This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Queen's Regulations for the RAF'.

Appx 17 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ACCEPTANCE OF BUSINESS APPOINTMENTS 
APPENDIX 17 
(Referred to in para J910
  
GUIDANCE TO COMMANDING OFFICERS CONSIDERING 
REQUESTS FROM SERVICE PERSONNEL TO TAKE UP PAID 
CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT DURING OFF-DUTY PERIODS 
 
 
1. 
Requests to undertake civilian employment during off-duty periods will not be authorised where the 
activity will bring the Service into disrepute.  In considering requests for such employment, Commanding 
Officers must take into account not only whether such employment complies with the specific 
requirements of QRs but also how such employment may be perceived by the public and the media. In 
particular, they should consider:  
 
 
(a) 
Nature of the Employment.  For example, some private security roles require the regular 
deployment of physical force which may be adversely portrayed if it becomes apparent that 
serving members of the Armed Forces are involved.  
 
(b) 
Ethos of the Organisation.  For example, some organisations may be perceived as having 
a ‘political’ agenda because they adopt a campaigning stance on certain controversial issues.  Care 
must be taken that a formal employment relationship with such an organisation does not appear to 
compromise the political neutrality of the Armed Forces.  
 
(c) 
Conflict of Interest.  There must be no conflict of interest between the individual’s Service 
duties and those required by his/her civilian employer.  
 
(d) 
Remuneration.  Service personnel will already be drawing a salary from the Armed 
Forces.  Care must be taken to avoid the perception that civil employment during off-duty periods 
detracts from availability for military duties.  At the more senior levels (1* level and above), 
including during Terminal Leave, an officer drawing significant remuneration from a civilian 
employer while still in receipt of a substantial salary from the Armed Forces may attract criticism.  
The perception may be compounded if his or her new employer is another public sector 
organisation, or defence industry partner. In the latter circumstances, the presumption is that 
permission will not be granted.  
 
(e) 
Other Benefits.  Care should be taken to ensure that there are no non-financial benefits 
resulting from a formal relationship with a civilian employer that could attract criticism.  
 
2. 
If a Commanding Officer judges that any of the factors above are likely to bring the Service into disrepute 
he should decline the request. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
QR(RAF) 
 
 
 
 
 
A17-1   
 
 
 
 
AL31/Feb 13