  out  in  regulation  9(3)  are  not 
determinative.  The  question  as  to  whether  the  British  citizen  would  be 
deterred  from  exercising  their  free  movement  rights  were  their  spouse/civil 
partner refused, must be determined having regard to all relevant factors.   
 
 
Appeal rights 
 
15. Where  any  of  the  above  factors  are  not  satisfied,  the  application  should  be 
refused in line with regulation 9(2)(c).  
 
16. All  such  refusals  would  attract  an  in-country  right  of  appeal  subject  to  the 
restrictions in regulation 26. 
 
Contact 
 
17. If  you  have  any  queries  about  this  notice,  please  contact  [REDACTED  – 
section  40(2)]  on  [REDACTED  –  section  40(2)],  or  email  the  European 
Operational Policy Mailbox at xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xxx.xx 
 
[REDACTED – section 40(2)
Head of European Operational Policy 
01 January 2014 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Annex A 
 
Transitional Arrangements 
 

 
1.  The changes to regulation 9 come into effect on  01 January 2014. However, 
transitional  provisions  which  allow  applicants  to apply  on  the previous  scope 
of the regulation 9 will apply in certain circumstances.  
 
2.  The transitional provisions apply  where the spouse/civil partner of the British 
citizen: 
 
a)  has  a  right  to  permanent  residence  in  the  UK  on  the  01  January 
2014; or 
 
b)  has a right to reside in the UK on 01 January 2014 and either: 
 
i. 
Holds  a  valid  registration  certificate  or  residence  card  or 
EEA family permit issued under the 2006 Regulations; or 
 
ii. 
Has  made  an application under  the 2006  Regulations for 
a registration certificate or residence card  or EEA family 
permit which has not yet been determined; or 
 
iii. 
Has  made  an application under  the 2006  Regulations for 
a registration certificate or residence card which has been 
refused  and  in  relation  to  which  an  appeal  under 
regulation  26  could  be  brought  whilst  the  appellant  is  in 
the  UK  (excluding  out  of  time  appeals)    or  an  appeal  is 
pending. 
 
3.  If  the  above  criteria  are  met,  these  transitional  arrangements  apply  until  the 
occurrence of one of the following events: 
 
a)  the six month validity period to enter the UK in reliance on a family 
permit has expired and the family member has not entered the UK;  
b)  An appeal (excluding out of time appeals) can no longer be brought 
and no appeal has been brought; 
c)  Any  appeal  against  the  decision  to  refuse  to  issue  residence 
documentation is dismissed, withdrawn or abandoned; 
d)  The person ceases to be the family member or family member who 
has retained the right of residence; 
e)  Any  right  of  permanent  residence  is  lost  as  a  result  of  two  more 
consecutive years absence from the UK.