This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Payments for disclosure of prosecution evidence'.


  Nicola Murchie 
Information Governance Adviser 
Information Governance 
   
 
Chief Executive’s Office 
Legal Aid Agency 
8th Floor (8.42) 
 
Mark Webster 
  102 Petty France 
T 0300 200 2020 
[FOI #171649 email] 
E 
 
InformationGovernanceLAA@legal
aid.gsi.gov.uk 
 
 
www.justice.gov.uk 
 
Our Reference: 84617 
   
2 September 2013 
 
Freedom of Information Request  
 
Dear Mr Webster, 
 
Thank you for your online request of 5 August 2013 in which you asked for the following 
information from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ): 
 
1.  Have representatives of the Legal Aid Agency or Ministry of Justice discussed 
these fees for disclosure of prosecution evidence with representatives of other 
government departments or the Forensic Regulator? If so, which department 
or persons, and what was the outcome of those discussions? 
 

2.  Have additional funds been made available to the Legal Aid Agency to pay fees 
for the disclosure of prosecution evidence? 
 

3.  Does the Legal Aid Agency have a policy with regard to paying fees for the 
disclosure of prosecution evidence? If so, what is that policy? Has the Legal 
Aid Agency set maximum limits for such fees? If so, what are the limits? 

 
Your request has been handled under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) 2000. 
 
I can confirm that the MoJ holds the information you have requested and I will answer each 
of your questions in turn. 
 
1.  Have representatives of the Legal Aid Agency or Ministry of Justice discussed 
these fees for disclosure of prosecution evidence with representatives of other 
government departments or the Forensic Regulator? If so, which department 
or persons, and what was the outcome of those discussions? 

 
Representatives from the Legal Aid Agency (LAA) have met with colleagues from the Home 
Office and Crown Prosecution Service.  All parties were keen to work together and agreed, 
in particular, that it is important for the defence to have appropriate access in accordance 
with relevant regulation and the Criminal Procedure Rules. 
 
It was noted that whilst historically the defence has not been charged for access, and use of, 
prosecution laboratory facilities, a number of contractors have started to levy a charge in a 
small number of cases. Whilst there have been a handful of Judgements on related matters, 
there is no contractual obligation, under the terms of the contract between the forensic 
providers and the Home Office/individual police forces, for the forensic providers to host 

defence examinations free of change. There is a contractual obligation to allow ‘access’ for 
the defence experts but not necessarily the facilities, staff or equipment without charge. 
 
To date, we have received a small number of applications for prior authority to incur 
expenditure of this type. The LAA will continue to consider any further requests on a case by 
case basis via our prior authority process and we will continue to monitor the volume and 
value of such applications, and to gather further information that can be used to both inform 
Ministers and discussions with officials from other Governmental Departments. 
 
2.  Have additional funds been made available to the Legal Aid Agency to pay fees 
for the disclosure of prosecution evidence? 
 
No.   
 

3.  Does the Legal Aid Agency have a policy with regard to paying fees for the 
disclosure of prosecution evidence? If so, what is that policy? Has the Legal 
Aid Agency set maximum limits for such fees? If so, what are the limits? 

 
The LAA will pay reasonable costs on a case by case basis. There is no upper limit set at 
this time but as above we will monitor the impact of these costs as an upper limit may be set 
in Regulations in future.  
 
You have the right to appeal our response if you think it is incorrect. Details can be found in 
the ‘How to Appeal’ section attached at the end of this letter. 
 
Disclosure Log 
 
You can also view information that the Ministry of Justice has disclosed in response to 
previous Freedom of Information requests. Responses are anonymised and published on 
our on-line disclosure log which can be found on the gov.uk website: 
https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ministry-of-justice/series/freedom-of-
information-disclosure-log 
 
 
Yours sincerely 
 
 
Nicola Murchie 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

How to Appeal 
 
Internal Review 
If you are not satisfied with this response, you have the right to an internal review. The 
handling of your request will be looked at by someone who was not responsible for the 
original case, and they will make a decision as to whether we answered your request 
correctly. 
 
If you would like to request a review, please write or send an email to the Data Access and 
Compliance Unit within two months of the date of this letter, at the  
following address: 
 
Data Access and Compliance Unit (10.34), 
Information & Communications Directorate, 
Ministry of Justice, 
102 Petty France, 
London 
SW1H 9AJ 
 
E-mail: [email address] 
 
Information Commissioner’s Office 
If you remain dissatisfied after an internal review decision, you have the right to apply to the 
Information Commissioner’s Office. The Commissioner is an independent regulator who has 
the power to direct us to respond to your request differently, if he considers that we have 
handled it incorrectly. 
 
You can contact the Information Commissioner’s Office at the following address: 
 
Information Commissioner’s Office, 
Wycliffe House, 
Water Lane, 
Wilmslow, 
Cheshire 
SK9 5AF 
Internet address: https://www.ico.gov.uk/Global/contact_us.aspx