This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Alcohol'.

The cost of alcohol harm to the NHS in England (2009/2010)  
A note on methodology and changes in cost components  
 
 
Introduction 
 
A Cabinet Office (2003) paper1 quantified the cost of alcohol misuse to the NHS in 
England at £1.4bn - £1.7bn per annum in 2001 prices. This estimate was updated by 
HIAT (2008)2 to £2.7bn per annum in 2006/2007 prices.  
 
Using similar methods to the original paper, it is estimated that the annual cost of 
alcohol harm to the NHS in England is £3.5bn in 2009/10 prices. The cost is divided 
into the following categories:  
 
 
Table 1 
 
Category of cost 
Cost (£m 2009/10) 
Hospital inpatient & day visits: 
  
Directly attributable to alcohol misuse 
£385m 
Partly attributable to alcohol misuse 
£1,386m 
Hospital outpatient visits 
£246m 
Accident and emergency visits 
£696m 
Ambulance services 
£449m 
NHS GP consultations 
£112m 
Practice nurse consultations 
£16m 
Dependency prescribed drugs 
£8m 
Specialist treatment services 
£122m 
Other health care costs 
£60m 
Total 
£3,480m 
 
 
This represents a 29% increase on the HIAT (2008) estimate. This note will explain 
what the causes of this increase were.  
 
 
Preliminary calculations: the number of higher-risk drinkers in England  
 
Some of the estimates above (Hospital outpatient visits, NHS GP consultations, 
Practice nurse consultations, Other health care costs) are based on the estimated 
number of higher-risk drinkers in England. This is calculated as follows. 
 
The Office for National Statistics mid-year population estimates for England (2009) 
record 20,548,100 men and 21,557,200 women aged 16+. It is estimated that, in 
2009, 7% of these men and 4% of these women were higher-risk drinkers, i.e. 
drinking more than 50 or 35 units of alcohol per week, respectively3.  
 
                                                
1 Cabinet Office (2003). Alcohol misuse: how much does it cost? London: Cabinet Office. Available at 
http://sia.dfc.unifi.it/costi%20uk.pdf 
2 HIAT (2008). The cost of alcohol harm to the NHS in England. London: Department of Health. 
Available at http://www.lho.org.uk/viewResource.aspx?id=13594 
3 ONS (2011) Smoking and drinking among adults, 2009. Newport: Office of National Statistics. 
Available at http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/search/index.html?newquery=smoking+and+drinking 
 
- 1 - 

In Table 2 below, the estimated numbers of higher-risk drinkers in England in 2009 
are compared with figures for 2006 used in the HIAT (2008) calculation.  
 
 
Table 2 
 
Number of higher-risk drinkers in England - 2006 and 2009  
  
2006 
2009 
Males  
1,597,560 
1,438,367 
Females  
1,055,985 
862,288 
Total  
2,653,545 
2,300,655 
 
 
Note that the resulting figures for 2009 are lower than those for 2006 used in the 
HIAT (2008) calculation (8% of men and 5% of women classed as heavy drinkers):  
 
However, the number of higher-risk drinkers affects only a part of the total cost of 
alcohol harm to the NHS, and it is possible that some of the previously ‘higher-risk’ 
drinkers have transferred into the ‘increasing-risk’ or ‘lower-risk’ categories which 
also influence the total cost of alcohol harm. In addition, the proportion of drinkers in 
the higher risk category has been relatively steady over the past decade or so4, and it 
is possible that past numbers of higher-risk drinkers have an effect on current costs.  
 
 
Methodology note  
 
Where appropriate, methods identical to those used in the HIAT (2008) calculations 
are used throughout the note. Any departures from these are noted and explained.  
 
 
Hospital inpatient and day visits 
 
The cost of alcohol-related inpatient stays made up the largest portion of the original 
Cabinet Office (2003) calculation. The HIAT (2008) update re-estimated this cost 
using the same data sources, assumptions and methodologies as the interim Public 
Service Agreement target on alcohol-related admissions. These were based in part 
on the provisional findings of a review of the relevant evidence on alcohol-related 
conditions, and the corresponding alcohol-attributable fractions (AAFs), by the North 
West Public Health Observatory (NWPHO).  
 
The NWPHO publishes a series for alcohol-related admissions using the methods set 
out by Jones et al. (2008)5. The NWPHO series is derived by applying AAFs to the 
diagnostic codes found within Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) records, considering 
any position within the diagnostic sequence to be relevant. Conditions entirely 
attributable to alcohol, such as alcoholic liver disease or alcoholic cardiomyopathy, 
have an AAF of 1 while conditions for which alcohol is one among a number of a 
causes have AAFs of less than 1. For example, around one quarter of deaths from 
malignant neoplasm of the oesophagus in men are estimated to be attributable to 
alcohol. 
 
                                                
4 ONS General Lifestyle Survey, 2008, data on drinking for 1998-2008 
5 Jones L, Bellis M A, Dedman D, Sumnall H, Tocque K (2008). Alcohol-attributable fractions for 
England: alcohol-attributable mortality and hospital admissions. Liverpool: Liverpool John Moores 
University. 
 
- 2 - 

The cost estimates produced here use this approach, but using DH’s own HES-
based series for alcohol-related admissions which differs slightly from the series 
reported by NWPHO. As an illustration of the effect of basing alcohol-related 
admissions on the entire diagnostic sequence, we also report an estimate of costs 
restricted to primary diagnosis only. This approach gives an estimate of around 
195,000 hospital admissions compared with around 1.1m for all diagnoses. Using the 
same average cost, the total cost estimate is correspondingly smaller at £326 million, 
£1.4bn less than the all diagnoses-based estimate. The higher figure is used here to 
maintain consistency with previous costings. However, the approach to alcohol-
related hospital admissions adopted in future will need to take account of the 
NWPHO consultation exercise on methods used to estimate alcohol-related hospital 
admissions in England6.    
 
 
In 2009/2010 prices, it is estimated that directly alcohol-related cases (those with an 
AAF of 1) generate a cost of £385 million, whilst partially alcohol-related cases (AAF 
< 1) cost £1,386 million. 
 
 
Hospital outpatient visits  
 
The Birmingham Untreated Heavy Drinkers Project (BUHD)7 recruited 500 untreated 
heavy drinkers in 1997, and followed them for a period of 10 years at two-yearly 
intervals. In the final stage in 2007, 259 participants out of the original sample were 
interviewed. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used in interviews to 
examine levels and patterns of drinking, and participants’ opinions on drinking as well 
as their own lives. The final report, published in 2009, discusses heavy drinkers’ use 
of hospital-based services, including outpatient attendance, and concludes that the 
cohort are twice as likely to use outpatient services8 as the general population.  
 
The General Lifestyle Survey (2009)9 finds an annual average of 1.04 outpatient 
attendances for men, and 1.17 attendances for women. Given the finding that higher-
risk drinkers are twice as likely as the general population to use outpatient services, 
these figures can be taken as estimates of higher-risk drinkers’ excess usage. 
Multiplying average usage by the number of higher-risk drinkers yields a total of 2.5 
million alcohol-related outpatient attendances per annum. Use of BUHD implies that 
only higher risk drinkers’ excess attendance is included and therefore results in an 
underestimate of the costs of outpatient visits to the extent that those drinking at 
more moderate levels of risk also have excess attendances. 
 
 
The cost of alcohol-related outpatient visits 
 
NHS Reference Costs (2009/2010) data states a national average cost of £98.39 for 
outpatient attendances. Applying this to the annual number of 2.5 million attendances 
yields an annual cost of £246 million.  
 
 
                                                
6http://www.lape.org.uk/downloads/Alcohol%20Related%20Hospital%20Admissions%20Consultation
.pdf  
7http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_
123885  
8 As well as A&E services  
9 http://data.gov.uk/dataset/general_lifestyle_survey  
 
- 3 - 

The cost to the NHS of alcohol-related outpatient visits is estimated to be £246 
million per annum in 2009/10 prices.  
 
 
Accident and Emergency visits 
 
A 2001 Cabinet Office-commissioned MORI poll of Accident and Emergency (A&E) 
staff estimated the percentage of A&E visits related to alcohol consumption. Although 
this poll is now over 10 years old and may therefore be considered out-of-date, no 
new estimates are available. Furthermore, the use of the polling data maintains 
consistency with the 2003 Cabinet Office report as well as the HIAT (2008) report. 
The MORI poll’s estimate was that 35% of A&E visits are alcohol-related.  
 
Hospital Episode Statistics (2009/10)10 show that there were 20,511,908 A&E visits in 
2009/10. Applying the MORI figure above gives 7,179,168 alcohol-related A&E visits. 
It should be noted that the figure of 35% has been taken elsewhere to lie at the upper 
end of the range of possible estimates of the proportion of A&E attendances 
attributable to alcohol. A report by the NWPHO on alcohol-related harm in Leeds11 
used 35% to produce a ‘high’ estimate of A&E attendances (‘low’ and ‘mid’ estimates 
being based on proportions of 2.9% and 7%). A report on alcohol misuse in 
Scotland12 cites a number of sources for the proportion of A&E attendances related 
to alcohol, a range of 2% to 40% being reported. Applying these limits to England 
would give a range of A&E attendances between 410,000 and 8.2 million.  
 
 
The cost of alcohol-related Accident and Emergency visits 
 
PSSRU (2010)13 gives a national average cost of £97 for A&E treatment not leading 
to an admission, and £131 for treatment leading to an admission. This classification 
of A&E treatment is different from that used in the HIAT (2008) report which used an 
average of PSSRU (2007) data for high cost investigations (referred/discharged) and 
low-cost investigations (referred/discharged). As the term ‘referred/discharged’ can 
be regarded as applying to ‘non-admitted’ patients14, the lower PSSRU (2010) figure 
of £97 was used to estimate the costs of alcohol-related A&E visits.  
 
Combining this with the number of visits yields a total cost of £696 million per annum. 
While we note that this estimate is comparable with previous costings, the range of 
between 2% and 40% for the proportion of A&E attendances which are alcohol-
related gives costs ranging from around £40 million to approximately £796 million. 
Further research is being considered by DH on the extent to which A&E attendances 
are related to alcohol consumption in order to refine this estimate. 
 
 
The cost to the NHS of alcohol-related Accident and Emergency visits is estimated to 
be £696 million per annum in 2009/10 prices.  
                                                
10 http://www.hesonline.nhs.uk/Ease/servlet/ContentServer?siteID=1937&categoryID=1272  
11 Jones l, Bates G, McCoy E, Tiffany C, Perkins C, Bellis M (2011). The economic and social costs of 
alcohol-related harm in Leeds 2008/09. Liverpool: Liverpool John Moores University. 
12 Scottish Government Social Research (2010). The societal costs of alcohol misuse in Scotland for 
2007. Edinburgh: Scottish Government Social Research. 
13 http://www.pssru.ac.uk/pdf/uc/uc2010/uc2010.pdf, page 119 
14 A&E HRG Definitions Manual: 
http://www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/Services/casemix/products/AEDefinitionsManual.pdf makes a 
distinction between A&E cases that are ‘referred/discharged’ and ‘died/admitted’  
 
- 4 - 

 
 
Emergency ambulance/paramedic journeys  
 
The MORI poll data mentioned above is also used for this category of NHS costs, 
that is, 35% of emergency ambulance/paramedic journeys are considered alcohol-
related. The Ambulance Services in England statistics (2009/10)15 indicate that there 
were 4,700,000 ambulance journeys in 2009/10 in total. This number encompasses 
journeys classed as ‘emergency’ as well as ‘urgent’. Previous estimates of costs of 
alcohol costs to NHS used ‘emergency’ journeys only. Since this breakdown was not 
available for 2009/10, it is estimated that 85% of total journeys were ‘emergency’16. 
This brings the total number of emergency journeys to approximately 3,996,000. We 
estimate that 35% of these, or 1,398,700, were alcohol-related.  
 
 
The cost of alcohol-related emergency ambulance/paramedic journeys  
 
PSSRU (2008)17 estimate a national average cost of £6.80 per minute for an 
emergency ambulance journey, and £6.90 per minute for a paramedic unit’s journey. 
To obtain costs in 2009/10 prices, HCHS Pay and Price inflators were used18. This 
yielded estimates of £7.20 per minute for an emergency ambulance journey and 
£7.30 per minute for a paramedic unit’s journey. Taking an average of these costs 
and applying the average journey time of 44.4 minutes yields an average cost of 
£321.30 per journey. Applying this figure to the number of journeys above yields a 
cost of £449 million per annum.  
 
 
The cost to the NHS of alcohol-related emergency ambulance/paramedic journeys is 
estimated to be £449 million per annum in 2009/10 prices.  
 
 
NHS GP consultations 
 
Cabinet Office (2003), through personal communication with the authors of the 
Birmingham Untreated Heavy Drinkers project, estimated that 22% - 35% of the 
cohort’s GP visits were alcohol-related. An average of these figures – 28.5% - is 
used in the calculations below.  
 
The General Lifestyle Survey (2009) finds that, on average, men had four GP 
appointments per year, whilst women had six. The estimated numbers of male and 
female heavy drinkers in the same period were 1,438,367 and 862,288, respectively.  
 
We therefore assume that 1,438,367 male heavy drinkers each had four GP visits 
annually, 28.5% of which were alcohol-related. Similarly, we assume that 862,288 
female heavy drinkers each had six GP visits, 28.5% of which were alcohol-related. 
This yields a total of 3.11 million alcohol-related GP consultations per annum. This 
again excludes any costs associated with more moderate drinkers. 
 
                                                
15 http://www.ic.nhs.uk/statistics-and-data-collections/audits-and-performance/ambulance/ambulance-
services-england-2009-10  
16 In 2006/07 this fraction was 83%, but had been increasing steadily since the mid-90s (68% in 
1995/1996), hence the 85% estimate for 2009/10.  
17 http://www.pssru.ac.uk/pdf/uc/uc2008/uc2008.pdf, page 82 
18 http://www.pssru.ac.uk/pdf/uc/uc2010/uc2010.pdf, page 223 
 
- 5 - 

 
The costs of alcohol-related GP consultations  
 
PSSRU (2010)19 identifies a cost of £36 per 11.7 minute GP surgery consultation 
session including qualification costs and direct care staff costs as well as salary 
oncosts and overheads. Combining this with the number of alcohol-related 
consultations calculated above yields a cost of £112 million per annum. If we assume 
that medicines prescribed as a result of these consultations can also be regarded as 
alcohol-related, we allow for an additional £39 of prescription costs per consultation, 
again drawing on PSSRU (2010). This would give a total cost associated with GP 
consultations of £234 million. However, we report the lower estimate here as it is 
comparable with previous costings. 
 
 
The cost to the NSH of alcohol-related GP consultations is estimated to be £112 
million per annum in 2009/10 prices. 
 
 
Practice nurse consultations  
 
It is assumed that the same proportion (28.5%) of heavy drinkers’ practice nurse 
appointments as GP appointments are related to alcohol. The General Lifestyle 
Survey (2009) finds that, on average, both men and women had two practice nurse 
appointments per year.  
 
On the basis that 1,438,367 male heavy drinkers and 862,288 female heavy drinkers 
each have two practice nurse visits annually, 28.5% of which are alcohol-related, 
there are an estimated 1.31 million alcohol-related practice nurse consultations per 
annum. The same caveat with regard to drinking at lower levels applies as before. 
 
 
The cost of alcohol-related practice nurse consultations 
 
PSSRU (2010)20 estimates a cost of £12 per practice nurse consultation in 2009/10 
prices, including qualification costs, salary oncosts and overheads. Using the above 
calculation of consultation numbers yields a total cost of around £16 million per 
annum.  
 
 
The cost to the NSH of alcohol-related practice nurse consultations is estimated to be 
£16 million per annum in 2009/10 prices. 
 
 
Specialist alcohol treatment services including community prescribing 
 
A significant proportion of specialist alcohol treatment services are provided by 
voluntary and other organisations independent of the NHS, although NHS provision 
is still substantial. Cabinet Office (2003) cites a paper by Alcohol Concern (2002), 
which used a survey methodology to assess expenditure on specialist alcohol 
treatment services. HIAT (2008) adjusted the Alcohol Concern (2002) figure to allow 
for incomplete response and uprated it for inflation.  
                                                
19 http://www.pssru.ac.uk/pdf/uc/uc2010/uc2010.pdf, page 167 
20 Ibid, page 164  
 
- 6 - 

 
As the Alcohol Concern (2002) study is now several years old, we use 2009/10 data 
from the National Alcohol Treatment Monitoring System (NATMS). This covers 
structured treatment, inpatient treatment, residential rehabilitation and community 
prescribing. We exclude residential rehabilitation as this is provided primarily by local 
authorities rather than the NHS.  
 
As an item for the costs of alcohol dependency-prescribed drugs has been included 
in previous analyses, we have separated out community prescribing costs from other 
specialist treatment costs. These costs include all the costs associated with the 
prescribing and monitoring of drug treatment and are estimated at £8 million. We 
have not allowed for any overlap with resources identified elsewhere.  
 
For the purposes of comparison with HIAT (2008) and Cabinet Office (2003), we 
report the net ingredient cost (NIC) of disulfiram and acamprosate, the two agents 
considered in those reports and the main compounds used to treat alcohol 
dependence. According to Prescription Cost Analysis (2009)21 data, NIC in 2009 for 
acamprosate was £1.59 million and, for disulfiram, was £792,000, yielding a total 
annual cost of £2.38 million in 2009 prices.    
 
Excluding residential rehabilitation and community prescribing costs, NATMS gives a 
cost of £122 million for specialist alcohol treatment services across just over 117,000 
episodes of care (as opposed to patients treated), for an average cost of £1,042 per 
episode. Table 3 below summarises the total costs of specialist alcohol treatment 
services.  
 
 
Table 3 
 
Episodes of care 
Average cost per episode 
Total cost  
117,144 
£1,042 
£122,084,556 
 
 
The method and estimate for calculating the 2009/10 costs of specialist alcohol 
treatment services differ substantially from both the original Cabinet Office (2003) 
paper and the HIAT (2008) update, thus limiting comparability. However, using 
NATMS results in improved accuracy of the final estimate.  
 
 
The cost of NHS specialist alcohol treatment services is estimated to be £122 million 
per annum in 2009/10 prices.  
 
 
Other health care usage 
 
Cabinet Office (2003) and HIAT (2008) further included the cost of alcohol-related 
counselling, community psychiatric nurse visits, health visitors and usage of ‘other 
services’ in their calculations. These categories were defined using the Birmingham 
Untreated Heavy Drinkers Project.  
 
                                                
21 http://www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/prescostanalysis2009  
 
- 7 - 

The latest publication in the series (Rolfe et al., 200922), presents the usage of these 
four categories for 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007 in terms of the number of visits 
per higher-risk drinker. The arithmetic average of this usage is taken for both males 
and females, resulting in the annual usage rates presented in Table 4 below. From 
Table 2 above, the estimated numbers of male and female higher-risk drinkers in 
England are 1,438,367 and 862,288, respectively. The figures in the first table are 
multiplied by these estimates in order to derive annual population usage (Table 5).  
 
 
Table 4 
 
Mean contacts 
Males 
Females 
Counselling 
0.200 
0.614 
Community Psychiatric Nurse 
0.250 
0.100 
Health visitor 
0.004 
0.640 
Other services 
0.132 
0.398 
 
 
Table 5 
 
Number of contacts  
Males 
Females 
Counselling 
287,830 
529,330 
Community Psychiatric Nurse 
359,592 
86,229 
Health visitor 
6,254 
551,864 
Other services 
189,177 
343,536 
Totals 
842,852 
1,510,959 
 
 
The cost of other alcohol-related health care  
 
The cost of a counselling session is taken from PSSRU (2007)23 and uprated by the 
HCHS pay and price index, resulting in a cost of £36.95 per visit in 2009/10 prices, 
including salary oncosts and overheads. The cost of a visit from a community 
psychiatric nurse is taken from PSSRU (2010)24, a figure of £70 an hour of face-to-
face contact equating to £23.33 for a 20-minute session. This is, again, reported in 
2009/10 prices and includes salary oncosts and overheads. The cost of a session 
with a health visitor is stated in PSSRU (2010)25 to be £100 per hour of client contact 
in 2009/10 prices. This equates to £33.33 for a 20-minute session, including 
qualification costs, salary oncosts and overheads.  
 
The cost of ‘other professionals’ was stated in Cabinet Office (2003) to be £1.24 per 
session, derived from BUHD data. No further information on this cost could be found 
in 2008 and it was therefore inflated by the HCHS pay and price index. This was 
repeated in the current calculations, yielding a cost of £1.63 per session in 2009/10 
prices. Multiplying usage figures by costs yields the following results:  
 
                                                
22Rolfe A, Orford J, Martin O (2009). Birmingham untreated heavy drinkers project. Birmingham: 
Collaborative group for the study of alcohol, drugs, gambling and addiction in clinical and community 
settings. Available at:   
http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_1
23885 
23 http://www.pssru.ac.uk/pdf/uc/uc2007/uc2007.pdf, page 152 
24http://www.pssru.ac.uk/pdf/uc/uc2010/uc2010.pdf, page 184 
25 Ibid, page 161 
 
- 8 - 

 
Table 6 
 
Costs of care  
Males  
Females  
Total  
Counselling 
£10,636,335  £19,560,624  £30,196,959 
Community Psychiatric Nurse 
£8,390,474 
£2,012,005  £10,402,480 
Health visitor 
£208,459  £18,395,477  £18,603,936 
Other services 
£308,424 
£560,084 
£868,508 
Totals 
£19,543,692  £40,528,191  £60,071,883 
 
 
The cost of other alcohol-related healthcare usage (i.e. that not covered elsewhere) 
is estimated to be £60 million per annum.  
 
 
Sources of increasing costs – a comparison of 2006/2007 and 2009/2010 
 
The table below presents the costs of alcohol harm to the NHS in England for both 
2006/2007 (HIAT 2008) and 2009/10. Increases in individual figures are calculated.  
 
 
Table 7  
 

Category of cost 
Cost (£ 2006/07) 
Cost (£ 2009/10) 
% Increase 
Hospital inpatient & day visits: 
  
  
  
Directly attributable to alcohol misuse 
£167,581,714 
£384,526,067 
129.5% 
Partly attributable to alcohol misuse 
£1,022,709,552 
£1,385,745,888 
35.5% 
Hospital outpatient visits 
£272,364,404 
£246,434,737 
-9.5% 
Accident and emergency visits 
£645,722,634 
£696,379,277 
7.8% 
Ambulance services 
£372,377,250 
£449,390,388 
20.7% 
NHS GP consultations 
£102,053,116 
£112,113,031 
9.9% 
Practice nurse consultations 
£9,514,944 
£15,736,480 
65.4% 
Dependence prescribed drugs 
£2,143,146 
£7,996,644* 
273.1%* 
Specialist treatment services 
£55,297,936 
£122,084,556* 
120.8%* 
Other health care costs 
£54,372,821 
£60,071,883 
10.5% 
Total 
£2,704,137,517 
£3,480,478,950 
28.7% 
* figures not directly comparable with previous years due to change in methodology 
 
 
The total cost of alcohol harm to the NHS in England has increased by approximately 
29% (or £776.3 million) in the three-year period. At the same time, the Hospital & 
Community Health Services (HCHS) pay and price index rose from 249.8 to 271.526 
implying an increase in unit costs of only around 9%.  
 
The components of total cost have changed by varying amounts in nominal terms 
between the current and previous estimates. Excluding those items for which the 
methodology has changed27, percentage changes in costs range from a decrease of 
9.5% in the cost of hospital outpatient visits, to an increase of 129.5% in the cost of 
hospital inpatient and day visits directly attributable to alcohol.  
                                                
26 PSSRU (2010), "Unit Costs of Health and Social Care 2010" 
27 The 273% increase in the cost of dependence-prescribed drugs and the 121% increase in specialist 
treatment services are not considered here due to changes in the estimation method  
 
- 9 - 

 
It is now also possible to see the extent to which changes in individual variables 
contributed to the total increase of £776.3 million. As Table 8 shows, approximately 
75% of the total increase in the cost of alcohol harm originates in increasing costs of 
hospital inpatient and day visits directly or partially attributable to alcohol misuse, with 
partially attributable hospital utilisation accounting for almost half of the overall 
increase. These costs are thought to have been most susceptible to artificial inflation 
over time due to changes unrelated to the actual occurrence of disease, such as 
coding practices. The NWPHO consultation on the methods for estimating alcohol-
related admissions should help to identify some of the difficulties with this particular 
measure and serve to inform future costing exercises. Given the predominant impact 
of hospital utilisation on the estimated increase in costs, the only other cost items of 
any note contribute 10% or less of the increase, such as ambulance services (9.9%) 
and A&E visits (6.5%)28.  
 
 
Table 8  
 
Category of cost 
£ Increase 
% of Increase 
Hospital inpatient & day visits: 
  
  
Directly attributable to alcohol misuse 
£216,944,354 
27.9% 
Partly attributable to alcohol misuse 
£363,036,335 
46.8% 
Hospital outpatient visits 
-£25,929,666 
-3.3% 
Accident and emergency visits 
£50,656,642 
6.5% 
Ambulance services 
£77,013,138 
9.9% 
NHS GP consultations 
£10,059,915 
1.3% 
Practice nurse consultations 
£6,221,536 
0.8% 
Dependency prescribed drugs 
£5,853,498* 
0.8%* 
Specialist treatment services 
£66,786,620* 
8.6%* 
Other health care costs 
£5,699,062 
0.7% 
Total 
£776,341,434 
100% 
* figures not directly comparable with previous years due to change in methodology 
 
 
 
 
                                                
28 Again, the contributions of increases in the costs of dependence-prescribed drugs and of specialist 
treatment services are not considered due to a change in the estimation method 
 
- 10 -