This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Migrants from Bulgaria and Romania'.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Potential impacts on the UK of future migration from Bulgaria and Romania  
 
Heather Rolfe, Tatiana Fic, Mumtaz Lalani, Monica Roman, Maria Prohaska 
and Liliana Doudeva  

 
 
 
 

 
 

link to page 3 link to page 4 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 9 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 18 link to page 19 link to page 23 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 26 link to page 32 link to page 34 link to page 34 link to page 34 link to page 35 link to page 35 link to page 37 link to page 40 link to page 43 link to page 47 link to page 49 link to page 49 link to page 49 link to page 50 link to page 50 link to page 52 link to page 52  
 
Contents 
Acknowledgements ........................................................................................................... iii 
Executive Summary ........................................................................................................... iv 
1.  Introduction ................................................................................................................ 1 
1.1 
Background to the report ..................................................................................... 1 
1.2 
Labour mobility within the EU, and interim restrictions ......................................... 1 
1.3 
Restrictions by the UK ......................................................................................... 2 
1.4 
Research aims and methodology ........................................................................ 3 
2.  Migration from Bulgaria and Romania within the EU ................................................... 5 
Key points ...................................................................................................................... 5 
2.1 
Background to future migration from Bulgaria and Romania ................................ 5 
2.2 
Drivers of migration ........................................................................................... 12 
2.3 
Migration intention & behaviour ......................................................................... 13 
2.4 
Roma migration patterns ................................................................................... 17 
3.  Bulgarian and Romanian Migration to the UK ........................................................... 18 
Key points .................................................................................................................... 18 
3.1 
The wider economic context .............................................................................. 18 
3.2 
Demographic, Geographic & socio-economic profile of EU2 migrants to the UK 20 
3.3 
A Comparison of EU2 and EU8 migration to the UK .......................................... 26 
4.  Social impact of Bulgarian and Romanian Migration on the UK ................................ 28 
Key points .................................................................................................................... 28 
4.1 
Our approach to assessing the potential social impact of EU2 migration ........... 28 
4.2 
Literature on current EU2 migration to the UK ................................................... 29 
4.3 
Migrants' use of services: general issues affecting demand and impact ............ 29 
4.4 
Health services & Public Health ......................................................................... 31 
4.5 
Housing ............................................................................................................. 34 
4.6 
Education .......................................................................................................... 37 
4.7 
Social security, welfare and benefits .................................................................. 41 
5.  Assessing the evidence base on impact of EU2 migration on the UK ....................... 43 
Key points .................................................................................................................... 43 
5.1 
Predicting future migration ................................................................................. 43 
5.2 
What are the main factors likely to influence the short-term & long-term impact of 
labour migration post 2014? ......................................................................................... 44 
5.3 
What can local authorities and service providers do to prepare? ....................... 46 
5.4 
Gaps in evidence ............................................................................................... 46 
ii 
 
 

link to page 54  
 
References .................................................................................................................. 48 
 
Acknowledgements 
We are grateful for the guidance and support of the British Embassies in Bucharest and Sofia at all 
stages of the research.  
We would also like to thank Jonathan Portes, NIESR director, for his advice throughout the project 
and NIESR Librarian Patricia Oliver for sourcing literature for the review.  
We are also grateful for feedback on an earlier draft of the report from representatives of the Home 
Office, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the Department for Work and Pensions, HM Revenue 
and Customs and the Department for Communities and Local Government. 
The authors take responsibility for the content of the report, the interpretation of data and findings 
and for the conclusions drawn.  
 
 
 
iii 
 
 

 
 
Executive Summary 
Scope and methodology 
This report was commissioned to provide evidence from which the UK Government can assess the 
potential impacts of migration from EU2 countries following the lifting of transitional controls at the 
end  of  2013.  To  assess  potential  impact,  we  look  at  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  and  at 
patterns  and  characteristics  of  migrants,  within  the  EU  and  currently  to  the  UK.  We  examine  the 
factors which may affect the scale and direction of EU2 migration after 2013. We then explore the 
potential impact of any further migration from the EU2 countries on services within the UK.  
The  review  is  based  on  an  analysis  of  literature  and  data  in  English,  Bulgarian  and  Romanian 
reviewed for its relevance and quality. The sources used and methodology are described in Annexes 
1 and 2 while a full descriptive bibliography is provided in Annex 3. While the volume of research is 
not insubstantial, evidence is weak in a number of respects and it is not possible to predict the scale 
of  future  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  to  the  UK  numerically.  There  are  a  number  of 
reasons for this: 
  The lack of accurate data on current migration, particularly on the number of migrants who have 
settled,  by  country  of  birth,  either  in  the  UK  or  elsewhere  within  the  EU,  or  who  have  been 
temporary migrants. Therefore, the UK record of National Insurance Numbers (NINO) database 
includes migrants who register and then leave the country, while the Labour Force Survey is a 
sample survey, in which numbers of EU2 migrants are very small.  
  While research studies refer to much migration being of a temporary nature, there is no agreed 
definition  of  temporary  or  permanent  migration  and,  other  than  where  migration  is  on  time-
limited visa arrangements, UK data does not allow for them to be distinguished. 
  The  inherent  unreliability  of  surveys  of  migration  intentions,  with  future  migration  highly 
dependent on economic, political and social factors in Bulgaria, Romania, UK, other EU countries 
and even outside of the EU.  
Therefore, estimates of potential migration to the UK are likely to be inaccurate and misleading and 
our report does not include these.  What we have done is consider factors which will encourage and 
discourage migration, the potential impact of the migration which may occur and what preparations 
might  be  put  in  place.  Wider  issues,  including  the  wider  economic  benefit  of  migration  from  EU2 
countries  to  the  UK,  benefits  to  the  economy  and  sectoral  impacts  were  outside  the scope  of  the 
research and are not covered in our report.  
Key findings 
Patterns of migration from Bulgaria and Romania  
The  main  destination  countries  for  EU2  migrants  are  Spain  and  Italy  and,  to  a  lesser  extent, 
Germany. These choices reflect restrictions and freedoms on the right of Bulgarians and Romanians 
to work across the EU, employment opportunities and similarities in language. As time goes on, the 
presence  of  social  and  economic  networks  of  existing  migrants  may  mean  that  EU2  migrants 
continue to migrate to Spain and Italy rather than other EU member states.  
In terms of characteristics of those who migrate from Bulgaria and Romania to elsewhere in the EU
most are young, aged under 35, with men and women in roughly equal numbers. EU2 migrants in EU 
member states are concentrated in a relatively small number of sectors: working in construction, in 
accommodation and catering and in private households in work such as care and cleaning. 
According  to  data  from  the  Labour  Force  Survey,  numbers  of  EU2  migrants  living  in  the  UK  are 
relatively low, at 26,000  Bulgarians and  80,000  Romanians. However, as a sample survey this may 
undercount  migrant  numbers.  As  elsewhere  in  the  EU,  EU2  migrants  are  overwhelmingly  young, 
iv 
 
 

 
 
aged under 35. However, men in a small majority and have a skill profile higher than elsewhere in 
the EU, with most having intermediate qualifications. This bundle of characteristics is likely to reflect 
current restrictions on employment of Bulgarian and Romanian nationals in the UK.  
Bulgarian  and  Romanian migrants  in  the  UK  are  concentrated  in  four  sectors:  hospitality,  cleaning 
services, construction and trade. They also show higher rates of self-employment than other Eastern 
European  migrants.  These  patterns  again  are  likely  to  reflect  current  restrictions  on  their 
employment. 
It  would  be  reasonable  to  speculate  that  the  profile  and  employment  patterns  of  Bulgarians  and 
Romanians  in  the  UK  will  change  once  restrictions  on  their  employment  are  lifted.  We  have 
considered  the  ways  in  which  their  profile  may  change  and  whether  the  pattern  of  migration  to 
Spain  might  be  replicated  in  the  UK.  While  difficult  to  predict,  we  believe  that  EU  migrants' 
employment  patterns  in  Spain  reflect  the  Spanish  labour  market,  and  opportunities  for  migrant 
workers. Therefore, it would seem most likely that any further EU2 migration to the UK will follow 
the pattern of EU8 migration and therefore be concentrated in lower, rather than intermediate or 
highly  skilled  work.  The  profile  of  further  EU2  migrants  to  the  UK  is  also  likely  to  be  young  and 
without families, initially at least.  
Drivers of migration and intentions to migrate 
Migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  is  very  largely  for  economic  reasons,  with  the  objective  of 
improving  employment  prospects  and  living  standards.  These  objectives  reflect  the  significant 
differences which exist between wages and living standards in Bulgaria and Romania and other EU 
member  states.  More  specific  reasons  identified  by  research  on  migrants'  motivations  include 
education, career considerations and, for Roma people, to escape discrimination.  
The UK has a considerably higher employment rate than either Bulgaria or Romania, higher GDP per 
capita and higher earnings so is potentially attractive to prospective economic migrants. However, 
while  surveys  in  Bulgaria  and  Romania  show  some  interest  in  migration  to  the  UK,  it  is  not  a 
favoured destination and there are indications that much of the interest that exists is in temporary 
stays rather than long term moves.  
The  scale of existing EU2 migration, particularly  to Spain and Italy, has been explained partly  with 
reference  to  the  various  ‘push’  factors  present  in  the  EU2  countries,  particularly  Romania,  at  the 
time  migration  took  place.  These  included  high  levels  of  unemployment  around  the  time  of 
accession to the EU in 2007. These may not apply at the time restrictions are removed in 2013.  
The social impact of Bulgarian and Romanian migration on the UK 
Our review of the impact of migration on UK services found very little literature specifically relating 
to migration from Bulgaria and Romania. Anticipating that evidence would be sparse, we reviewed 
literature  on  EU8  migration,  interpreting  findings  according  to  ways  in  which  EU2  migration  may 
differ. Our conclusions on the potential social impacts of EU2 migration are as follows: 
  Many services were not well-prepared for EU8 migration and found it difficult to cope with the 
increased demand. However, a feature of EU8 migration was its wide geographical spread across 
the UK, because of labour shortages at the time, the role of agencies and historic links between 
Poland the UK. EU2 migration is less likely to be so widely dispersed across the UK.  
  In relation to health services, future migration from Bulgaria and Romania is unlikely to have a 
significant  impact.  Economic  migrants,  in  particular,  are  generally  young  and  healthy  and,  as 
such, do not make major demands on health services. 
  With  regard  to  education,  potential  family  migration  from  the  EU2  countries  may  potentially 
increase  pressure  on  school  places  at  primary  level  in  some  areas.  While  existing  evidence 
suggests that migrant children do not have a negative impact on school performance, language 
assistance will need to be provided, at least for any new arrivals from Bulgaria and Romania.  

 
 

 
 
  The impacts of migration on housing will depend on housing supply as well as the buoyancy of 
the  local  housing  market.  The  demands  on  housing  are  highly  dependent  on  the  rate  of 
permanent settlement of EU2 migrants and particularly family formation.  
  There  is  a  limited  evidence  base  on  the  impact  of  migrants  on  the  welfare  system.  Studies 
covering EU10 migrants find them to be less likely to claim benefits than other migrant groups 
and that those who claim benefits, the majority claim child benefits. 
Factors which will influence the impact of labour migration post 2014 
Available evidence suggests that the UK is not a favoured destination for Bulgarians and Romanians 
who are  considering migration as a future option. However, the  unstable economic climate  within 
the EU and particularly rising unemployment in Southern EU countries, make this uncertain.  
One  consideration  is  whether  much  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  to  the  UK  has  already 
happened, but is confined to particular sectors. This may also include spurious 'self employment' and 
employment in the grey economy. It is possible that once restrictions are lifted, actual numbers of 
EU2 citizens working in the UK may not increase substantially.  
Research  evidence  suggests  that  much  migration  from  Eastern  Europe  to  the  UK  is  currently 
temporary.  However,  the  typical  profile  of  current  EU2  migrants  to  the  UK  as  young  and  without 
children may change if longer term settlement develops. It is longer term settlement which has the 
most significant implications for the demand on services, including housing, education and health.  
The  report  identifies  a number of key gaps in evidence  which  could  help inform future impacts of 
economic migration resulting from EU expansion.  
 
 
vi 
 
 

 
 
1.   Introduction 
 
1.1 Background to the report 
As well as having a positive impact on economic prosperity, migration presents challenges, nationally 
and at local level. It can place pressure on services such as health, education and housing. The ability 
of service providers to meet these demands depends to some extent on their level of preparedness. 
This includes having an idea of both general increases in demand and the types of services which will 
be accessed. The aim of this report is to provide an evidence base from which the UK Government 
can assess the potential impacts of migration from EU2 countries following the lifting of transitional 
controls at the end of 2013.  
1.2 Labour mobility within the EU, and interim restrictions 
Free movement of people, along with the free movement of goods, services and capital is one of the 
fundamental  pillars  of  the  European  Union.  While  the  policy  of  unrestricted  labour  mobility  was 
introduced  to  improve  the  matching  of  labour  supply  and  demand,  concerns  regarding  the 
immediate  impacts  of  opening  labour  markets  have  arisen  for  each  stage  of  expansion.  To  lessen 
possible  short-term  labour  market  impacts  related  to  enlargement,  Accession  Treaties  include 
provision  for  member  states  to  apply  restrictions  on  free  movement  of  workers  from  acceding 
countries for a period of up to 7 years if there is a 'serious labour market disturbance or the threat 
thereof'.  
Bulgaria and Romania joined the EU in 2007, three years after the EU8 countries (Poland, Lithuania, 
Latvia,  Slovenia,  Slovakia,  Czech  Republic,  Estonia  and  Hungary).  Both  in  the  case  of  EU8  and  EU2 
accession,  concerns  were  expressed  over  possible  labour  market  impacts  on  existing  EU  member 
states.  These  were  based  on  the  combined  size  of  the  countries  joining  the  EU  (more  than  100 
million inhabitants) and the large income gap with the existing member states, given that levels of 
income  in  the  acceding  countries  was  several  times  lower  than  the  EU15  average.  Geographical 
proximity  of  the  new  member  states  was  also  a  factor  in  concerns  over  the  possible  scale  of 
migration.  Therefore,  a  number  of  countries  placed  restrictions  on  the  mobility  of  workers  from 
acceding countries.   
The impact on a country of labour market restrictions imposed on new member countries’ nationals 
is, at least in part, a function of labour market restrictions imposed on them by other EU member 
states. This is shown in EC (2012), MAC (2011), Holland et al. (2011), Kahanec (2012), Wright (2010). 
Therefore, it is useful to look at the restrictions which EU member states have placed on migration 
from Bulgaria and Romania. Table 1.1 below shows the gradual opening of labour markets of the old 
member  states  to  arrivals  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania,  against  the  background  of  transitional 
arrangements applied to workers from the EU8 countries joining in 2004.  
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
Table 1.1. Year of granting access to the labour market for workers from Bulgaria and Romania 
and Central and Eastern European countries  

 EU15 
EU2:    
Member 
Bulgaria 
States 
Romania 
EU8  
Belgium 
Restrictions 
2009 
Denmark 
2009 
2009 
Germany 
Restrictions* 
2011 
Ireland 
2012 
2004 
Greece 
2009 
2006 
Spain 
2009** 
2006 
France 
Restrictions 
2008 
Italy 
2012 
2006 
Luxembourg 
Restrictions 
2007 
Netherlands 
Restrictions 
2007 
Austria  
Restrictions 
2011 
Portugal 
2009 
2006 
Finland 
2007 
2006 
Sweden 
2007 
2004 
UK 
Restrictions 
2004 
*From January 2012, Germany eased restrictions for seasonal workers, skilled workers with a university degree whose 
employment corresponds to their professional qualification and for those taking part in  in-firm training 
**Having not initially applied restrictions, Spain applied these for Romanian workers from 2011 
Source: EC Directorate-General for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion 
The countries choosing to open their labour markets to workers from Bulgaria and Romania in 2007, 
the year of their accession, were Finland and Sweden, as well as a majority of member states that 
joined the  EU in 2004: the Czech Republic, Estonia, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovenia and 
Slovakia.  The  majority  of  EU  member  states  therefore  imposed  interim  restrictions.  While  Spain 
initially did not, In July 2011 it introduced restrictions for Romanian workers until the end of 2012, 
while Italy lifted restrictions in January 2012. At the time of our review in August 2012 there were 10 
countries  applying  restrictions  on the  movement of workers  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania: Belgium, 
Germany, France, Ireland, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Austria, and the UK, and Spain. 
1.3 Restrictions by the UK 
The UK imposed restrictions on access to its labour market for workers from Bulgaria and Romania in 
2007.  These  were  reviewed  after  two  and  five  years  and  maintained    beyond  31  December  2008 
and, again, extended beyond 31 December 2011, on both occasions on the basis of advice from the 
independent  Migration  Advisory  Committee,  which  drew  attention  to  the  prevailing  economic 
situation and the uncertainty as to other Member States’ decisions (2011).  
As EEA nationals, citizens of Bulgaria and Romania can enter and live in the UK without needing to 
apply  for  permission, as long as they can support themselves  and their families in the UK without 
'becoming  an  unreasonable  burden  on  public  funds'1.  Bulgarian  and  Romanian  nationals  are,  with 
some  exemptions,  required  to  seek  permission  from  the  UK  Border  Agency  before  starting 
employment  in  the  UK.  They  require  an  Accession  Worker  Card,  for  which  purpose  an  employer 
must  normally  apply  for  approval  under  the  work  permit  criteria which  were  in  force  prior  to  the 
date  of  accession.  The  exception  to  this  is  where  individuals  are  employed  under  the  Seasonal 
Agricultural Workers Scheme (SAWS) or the Sectors Based Scheme (food processing). Bulgarian and 
                                                
1 http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/bulgaria-romania/ 

 
 

 
 
Romanian citizens become exempt from the work authorisation requirement where they have been 
employed legally continuously for a period of 12 months and may apply to be exempted from the 
requirement where they are highly skilled. They also do not need UK Border Agency permission to 
work in a self-employed capacity. However, they can  apply  for a registration certificate  to confirm 
their right to work as a self-employed person in the UK. 
Therefore, while having the right to live in the UK and to be self-employed, in terms of employment, 
the  interim  restrictions  on  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  to  the  UK  largely  restrict  EU2 
nationals  to  employment  under  the  terms  of  the  pre-Points  Based  System  work  permits 
arrangements,  along  with  non-EU  nationals,  and  their  employment  is  consequently  generally 
restricted to skilled work and will normally be subject to a labour market test.  
All restrictions must be lifted at the end of 2013. This will mark the end of the seven year period of 
limited access of Bulgarian and Romanian workers to the EU15 labour markets. All countries which 
have not yet lifted the labour market restrictions will be obliged to do so. 
 
1.4 Research aims and methodology  
The aim of the report is to provide an evidence base from which the UK Government can assess the 
potential  impacts  of  migration  from  EU2  countries  following  the  lifting  of  transitional  controls. 
Evidence will be used to help inform planning and policy making by national and local government. 
The research therefore aimed to answer three sets of questions: 
 
What are the drivers of migration from the EU2 countries to the UK, which push /pull factors 
are most significant and what are the future intentions to migrate? 
 
What is the profile of the current UK diaspora population from the EU2 countries, what are 
migrants’ demographic characteristics, where do they settle and what are their skills and 
family profiles? 
 
What is the social impact of migration, particularly on services, including health care, 
housing and education?  
To  answer  these  questions,  we  carried  out  a  critical  and  policy-focused  review  of  the  literature 
covering  research  on  Bulgarian  and  Romanian  migration  to  the  UK.  We  reviewed  publications 
written in English, Bulgarian and Romanian.  We also carried out analyses of relevant migration data, 
both EU wide and in relation to Bulgaria, Romania and the UK. The review includes both qualitative 
and  quantitative  literature  looking  at  migration  from  both  academic  and  policy  perspectives  and 
produced  by  a  range  of  national  and  international  organisations.  The  sources  used  to  identify 
relevant evidence are described in Annex 1. Literature was reviewed for its relevance to the research 
and  also  for  quality.  Annex  2  sets  out  the  selection  methodology  and  the  approach  to  quality 
assessment  and  inclusion  or  exclusion  criteria  for  documents  included  in  the  review.  A  full 
descriptive bibliography of all sources used in the review is provided in Annex 3.  
To  assess  the  potential  impact  of  EU2  migration,  we  have  used  evidence  of  the  impact  of  EU8 
migration, from 2004 onwards. This is because literature on existing  EU2 migration is both limited 
and because its nature is very likely to change following removal of restrictions. The validity of this 
approach is assessed in the report, through comparing current EU8 and EU2 migration to the UK and 
EU more widely.  
The  report  refers  to  various  sources  of  data,  compiled  by  international  organisations  (such  as 
Eurostat  data  on  Population  Statistics,  International  Migration  Flows,  Labour  Force  Surveys)  and 
OECD),  as  well  as  by  national  bodies  (national  statistical  offices  ONS,  Bulgarian  and  Romanian 
Statistical  offices).  In  the  UK,  data  on  migrants  is  also  available  through  the  Worker  Registration 
Scheme  (WRS)  and  the  records  of  National  Insurance  Number  allocations).  Unfortunately  none  of 

 
 

 
 
these data sources provides a complete picture. In this report we will predominantly refer to data 
compiled  by  NIESR  and  published  in  Holland  et  al.  (2011),  which,  to  our  knowledge,  is  the  most 
comprehensive  set  of  data  on  migration  from  individual  countries  of  the  EU8+2  to  individual 
countries of the EU15. Wherever relevant, we will also refer to national data. Wherever we discuss 
the socio-economic profile of Bulgarian and Romanian migrants we will refer to the European Labour 
Force Survey and the latest data published by the European Commission (2012), the UK’s records of 
National  Insurance  Number  allocation  (NINO),  as  published  by  Holland  et  al  (2011),  and  Bulgarian 
and  Romanian  national  data.  The  limitations  of  the  Labour  Force  Survey  and  the  NINO  database 
mean that  neither  provides  an  accurate  count  of migrants  in  the  UK.  The  NINO  database  includes 
migrants who register and then leave the country, while the Labour Force Survey is a sample survey, 
in which numbers of EU2 migrants are very small. Because of these limitations, we have cautioned 
against using these sources to predict the number of future migrants to the UK. 
The report has the following structure: Chapter 2 looks at past and current migration from Bulgaria 
and  Romania  within  the  EU,  patterns  and  characteristics  of  migrants,  drivers  of  migration  and 
evidence of intentions to migrate. Chapter 3 looks at evidence particularly in relation to the UK and 
examines the current profile of EU2 migration. Chapter 4 examines the potential impact of migration 
from Bulgaria and Romania on services within the UK, focusing on health care, education services, 
housing  and  social  security.  Chapter  5  looks  at  limitations  in  the  evidence  base  and  draws  some 
conclusions from the evidence presented in the report.  

 
 

 
 
  
2.  Migration from Bulgaria and Romania within the EU 
Key points 
  The  current  period  of  outward  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  follows  three  earlier 
waves: the break-up of the Eastern Block in 1989; economic crisis in the late 1990s; and the 
removal of visa requirements for European travel in 2001  

  Currently, Bulgarian and  Romanian citizens are among the most mobile in the EU, although 
numbers of Bulgarian migrants are substantially smaller because of differences in population 
size of the two countries. 

  Currently, the main destination countries for EU2 migrants are Spain and Italy and, to a lesser 
extent,  Germany.  These  choices  reflect  restrictions  and  freedoms  on  the  right  of  Bulgarians 
and Romanians to work across the EU, employment opportunities and similarities in language. 
In time, the presence of existing networks of migrants may also be a factor.  

  It  is  difficult  to  quantify  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  with  any  degree  of  accuracy 
because statistics collected from within the two countries largely measure permanent moves 
rather than shorter periods of migration. 

  EU2  migrants  within  the  EU  are  young;  most  are  under  35  years.  The  gender  balance  was 
initially  male-dominated  but  is  now  roughly  equal.  Within  the  EU,  EU2  migrants  are 
concentrated  in  a  relatively  small  number  of  sectors:  construction,  private  household 
employment (e.g. care and cleaning) and accommodation and catering activities.  

  EU2 migration is principally  economic, to find work and achieve a higher standard of living. 
Significant differences exist between wages and living standards in Bulgaria and Romania and 
Western European countries. Education and career considerations are further factors and, for 
Roma people, discrimination and poverty.  

  Although many EU2 nationals already work abroad, available surveys suggest that there may 
still be potential for further migration. However, surveys of intentions to migrate show varying 
levels of interest in moving abroad and may not be reliable.  

 
 
2.1 Background to future migration from Bulgaria and Romania 
 
Phases of migration from Bulgaria and Romania 
Research  on  patterns  of  outward  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  identifies  at  least  four 
distinct, but overlapping, periods of migration since 1989, (Sandu et al, 2006; Nazarska et al, 2011):  
  the break-up of the Eastern Block in 1989 and subsequent migration between 1990-1995 
  the collapse of the Bulgarian economy in 1996 
  placing of Bulgaria and Romania on the Schengen 'White List' in 2001 
  membership of the European Union in 2007 
The first two of these stages were believed to result in increased irregular migration from Bulgaria 
and Romania, as well as under work permit arrangements. Joining the Schengen 'White List' meant 
that  citizens  could  travel more  freely,  without  visas,  within  the  EEA.  Joining  the  EU  in  2007  led  to 
migration  to  countries  which  did  not  impose  interim  restrictions,  and  also  to  those  which  did  but 

 
 

 
 
where  Bulgarians  and  Romanians  could  work  under  certain  arrangements  (see  Chapter  1).  This 
fourth stage of migration led to the highest rate of migration in the history of the two countries.  
In  relation  to  Romanian  migration,  Sandu  et  al  (2006)  attach  percentage  rates  of  migration  to 
particular phases in the country's migration history: in the first stage between 1990 and 1995, the 
migration  rate  was  0.5  per  cent;  while  between  1996  and  2001,  the  temporary  emigration  rate 
reached  between  0.6  and  0.7  per  cent.  The  third  stage,  following  the  access  of  Romania  to  the 
Schengen  area,  began  in  2002  and  signaled  significant  outward  migration,  reaching  2.8  per  cent 
between 2002 and 2005.  
More  recent  research  identifies  a  further  wave  of  Romanian  migration  (Alexe,  2011),  which  is 
characterised  by  labour  mobility  of  professionals  in  the  context  of  the  economic  downturn  and 
financial crisis. It has been argued that this migration is not circular, as in the case of at least some of 
the  migration  in  previous  waves  and  that  migration  of  doctors  is  particularly  likely  to  turn  into 
permanent migration. 
Where have Bulgarians and Romanians migrated to? 
In  2008  the  EU27  member  states  received  nearly  two  million  migrants  from  other  EU  countries 
(European  Commission,  2012).  Most  of  this  migration  was  East-West  migration  from  EU8+2 
countries to EU15 countries (see Holland et al, 2011). Bulgarian and Romanian nationals are among 
the most mobile in Europe. Table 2.1 shows the top five citizenships of immigrants to EU27 member 
states. Romanians are ranked first, followed by Poles and Bulgarians.  
Table 2.1. Top 5 citizenships of immigrants to EU27 member states, 2008 
Country of citizenship 
Per 1000 
Romania 
384 
Poland 
266 
Bulgaria 
91 
Germany 
88 
Italy 
67 
Source: European Commission, 2012 
The  main  destination  countries  of  Bulgarian  and  Romanian  migration  are  Southern  European 
countries, and to a lesser extent Germany (see figure 2.2) Countries favoured by Romanians are Italy 
and Spain which in 2009 attracted about 40 and 43 per cent of mobile Romanians respectively. With 
regard to migration from Bulgaria, Spain is a clear favourite, with around 38 per cent of Bulgarians 
choosing  to  migrate  there.  Other  choices  of  Bulgarian  migrants  include  Germany  (15  per  cent), 
Greece  (13  per  cent)  and  Italy  (11  per  cent).  The  UK  ranks  fourth  as  a  destination  country  for 
Romanian movers - in 2009 about 4 per cent of mobile Romanians were living in UK. It ranks fifth for 
Bulgarians, attracting around 6 per cent of mobile Bulgarians in 2009.  
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
Figure 2.2. Romanian and Bulgarian migrants in EU countries 
Romanians 
Bulgarians  
Italy 
Spain 
Spain 
Germany 
Germany 
UK 
Grece 
Italy 
Austria 
UK 
Grece 
France 
Portugal 
Netherlands 
France 
Belgium 
Belgium 
Austria 
Ireland 
Portugal 
Sweden 
Sweden 
Netherlands 
Denmark 
Denmark 
Ireland 
Finland 
Finland 
Luxembourg 
Luxembourg 

500,000 
1,000,000   

100,000 
200,000 
 
Source: Holland et al., 2011 
Spain has been the destination of choice for many EU2 migrants, particularly from Bulgaria and this 
has been the focus of a small number of studies. Researchers have noted that Spain has undergone 
major economic growth since joining EU in 1986, leading to increased labour demand which has not 
been  possible  to  meet  from  native  population.  Spain  has  experienced  migration  from  both  EU2 
countries, but levels of migration have been lower from Romania than from Bulgaria (Stanek, 2009).  
Several factors may explain why Spain and Italy are the preferred destination countries for Bulgarian 
and Romanian migrants. These include their geographic accessibility and similarities in language and 
the  presence  of  existing  migration  networks  (Drew  and  Sriskandarajah,  2006,  Markova  and  Black, 
2007).  Several  sources  point  out  the  circular  character  of  migration,  particularly  from  Romania  to 
Italy,  because  of  both  geographical  proximity  and  large  amount  of  seasonal  work  available  to 
migrants  (Stanek,  2009;  Iara,  2010;  Mara, 2012).  There  is  also  evidence  of  longer-term  settlement 
and  family  reunification  among  Bulgarian  and  Romanian  migrants  in  Spain,  with  the  profile  of 
migrants  changing  from  predominantly  single  male  migrants  to  female  migrants  and  a  wider  age 
range. (Stanek, 2009). 
How many Bulgarians and Romanians have migrated? 
It  has  been  argued  that  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  should  not  be  treated  as  a  single 
entity,  principally  because  the  potential  inflow  of  Bulgarian  immigrants  is  significantly  lower  in 
volume than that from Romania and is therefore less likely to have an impact on the labour markets 
of receiving countries. The main reason for this is the difference in size between the two countries, 
with  Romania  having  roughly  three  times  the  population  of  Bulgaria  (22  million  and  7  million 
inhabitants respectively). In relation to the migrant populations of Spain and Italy therefore,  there 
are  approximately  1.7  million  Romanian  migrants  in  these  two  countries,  while  the  number  of 
Bulgarian immigrants is a fraction of this, at 200,000 (Vankova, 2012). The discrepancy in population 
size  was  also  a  factor  in  the  imposition  of  restrictions  on  the  free  movement  of  workers  from 
Romania to Spain in 2011 but not on Bulgaria. This decision represented a change in approach since 
Spain  had  initially  opened its  labour market  to  both Bulgaria  and  Romania  (Angelov  and  Vankova, 
2011).   
First,  in  relation  to  migration  from  Bulgaria,  methodological  differences  between  studies  in 
measuring migration, use of different data sources and discrepancies in the data make it difficult to 
produce  a  coherent  picture.  Data  from  the  National  Statistics  Institute  in  Bulgaria  show  that 
between 1992 and 2001 (prior to EU accession), 217, 809 Bulgarians emigrated while the number of 

 
 

 
 
emigrants between 2001 and 2011 was approximately 175,244. Therefore, recent migration, which 
in theory has been enabled by relaxations on restrictions such as visa requirements, has been at no 
higher  rate  than  previously.  This  suggests  that  labour  market  restrictions  are  not  the  sole  factor 
limiting  emigration.  In  recent  years,  emigration  from  Bulgaria  has  decreased  significantly,  while 
immigration into the country has increased. Net migration is still negative (i.e. emigration prevails), 
but  its volume  is fairly  low.  The  relatively slow rate of migration from Bulgaria in recent years has 
been  explained  with  reference  to  stabilisation  of  the  labour  market  and  rising  income  levels:  the 
unemployment  rate  in  Bulgaria  has  reached  levels  comparable  to  levels  recorded  in  Western 
European countries and differences in income have decreased to some extent (Belcheva, 2011). 
There  has  been  some  speculation,  particularly  within  the  Bulgarian  press,  about  the  effect  of  the 
economic downturn on migration, and particularly on return migration.  Data from official sources, 
do not contain clear  cut evidence of  large  scale  return of Bulgarian emigrants back  to the country 
(Krasteva et al, 2010).  
In relation to Romanian migration flows after 1989, researchers have observed that large differences 
exist  between  statistics  available  through  various  sources,  both  at  the  national  and  international 
levels. According to Iara (2010) the most comprehensive dataset on emigration of Romanian citizens, 
both  in  terms  of  consistency  and  country  coverage,  is  available  from  the  National  Institute  of 
Statistics  (INS).  The  limitations  of  this  dataset  are  in  its  ability  to  measure  migration  only  with 
reference  to  termination  of  residence  status  in  Romania.  Therefore  the  data  captures  only 
permanent migration rather than temporary or circular migration. The advantage of the INS data is 
in  being  able  to  measure  long  term  or  permanent  migration  and  in  providing  data  on  different 
destination  countries.  According  to  the  INS  data,  in  1990  emigration  from  Romania  more  than 
doubled  as  compared  to  the  previous  years,  and  reached  around  100,000.  In  the  following  years 
migration recorded by the Romanian authorities substantially declined. After a small peak of 25,000 
in 1995, annual net migration outflows constantly diminished to just 8,000 in 2002. The most recent 
years  showed  a  slight  increase  in  the  number  of  individuals  who  settled  abroad  to  around  9,000-
13,000  (Iara,  2010).  Other  researchers  using  the  same  data  reach  similar  conclusions,  with  the 
number of Romanian migrants registered by the INS in 2010 being 7900 (Roman et al, 2012).  
Analysts of Romanian migration statistics agree that the data underestimates the extent of migration 
from  the  country.  One  researcher  compares  the  figure  of  386,827  people  leaving  the  country 
between  1990  and  2006,  recorded  in  INS  data,  with  data  from  Italian  sources:  the  Italian  non-
governmental organization Caritas gives a figure of 555,997 Romanian migrants in Italy for the year 
2007. At the  same  time,  the  Italian National Statistic Institute reports 342,200 Romanian migrants 
for the same year (Siar, 2008). 
Data on the outward flow of migration from Romania is also available from SOPEMI data which looks 
at the number of Romanian residents in OECD countries2. The inflow of Romanian nationals to the 
countries  covered  amounted  to  around  80,000  in  2000,  and  this  figure  rose  to  192,000  in  2006. 
According  to  the  OECD the  total  sum  of  inflows  of Romanians  to  all  OECD  countries  amounted  to 
89,000  and  205,000  respectively  in  2000  and  2006.  The  scale  of  the  inflows  increased  especially 
sharply  in  2002  against  the  previous  year,  by  63  per  cent,  to  149,000.  The  annual  inflows  of 
Romanian nationals to the OECD countries  peaked in 2004 at 202,000, thereafter they diminished 
slightly.  The  author  concludes  that  over  the  period  considered,  inflows  of  Romanian  nationals 
increased  steadily  for  almost  all  countries.  Iara  notes,  that  this  contrasts  with a  declining  trend  in 
migration  until  2002  as  shown  by  the  INSSE  data.  According  to  the  author,  this  shows  that  non-
permanent (but still longer-term) forms of migration gained at importance. This reflects stays for the 
purpose  of  study,  and  the  fact  that  more  and  more  migrants  do  not  consider  their  migration  as 
definite and keep their legal residence as Romania. 
                                                
2 OECD countries include the US, Canada, New Zealand and many, but not all, EU member states. 

 
 

 
 
To conclude, the trends in migration from Bulgaria and Romanian migration after 1989 show various 
trends, depending on the source of data and the type of migration. While permanent migration as 
reflected,  for  example,  in  the  data  of  the  Romanian  National  Institute  of  Statistics,  shows  a 
decreasing trend, other sources (such as the OECD data) suggest a sharp increase, mainly after 2000. 
Increases have been identified in temporary migration from Romania, mainly after 2002. 
Characteristics of Bulgarian and Romanian migrants in the EU 
Information about migrants’ profiles is useful for developing migration policies both in sending and 
receiving  countries,  and  particularly  necessary  for  estimating  the  potential  impact  of  existing  and 
future migration. Data on migrants’ personal characteristics is available both from general EU wide 
sources and also data and research within Bulgaria and Romania. 
Analyses  of  data  on  migration  all  lead  to  the  same  general  conclusion  on  the  characteristics  of 
migrants from Bulgaria and Romania in relation to age and gender distribution. As figure 3.5 shows, 
the  average  European  migrant  is  young  and  below  35  years  old,  a  description  which  applies  to 
movers from Bulgaria and Romania (Drew and Sriskandarajah, 2006, Kausar, 2011, EC, 2012). These 
migrants are on average younger than the overall labour force both in their countries of origin, as 
well as in the UK and other EU15 receiving countries. About 62 per cent of workers who had moved 
recently  are  younger  than  35  years  old.  Migrating  Bulgarians  and  Romanians  are  somewhat  older 
than workers from Central and Eastern Europe: 38 per cent of movers from Bulgaria and Romania 
are  above  the  age  of  35  years  old,  as  compared  to  29  per  cent  of  arrivals  of  that  age  from  EU10 
countries. This suggests that the profile of a migrant from an EU8 country and that of a migrant from 
an EU2 country differs slightly. As we explain below, they are also employed in different sectors and 
choose different countries to which to migrate. 
There  are  slightly  more  women  among  those  emigrating  (see  figure  2.3).  The  EU  LFS  statistics 
suggest  that,  in  recent  years,  women  have  been  evenly  represented  among  mobile  workers  from 
Bulgaria and Romania, although this is slightly different in the case of migration to the UK.  
Figure 2.3 Age and sex distribution of EU2 and EU8 movers to EU15 
Age structure 
Sex distribution 
15-24 
25-34 
35-54 
55-64 
Men 
Women 
EU2 movers  18 
44 
36  2 
EU2 movers 
50 
50 
EU10 movers  15 
55 
27  2 
EU10 movers 
47 
53 
Total EU2 population  9  26 
53 
12 
Total EU2 population 
45 
55 
Total EU10  9  28 
51 
12 
Total EU10 population 
46 
54 
population 
Total EU15  11  23 
53 
13 
Total EU15 population 
45 
55 
population 
 
 
Source: EU LFS, after European Commission, 2012 
There is a sizeable body of research covering the characteristics of migrants from Romania, both in 
general and specifically in relation to recent migration to Spain and Italy. There is also evidence from 
surveys of Bulgarian migrants living in the UK, Greece and Italy in 2005 and 2009 (Markova, 2005: 
Markova,  2009).  These  show  various  characteristics  of migrants,  and changes  in  profile  over  time: 
first,  in  relation  to  Bulgarian  migrants,  surveys  in  2005  and  2009  show  that  women  are  a  small 
majority and that family migration is common. The age of migrants increased slightly over the time 

 
 

 
 
of  the  two  surveys,  with  the  average  age  of  arrival  for  the  2009  at  32  years  old.  However,  both 
surveys have small sample sizes and may not be reliable. 
Romanian research on migration between 1980 and 2000 identifies changing patterns in relation to 
its gender composition. One study notes that the number of male migrants from Romania exceeded 
the number of women during the first years of transition after 1989 (Zaman and Sandu, 2003). The 
increasing  feminization  of  Romanian  emigration  has  become  a  key  characteristic  of  Romanian 
migration and at the end of the 1990s the shares of males and females were balanced. More recent 
research  on  the  structure  of  permanent  emigration  in  2007  (using  INS  data  described  above) 
describes a number of features of permanent, as opposed to temporary migrants: women are in the 
majority, at 65 per cent, as are aged between 26 and 40 years old (over 57 per cent) and those with 
high school and post high school education (53 per cent in 2005) (Pehoiu and Costache, 2010).   
Studies  of the  Romanian migration profile  in Spain and Italy  are a useful source  of information on 
the characteristics of those  who migrate.  These  are clear about the general profile of  migrants, as 
relatively young and fairly evenly balanced in terms of gender. For example, analysis of the profile of 
Romanian migrants in Spain found men and women in roughly even proportions, while with respect 
to  age,  Romanian  migrants  were  younger  than  the  native  population  with  an  average  age  of  just 
under 32 years old (Barbulescu, 2009).  
Migration of Romanians to Spain has been characterised, to some extent, by family migration One 
large  piece  of  research  on  migration  which  predated  entry  to  the  EU,  identifies  two  stages  of 
temporary  migration,  starting  first  with  migration  of  married  men,  with  vocational  or  high  school 
education,  from  urban  areas.  This  was  then  followed  by  diversification  in  the  flows  of  migrants, 
following relaxation in visa requirements, with an increase in women, those from rural areas, single 
migrants,  and  those  with  secondary  school  education  (Sandu  et  al,  2006).    More  recent  research, 
following entry to the EU found that one third of Romanians living in Madrid came alone, while two-
thirds  came  with  their  whole  families  or  family  members  (Marcu,  2011).  Similarly,  research  on 
Romanian migration to Italy has found that migration following  visa liberalisation and immediately 
after EU accession, migration of Romanian migrants to Italy was dominated by women, while more 
recent  data  shows  increasing  numbers  of  men  coming  to  Italy.  (Mara,  2012).  In  terms  of  family 
status, 87 per cent of early comers live with their partners and more than 50 per cent have children 
who live with them in Italy. As in the case of Romanian migrants in Spain, these figures indicate that 
the first comers live with their families or family members. More recent arrivals, in contrast, are less 
likely to be married; less than half of them are married and one-third of them are single. 
Other  research  also  examines  the  socio-economic  and  demographic  profiles  of  Romanian 
immigrants  to  Spain,  using  data  from  the  Spanish  survey  Encuesta  Nacional  de  Inmigrantes  (ENI) 
(2007),  (Barbulescu,  2009).  This  research  finds  that,  in  relation  to  educational  attainment,  the 
attainment of immigrants differs to that of the Spanish population: a higher proportion of migrants 
have  primary  or  secondary  education,  but  very  few  Romanian  migrants  had  tertiary  education. 
Research on Romanian migrants in Italy found that more than 45 per cent of early comers and those 
who  arrived  immediately  after  the  EU  accession  had  achieved  a  secondary  level  of  education, 
compared  to  one-third  of  the  most  recent  arrivals.  Those  with  a  vocational  level  of  education  or 
degree level qualification remained roughly stable at around 25-30 per cent (Mara, 2012).  
A very clear message  from research on the profile of Romanian migrants  in Spain and Italy is that 
characteristics vary considerably according to the stage of migration, with the profile of early arrivals 
different  from  those  who  come  later.  This  is  likely  to  reflect  the  different  conditions  under  which 
Romanians  were  permitted  to  live  and  work  within  the  EU  and  the  particular  labour  market 
opportunities in the countries to which they migrated. A further factor is the various ‘push’ factors 
present in Romania during these periods of outward migration. Therefore, while findings relating to 
the  characteristics of Romanian migrants may  have  implications for potential migration to the UK, 
10 
 
 

 
 
they may also reflect factors in Romania and elsewhere in the EU which either no longer apply or are 
not relevant to migration to the UK.   
 
Employment characteristics of EU2 migrants within the EU 
It is usual for mobile workers to have a high employment rate because their main reason to move 
abroad  is  to  find  work.  European  Commission  data  shows  that,  over  the  period  2005-2009,  a 
majority  of  Bulgarian  and  Romanian  citizens,  close  to  70  per  cent  were  employed.  The  2009 
recession  limited  employment  opportunities  for  all  workers  in  the  EU15  including  migrants  (see 
figure2.4). 
 
Figure 2.4. Labour market status and educational attainment of EU2 and EU8 movers to EU15 
Labour market status 
Educational attainment 
Employed 
Unemployed 
Inactive 
Low 
medium 
High 
EU2 movers 
63 
16  21 
EU2 movers 
34 
52 
14 
EU10 movers 
74 
8  18 
EU10 movers  17 
61 
22 
Total EU2 
59 

36 
population 
Total EU2 population 
20 
61 
19 
Total EU10 
60 

33 
population 
Total EU10 population  9 
67 
25 
Total EU15 
65 
7  28 
population 
Total EU15 population 
26 
45 
29 
 
 
Source: EU LFS, after European Commission, 2011 
In 2010 the rates of employment of migrants from Bulgaria and Romania, as well as mobile workers 
from  EU10  countries,  were  higher  than  those  of  the  total  population  of  Bulgaria  and  Romania,  as 
well as the EU10 total population. They were comparable with the rates of employment recorded in 
the countries of the EU15. It should be noted that the employment rates of Bulgarian and Romanian 
workers  declined  in  2009  as  a  result  of  the  crisis  which  hit  Spain  and  Italy,  the  main  destination 
countries  for  Bulgarian  and  Romanian  migrants,  particularly  hard.  This  led  to  increases  in 
unemployment  among  EU2  movers  which,  as  the  European  Commission  (2012)  notes,  was  mainly 
due to their concentration in Spain where 62 per cent of all unemployed E2 movers live. The rise in 
the  number  of  unemployed  is  also  explained  by  their  socio-economic  characteristics  (EU2  movers 
within the  EU as a whole are  young and low skilled and  their concentration in  sectors which have 
been most affected by economic recession, in particular the construction sector.  
Mobile workers from Bulgaria and Romania are concentrated in a relatively small number of sectors: 
construction, activities of households, and accommodation and food service activities. These sectors 
represent more than half of all recent EU2 migrants in employment, while the total share of these 
sectors  in  local  employment  in  EU15  countries  is  only  about  14  per  cent.  In  comparison,  EU8 
nationals  are  predominantly  employed  in  manufacturing,  wholesale  and  retail  trade,  and 
accommodation and food service activities (Holland et al, 2011).  
Analysis of the Spanish ENI data (see earlier) has found that the majority of Romanian migrants are 
employed in elementary occupations (42 per cent) followed by qualified workers in  manufacturing 
(35 per cent) and in the services sector (11 per cent) (Barbulescu, 2009). Earnings were found to be 
11 
 
 

 
 
highly concentrated at the lower end of the income distribution. In addition, educational attainment 
of Romanian migrants was found not to correspond to their position in the labour market or level of 
income.  Other  research  on  the  occupations  of  Romanian  migrants  abroad  finds  that  they  are 
concentrated  in  construction  (36  per  cent),  agriculture  (28  per  cent),  private  households  (house 
cleaning and caring services 15 per cent), and hotels and restaurants (12 per cent) (Siar,2008).  
Research on Romanian migrants in Italy shows similar patterns but also highlights gender differences 
in occupational distribution: almost 40 per cent of male Romanian migrants work in craft and related 
trade  workers, a quarter in  manufacturing and less than one-fifth work  in  unskilled manufacturing 
and  service  roles.  Women,  in  contrast,  are  concentrated  in  care  work  and  in  private  household 
employment,  as  they  are  in  Spain.  The  expansion  of  working  quotas  for  in  care  and  in 
home/domestic services is believed to have been a particular factor behind migration to Italy from 
Romania (Mara, 2012). 
2.2 Drivers of migration 
Migration behaviour is commonly characterised in terms of a push-pull approach, which consists of 
factors which attract immigration and factors that stimulate emigration. The former are pull factors 
that determine the choice of the destination country, while push factors determine the decision to 
migrate (Lee, 1966). Push and pull factors include income levels and employment opportunities both 
at a macro, and sectoral level. Significant income gaps between new and old members have been a 
cause of concern for some EU15 governments, potentially leading to an excessive influx of workers. 
Therefore,  in  considering  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania,  much  of  the  focus  has  been  on 
economic push and pull factors.  
A  number  of  studies  of  migration  from  Bulgaria  point  to  economic  factors  as  the  most  significant 
drivers of migration. Research finds consistently that Bulgarians emigrate principally for employment 
purposes with a small percentage also emigrating for educational purposes (Angelov and Vankova, 
2011; Belcheva, 2011; Belcheva, 2011; Vankova, 2012). Economic factors motivating the decision to 
emigrate  play  a  much  greater  role  than  existing  labour  market  restrictions  in  target  countries, 
according  to  research  by Angelov  and  Vankova.  The  authors  state  that  for most  Bulgarians  labour 
market  restrictions  in  recipient  countries  imply  that  they  would  be  working  illegally  for  a  longer 
period of time and that transitional arrangements merely keep a greater number of Bulgarians in the 
irregular labour market.  
A  recent  survey  of  push  and  pull  factors  compares  the  attitudes  towards  migration  among  the 
Bulgarian population,  including members of the Roma community.  The main migration driver is to 
find work, with 73 per cent of all Romanian migrants reporting this motivation, and 84 per cent of 
the  Roma  Community.  For  the  latter  group,  discrimination  is  a  further  factor  in  motivations  to 
migrate. Educational opportunities are also a factor in considerations to migrate, although less so for 
the  Roma  community.  Pull  factors  were  friends  and  relatives  in  potential  destination  countries  to 
emigrate  to, better  educational opportunities and better living  standards  (Vankova, 2012)  A wider 
review  of  surveys  of  migration  intentions  also  notes  that  the  main  factor  behind  migration  for 
Bulgarians  are  to  find  employment  and  to  achieve  a  better  quality  of  life  are  the  top  reasons  for 
Bulgarian mobility (Krasteva, 2010) 
Economic  factors  are  by  no  means  static  and  recent  research  from  Bulgaria  suggests  that  the 
strength of some push factors for emigration maybe in gradual decline, with the unemployment rate 
in Bulgaria is now comparable to Western Europe and income differences have decreased (Vankova, 
2012).  Therefore,  while  in  the  1990s  per  capita  income  in  Western  Europe  was  four  times  higher 
than in Bulgaria, a decade later the ratio is 2.5, measured by purchasing power parity (Angelov and 
Vankova, 2011). 
Romanian  literature provides  an indication of factors behind migration decisions, in terms of push 
and  pull  factors  but  does  not  provide  an  in-depth  analysis  of  the  factors  that  drive  the  migration 
12 
 
 

 
 
process. As with Bulgarian research, evidence in relation to Romania suggests that economic factors, 
particularly employment opportunities, are the most significant push factors.  Therefore, in relation 
to labour migration from Romania to Spain, Sandu and colleagues refer to significant gap between 
wages  and  living  standards  in  Romania  and  Western  European  countries  (Sandu  et  al.  2004).  A 
further  factor  is  the  decreasing  cost  of  migration,  reflected  by  lower  costs  of  travel  and 
communication. These factors are believed to have been significant in enabling Romanians to travel 
abroad for work (Silasi and Simina, 2008). 
Research  evidence  also  points  to  the  importance  of  personal  development,  career  prospects  and 
recognition  as  factors  influencing  the  decision  to  migrate  for  some  groups,  particularly  highly 
qualified  professionals.  Studies  have  identified  this  as  an  important  factor  for  some  professionals 
migrating to the EU, particularly to Italy and Spain (Zaman and Sandu, 2003; Silasi and Simina, 2008). 
This  was  also  found  in  other  research  which  found  those  who  had  migrated  expressing  their 
satisfaction with being respected at their work place (Sandu et al, 2006).  
While there is a consensus that the strongest and most relevant push and pull factors are economic 
(Sandu  et al, 2006;  Rotila, 2008;  Silasi and Simina,  2008;  Iara, 2010), these  factors  largely apply to 
labour  migration.  This  is  the  most  significant  type  of  migration  in  recent  years.  However,  earlier 
periods  of  migration  have  been  influenced  by  political  factors,  as  has  been  driven  by  ethnic  and 
religious considerations. The National Strategy of Bulgaria on migration identifies several groups of 
factors affecting Bulgarians’ decisions to migrate, in addition to the main economic drivers (Council 
of Ministers, 2008). These include political factors and specifically instability in the 1990s. It is argued 
that lack of trust in democratic institutions contributed to migration, especially among the younger 
population. Deficits in public services have been cited as a further factor encouraging migration from 
Bulgaria (Vankova, 2012).  
The presence of family and friends, including a partner, living abroad has also been identified as a 
factor influencing migration of some  individuals,  (Markova and Black,  2007;  Sikora et al, 2010).  At 
the same time, it has been noted that, a strong family culture within Bulgaria and Romania is a factor 
discouraging migration (Council of Ministers, 2008)  
2.3 Migration intention & behaviour 
Intentions to migrate 
The  focus  of  literature  on  Romanian  migration,  especially  dating  from  before  2007,  explores 
migration  intentions  in  the  context  of  the  prospect  of  EU  enlargement,  which  was  an  issue  of 
considerable  interest  within  the  country  at  the  time.  The  intentions  of  Romanians  to  migrate  are 
described in Sandu et al (2006). In their complex research on temporary living abroad, based on data 
collected through a national survey, the authors found almost 11 per cent of Romanians aged 18 to 
59  years  expressing  a  desire  to  leave  the  country  to  work  abroad  within  the  following  year.  The 
study also found that previous work experience abroad is one of the strongest incentives to migrate 
again, with almost 40 per cent of those who have already worked abroad wanting to migrate.  
A  number  of  recent  surveys  have  explored  attitudes  towards  migration of  Bulgarians.  A  survey  by 
the  Open  Society  Institute  in  2011  found  that  13  per  cent  of  respondents  intending  to  go  abroad 
within the next 12 months. The majority (52 per cent) intended to go abroad to look for a job and 14 
per  cent  had  already  found  a  job.  Over  70  per  cent  had  already  chosen  a  destination  country  to 
emigrate to, with 11 per cent wanting to go to the UK (Belcheva, 2011). The same survey found that 
around 5 per cent of Bulgarians have specific plans to move abroad for more than three months but 
that  they  intend  to  return  to  their  family  in  Bulgaria.  However,  in  view  of  the  current  economic 
situation  and  relatively  low  standard  of  living,  some  respondents  were  inclined  to  migrate  for  a 
longer period of time: around one in ten respondents (11 per cent) have specific plans to leave home 
and settle elsewhere, with more men than women considering such a move (62 per cent, compared 
to 38 per cent).  
13 
 
 

 
 
Similarly,  a  survey conducted in November 2010  found  that 13 per cent of adult Bulgarians would 
like to live and work abroad but many are interested in temporary, rather than permanent migration 
(Grigorova,  2010).  Therefore,  the  research  found  only  three  per  cent  of  surveyed  Bulgarians  had 
definite plans to emigrate. Other Bulgarian research has found very high rates of interest in working 
abroad,  for  example  as  high  as  two-thirds.  However,  the  sample  for  one  such  survey  was  biased, 
drawn from users of a job search website (Intelligence Group, 2011). 
Recent research by the Bulgarian National Public Opinion Centre reports that 36 per cent of parents 
would encourage their children to settle abroad, an increase from 30 per cent in 2009 (NPOC, 2012). 
An even higher proportion, 67 per cent would encourage their children to study abroad. With regard 
to  their  own  intentions,  14  per  cent  of  respondents  said  that  they  intended  to  leave  Bulgaria 
permanently, slightly higher than an earlier survey in 2009. Intentions to migrate were higher among 
unemployed  and  university  graduates.  Survey  respondents  expressed  more  interest  in  temporary 
moves than in permanent migration, with 28 per cent expressing an interest in working or studying 
abroad without permanently leaving.  
An  earlier  survey  provides  a  comparison  of  emigration  attitudes  between  2001  and  2006  (BBSS 
Gallup International, 2006). Figure 2.5 shows the results. The table shows that around 34 000 people 
stated their intention to work and live in a European Union member country for more than one year. 
The most preferred destinations were Spain and Germany. Some destinations such as North America 
(the US and Canada) and Germany became less attractive over the period 2001-2006, while Spain, 
the UK, and Italy became more attractive. 
 
 
14 
 
 



 
 
Figure 2.5 Emigration attitudes among Bulgarians 
 
 
 
The overall level of emigration attitudes and intentions remained unchanged over the period 2001-
2006, but there is change in the internal structure of emigration. There was a decrease in the share 
of  long-term  emigrants  and  a  significant,  almost  double  increase  in  the  share  of  short-term 
emigrants  (see  earlier).  The  research  also  found  some  changes  in  the  characteristics  of  potential 
migrants,  with  an  increase  in  the  proportion  of  women  interested  in  migrating.  The  research  also 
found that most of the potential emigrants were young (up to 40 years old) and with intermediate 
qualifications (BBSS Gallup International, 2006). 
Intentions to return to Bulgaria and Romania 
Whether  migrants  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  practice  temporary  migration  has  important 
implications for assessing the future impact of any potential migration to the UK. The intentions of 
migrants to stay in the countries to which they had moved or to return home, has been explored by 
some research studies, particularly within Romania. This has become of particular interest following 
the  economic  recession  across  Europe,  which  has  been  experienced  particularly  strongly  in  Spain 
and Italy, which have been top destinations for EU2 migrants. Research on intentions to return has 
used a variety of methods.  
15 
 
 

 
 
Research  on  Romanian  migrants  living  in  Madrid  has  come  up  with  varying  results  in  response  to 
questions  about  intentions  to  return.  A  survey  on  intentions  of  Romanians  to  return,  ENI  (the 
National Immigrants Survey of Spain) found that at the end of 2006 and the beginning of 2007 only 7 
per  cent  of  Romanian  migrants  living  in  the  Madrid  region  wished  to  return  to  Romania.  A  later 
survey, conducted in 2008 found in contrast that a large share of Romanian migrants, 71 per cent, 
living in the region of Madrid had the intention to return, while the remaining 29 per cent wished to 
remain in Spain However, intentions to return become less certain as questions get more precise, so 
that only 42 per cent  of Romanian migrants in the Madrid region declared they intended to return 
'very  surely'  and  13  per  cent  'surely',  while  14  per  cent  were  'uncertain'  and  2  per  cent  'very 
uncertain'. On the other hand, 14 per cent of Romanian migrants in the Madrid region declared they 
wish  to  return  to  Romania  within  a year,  33  per  cent  within 2  to 5 years,  and 15  per  cent  after  5 
years, while  29 per  cent  of them wished to stay in Spain  (Sandu,  2009).  The  difference  in  findings 
between  the  two  surveys  may  be  attributable  to  features  of  survey  design,  but  also  by  the 
deteriorating economic climate within Spain, discussed in more detail below.  
Marcu (2011)  analyses  return intentions of Romanian migrants,  using a combination of qualitative 
and quantitative methods, based on data from the ENI and municipal population registries (Padron 
Municipal
) for the years 1996–2008, and 75 in-depth interviews. She distinguishes between migrants 
who are definitely planning to return (32 per cent), the undecided, those who come and go (29 per 
cent) and those whose return is uncertain (15 per cent). The author concludes that the likelihood of 
returning  to  Romania  is  greatest  among  immigrants  who  have  families  in  Romania,  46  percent  of 
whom say that they will certainly return to their home country. 
Other research has used a model-based analysis, using data from World Bank surveys (Shima, 2010). 
This  concludes  that  labour  market  upgrading  among  Romanian  returnees  is  positively  correlated 
with  intentions  to  return permanently.  She  finds  that  a  higher  educational  level  and  intentions  to 
become an entrepreneur upon return are correlated with the decision of Romanians to return. The 
research finds that, among women, upgrade in employment is positively related to the duration of 
stay  abroad  and  intentions  to  return,  whereas  for  men,  the  duration  of  stay  has  no  impact  on 
upgrading. A decision to return permanently in the case of men is positively related to an intention 
to start one’s own business. 
The effect of the recent economic crisis 
The Europe-wide economic recession has not led to a wave of mass returns of Romanians working 
abroad, and those who returned to the country are most likely to stay for a short period of time. An 
analysis  of  mobility  patterns  of  Romanian  migrants  returning  from  Spain,  concludes  that  although 
some Romanians have recently returned home, there is no clear evidence that the crisis has resulted 
in  significant  numbers  of  returnees  (Barbulescu,  2009).  A  possible  explanation  of  this  is  that 
opportunities  available  to  migrants  in  the  labour  markets  of  other  EU  member  states  are  more 
attractive than those available in Romania. One study suggests that, rather than return home, many 
Romanian migrants in Italy and other EU member state have opted to live, somewhat precariously, 
in the destination country. The prospects of a lower wage, fewer opportunities to find a better paid 
occupation  and  greater  difficulties  in  setting  up  an  entrepreneurial  activity  limit  the  choices  for 
return (Ferri and Rainero 2010). Other recent research on the impact of the recent economic crisis 
concludes  that,  in  relation  to  Romanian  migration,  the  main  impact  has  been  a  slow-down  in 
migration  and  a  growth  in  the  rate  of  the  return  that  would  have  happened  later  anyway.  The 
research also identifies an increase in circular migration resulting from economic recession. 
Research findings suggest that, both in Italy and Spain, migrant women have been less affected by 
unemployment resulting from economic recession than men. This is a consequence of concentration 
of women in sectors less prone to economic fluctuations, while men were employed mostly in the 
construction sector, which in Spain has been particularly affected by the recession (Staciulescu et al, 
2011). At the same time, 2009 saw 15 per cent more companies registered by Romanian citizens as 
16 
 
 

 
 
compared  to  the  preceding  year,  reaching  32.452.  This  corresponds  to  higher  levels  of  self-
employment which we discuss later.  
2.4 Roma migration patterns 
The  migration  behaviour  of  the  Roma  communities  of  Bulgaria  and  Romania  follow  particular 
patterns. Evidence on the particular patterns of Roma migration is available from Bulgarian research 
which  identifies  similarities  and  differences  between  the  push  factors  for  Roma  and  the  wider 
Bulgarian population. (Angelov and Vankova, 2011) Both groups identified employment as the main 
reason  for  choosing  to  work  abroad.  However,  unlike  the  wider  Bulgarian  population,  the  Roma 
community did not  identify education as a push factor marking a key distinction between the  two 
groups.  In  addition,  migration  among  the  Roma  community  is  mostly  temporary  and  circular  with 
two thirds of Roma migrants returning to Bulgaria within less than six months. Target destinations 
also  differed  with  Greece  as  the  main  destination  for  Roma  migrants.  This  is  explained  with 
reference  to  its  proximity  to  Bulgaria,  low  travel  costs  and  for  opportunities  for  seasonal 
employment  in  tourism  and  agriculture.  In  contrast,  Germany  was  found  to  be  the  most  desired 
destination  for  non-Roma  Bulgarian  migrant  workers  followed  closely  by  Spain  (Angelov  and 
Vankova, 2011).   
Discrimination  and  poor  living  standards  are  also  key  drivers  of  migration  among  the  Roma 
communities  in  Bulgaria  and  Romania.  A  survey  by  the  European  Union  Agency  for  Fundamental 
Rights FRA (2009) finds that poverty and racism are the major factors behind outward migration of 
individuals from the Roma community. Specifically, unemployment and segregation were found to 
be  key  push  factors.  The  prospect  of  finding  work  and  achieving  a  higher  standard  of  living  were 
among  the  key  factors  attracting  members  of  the  Roma  community  to  certain  host  countries  are 
expectations and prospects of finding work and improving the standard of living.  Therefore,  some 
research has found a stronger interest in migration among those who identify themselves as Roma 
(Belcheva, 2011).   At the same time, recent Bulgarian research has found similar levels of interest in 
permanent  migration  among  the  Roma  community  as  Bulgarians  as  a  whole,  with  12  per  cent 
wishing to leave the country for good (NPOC, 2012).  
 
 
 
17 
 
 

 
 
3.  Bulgarian and Romanian Migration to the UK 
Key points 
  GDP, earnings and employment levels are likely to have some bearing on the future scale of 
migration from EU2 countries to the UK. A comparison of these shows level of GDP in Bulgaria 
and Romania several times lower than the UK. Earnings are considerably below UK levels and 
both Bulgaria and Romania have lower employment rates than the UK. 

  Both Bulgaria and Romania have a declining population, while that of the UK is increasing. All 
three countries have an ageing population but the trend in Bulgaria is more marked. Levels of 
education are lower in both Bulgaria and Romania than in the UK. 

  Levels  of  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  to  the  UK  are  currently  relatively  low, 
compared both to levels of EU8 citizens in the UK and EU2 citizens in Spain and Italy. Current 
migrants from Bulgaria and Romania are concentrated in London and the South East.  

  The great majority of migrants from Bulgaria and Romania in the UK are aged between 18 and 
34 years old, which is similar to that of workers from the EU8 countries which joined the EU in 
2004. Men are slightly over-represented among EU2 migrants to the UK.  

  The skill levels of current EU2 migrants to the UK are higher than those of EU8 migrants, with 
almost twice as many in skilled occupations. Levels of self employment are also relatively high. 
These features of the EU2 migrant population may change following removal of restrictions. 

  Some characteristics of EU2 migrants currently in the UK are typical of a new migrant group 
and  of  economic  migrants:  their  relatively  young  age,  small  numbers  of  children  and  older 
people, concentration in London and South East England.  

  Survey evidence suggests that the UK is not a strongly favoured location for those interested 
in  migrating.  There  is  little  firm  evidence  to  suggest  that  flows  will  therefore  increase 
substantially once transitional controls are lifted. 

3.1 The wider economic context  
In this chapter we describe the profile of Bulgarian and Romanian migrants to the UK. We start with 
illustrating recent trends in migration from Bulgaria and Romania to the UK in the wider European 
context. We compare the pattern of migration from the EU2 countries to that of migration from EU8 
countries. We then turn to analysing socio-economic characteristics of migrants  from Bulgaria and 
Romania  and  their  demographic,  skills  and  labour  market  status  profiles.  The  literature  refers  to 
several  sources  of  data:  compiled  by  international  organisations  (such  as  Eurostat  (data  on 
Population Statistics, International Migration Flows, Labour Force Surveys) and OECD), as well as by 
national bodies (national statistical offices ONS, Bulgarian and Romanian Statistical offices; in the UK 
data on migrants is also available through the WRS and the records of National Insurance Number 
allocations).  Unfortunately  none  of  these  data  sources  provides  a  full  picture  of  Bulgarian  and 
Romanian migration to the UK.  
Before examining the profile of current migration to the UK, it is useful to consider a few features of 
the economies of the UK, Bulgaria and Romania, since these may be important factors in 
encouraging migration once interim restrictions are lifted.  
Tables 3.1 shows Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the EU27 member states, Bulgaria, Romania and 
the UK. Table 3.1 shows that the level of GDP in Bulgaria and Romania, both in terms of Euro per 
inhabitant, as well as in terms of Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant is several times lower 
the EU average. The discrepancy between Romania and Bulgaria and the UK is even higher.  The gap 
has diminished significantly over the last decade, although the differences remain.  
18 
 
 

 
 
Table 3.1 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the EU27 member states, Bulgaria, Romania and the UK 
Gross domestic product at market 
Gross domestic product at 
prices (Millions of national 
  
market prices (Millions of Euro) 
currency) 
  
2000 
2010 
2000 
2010 
EU27 
9,200,905.0 
12,278,344.4 
9,200,905.0 
12,278,344.4 
Bulgaria 
14,035.1 
36,052.4 
27,398.7 
70,511.2 
Romania 
40,651.3 
124,058.9 
80,984.6 
522,561.1 
UK 
1,600,206.7 
1,709,606.7 
975,294.0 
1,466,569.0 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross domestic product at 
market prices (Euro per 
Gross domestic product at market 
  
inhabitant) 
prices (PPS per inhabitant) 
  
2000 
2010 
2000 
2010 
EU27 
19,000 
24,500 
19,000 
24,500 
Bulgaria 
1,700 
4,800 
5,400 
10,700 
Romania 
1,800 
5,800 
5,000 
11,400 
UK 
27,200 
27,500 
22,600 
27,400 
 
A    comparison  of  earnings  in  the  three  countries  is  presented  in  Table  3.2.  The  level  of  nominal 
earnings in Bulgaria and Romania has increased over time, although it still remains much below the 
UK level.  
Table 3.2 Average annual earnings in the UK, Bulgaria and Romania 
Average annual earnings, All 
NACE Rev. 1 activities (except 
agriculture; fishing; activities of 
Average annual earnings, NACE 
households and extra-territorial 
Rev. 2, Business economy (in 
Earnings 
organizations) (in Euro) 
Euro) 
  
2000 
2007 
2008 
2010 
Bulgaria 
1,411.2 
2,699.7 
3,328 
4,058 
Romania 

5,069.4 
5,457 
5,420 
UK 
36,728.0 
44,457.6 
41,714 
38,925 
Source: Eurostat 
Although Bulgaria and Romania are catching up, they remain among the poorest countries in the EU. 
Above we present real and nominal difference in GDP per capita and earnings between Bulgaria and 
Romania and the UK.  Differences in real GDP per capita between Bulgaria and Romania and other 
EU countries are indicative of how attractive migrating to another EU country might be to citizens of 
Bulgaria  and  Romania.  Nominal  differences  in  earnings  may  also  indicate  how  likely  Bulgarian  and 
Romanian workers in other EU countries are to send remittances to their home countries. One could 
speculate that absolute, that is nominal, differences in earnings may matter for temporary migrants 
who intend to return to their home countries in the medium term. Real differences are more likely 
to be taken into account by long term migrants wishing to stay in their countries of destination in 
the longer term.  
Table 3.3 shows the rates of employment and unemployment in the UK, Bulgaria and Romania. This 
shows the UK to have a considerably higher employment rate than both Bulgaria and Romania and 
to have a considerably lower unemployment rate than Bulgaria. A comparison of both employment 
and  unemployment  rates  between  2000  and  2010  shows,  however,  that  Bulgaria  increased  its 
19 
 
 

 
 
employment rate over this time, and reduced its unemployment rate. The trend in Romania was in 
the opposite direction, but both the fall in the employment rate and rise in unemployment rate were 
not large.  
Table 3.3 Rates of employment and unemployment in the UK, Bulgaria and Romania 
Employment rate 
(15 to 64 years) 

2000 
2010 
Bulgaria 
50.4 
59.7 
Romania 
63.0 
58.8 
United Kingdom 
71.2 
69.5 
 Unemployment rate   
 
2000 
 
 
2010 
Bulgaria 
16.4 
10.3 
Romania 
6.8 
7.3 
United Kingdom 
5.4 
7.8 
 
There  has  been  no  research  looking  at  the  particular  pull  factors  for  migration  from  the  EU2 
countries to the UK in particular. However, it may also be useful to look at the evidence on push and 
pull  factors  from  the  EU8  countries  to  the  UK  and  to  consider  their  relevance  to  potential  EU2 
migration.  A number of studies have found that the main motivation of  EU8 migrants to come to 
the  UK  is  the  desire  to  enter  the  UK  labour market.  Higher  relative  levels of  pay  have  been  a  key 
factor  behind  EU8  migration.  As  one  study  concludes,  ‘This  pre-eminence  of  economic motivation 
appears  to  have  been  largely  driven  by  the  favourable  disparity  in  earning  potential  between 
countries of origin and the UK’ (Cook et al, 2008). Another study involving interviews with migrants 
in Sussex found that the majority of migrants came to UK and, also to the local area for economic 
reasons,  which  included  the  difficult  economic  situation  in  their  countries  of  origin,  high 
unemployment rates, loss of jobs and loss of their own business (Sikora et al, 2010).  
Decisions of EU8 migrants have been found to be based on personal and social grounds as well as 
purely economic considerations. Some research has also found migrants to be motivated by joining a 
partner who previously migrated to the UK (Sikora et al, 2010). The choice of the UK as a destination, 
rather  than  other  countries  open  to  EU8  migrants  has  also  been  explained  with  reference  to 
presence of family and friends (Markova and Black, 2007). 
3.2 Demographic, Geographic & socio-economic profile of EU2 migrants to the UK  
A comparison of the population profiles of Bulgarian, Romania and the UK 
The relative sizes of the populations of Bulgaria, Romania and the UK are presented in Table 3.4. This 
shows that the UK, with 62 million inhabitants, is more than three times the size of Romania, at just 
under  21.5  million  inhabitants,  and  more  than  eight  times  the  size  of  Bulgaria,  which  has  a 
population of around 7.5 million. The table also shows the change in population between 2000 and 
2010 in the three countries. While the UK’s population grew 5.6 by per cent during this period, the 
population of Romania declined by 4.5 per cent, and that of Bulgaria by as much as 8 per cent. 
 
Table 3.4 Population sizes of Bulgaria, Romania and the UK 2000 and 2010 
Population 
2000 
2010 
Bulgaria 
8190876 
7563710 
Romania 
22455485 
21462186 
20 
 
 

 
 
UK 
58785246 
62026962 
The age profile of the populations of the three countries is shown in Table 3.5. This shows all three 
countries as having a tendency towards an ageing population. However, the population of Romania 
shows more marked ageing, with the population aged under 15 years old falling from 19 per cent to 
15 per cent between 2000 and 2010 
Table 3.5 Age profile of the populations of Bulgaria, Romania and the UK 2000 and 2010 
Age 
structure 

  
2000 
  
  
2010 
  
65 and 
65 and 
  
Under 15 
15 to 64 
over 
Under 15 
15 to 64 
over 
Bulgaria 
16% 
68% 
16% 
14% 
69% 
18% 
Romania 
19% 
68% 
13% 
15% 
70% 
15% 
UK 
19% 
65% 
16% 
17% 
66% 
16% 
 
The three countries also vary in the educational attainment of their populations. As Table 3.6 shows, 
35 per cent of the UK population is education to the first and secondary stage of tertiary education, 
which  in  the  UK  corresponds  to  post-secondary  school  study.  In  Bulgaria,  23  per  cent  of  people 
attain this level of education, while in Romania it is considerably lower at 14 per cent. In all three 
countries the proportion of people attaining this level of education grew between 2003 and 2010 
Table 3.6 Educational attainment in Bulgaria, Romania and the UK 2003 and 2010 
Educational 
attainment 

  
2003    
  
2010    
Upper 
Pre-
secondary 
Pre-
Upper 
primary, 
and post-
First and 
primary, 
secondary 
First and 
primary and 
secondary 
second 
primary and 
and post-
second 
lower 
non-
stage of 
lower 
secondary 
stage of 
secondary 
tertiary 
tertiary 
secondary 
non-tertiary 
tertiary 
  
education 
education 
education  
education 
education 
education  
Bulgaria 
29% 
50% 
21% 
21% 
56% 
23% 
Romania 
30% 
60% 
10% 
26% 
61% 
14% 
UK 
33% 
36% 
31% 
24% 
41% 
35% 
 
Numbers of migrants from Bulgaria and Romania to the UK 
In absolute terms the number of Bulgarian and Romanian migrants currently living in the UK location 
is  relatively  low  (26,000  and  80,000,  respectively).  This  compares  with  168,000  Bulgarians  and 
823,000  Romanians  settling  in  Spain,  and  46,000  Bulgarians  and  888,000  settling  in  Italy.  It  is  also 
low compared to the number of EU8 nationals settling in the UK (815,000).  
Figure  3.7  shows  the  number  of  Bulgarian  and  Romanian  nationals  residing  in  Spain  and  Italy  as 
compared to the UK, as of 2009, as well as the number of Bulgarian and Romanian nationals residing 
in the UK over 1997-2009.  
 
21 
 
 

 
 
Figure 3.7. Bulgarian and Romanian migrants in the UK 
1000 
90 
900 
80 
800 
70 
700 
60 
600 
500 
50 
400 
40 
300 
30 
200 
20 
100 

10 


 
 
 
8


8


8

ian
UE
ian
UE
ian
UE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
arian
lg
lgarian
lgarian
u
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
B
Roman
Bu
Roman
Bu
Roman
Bulgarians in the UK 
UK 
Spain 
Italy 
Romanians in the UK 
 
 
Source: Holland et al., 2011 
Location of Bulgarian and Romanian migrants in the UK 
We have compared the above international data with the data on the number of NINO allocations 
published by the DWP. According to the NINO data, the numbers of NINO allocated to Bulgarian and 
Romanian  nationals  from  2002  to  the  first  quarter  of  2012  amounted  to  89,000  and  125,000, 
respectively. This is slightly more than the European data presented above suggests (note the latest 
data is as of 2009). This is explained by the fact that the there is no requirement to de-register or to 
re-register following movement out and back in to the UK. NINO registers do not account for those 
who  stay  only  temporarily.  Other  limitations  of  NINO  data  relate  to  their  recording  the  year  of 
registration,  rather  than  arrival  in  the  UK,  and  absence  of  data  on  migrants’  internal  movements 
within the UK.  
With regard to temporary migration, rather than longer term settlement, the recent crisis may have 
induced  some  return  migration  or  relocation  of  mobile  workers  within  the  EU.  This  is  what  the 
European  data  would  suggest,  at  least  in  the  case  of  Bulgarian  workers:  there  was  a  drop  in  the 
number  of  Bulgarians  in  the  UK  between  2008  and  2009  (from  about  50,000  to  26,000,  shown  in 
figure 3.7).    
As  Table  3.8  shows,  most  migrants  from  Central-Southern  Europe  settle  in  London.  About  50  per 
cent of Romanians, and about 35 per cent of Bulgarians residing in the UK in 2009 chose London in 
which to live. Although London continues to attract the greatest proportion of new migrants arriving 
in  the  UK,  its  share  has  decreased  over  time  as migration  to  other  regions  has  increased  (Rincon-
Aznar and Stokes, 2011). However, the onset of economic recession has increased the concentration 
of migrants  in London  (Boden and Rees, 2010)  Prior to the economic crisis, the  share of Bulgarian 
and  Romanian  nationals  settling  in  London  was  somewhat  higher,  as  shown  by  table  3.8.  Datta 
(2011), drawing upon research carried out with low-paid Bulgarian migrants in London, documents 
that the recession had exacerbated their economic insecurity (which related to the fear of a job loss, 
or experiences of unemployment).  
22 
 
 

 
 
Table 3.8. Regional distribution of EU-2 nationals allocated a NINo, 2007-2009 in % 
 
Bulgaria 
 
Romania 
 
2007 
2008 
2009 
 
2007 
2008 
2009 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Scotland 
4.6 
7.6 
8.7 
 
2.6 
3.7 
5.2 
North East 
0.6 
0.4 
0.6 
 
0.7 
1.0 
1.0 
North West 
3.0 
3.8 
3.6 
 
2.2 
2.8 
3.9 
Yorkshire and the 
1.6 
2.2 
2.2 
 
1.9 
2.2 
2.2 
Humber 
Wales 
0.8 
0.8 
1.3 
 
0.8 
1.1 
1.4 
West Midlands 
9.4 
11.1 
12.9 
 
3.2 
5.4 
7.3 
East Midlands 
3.4 
2.9 
2.8 
 
4.2 
3.6 
3.8 
East of England 
7.7 
9.5 
9.0 
 
4.0 
5.9 
8.9 
South East 
13.4 
13.5 
17.9 
 
8.0 
9.0 
11.9 
London 
51.7 
42.9 
35.1 
 
69.1 
61.2 
49.0 
South West 
3.0 
3.7 
3.9 
 
2.6 
3.6 
4.4 
Northern Ireland 
0.9 
1.6 
2.0 
 
0.7 
0.5 
1.1 
Source: Department for Work and Pensions, after Holland et al. (2011) 
 
While discussing the size of migration from Bulgaria and Romania to the UK we should mention the 
issue  of  comparability  of  the  data.  As  pointed  out  in  the  methodology  section,  the  literature 
reviewed in this report refers to various sources of data. The datasets compiled by international and 
national organisations differ not only because they measure different groups of migrants, or apply 
different definitions of a migrant. The data may refer to flows or stocks, and these are not always 
directly  comparable.  The  Labour  Force  Survey  data  collected  by  national  statistical  offices  in  the 
sending  countries  provides  a  slightly  different  picture  of  migration  from  the  one  obtained  on  the 
basis  of  LFS  data  collected  in  the  receiving  countries.  While  the  quality  of  data  will  improve  over 
time, it should currently be treated with caution.  
Characteristics of Bulgarian and Romanian migrants in the UK 
We have already identified some characteristics of EU8 migrants across with EU. In this section, we 
look at their current profile in the UK, which as we explain is slightly different. Stokes, (2011) using 
data  from  NINO  allocations  shows  that  the  vast  majority  of  migrants  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania 
were aged between 18 and 34 years old at the time of registration. As figure 3.10 shows, Bulgarian 
nationals  were  on  average  slightly  younger  than  the  Romanians.  The  age  distribution  of  workers 
from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  is  broadly  similar  to  that  of  workers  from  the  EU8  countries  which 
entered the EU in 2004.  
Gillingham (2010) using data from both NINO allocations and the WRS, shows there has been some 
change  in  the  age  profile  of  EU-8  migrants  arriving  in  the  UK  since  2004.  Both  sources  indicate  a 
decrease in the proportion of those aged under 35, and an increase in the proportion aged 35 and 
above. This same pattern is found in EU LFS data shows as for the stock of Bulgarian and Romanian 
workers residing in EU15 countries (Fic, 2011). Over the period 2004-2010, the share of those aged 
under  35 decreased and of those  aged 35 and above  increased. It can be  expected that the same 
pattern will apply to Bulgarian and Romanian citizens residing in the UK.  
The gender distribution is shown in figure 3.10.  There are slightly more men arriving in the UK than 
women. 
With regard to the family profile of migrants, Kausar (2011) reports that both EU2 and EU8 migrants 
were more likely to be married than migrants from other countries; 50 per cent of EU2 migrants and 
23 
 
 

 
 
60 per cent of EU8 migrants were married as compared to 42 per cent of all other migrants. Both 
EU2 and EU8 migrants were less likely to have dependent children than other migrants (63 per cent 
and 54 per cent, respectively). Matheson (2009) documents the increase in the number of children 
within  the  EU8  population  as  a  result  of  both  children  born  in  EU8  countries  migrating  with  their 
families and the number of babies born to mothers from the EU8 residing in the UK.  
Figure 3.10. Age and gender distribution of Bulgarian, Romanian and EU8 movers to the UK 
Per cent of migrants by age, 
Per cent of migrants by 
NINO allocations, 2009 
gender, NINo allocations, 
2009 
Bulgaria 
44 
37.1  17.2 
Bulgaria 
55.9 
44.2 
Romania 
38.4 
43.7 
17.1 
Romania 
55.8 
44.2 
EU8 
41.9 
33 
22.4 
EU8 
53.5 
46.5 
All other nationals 
40 
42.8 
15.5 
All other nationals 
53.6 
46.4 
less than 24  25-34 
Male 
Female 
35-54 
55 and over 
 
 
Source: DWP, after Holland et al 
Qualifications held by migrants are not well reported in the UK LFS with a large proportion reporting 
'other' qualifications (Migration Advisory Committee, 2008). Data from the European Labour Force 
Survey suggests that the majority (60 per cent) of Bulgarian and Romanian workers coming to the UK 
have  intermediate  qualifications.  The  proportion  of  those  with  higher  educational  attainment  is 
greater than among movers settling in Italy; and comparable with migrants residing in Spain. 
Figure 3.11. Economic characteristics of EU2 and EU8 migrants in the UK, Italy, and Spain. 
Educational attainment of EU2 and 
Share of self-employed and 
EU8 migrants in the UK, Italy and 
employees among migrants in the 
Spain 
UK, Italy and Spain 
 
EU2 
22 
61 
17 
EU2 
58 
42 
UK
 
EU8 
18 
67 
16 
EU10 
91 

UK
EU15 
89 
11 
EU2 
35 
59 

 
IT
EU2 
91 

 
EU8 
27 
62 
11 
IT
EU10 
88 
12 
EU15 
73 
27 
EU2 
 
35 
49 
16 
 
EU2 
ES
97 

EU8 
19 
45 
36 
ES
EU10 
77 
23 
Low 
Medium 
High 
Employees 
Self-employed 
 
 
 
 
 
24 
 
 

 
 
Sectoral structure of EU2 and EU8 
Occupational structure of EU2 and EU8 
migrants 
migrants in the UK, Italy and Spain 
Construction 
Activities of HH as employers 
 
EU2 
29 
53 
18 
Manufacturing 
Accom. & food service act. 
UK
EU8 
35 
52 
13 
Wholesale & retail trade, etc. 
Agriculture 
Admin.&support service act. 
 
EU2 
37 
59 

Transportation and storage 
IT
Health &social work activities 
EU8 
37 
49 
13 
Other service activities 
Professional 
 
EU2 
41 
55 

Education 
ES
Information and comunication 
EU8 
20 
60 
21 
Arts 
Public administration … 
Water supply; sewerage* 
Real estate activities* 
Low skill occupations 
Financial and insurance act. 
Medium skill occupations 


10  15  20  25 
High skill occupations 
EU2 
EU8 
 
Source: European Commission, 2012 and Holland et al, 2011 
Employment status and sectoral patterns 
Movers  from  the  EU2  predominantly  work  in  occupations  requiring  low  or  intermediate 
qualifications such as elementary occupations and as craft and related trades workers. Across the EU 
these  include  construction,  manufacturing,  accommodation,  food  and  service  activities,  wholesale 
and retail trade. 
The  European  Commission  (2012)  estimates  that,  on  average,  about  30  per  cent  of  EU2  and  EU8 
mobile workers work below their qualifications. The incidence of down-skilling in the UK is higher in 
the case of EU8 migrants than in the case of EU2 movers (Holland et al, 2011) which may be related 
to the  size of their population in the  UK. The  incidence of down-skilling in the case of EU2 mobile 
workers is higher in Spain than in the UK. Quoting results of a survey conducted in 2008, Iara (2010) 
documents that virtually all Romanians (93 per cent) with a high level of education, working in Italy, 
were overqualified for the job they did. This is probably a consequence of current restrictions on the 
right of Bulgarians and Romanians to work in the UK, which confines them to particular sectors and 
occupations.  
Restrictions  on  workers  under  transitional  arrangements  only  apply  to  employees,  and  not  to  the 
self-employed.  Several  sources  suggest  that  there  has  been  a  relatively  disproportionate  share  of 
self-employed among mobile workers to circumvent current restrictions. It has been argued that a 
proportion of those registered as self-employed workers are not genuinely self-employed but have 
adopted, or been given this status, because of current restrictions on employment. EC, 2012). The 
share  of  self-employed  differs  significantly  across  countries  and  it  appears  that  the  share  of  self-
employed is correlated with restrictions on the free movement of workers (EC, 2012). In the case of 
the UK the share of the self-employed among movers from Central and Eastern Europe is very low, 
while it is significantly higher among arrivals from Bulgaria and Romania (Kausar, 2011). Spain, which 
granted free access to its labour market for movers from EU2 countries in 2009, in 2010 recorded a 
very low share of self-employed at 3 per cent, as compared to the 8 per cent share recorded in 2008.  
Surveys of Bulgarian workers in countries including the UK have found that they are concentrated in 
four sectors: hospitality, cleaning services, construction and trade. For those interviewed in 2009 in 
the UK, agriculture was also a significant sector for employment of Bulgarian migrants. Bulgarians in 
the three countries surveyed, the UK, Greece and Italy, also work as self-employed. This research has 
also  looked  at  employment  prior  to  coming  to  the  UK.  Previous  jobs  of  migrants  were  found  to 
include doctors, accountants, midwifes, nurses, tennis coaches, fitness instructors, shop-owners, taxi 
25 
 
 

 
 
drivers  and  locksmiths.  Just  under  a  quarter  had  worked  in  another  foreign  country  before 
(Germany,  Greece,  Libya)  and  most  of  the  migrants  interviewed  were  first  time  emigrants.  As  for 
their  first  employment  in  the  UK,  the  main  sectors  were  construction  (men);  personal  services 
(women); hotel and restaurant services (both men and women) (Krasteva et al, 2010).  
The UK as a potential destination for migrants from Bulgaria and Romania 
There  is  little  firm  evidence  to  suggest  that  the  UK  is  favoured  as  a  potential  destination  for 
migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  and  that  flows  will  therefore  increase  substantially  once 
transitional controls are lifted. The media in Romania suggested some time ago that the UK will be 
chosen as a destination after 2007, because of the scale of migration from Polish after 2004. Some 
researchers have  rejected this as speculation and conclude  that language  and network effects will 
influence the decision of Romanians to choose Italy and Spain (Silasi and Simina, 2008) 
There is some evidence from Bulgaria that there is more interest in the UK as a destination than in 
the past, but levels of interest are still relatively low: 15 per cent of those wishing to leave Bulgaria 
said  they  were  planning  to  go  the  UK  (Belcheva,  2011).  Other  research  has  found  that  England  is 
seen  as  a  destination  by  around  10  per  cent  of  respondents wishing  to migrate  (Pamporov,  2011) 
This  interest  has  been  explained  with  reference  to  the  teaching  of  English  as  the  main  foreign 
language in Bulgarian schools.  
There is evidence of some support organisations for Bulgarians and Romanians within the UK. These 
include  cultural associations,  supplementary  schools  and  churches  (See  Annex 5). Existence of this 
type  of  support  is  likely  to  reflect,  rather  than  encourage  migration,  although  it  may  assist  longer 
term settlement.   
3.3  A Comparison of EU2 and EU8 migration to the UK 
A number of studies have compared the social and demographic characteristics of current EU2 and 
EU8 migrants to the UK. They have been found to be similar in a number of respects, which may be 
helpful when considering the potential impact of EU2 migration. 
Similarities have been noted in the age profile of EU8 and EU2 migrants as well as in education levels 
(Sumption and Somerville, 2009). Both groups also have low  unemployment rates and high labour 
force participation (Migration Advisory Committee, 2008). The main differences found in the profiles 
of  current  EU2  and  EU8  migrants  are  in  their  occupational  skill  levels  and  in  the  proportion  with 
children.  
First, with regard to skills differences, the majority of current EU2 migrants in the UK perform jobs in 
the top two (of four) occupational skill groups (MAC, 2008).  Using Labour Force Survey data, Kauser 
(2011) found that 26 per cent of EU2 migrants are in skilled occupations, compared to only 15 per 
cent of EU8 migrants. Sumption and Somerville (2010) argue that this skills difference is most likely 
due to the labour market restrictions that EU2 migrants currently face. They are limited primarily to 
intermediate  and  skilled  occupations  and  to  self-employment,  although  lower  skilled  work  is 
possible through the Sectors Based Scheme and the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme.  
Secondly,  EU8  migrants  are  more  likely  to  be  living  in  family  groups  than  EU2  migrants  (Kauser, 
2011).  This may also be explained by tighter restrictions on EU2 migrants' employment which may 
deter family migration and settlement.  
Some characteristics of  EU2 migrants might be seen as  both typical of a new migrant  group, most 
notably  in  terms  of  age  and  small  numbers  of  children  and  older  people.  Other  characteristics, 
particularly  their  concentration  in  particular  sectors  and  in  self-employment,  are  likely  to  reflect 
current  employment  restrictions.  It  has  therefore  been  argued  that  the  population  of  new  EU2 
migrants  is  likely  to  resemble  the  EU8  migrant  population  more  closely  once  the  labour  market 
restrictions  are  lifted  (MAC,  2008).  We  believe  that  this  is  likely  to  be  the  case  and  that,  in  the 
26 
 
 

 
 
absence of reliable evidence on either current or future migration intentions, evidence in relation to 
EU8 migration is of potential value in assessing potential impacts. This has informed our approach to 
assessing the potential social impacts of EU2 migration, explored in the next chapter.  
 
 
 
27 
 
 

 
 
 
4.  Social impact of Bulgarian and Romanian Migration on the UK 
Key points 
  Our review of the impact of migration on UK services found very little literature specifically 
relating to migration from Bulgaria and Romania. We have focused on literature on the impact 
of EU8 migration and have interpreted its findings to account for ways in which EU2 migration 
may differ.  

  Many  services in  the  UK were  not well-prepared  for  EU8 migration  and  found  it  difficult  to 
cope  with  the  increased  demand.  Impacts  were  also  greater  where  services  were  already 
stretched.  However,  a feature of  EU8  migration was its wide geographical spread across the 
UK. EU2 migration may not be so widely dispersed. 

  Significant family migration from the EU2 countries may increase pressure on school places at 
primary level in some areas. However, there is less pressure on secondary school places.  
  Any impact of EU2 migration on housing will depend on the existing housing supply as well as 
the buoyancy of the local housing market.  
  Future  EU2  migration  is  unlikely  to  have  a  significant  impact  on  health  services  as  a  whole 
because of the age profile of economic migrants.  
  Our  review  identified  a  limited  evidence  base  on  the  impact  of  migrants  on  the  welfare 
system.  However,  current  research  has  found  that  EU2  and  EU8  migrants  are  less  likely  to 
claim benefits than other migrant groups and that of those EU10 migrants who claim benefits, 
the majority claim child benefits. 

 
4.1 Our approach to assessing the potential social impact of EU2 migration  
The focus of this chapter is to identify research which could be used to assess the potential impact of 
migration  to  the  UK  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  once  restrictions  are  lifted.  The  scope  of  the 
literature review is wide, and here we focus on the impacts of EU2 migration experienced in the UK 
with  particular  reference  to  the  impacts  on  services,  including  health,  education  and  housing  and 
services in general. As we explain, a range of factors are likely to affect the degree of impact of any 
future migration from Bulgaria and Romania. While the scale of migration is obviously a key factor, 
these include the personal characteristics of migrants, including their age and if they come alone or 
with families, the extent to which they settle and where they live within the UK.  
One possible approach to assessing the potential impact of EU2 migration would be to look at exiting 
migration  from  EU2  countries  and  the  implications  of  this  for  migration  once  restrictions  are 
removed.  Unfortunately,  this  approach  has  two  drawbacks.  The  first  of  these  is  the  very  limited 
research evidence in relation to the social impacts of existing EU2 migration to the UK. The second 
drawback is that Bulgarian and Romanian nationals have entered the UK under arrangements which 
have  restricted their employment in a number of ways. These  are  likely to have encouraged short 
term stays of eligible individuals rather than longer term settlement of families. With the lifting of 
restrictions, this is likely to change. Therefore the demographic composition and demands that EU2 
migrants are likely to place on UK services will be very different.  
Our proposed approach is based on an assessment of similarities between current EU8 migration to 
the  UK  and  prospective  EU2  migration.  We  compared  some  of  the  key  features  of  EU2  and  EU8 
migration  in  Chapter  3,  and  how  these  reflect  their status  as  economic  migrants.  While  the  social 
and demographic characteristics of current EU2 and EU8 migrants differ somewhat it is expected the 
28 
 
 

 
 
population of new EU2 migrants is likely to resemble the EU8 migrant population more closely once 
the labour market restrictions are lifted (MAC, 2008).  
The body of evidence on EU8 migration impacts on the demand for UK services is now considerable, 
although  more  in  some  areas  of  service  provision  than  others.  Our  review  has  covered  a  large 
number of studies and also incorporated evidence from larger reviews which have included studies 
which  are  too  small  and  localised  to  be  considered  separately  in  this  review  of  evidence.  These 
larger reviews  include  NIESR's review of the impact  of migration into Scotland (Rolfe and Metcalf, 
2009)  and  on  the  impact  of  migration  on  demand  for  health  and  education  (George  et  al,  2012), 
although this particular review was of the impact of non-EU migration. 
4.2 Literature on current EU2 migration to the UK 
As stated above, only limited consideration has been given to the potential impact of migration to 
the UK from Bulgaria and Romania once restrictions on employment are lifted in 2014.  
A small number of studies have either looked at current migration from the EU2 countries or have 
attempted to predict its impact using a combination of data on EU2 migration and existing evidence 
on  EU8  migration.  The  obvious  drawback  of  predicting  the  impact  of  future  EU2  migration  from 
analyses  based  on  current  EU2  migration  is  that  Bulgarian  and  Romanian  nationals  enter  the  UK 
under interim restrictions and their stay is more likely to be temporary. These may encourage short 
term  stays  of  eligible  individuals  rather  than  longer  term  settlement  of  families.  Indeed,  a  recent 
study of Bulgarian migrant workers in London found that nearly 65 per cent of the interview sample 
did not have any dependents (Datta, 2011).  
Research by the Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG) on the potential impact 
of EU2 migration on demand for services and other social impacts found evidence of EU2 accession 
migration since 2007 too limited to use reliably and therefore drew on evidence from EU8 migration 
into  the  UK  (Department  for  Communities  and  Local  Government,  2007).  Other  Government 
investigations  have  used  a  range  of  sources  to  predict  the  likely  flow  of  new  migrants  following 
removal of restrictions. In particular, a report on Bulgarian and Romanian accession to the EU by the 
House  of Commons Home Affairs Committee  looked at evidence  including unemployment rates  in 
Bulgaria  and  Romania  (House  of  Commons  Home  Affairs  Committee,  2008).  The  Committee 
considered  evidence  on  the  low  unemployment  rate  in  Romania  and  the  long  term  trend  for 
economic growth. Other research, for the Department for Communities and Local Government, also 
remarks that the EU2 (and EU8) countries have experienced falling unemployment rates since 2004, 
possibly  due  to  a  declining  population,  so  that  unemployment  may  not  be  a  strong  push  factor 
(Kauser, 2011). Oral evidence from both Bulgaria and Romania referred to the preferred destinations 
of potential migrants, which were considered to be Italy, Spain and Germany for Romanian nationals 
and Spain, Portugal, Italy, France and Greece for Bulgarians. Although, these preferences may have 
now  changed  in  the  light  of  the  economic  situation  in  some  of  these  member  states,  this 
corresponds with other evidence that the UK may not be the first choice of EU2 migrants (House of 
Commons Home Affairs Committee 2008).  
4.3 Migrants' use of services: general issues affecting demand and impact 
In this chapter of the report we look at the impact of migration on a range of services, focusing on 
the  key services  of housing, health and education and social security. In addition to studies which 
have focused on migration impacts on specific services, a number have looked more broadly at the 
impact of migration on public services or have identified issues which are relevant to migrants’ use 
of  services  more  generally.  Before  turning  to  particular  areas  of  service  provision,  we  provide  an 
overview of these more general findings.  
As  previous  research  by  NIESR  has  found,  there  is  very  little  research  which  looks  directly  at  the 
impact of migration on public services (Rolfe and Metcalf, 2009). The focus of much of research is on 
29 
 
 

 
 
migrants'  access  to  service  and  on  their  levels  of  awareness  of  entitlements,  rather  than  on  the 
impact on services they may access. This is found particularly in relation to health, where there have 
been concerns that some groups of migrants may not be accessing the services they need (Medicins 
du Monde, 2007; Raphaely and O’Moore, 2010).  
Another  feature  of  some  published  research  on  migrants'  use  of  services  is  its  broad  focus  on 
migrants and lack of distinction between groups of migrants. This is important because migrants do 
not  have  the  same  level  of  need  for  services  and  therefore  will  have  different  levels  of  impact 
according  to  their  personal  characteristics  and  background.  While  some  research  has  focused 
specifically  on  refugees  and  asylum  seekers  and  on  their  particular  service  needs,  others  do  not 
distinguish  between  groups  of  migrants,  for  example  EU  and  non-EU,  and  some  include  migrants 
who  have  been  resident  in  the  UK  for  many  years.  Therefore,  this  research  makes  it  difficult  to 
assess  the  actual  and  potential  impact  of  particular  migrants,  including  potential  migration  from 
Bulgaria and Romania.  
The problem of lack of distinction between migrants in some of the literature stems in part from lack 
of information about migrants who are accessing services. As an earlier NIESR review for the Scottish 
Government found, the record systems of many service providers do not allow for analysis of use by 
nationality or migrant/non-migrant status. In some cases this is because the characteristics of service 
users are not adequately recorded. However, some studies have found some service providers carry 
out  no  monitoring  of  enquiries  and  are  therefore  only  able  to  provide  estimates  of  migrant  use, 
based on providers' personal impressions (Orchard et al, 2007). These estimates may not accurately 
reflect  characteristics  of  service  users.  Therefore,  as  the  NIESR  report  concluded,  record  keeping 
needs to be  improved in some  service  areas if the impact of migration is to be  properly assessed. 
These  systems  could  be  put  in  place  in  advance  of  the  lifting  of  restrictions  on  migration  from 
Bulgaria and Romania in 2013.  
As a number of evidence reviews have concluded (Arai, 2005; Rolfe and Metcalf 2009), many studies 
of the  impact  of migration on demand for services are  small scale, conducted within UK localities, 
commissioned  by  local  authorities.  These  studies  have  considered  migrants’  needs  for  service 
provision, changing levels of demand for services, the capacity of organisations and staff to deal with 
this demand and the experiences and needs of migrants themselves. Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) point 
to  a  number  of  limitations  of  these  studies,  including  their  small  sample  sizes,  low  response  rates 
and lack of clarity in research methods. However, they also note that despite  these shortcomings, 
these smaller studies present a fairly consistent picture in relation to demand for services from EU8 
migrants  which  is  supported  by  larger  studies.  There  are  three  main  messages  from  studies  of 
general demand for services resulting from EU8 migration: 
  Many services were not well prepared for EU8 migration and response has not been well-
coordinated nationally  
  Services often do not record the personal characteristics of users in order for the impact 
of migration to be assessed 
  Migration impacts are felt most where services are already stretched 
  The greatest impact has been on demand for translation and interpretation services 
Many  services  were  not  prepared  for  the  level  of  EU8  migration  because  it  was  more  widely 
distributed  than  earlier  migration  to  the  UK  and  included  areas  which  had  previously  experienced 
low levels of migration (Andrews et al, 2011). Many local service providers have not been aware of 
migrants’  rights  in  relation  to  access  to  services  (Rolfe  and  Metcalf,  2009).  Local  authorities  have 
responded in a piecemeal way (Cook et al, 2008) with some  better able  to assist  migrants, and to 
deal  with  any  increased  demand  than  others.  A  review  of  the  performance  of  English  councils, 
matched  with  migration  data,  found  that  significant  levels  of  EU8  migration  did  affect  service 
performance.  However,  local  authorities  with  previous  experience  of  migration  were  able  to 
maintain  service  standards  better  than  others  and  able  to  cancel  out  any  negative  impact  of  EU8 
30 
 
 

 
 
migration on  service  performance  (Andrews  et  al, 2011).Other studies refer more generally to the 
impact that migration can have where services are already stretched by lack of resources (Green et 
al, 2008). The House of Lords Select Committee enquiry refers to this problem, where increases in 
demand are not budgeted for (House of Lords, 2008). 
Studies  have  consistently  found  that  the  greatest  impact  on  services  has  been  in  the  demand  for 
translation and interpretation services. This area of service provision has not been well-funded and 
migration  from  EU8  countries  has  put  additional  pressure  on  budgets  and  existing  services  (Audit 
Commission, 2007; Cook et al, 2008). However, there is also evidence from local studies that lack of 
English  language  skills  among  migrants  reduces services  use  and  increases  reliance  on  friends  and 
family (Rolfe and Metcalf, 2009; Scullion and Morris, 2009a&b; Scullion et al, 2009). More generally, 
there is evidence of ‘self-sufficiency’ among EU8 migrants (Rolfe and Metcalf, 2009). However, while 
this may reduce pressure on services, it may also result in exploitation of migrants where they are 
not aware of their rights and of available support (Sumption and Somerville, 2010).  
The implications of these findings for EU2 migration following removal of barriers depend on both its 
scale  and  distribution.  Research  evidence  suggests  that  the  effects  on  service  demand  were  felt 
most in areas of the UK which had little experience of previous migration and were not prepared for 
or experienced in providing services to migrants. It might be expected that, more than eight years 
after initial EU8 migration, this situation has now changed and that many local authorities and other 
service providers are better equipped to address the needs of migrants, both in terms of knowledge 
of migrants’ rights and entitlement and skills for working with migrants. However, the budgets of UK 
local  authorities  and  other  service  providers  have  been  reduced  following  Government  spending 
cuts and this may affect their ability to deal with any increased demand for services, and particularly 
for  language  support.  The  implications  of  potential  EU2  migration  for  particular  service  areas  are 
considered in the following sections.  
4.4 Health services & Public Health 
Evidence about the impact of migration on health focuses on three main areas which are reviewed in 
turn: 
  Levels of demand for health services  
  Migrants’ access to and usage of health services 
  Public health impacts of migration 
Levels of demand for health services  
The  impact  of  migration  on  health  services  has  been  assessed  primarily  within  reviews  of  service 
impacts  more  widely,  and  through  evidence  gathering,  either  from  literature  reviews  or  from 
consultation with service providers at health authority or local authority level. As a previous report 
by NIESR indicates, much of this research has focused on EU migrants or on migrants as a whole and 
has tended to be region-specific (George et al, 2012).  
George et al (2012) found that, overall, migrants in general are  unlikely to pose a disproportionate 
burden on health services (i.e. one that is greater than would be expected, given their proportion of 
the  population).  Other  reviews  with  a  regional  focus  came  to  similar  conclusions.  For  example,  a 
review of evidence by the Scottish Parliament found little evidence of increased demand for health 
services resulting from migration into Scotland (Scottish Parliament, 2010). Similarly, an enquiry by 
the  Welsh  Assembly  Government  revealed  that  migrants  were  making  little  impact  on  health 
services. This was largely believed to be because economic migrants tend to be young and healthy, 
aged  between  18  and  34,  return  to  their  countries  of  origin  for  treatment  and  are  not  aware  of 
services  available  to  them  (National  Assembly  for  Wales,  2008).  Such  a  finding  is  in  keeping  with 
other research looking at the impact of migration across the UK which has shown that new economic 
migrants are generally young and healthy (CLG, 2006; ICOCO, 2007) and as such do not make major 
31 
 
 

 
 
demands  on  health  services.  Such  findings  demonstrate  that  future  migration  from  Bulgaria  and 
Romania is unlikely to have a significant impact on health services as a whole.  
Some  studies  have  indicated that that levels of demand for health care may change  in the future. 
However,  this  is  based  on  observations  of  increased  settlement  among  migrant  workers  in  local 
areas  rather  than  forecasting  based  on  existing  data or  research on  migrants'  intentions (National 
Assembly  for  Wales,  2008;  Collis  et  al,  2010).  Collis  and  colleagues  also  note  that  GP  registration 
rates among EU2 and EU8 workers are lower than among Portuguese workers and believe this may 
be due to the fact that the Portuguese community has been resident in the area for longer.  
Disproportionate demand  
The  studies  cited above  have  looked  at  the  impact  of migration  on  the  overall  demand  for  health 
services. Other studies have focused on disproportionate demand of particular health services such 
as maternity services (Klodawski and Fitzpatrick, 2008). Analysis for the London Health Observatory 
found that the majority of 'additional' births in London have involved mothers born in England and 
Wales  and  in  the  rest  of  the  world  but  not  recent  migrants  from  EU8  countries  (Klodawski  and 
Fitzpatrick, 2008). Given the similarities in social and demographic characteristics between EU8 and 
EU2 migrants, it thus seems unlikely that future migration from Bulgaria and Romania will lead to a 
disproportionate increase in demand for maternity services.  
The  issue  of  'health  tourism'  and  whether  migrants  enter  the  UK  to  access  state  health  care 
provision  is  also  considered  in  some  literature  (Kelly  et  al,  2005;  Medicins  du  Monde,  2007). 
Research  by  Medicins  du  Monde  (a  London-based  non-governmental  organisation)  found  no 
evidence of health tourism among more than 600 migrants who had accessed their services. These 
migrants  had  been  living  in  the  UK  for  an  average  of  three  years  before  seeking  healthcare.  The 
health  conditions  seen  in  the  service  users  were  broadly  reflective  of  the  health  conditions  found 
among the general population in general practice; the majority needed help to access primary care 
or  antenatal  services  rather  than  specialist  treatment  (Medicins  du  Monde,  2007).  Further,  some 
research on EU8 migration has shown that migrants prefer to return home for healthcare (Scullion 
and Morris, 2009a&b; Green et al, 2008). This seems likely to be linked to the frequency with which 
EU8 migrants travel to and from the UK and the temporary nature of some such migration. Green et 
al  (2008)  argue  that  as migrant  workers  settle more  permanently  in  the  UK,  their  usage  of  health 
services will become similar to the wider UK population. Such a finding clearly has implications for 
future migration of EU2 nationals and will depend on the length and purpose of migration. 
As  previous  research  by  NIESR  has  identified,  disproportionate  demand  may  derive  from  other 
issues, such as language difficulties (George et al, 2012). A study of migrant workers in Peterborough 
identified interpreting costs as a key additional cost associated with providing healthcare to migrants 
(Scullion and Morris, 2009a). Johnson (2006) also found that the availability of a universal language 
support service through NHS Direct is not well understood or used by medical and nursing staff. This 
could  have  implications  for  efficiency  and  time  spent  with  migrant  users  of  health  care  services. 
However, as of yet, such impacts have not been measured. 
Migrants’ access to and usage of health services 
Within the existing literature  on health service  impacts  of migration, there  is a particular focus on 
migrants’ access to and use of health services. A number of studies have looked at migrants’ levels of 
registration  with  GP  practices  and  dentists  and  their  use  of  hospitals,  particularly  Accident  and 
Emergency facilities (Collis et al, 2010; Green et al, 2010; Raphaely and O’Moore, 2010; Scullion and 
Morris, 2009a&b; Green et al, 2008; Zaronaite and Tirzite, 2006).  
Such  studies  have  generally  found  low  rates  of  GP  registration  among  EU8  migrant  workers.  For 
example, a survey focusing on EU8 migrant workers in the South East of England found that 55 per 
cent of the 726 respondents were registered with a GP (Green et al, 2008). Similarly, a survey of 697 
migrants  (the  majority  of whom  were  EU8  migrants)  in  South  Lincolnshire  found  that  53  per  cent 
32 
 
 

 
 
were registered with a GP (Zaronaite and Tirzite, 2006). Those migrants with families or dependants 
were found to be more likely to register with a GP (Green et al, 2008). Collis et al (2010) noted that 
even  when  registered  with  a  GP,  levels of  usage  of this  service  remained  low  with  66  per  cent  of 
respondents indicating that they had only used their GP once or twice in the past year and a further 
14 per cent indicating that they had not made any appointments.   
As George  et al (2012)  note,  the  explanations put  forward for low  rates of GP registration include 
language  barriers,  difficulties  in  taking  time  off  for  appointments,  opening  hours,  and  a  lack  of 
knowledge  and  understanding  of  primary  and  secondary  health  care  services  in  the  UK.  Indeed, 
Zaronaite  and  Tirzite  (2006)  state  that  the  UK  has  different  rules  than  other  countries  for  GP 
registration and that lack of information and poor English language  skills prevent migrant  workers 
accessing  healthcare  services.  Language  difficulties  are  also  identified  as  a  barrier  to  accessing 
healthcare  in  other  studies  focusing  on  EU8  and  EU2  migrants  (Schneider  and  Holman,  2009; 
Uscreates,  2008).  Lack  of  trust  in  NHS  services  has  also  been  identified  as  an  issue  for  some  EU8 
migrants (Uscreates, 2008).  
A  number  of  reports  have  noted  that  some  migrant  workers  go  directly  to  hospital  Accident  and 
Emergency departments for primary health care needs (ICOCO, 2007; Raphaely and O’Moore, 2010; 
Scullion and Morris, 2009a&b; Scottish Parliament, 2010). Such a phenomenon is attributed to the 
fact  that  some  migrants  are  not  registered  with  a  GP  and  do  not  understand  their  entitlement  to 
care under the NHS (Raphaely and O’Moore, 2010) or because migrants lack an understanding of the 
health care system in the UK (Scullion and Morris, 2009a&b). Green et al (2008) and Raphaely and 
O’Moore  (2010)  point  to  the  need  for  more  guidance  for  service  providers  and  migrant  workers 
about access and entitlement to health care as well as the purpose of different health care services. 
Such recommendations are clearly pertinent for future migrants from Bulgaria and Romania.   
Public health impacts of migration  
Research  on  immunisation  coverage  rates,  rates  of  disease,  health-related  behaviours  and 
conditions  of  migrants  can  inform  understandings  of  migrants'  impact  on  consumption  of  health 
services.  However,  there  is  currently  a  dearth  of  readily  accessible  data  on  migrants'  health. 
Jayaweera (2010) and (2011) indicate that this is due to the fact that existing data tends to focus on 
ethnic minorities rather than specifically on migrants and does not include migration variables such 
as country of birth, immigration status and length of residence in the UK.  
The  limited  published  research  available  on  the  health  of  EU8  migrants  indicates  that  they  are 
generally  healthy,  because  they  tend  to  be  young  and  in  employment.  A  study  of  EU8  and 
Portuguese  migrants  in  Peterborough  which  included  a  survey  of  278  migrant  workers  found  that 
only  9  per  cent  of  respondents  indicated  that  they  or  a  family  member  had  a  particular  health 
problem (Scullion and Morris, 2009a). Similarly, research by the Department for Communities and 
Local  Government  showed  that  EU8  migrants  were  less  likely  to  have  serious  health  problems 
(lasting  more  than  a  year)  than  the  UK  born.  This  was  largely  explained  by  the  fact  that  migrants 
tend  to  be  younger  and  would  find  it  difficult  to  migrate  while  suffering  from  a  serious  health 
condition  (CLG,  2007).  Interestingly,  a  longitudinal  study  of  EU8  and  EU2  migrants  found  that  ill 
health led to a shorter length of stay in the UK for some (Schneider and Holman, 2010).     
Some  research  has  also  identified  higher  rates  of  smoking  among  recent  migrants  compared  with 
non-migrants,  particularly  from  EU8  and  EU2  countries  (Collis  et  al,  2010).  Data  from  the  World 
Health Organization (WHO)  indicates that 44 per cent of Bulgarian adult males and 23 per cent of 
Bulgarian adult females are smokers while 33 per cent of Romanian adult males and 10 per cent of 
Romanian adult females are smokers. This compares to 26 per cent of adult males and 23 per cent of 
adult females in the UK. Although the impacts of these higher rates are not known, such statistics 
could  lead  to  a  higher  demand  for  health  services  if  Bulgarians  and  Romanians  settle  more 
permanently in the UK since smoking-related diseases often onset later in life. In contrast, WHO data 
on total alcohol consumption in 2008 shows that Bulgaria and Romania have lower rates of alcohol 
33 
 
 

 
 
consumption  than  the  UK  (Health  Protection  Agency,  2008).  Similarly,  the  impacts  of  these 
consumption rates are not known. Prediction is also complicated by the fact that migrants tend to 
change their lifestyle as they become settled and adopt behaviours closer to the host population.  
Epidemiological research comparing rates of disease and health conditions between populations has 
relevance for understanding the impact of migration and can be useful in terms of service provision 
planning. Research on immunisation coverage rates has reported very high coverage in most of the 
accession countries, although some countries have higher rates of infection than the UK. Data from 
the  WHO  shows  that  despite  vaccine  coverage  rates  of  95  per  cent  or  above,  Romania  has  the 
highest rates of measles and mumps among the accession countries and the second highest rate of 
rubella. Romania’s tuberculosis notification rate is also the highest amongst the accession countries 
although  the  HIV  notification  rate  is  lower  than  in  the  UK.  A  similar  situation  applies  to  Bulgaria: 
immunisation  coverage  rates  are  generally  higher  than  in  the  UK,  yet  rates  of  mumps,  pertussis 
(whooping cough) and rubella are slightly higher than in the UK. The TB notification rate in Bulgaria 
is  three  times  higher  than  in  the  UK  while  the  HIV  notification  rate  is  much  lower  than  in  the  UK 
(Health Protection Agency, 2008). Such findings have implications in terms of service planning, with 
higher TB notification rates among Bulgarians and Romanians having particular importance given the 
current level of houses in multiple occupation (HMOs) identified among recent migrants.  
A  survey  of  2648  Central  and  Eastern  European  migrants  (CEE)  living  in  London  found  that  CEE 
migrants in London report high rates of behaviours associated with increased risk of HIV and sexually 
transmitted infections (STI) acquisition and transmission. Risk behaviours varied by region and sex. 
For example, EU8 respondents were more likely to report recreational drug use in the past year than 
EU2 migrants. EU2 males were more likely to have paid for sex than EU8 males, although this was 
widely reported by males from both groups. Both groups reported more consistent condom use and 
lower reported diagnoses of STIs than the general population. Such findings should inform service 
planning and identify where HIV and STI interventions need to be targeted (Burns et al, 2012).  
4.5 Housing 
The  impact  of  migration  on  housing  has  received  considerable  media  attention  in  recent  years.  A 
widespread  public  perception  persists  that migrants  pose  a  disproportionate  burden  on  the  social 
housing market in particular, yet evidence to date does not substantiate this claim. As the research 
examined  below  indicates,  any  consideration  of  the  impacts  of  migration  must  be  contextualised 
within a broader picture of the UK housing market, and particularly the affordable housing market, 
which  is  currently  under  considerable  strain  for  reasons  relating  to  the  ongoing  recession  and  a 
dramatic decline in the number of new-builds.  
Research on the impact of migration on housing covers four main areas which are examined below: 
  Migrants’ access to and use of private rented accommodation 
  Impact of migration on the housing market  
  Social housing  
  Homelessness 
Migrants’ access to and use of private rented accommodation  
Several studies identified that the majority of migrants find low-cost accommodation in the private 
rental sector (PRS) (Diacon et al, 2008; Green et al, 2008; Phillimore et al, 2008; Rolfe and Metcalf, 
2009;  Scullion  and  Morris,  2009a&b;  Perry,  2012).  A  recent  analysis  of  Labour  Force  Survey  data 
shows that three quarters of recent migrants (defined as being those who have been in the UK for 
five years or less) are living in the PRS (Migration Observatory, 2012). Similarly, a study focusing on 
EU8 migrants in the East Midlands found that the vast majority were housed in the PRS (Phillimore 
et al, 2008) while a study focusing on EU8 and EU2 migrants in Liverpool found that 73 per cent of 
respondents were housed in the PRS (Scullion and Morris, 2009b).  
34 
 
 

 
 
Some  studies  have  also  found  evidence  of  migrants  living  in  'tied'  accommodation  where 
accommodation is provided by the employer. Such practices are identified as being more common 
within the hospitality and agriculture industry (Diacon et al, 2008) and in rural areas (Phillimore et al, 
2008). Although this can work well in some instances, there are concerns about overcrowding, high 
rents and poor conditions (Diacon et al, 2008) particularly  where migrants  are placed in houses in 
multiple  occupation  (HMOs)  (Perry,  2012).  Further,  tied  accommodation  can  make  individuals 
vulnerable as complaints can render migrants homeless and out of work (Audit Commission, 2007). 
In some cases, tied accommodation can also be indicative of forced labour (Wilkinson et al, 2010).  
Pathways to finding private accommodation can vary among EU8 migrants. For example, Rolfe and 
Metcalf (2009) identified that EU8 migrants in Scotland initially tend to stay with friends and family 
and  then  move  into  private  rented  accommodation.  Meanwhile,  a  study  of  EU8  migrants  in  a 
northern  city  found  that  many  EU8  migrants  initially  live  in  housing  provided  by  employment 
agencies  but  move  into  privately  rented  accommodation  shortly  afterwards  (Cook  et  al,  2012).  A 
study on migrant workers in Peterborough also cites the key role that social networks play in helping 
people  to  find  accommodation:  48  per  cent  of  278  respondents  (the  majority  of  whom  were  EU8 
migrants)  indicated  that  they  had  found  their  current  accommodation  through  friends  or  family 
(Scullion and Morris, 2009a).  
Frequent  changes  of accommodation appear to be common among some migrants  (Spencer et  al, 
2007; Scullion and Morris, 2009a; Radu, Hudson and Philips, 2010). Spencer et al (2007) found that 
almost a third of respondents had moved at least once since arriving in the UK up to eight months 
ago, with a few having moved three or more times in that period. Of those who had moved, 38 per 
cent  had moved due  to the  cost  or poor condition of their housing, while  30 per cent  had moved 
because  of  a  job  with  the  remainder  citing  ‘other  reasons’  for  doing  so.  The  poor  quality  or  sub-
standard  accommodation  of  migrants  was  also  identified  in  other  studies,  with  local  stakeholders 
fearing this could have implications for health and safety (Green et al, 2008; Phillimore et al, 2008). 
This  has  been  attributed  to  the  fact  that  recent  migrants  are  often  unable  to  access  mainstream 
housing because they lack sufficient funds for a deposit and do not have the necessary references 
and  forms  of  identification  required  by  many  letting  agents  and  landlords  (Phillimore  et  al,  2008; 
Nicholson and Romaszko, 2008; Diacon et al, 2008). As such, new migrants often end up in the least 
desirable accommodation, where demand is lowest (Robinson, 2007). However, Spencer et al (2007) 
also found that some overcrowding occurred within migrants’ accommodation due to the fact that 
migrants were ‘choosing’ to sub-let in order to reduce the rent they were paying.  
Impact of migration on the housing market  
Before  examining  the  impact  of  migration  on  the  housing  market,  it  is  important  to  first 
contextualise demand from migrants within the broader issues affecting the UK housing market. The 
PRS is currently under immense pressure and demand within this sector has continued to grow as a 
result  of the  continued increase  in the  number of single person households, the  large  numbers of 
young  couples  who  are  unable  to  buy,  the  large  student  population  and  recent  changes  to 
government policy around housing (Perry, 2012). As such, migrants are competing for housing in the 
PRS at a time when demand, including from other migrants, is growing faster than supply and rents 
are rising. Indeed, the backlog of housing need was estimated to be around two million households 
overall in 2010 and is projected to remain ‘at higher than recent levels’ for the next decade (Perry, 
2012).  
As  mentioned  above,  changes  to  government  policy  have  also  affected  demand  in  the  PRS  Local 
authorities have been ‘encouraged to prevent homelessness by securing offers of PRS properties for 
potentially homeless families to avoid them being formally accepted as homeless and given a social 
letting’.  A  reported  55,000  households  were  assisted  in  this  way  between  2010  and  2011  (Perry, 
2012). Competition within the PRS is also set to worsen in high-demand areas as a result of changes 
to  the  Local  Housing  Allowance  in  the  2010  budget.  Wilcox  (2010)  notes  that  many  existing 
35 
 
 

 
 
claimants in inner London and other high-value areas will be required to move to areas with lower 
property values, thus putting further pressure on demand for affordable housing.  
Migrants from EU8 and EU2 countries have tended to compete with others at the lower end of the 
market  for  accommodation  in  the  PRS.  Perry  (2012)  argues  that  migrants  can  sometimes  displace 
others because they offer certain advantages to landlords. For example, migrants may be willing to 
tolerate lower standards of accommodation and overcrowding and will also pay rent directly to the 
landlord rather than via housing benefit (Rugg and Rhodes, 2008). Some migrants may also sub-let in 
order to reduce housing costs (Spencer et al, 2007). 
Concentrations of migrants in the PRS can have an impact on local housing markets, through higher 
rents and possibly through higher property prices which can reduce access for prospective first-time 
buyers  (ICC,  2007).    However,  a  study  focusing  on  the  East  Midlands  found  that  the  impact  of 
migration  on  housing  varied  according  to  the  housing  supply  across  the  region  (Phillimore  et  al, 
2008). In rural areas, for example, migration to the local area had led to an increase in rental prices 
with  some  locals  being  priced  out  of  the  housing  market.  In  contrast,  in  urban  areas  within  the 
region, migrants were thought to have had an insulating effect on the local housing market and had 
prevented a downward trend in prices (Phillimore et al, 2008).  
Similarly,  Pemberton  (2009)  found  that EU8 migration  in  general  was  positively  impacting on  low-
demand housing areas, such as Housing Market Renewal Pathfinder (HMRP) areas in England. Two 
case  studies  of  HMRP  areas  revealed  that  migrants  had  stabilised  demand  for  private  rented 
accommodation.  Such  a  trend  does  not  appear  to  have  been  at  the  expense  of  existing  residents 
who  (in  both  case  study  areas)  were  on  average  more  likely  to  be  owner-occupiers  or  local 
authority/registered  social  landlord  tenants.  Nevertheless,  interviews  with  existing  residents  and 
migrants revealed that individuals were facing higher rental prices and that this in turn was creating 
affordability problems (Pemberton, 2009).   
In  conclusion,  future  migration  to  the  UK,  including  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  is  likely  to  place 
added pressure on the lower-end of the PRS. However, the impacts of such migration at a local level 
will depend on the existing housing supply as well as the buoyancy of the local market.  
Social housing  
Current demand for social housing outweighs supply, due to a combination of a decline in new-build 
activity and a reduction in the  size  of the sector resulting from the sale  of some  social housing to 
existing  tenants.  In  such  a  context,  migrants  are  mistakenly  perceived  to  gain  access  to  social 
housing at the expense of other ‘more deserving’ groups (Robinson, 2010). Indeed, research to date 
shows  no  evidence  that  social  housing  allocation  favours  migrants  over  UK  citizens  (Rutter  and 
Latorre, 2009; Robinson, 2007). In fact, 90 per cent of those living in social housing are British born 
and  new  migrants  to  the  UK  make  up  less  than  2  per  cent  of  the  total  of  those  in  social  housing 
(Rutter and Latorre, 2009). In 2006-7, EU8 migrants comprised less than 1 per cent of social rented 
lettings  and  that  three  quarters  of  the  EU8  households  in  social  rented  accommodation  were  in 
employment compared to just one third of all households who have moved into a new social rented 
tenancy in 2006-7 (Robinson, 2007).  
Research by Dustmann and colleagues found that EU8 migrants with at least one year of residence in 
the UK (and who were therefore legally eligible for social housing) were 58 per cent less likely to live 
in social housing than natives. This is partly explained by the different demographic characteristics of 
migrants but, when these are controlled for, migrants were found to still be 28 per cent less likely to 
live in social housing (Dustmann et al, 2010).  
Some  research  has,  however,  identified  the  possibility  of  increased  pressure  on  the  social  rented 
sector as migrants become more settled in the UK and gain entitlement to social housing (Green et 
al,  2008).  For  example,  Green  and  colleagues  note  that  there  has  been  a  large  increase  in  the 
number  of  EU8  nationals on  council  waiting  lists  in the  South East.  Other  studies  show  that  some 
36 
 
 

 
 
EU8  migrants  have  aspirations  of  finding  accommodation  within  the  social  rented  sector.  A  study 
focusing on EU8 migrant workers in Peterborough found that approximately half of the 278 workers 
interviewed  had  a  future  preference  for  living  in  socially  rented  accommodation  (Scullion  and 
Morris, 2009a). A similar study focusing on Liverpool found that the majority of the 235 respondents 
wanted to either live  in socially  rented accommodation or purchase  their own home  in the future 
(Scullion  and  Morris,  2009b).  A  third  study  of  EU8  and  EU2  migrants  in  Nottingham  found  that  a 
quarter  of  the  235  respondents  wanted  to  live  in  socially  rented  accommodation  in  the  future 
(Scullion et al, 2009). These findings indicate that future migration from Bulgaria and Romania may 
in time place added pressure on the social housing market. However, further research into this area 
is needed before firm conclusions can be drawn. The impact of the recent changes to EU8 migrants 
benefit eligibility on demand for social housing would be a useful starting point.  
Homelessness  
The overwhelming majority of Central and Eastern European migrants in the UK successfully obtain 
employment  and  accommodation.  However,  homelessness  has  been  identified  as  an  emerging 
problem faced by some migrant workers, particularly EU8 migrants (CLG, 2007; Diacon et al, 2008; 
Spatial Strategy and Research, 2010). The causes of such homelessness vary but are certainly linked 
to  earlier  restrictions  on  EU8  migrants’  access  to  benefits.  Indeed,  prior  to  May  2011,  those  EU8 
workers  who  were  not  registered  on  the  Workers  Registration  Scheme,  or  who  lost  their 
employment during the initial 12 month period were unable to access state support.  
A national survey conducted by Homeless Link in 2008 found that 70 per cent of the day centres for 
homeless had encountered service users from Eastern European countries (Homeless Link, 2008). In 
2009, the same organisation published a survey indicating that rough sleeping by EU10 nationals is 
increasing with this group comprising 25 per cent of London rough sleepers compared to 18 per cent 
in 2008. It is thought that fewer than half of enumerated rough sleepers in London in 2010-11 were 
UK nationals, with CEE migrants comprising 28 per cent of the visible homeless population and the 
remainder comprising 'other' migrant groups (CHAIN database, maintained by Broadway and quoted 
by  DCLG,  2012).  Such  findings  clearly  have  implications  for  future  migration  from  Bulgaria  and 
Romania, particularly since it is understood that their access to benefits will initially be restricted.    
4.6 Education 
Of all services  potentially accessed by migrants, education is one  in which rights  of access  are the 
most clear and where impacts may therefore be felt. As Reynolds (2008) notes, unlike other areas of 
service  provision,  the  rights  and  entitlement  of  migrant  children  to  education  is  clear,  covered  by 
Article  28  of  the  UN  Convention  on  the  Rights  of  The  Child  (UN,  1989)  and  Article  2  of  the  first 
protocol  of  the  European  Convention  on  Human  Rights  (EU,  1998).  However,  whether  migrants 
access education services does, of course, depend on whether they arrive with children, or settle in 
the UK and form families. In relation to potential EU2 migration, this factor is particularly unclear.  
Because  of  its  status  as  a  universal  and  key  service,  education  along  with  health  and  housing 
services, is the area of service provision which has received most attention in debates on migration 
impacts in the UK. This has been particularly true of media coverage. Despite much speculation on 
the impact of migration on schools and education, research-based evidence is not strong. One of the 
difficulties  of  establishing  stronger  estimates  is  in  identifying  migrant  children  from  education 
databases.  The  school  census,  which  forms  the  National  Pupil  Database,  is  the  main  source  of 
information on pupil characteristics. This is a count of all children of all school ages enrolled in local 
authority  schools  in  the  UK.  The  census  collects  data  on  pupils'  age,  ethnicity,  first  language  and 
home postcode. This data can be used to identify migrants, on the basis that entry to school after 
age 5, of pupils for whom English is not first language, identifies likely immigrants. However, this is 
problematic  for  a  number  of  reasons:  firstly,  migrant  children  may  arrive  before  they  reach 
compulsory school age; secondly, children's country of birth is not recorded, so that the impact of 
37 
 
 

 
 
migration from particular countries cannot be measured. Thirdly, ethnic group, which is recorded for 
all  children,  cannot  be  used  as  a  measure  since  this  gives  no  indication  of  whether  a  pupil  is  a 
migrant,  UK  first  generation,  second  generation  or  more  (Rolfe  and  Metcalf,  2009).  Another 
drawback,  although  not  relevant  for  the  purposes  of  this  review  is  that  the  data  source  does  not 
help in identifying migrant children with English as a first language.  
Despite  problems  with  the  data,  some  research  has  used  the  National  Pupil  Database  to  identify 
particular  groups  of  migrant  children,  for  example  Polish  children  who  can  be  identified  as  pupils 
who speak Polish as their first language (Geay et al, 2012). With the aim of focusing on this particular 
group of migrants, this research looked at performance data for Catholic Primary Schools. It would 
be possible for future research to identify pupils with Romanian or Bulgarian as their first language, 
although these might include children who were born in the UK rather than those who arrived with 
their families following the removal of barriers in 2013. 
Evidence of the impact on migration on education and schools falls into four main areas which we 
review in turn:  
  The increase in pupil numbers resulting from migration 
  Impacts of migration on school and pupil performance 
  Additional demands on schools arising from the needs of some migrant pupils  
  Pupil mobility and churn 
Increase in pupil numbers  
One  of  the  more  basic  ways  in  which  migration  can  impact  on  schools  and  education  services  is 
through  an  increase  in  pupil  numbers.  The  impact  of  migration  on  demand  for  school  places  has 
therefore been a central theme of research looking on migration and education services in the UK, 
although  there  has  been  relatively  little  primary  research.  As  a  review  by  NIESR  for  the  Migration 
Advisory Committee concluded, much of this has focused on the recent migration, particularly from 
Eastern  Europe  (George  et  al,  2012).  A  review  by  the  Audit  Commission  found  that  some  schools 
have found difficulty in coping with the number of new arrivals resulting from recent migration into 
the UK (Audit Commission, 2007) and other local studies have reported similar difficulties, at least 
initially  (see  George  et  al,  2012).  Data  on  pupil  numbers  in  shows  that  overall  pupil  numbers  are 
increasing, but this has been only since 2011. This is accounted for by increased numbers of children 
at  State  funded  nursery  and  primary  school  level  since  2010.  At  the  same  time,  there  has  been  a 
decline in pupil numbers at secondary school level, since 2004, which is predicted to continue until 
around 2016 when increases at primary level will begin to impact on secondary schools. The number 
of pupils at secondary level is expected to decline by 5 per cent between 2011 and 2015 (DfE, 2012). 
Therefore, where pressure on places exists, it applies largely at primary school level.  
However,  data  on  pupil  numbers  and  school  capacity  are  aggregate  and  do  not  reflect  different 
patterns of demand for places across the UK. As well as differences at primary and secondary level, 
demand  for  places  in  rural  areas  may  be  lower  than  in  larger  towns  and  cities  for  example.  The 
impact of further migration, including from Bulgaria and Romania, on demand for school places will 
therefore depend to a large extent on where migrants choose to live as well as the age of children in 
families moving to the UK.  
The  potential  impact  of  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  on  schools  and  education  also 
depends on the characteristics of migrants, particularly whether they are young, single and childless 
or  whether  families  with  children  of  school  age  migrate  to  the  UK.  The  predominance  of  young, 
single  people  among  initial  migrants  from  the  EU8  countries  undoubtedly  limited  the  impact  on 
schools  and  education  services  initially  (Audit  Commission,  2007).  Similarly,  NIESR  concluded  that 
the children of non-EEA migrants who enter the UK on work permits have a relatively small impact 
because, where they have children, these are under school age (George et al, 2012).  
38 
 
 

 
 
Another  key  factor  determining  the  impact  of  potential  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  on 
schools and education services is the settlement rate of migrants and whether some migrants who 
initially migrate alone and on a temporary basis are later joined by their families (ICOCO, 2007). 
A further consideration is whether Bulgarian and Romanian communities in the UK are establishing 
their own schools and will therefore make fewer demands on the state education sector because of 
these  independent  arrangements.  While  both  Bulgarian  and  Romanian  schools  have  been 
established  in  the  UK,  these  are  open  after  normal  school  hours  and  provide  supplementary 
education  in  native  language  and  culture.  They  are  located  largely  in  London,  although  Bulgarian 
schools have been set up in Essex, Surrey and Kent, and a Romanian school has been established in 
Nottingham. While of educational and social value to Bulgarian and Romanian migrant children, they 
do not affect demand for school places. 
Impact on pupil and school performance 
A number of studies have looked at the impact of migration on the pupil performance, as measured 
by  standard  assessment  tests  carried  out  in  schools.  Measurement  is  problematic  because 
identifying  migrant  children  from  education  databases  is  not  straightforward,  as  explained  earlier. 
The  closest measure of the  impact of migration on school performance  is attainment of pupils for 
whom English is an additional language. While this  group does  not  correspond directly to migrant 
pupils, since some will be native English speakers and some children of migrants may have English 
language  needs,  this  group  does  include  pupils  from  Eastern  Europe  and  may  be  of  some  use  in 
measuring  the  potential  impact  of  migration  on  pupil  and  school  performance  from  Bulgaria  and 
Romania. 
A recent  evidence  review by NIESR  for the Migration Advisory  Committee examined the statistical 
evidence on attainment of pupils for whom English is an additional language Using recent data on 
pupil test and examination results from the Department for Education, the review found that these 
pupils perform almost as well as pupils whose first language is English (George et al, 2012). Other, 
more  detailed  research,  on  the  performance  of  migrant  children  in  Catholic  primary  schools, 
attended by many EU8 children, found a small negative association between the percentage of non-
native  speakers and the  educational attainment of native  English speakers. However, once  factors 
associated with deprivation were taken into account, any negative effects disappeared  (Geay et al, 
2012). Other research suggests that the stronger performance of schools in London results at least in 
part  from  the  achievements  of  migrant  pupils  (George  et  al,  2012).  There  has been  no  equivalent 
research on the performance of migrant pupils in secondary schools. 
Additional demands on schools 
Aside  from  demand  for  places,  research  has  been  conducted  on  the  additional  requirements  on 
schools which may result from migration. The most obvious additional requirement for pupils from 
non-English speaking countries is for translation and interpreting services. In the past, schools were 
allocated  additional  funding  from  the  Ethnic  Minority  Achievement  (EMA)  Grant  and,  later,  the 
Migration  Impacts  Fund  to  assist  migrant  pupils  with  English  language  needs.  These  resources 
enabled  them  to  fund  bi-lingual  teaching  assistants  and  other  forms  of  language  support.  These 
resources  have  been  found  to  be  insufficient  with  some  schools  reporting  assisting  pupils  with 
English  language  needs  (Scullion  et  al,  2009).  Funding  arrangements  have  now  changed  so  that 
schools now have to fund this support from within their own budgets. Although studies consistently 
find that language support represents a cost to schools, these are rarely quantified, possibly because 
schools resource this support through various budgets and staffing arrangements.  
Migration from countries where access to formal education is later than in the UK has also placed 
additional demands on schools to fill gaps in early numeracy and literacy (Gordon et al, 2007). This 
particular  demand  may  arise  in  relation  to  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  because 
compulsory schooling in both countries begins at age 7 (with mandatory preparatory year from age 6 
39 
 
 

 
 
in Romania). In the UK school is compulsory for children from age 5. Particular issues may also arise 
in  relation  to  the  education  of  children  from  Roma  communities  in  the  two  countries,  where 
participation  rates  are  considerably  lower  than  for  the  population  as  a  whole.  However,  recent 
research  has  found  that  Roma  children  do  well  in  UK  schools,  performing  only  slightly  below 
average, which is to be expected given that they arrive in the UK with limited English (Equality UK, 
2011).  Other  needs  identified  as  placing  additional  demands  on  schools  include  complex  special 
needs  which  may  be  initially  hidden  by  language  needs  and  attendance  patterns  among  some 
migrant groups (ICOCO, 2007; Scullion et al, 2009).  
Other  demands  on  schools  and  teachers,  identified  by  research,  include  the  need  to  understand 
cultural differences and lack of records and assessments (Wales Rural Observatory, 2006; Gordon et 
al,  2007).  These  are  reported  to  have  affected  schools’  abilities  to  work  effectively  with  migrant 
pupils  (ICOCO,  2007).  Some  studies  find  that  migrant  parents  have  little  involvement  with  their 
children’s schools, compared to non-migrant parents (Audit Commission, 2007; Sikora et al, 2010). 
Factors  responsible  for  lower  levels  of  engagement  are  thought  to  include  weak  English  language 
skills and shift working.  
It  has  also  been  suggested  that  teachers  in  parts  of  the  UK  have  lacked  expertise  in  meeting  the 
needs of migrant children (Audit Commission, 2007). Lack of expertise and understanding of migrant 
children’s  requirements  may  lead  to  additional  costs,  for  example  of  teacher  time.  Research  in 
Wales, involving consultation with 22 local authorities, found that migrant children’s language needs 
are  sometimes  misunderstood  as  special  educational  needs,  leading  to  unnecessary  allocation  of 
additional  resources  (Welsh  Local  Government  Association,  2008).  Many  such  impacts  have  been 
found  in  areas  of  the  UK  with  little  experience  of  migration  and  have  arisen  from  the  dispersed 
nature of migration from Eastern Europe. It might reasonably be expected that schools and teachers 
in areas without experience of receiving migrant children may have gained this. Moreover, migration 
from Bulgaria and Romania may not follow this dispersed pattern, but may take a more traditional 
route to larger towns and cities.  
Mobility and churn among migrant pupils 
The school year in England and Wales runs from September to July and in Scotland from August to 
June.  Migrants  may  arrive  in  the  UK  at  any time  and  therefore may  be  seeking  school  places  part 
way through the school year. This has been reported to cause difficulties for schools, particularly in 
relation  to  costs:  the  school  funding  formula,  which includes  funding  for  pupils  with  English  as  an 
Additional Language, is based on numbers at the time of the annual schools census in, and additional 
numbers  do  not  result  in  additional  payments.  The  former  Association  of  London  Government  is 
reported as estimating the cost of registering new pupils at non-standard times at in 2005 as £400 
for  primary  school  children  and  £800  for  children  enrolling  in  a  secondary  school  (ICOCO,  2007). 
These estimates do not include any additional costs which may be required by migrant children, for 
example  additional  support  staff  and  liaison  with  other  services,  for  example  health  and  social 
services. These needs are more difficult to meet where pupils arrive mid-term (Woods and Watkin, 
2008). 
Mobility  among  pupils  has  been  identified  more  generally  as  a  problem  for  schools  and  a  small 
number of studies have looked at its effects in some depth. Some studies have a particular focus on 
the impact of migration on mobility and ‘churn’ (where pupils then leave a school) while others have 
a  wider  focus,  looking  at  mobile  families  and  the  effects of  mobility on  schools  more  widely.  One 
study found that schools with high levels of pupil mobility and churn experience difficulty in meeting 
the learning needs of all pupils because these change with the changing composition of pupils. The 
intensive  help  required  by  older,  teenage,  pupils  was  found  to  be  particularly  resource-intensive 
(Dobson and Pooley, 2004). However, two important factors must be taken into consideration: first 
that migration  is  not  the  only  cause  of  pupil  mobility, with  resident  groups  showing  high  levels of 
mobility, particularly Gypsy, Roma and Traveller families native to the UK (Wilkin et al, 2010).  
40 
 
 

 
 
The second factor to consider is that schools receiving the highest numbers of migrant children are 
in some of the most deprived areas and also experience high levels of churn because they are less 
desirable  to  parents  (Dobson  and  Pooley,  2004; Cook  et  al.,  2008). Migrants  who  arrive  in  the  UK 
with children of school age may find they have initially little choice of school and therefore may wish 
to  move  once  they  have  identified  and  found  a  place  at  an  alternative  school.  Some  research 
suggests  that  some  of  the  mobility  among  EU8  migrant  children  is  accounted  for  by  parents’ 
preference for Catholic schools which may be over-subscribed and operate waiting lists (Scullion et 
al,  2009).  Bulgaria  and  Romania  have  small  Catholic  populations,  so  that  this  particular  form  of 
mobility is unlikely to be replicated by prospective EU2 migrants.  
4.7 Social security, welfare and benefits 
The rights of Bulgarian and Romanian migrants to social security and welfare benefits are currently 
very limited. Those who are authorised to work in the UK can claim housing benefit to help pay their 
rent while working, and also may have access to tax credits and child benefit.  
Romanian and Bulgarian national workers who become unemployed only acquire the same rights to 
non-contributory  benefits,  such  as  income-based  Jobseeker’s  Allowance,  as  other  EEA  nationals  if 
they have been continuously  employed in accordance  with the Home Office Worker Authorisation 
Scheme for 12 months or more. Romanian and Bulgarian nationals may also come to the UK if they 
are  self-employed.  If  they  stop  working  as  a  self-employed  person  they  will  generally  only  have  a 
right to reside if they are self-sufficient, they cannot claim income-related benefits such as income-
based  Jobseeker’s  Allowance.  Both  Romanian  and  Bulgarian  self  employed  people  and  those 
employed in accordance  with the  Home Office Worker Authorisation scheme  are entitled to claim 
housing benefit and council tax benefit while they are in work. 
Data  on  EU2  migrants  accessing  these  benefits  is  not  available  and  more  generally,  the  current 
evidence  base  around  the  impact  of  migrants  as  a  whole  on  the  welfare  system  is  limited  and 
somewhat  mixed  in  terms  of messages.  For example,  Barrett  and  McCarthy  (2008)  use  the  British 
Household Panel Survey (BHPS) to examine differences in the receipt of benefits between migrants 
and  natives.  Their  main  conclusion  is  that  migrants  are  less  likely  to  receive  welfare  payments. 
However, Drinkwater and Robinson (2011) point out that the nature of the BHPS data means that it 
only  contains  a  relatively  small  number  of  migrants  within  the  sample.  Their  research  takes  a 
different approach and uses the Labour Force Survey (LFS) to analyse the incidence of welfare claims 
by  immigrants  and  what  determines  these  claims.  They  argue  that  it  is  hard  to  generalise  on  the 
welfare participation of migrants since claims vary considerably by immigrant group as well as by the 
type  of  benefit  being  claimed.  As  such,  they  focused  their  analysis  on  specific  migrant  groups, 
including EU8 migrants.   
A number of studies of EU2 and EU8 migrants indicate that they are less likely to claim benefits than 
other migrant groups. Research by Dustmann and colleagues found that EU8 migrants with at least 
one year of residence in the UK (and who were therefore legally eligible to claim benefits) were 60 
per cent less likely than natives to receive state benefits or tax credits and 58 per cent less likely to 
live  in  social  housing.  This  is  partly  explained  by  the  different  demographic  characteristics  of 
migrants but, when these are controlled for, migrants were found to still be 13 per cent less likely to 
receive benefits and 28 per cent less likely to live in social housing (Dustmann et al, 2010).  
Other  recent  research  sheds some  light  on the types of benefits  which EU2 and EU8 migrants  are 
likely  to claim. This  research  found that of the relatively small pool of EU2 and EU8 migrants  who 
claim benefits, the majority claim child benefits. However, the authors note that such results should 
be  treated  with  caution  due  to  the  low  sample  size  (CLG,  2011).  Descriptive  analysis  of  the  LFS 
indicates  that  EU8  nationals  and  Australians  are  the  least  likely  migrant  groups  to  claim  welfare 
benefits, a finding linked to the younger age observed among both groups as well as the fact that 
they tend to migrate for the purpose of employment (Drinkwater and Robinson, 2011). Econometric 
41 
 
 

 
 
analysis of LFS data revealed that EU8 migrants, especially males, are significantly less likely to claim 
unemployment  related  and  sickness  benefits  but  far  more  likely  than  the  UK  born  to  claim  child 
benefit  and  working  tax  credits,  even  if  their  children  do  not  actually  reside  with  them  in  the  UK 
(Drinkwater  and  Robinson,  2011).  Similarly,  a  study  on  EU8  and  EU2  migrant  workers  in 
Peterborough  found  that  child-benefit,  child  tax  credit  and  working  tax  credits  were  the  most 
commonly claimed benefits. For example, 35 per cent of respondents claimed child benefit, 25 per 
cent  claimed  working  tax  credits  while  only  6  per  cent  of  respondents  had  claimed  Job  Seekers 
Allowance  and  only  2  per  cent  of  respondents  were  claiming  sickness  and  incapacity  benefits 
(Scullion and Morris, 2009a&b).   
Migrants  access  to  and  understanding  of  the  welfare  system  must  also  be  considered  in  any 
examination of the impacts of migration on social security. Radu, Hudson and Philips (2010) found 
that family and community networks played a role in sharing information about the welfare system 
and  application  procedures.  They  identified  poor  English  language  skills  as  a  barrier  to  migrants' 
successful interaction with the welfare system. They also noted that frequent changes in migrants' 
employment status (for example from full time to part time), changes of employer and changes in 
address could make necessary updates to the HMRC more difficult when working tax credit claims 
are made soon after arrival.   
Drinkwater  and  Robinson  (2011)  warn  that  the  relationship  between  immigrants  and  welfare 
participation  is  not  static and  that  the  recent  recession  is  likely  to  have  had  an  impact  on  benefit 
claims as seen by a higher social assistance benefit complains in 2009 by EU8 migrants compared to 
previous years. Further, the evidence cited in this chapter relates to analysis conducted before the 
changes to EU8 welfare eligibility requirements which took effect on 1 May 2011. EU8 workers now 
enjoy the same rights as other EU nationals living in the UK and are able to access benefits without 
needing to remain compliant with the conditions of the Workers Registration Scheme. The impact of 
such  changes  should  be  explored  in  any  consideration  of  the  impact  of  future  migration  from 
Bulgaria and Romania on the UK welfare system.  
 
 
 
42 
 
 

 
 
5.  Assessing the evidence base on impact of EU2 migration on the UK 
Key points 
  It is not possible to predict the scale of migration from Bulgaria and Romania to the UK with 
any degree of certainty because of the lack of accurate data on current migration and because 
of the many factors which determine migration decisions and patterns. 

  Available  evidence  suggests  that  the  UK  is  not  a  favoured  destination  for  Bulgarians  and 
Romanians who are considering migration as a future option. However, the economic climate 
within the EU may change this.  

  It is possible that much migration from Bulgaria and Romania to the UK has already happened, 
but  is  confined  to  particular  sectors.  As  well  as  to  employment  through  legitimate  visa 
arrangements and sector programmes, this may also include spurious 'self employment' and 
employment in the grey economy.  

  Much migration is currently temporary, but there is evidence of settlement of  EU8 migrants 
and a similar pattern may develop for  EU2 migration. The profile of current  EU2 migrants to 
the UK is typically young and without children but, as the case of EU8 migration suggests, this 
may change if longer term settlement develops and will have implications for the demand on 
services.  

  Assessment of the potential impact of EU2 migration is made difficult by gaps in evidence, or 
which  we  have  identified  a  number.  These  relate  to  evidence  of  migration  behaviour  and 
intentions and the employment patterns of EU2 migrants in the countries to which they move. 
They also concern gaps in evidence on the costs of providing services to migrants.    

 
5.1 Predicting future migration  
The  objective  of this report  was  to provide  an evidence  base  from which the UK Government can 
assess  the  potential  impacts  of  migration  from  EU2  countries  following  the  lifting  of  transitional 
controls.  
The evidence we have gathered can be used to help inform planning and policy making by national 
and local governments.  
We have looked at three groups of factors: 
  the drivers of migration from the EU2 countries to the UK including push and pull factors and 
future intentions to migrate  
  the profile of the current UK diaspora population in terms of demography, location, skills and 
family profiles 
  the impact of migration from the EU2 countries on the UK, with a particular focus on the social 
impact such as the impact of migration on health care, education services, and housing.  
Why no numbers? 
While we have reviewed a wide range of evidence, it is not possible to predict the scale of migration 
from Bulgaria and Romania to the UK with any degree of certainty. There are two main reasons for 
this: first the lack of accurate data on current migration, particularly on the number of migrants who 
have  settled,  by  country  of  birth,  either  in  the  UK  or  elsewhere  within  the  EU,  or  who  have  been 
temporary  or  ‘circular’  migrants.  The  second  problem  concerns  the  inherent  unpredictability  of 
migration.  Future  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  to  the  UK  will  depend  on  a  number  of 
43 
 
 

 
 
factors. These  include  the  propensity  to migrate,  linked  to economic  factors  in Bulgaria,  Romania, 
UK, other EU countries and even outside of the EU. It will also depend on political and social factors, 
which are arguably more difficult to predict than economic effects.  
Consequently, any numerical estimates of potential migration to the UK are likely to be inaccurate 
and misleading. Therefore, our report includes no numerical estimates of the scale of migration from 
Bulgaria and Romania to the UK once interim restrictions are lifted. What our report does is consider 
both  the  factors  which  will  encourage  and  discourage  migration,  the  potential  impact  of  the 
migration  which  may  occur  and  what  preparations  can  be  put  in  place.  We  have  assessed  these 
using existing evidence of the impact of EU8 migration on the demand for services in the UK. 
5.2 What are the main factors likely to influence the short-term & long-term impact of 
labour migration post 2014?   
Will migration from Bulgaria and Romania increase once restrictions are lifted? 
On the first of the factors outlined above, whether migrants will come to the UK from Bulgaria and 
Romania, a number of factors must be considered:  
Firstly, looking at current migration from Bulgaria and Romania within the European Union, a large 
share  has  economic  causes,  with  income  levels  and  employment  opportunities  the  predominant 
push and pull factors: the level of income in the EU2 countries as compared to the EU15 average is 
much lower, both as measured in terms of GDP per capita, as well as wages). The level of GDP per 
capita and the scale of emigration are relatively strongly correlated (Sriskandarajah et al, 2005, EC, 
2012). Although they are catching up, Bulgaria and Romania, remain the poorest countries in the EU, 
with gross  national income  at about 40 per cent of the EU level.  However, as past migration from 
Bulgaria and Romania demonstrates, factors driving migration are not solely economic: political and 
social factors also  play  a  part in migration decisions and behaviour. For some groups, for example 
the  Roma  Community,  factors  such  as  discrimination  are  also  important.  Therefore,  whether 
Bulgarians  and  Romanians  decide to migrate  within the  EU  will  depend  on the  economic,  political 
and social climate in those countries in the coming years.  
An  important  question  is  whether  the  UK  will  be  a  favoured  destination  for  future  migrants  from 
Bulgaria and Romania, either currently living in their home countries, or elsewhere in the EU. Here, 
the  evidence is equally unclear and predictions inherently  unreliable. In recent years, since joining 
the EU, Bulgarian and Romanian nationals have been, along with Polish nationals, the most mobile in 
Europe, and Romanians have been particularly mobile. The main destination countries of Bulgarian 
and Romanian migration are Southern European countries, and to a lesser extent Germany. In 2009 
Italy  and  Spain  2009  attracted  about  83  per  cent  of  mobile  Romanians,  and  49  per  cent  of 
Bulgarians. At this time, only  4 per  cent  of Romanian migrants,  and 6 per cent of Bulgarians were 
living in the  UK. While their relatively low  presence  in the UK may be  explained with reference to 
restrictions  on  the  right  to  work,  literature  gives  several  reasons  why  for  Spain  and  Italy  are  the 
preferred  destinations  for  Bulgarians  and  Romanians.  These  include  geographic  and  linguistic 
accessibility and the presence of existing migration networks. However, given the predominance of 
economic factors in migration decisions, the economic crisis, which has hit Spain and Italy more than 
many EU states, makes the scale and direction of future migration flows from EU2 highly uncertain. 
It  is  also  useful  to  look  at  other  examples  of  EU  member  states  which  have  removed  barriers  to 
employment of EU10 citizens. For example the lifting of restrictions on Polish migration by Germany 
in 2011 did not lead to an increased migration from Poland despite the fact that Germany has always 
been  a  traditional  destination  country  for  Polish  migration.  Similarly,  the  UK  has  not  been  a 
traditional  destination  country  for  Bulgarian  and  Romanian  migration.  There  are  also  likely  to  be 
differences  in  the  number  of  migrants  arriving  in  the  UK  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania,  with  the 
44 
 
 

 
 
potential  scale  of  migration  from  Bulgaria  considerably  smaller,  reflecting  its  population  size  and 
lower levels of unemployment.  
A further, but highly important factor, is whether much migration from Bulgaria and Romania to the 
UK has already happened, but is confined to particular sectors. As well as to employment through 
legitimate  visa  arrangements  and  sector  programmes,  this  may  also  include  spurious  'self 
employment'  and  employment  in  the  grey  economy.  Some  research  on  migration  patterns, 
particularly  from  Bulgaria,  suggests  that  the  relaxation  of  restrictions  are  not  the  key  factor  in 
increasing  levels  of  migration.  Therefore,  once  these  are  lifted,  post  2013,  actual  numbers  of  EU2 
citizens working in the UK may not increase substantially.  
Will migration be temporary or permanent? 
The extent to which current EU8 and EU2 migrants have settled permanently in the UK is not entirely 
clear and the extent to which they will do so in the future is impossible to predict. Studies involving 
research with migrants have concluded that there is considerable uncertainty around intentions to 
stay  or  leave  (Green  et  al,  2008).  Studies  of  EU8  migration  also  indicate  the  intentions  to  settle 
change over time and that, while initially, migrants may not intend to stay permanently, this changes 
and that there is a tendency for migrants to stay longer than they originally intended (Spencer et al, 
2007; Cook et al, 2008; Green et al, 2008). Research findings suggest that decisions of EU8 and EU2 
migrants are influenced by perceptions of the health of economies in migrants’ countries of origin. 
Schneider  and  colleagues  found  that  EU8  and  EU2  migrants  have  an  increasingly  negative  view  of 
economic and political situation in countries of origin, and that this influences a longer stay in the 
UK.  
As with decisions to migrate, economic considerations are not, however, the only factor influencing 
decisions  to  stay  or  leave.  In  relation  to  EU8  and  EU2  migrants,  Schneider  and  colleagues  (2010) 
found  that  personal  reasons  played  an  important  role.  These  include  migrants’  perception  of  the 
social situation in the UK. As one study concludes, 
‘…it appears as if migrants’ decisions to change their intentions to settle are not based on a 
single  factor  but  on  a  variety  of  factors,  of  which  time  spent  in  the  UK,  the  location  of 
partner  and  family  members  and  the  acquisition  of  the  right  to  legally  settle  in  the  UK 
appear to be important’ (Spencer et al, 2007:79).  
Spencer  and  colleagues  also  found,  not  surprisingly,  that  legal  status  affects  decisions  to  stay. 
Therefore,  EU2  migrants  who  may  be  currently  working  undocumented  in  the  UK  may  feel 
encouraged to stay following the removal of barriers in 2013.  
Who will migrate from Bulgaria and Romania to the UK? 
As  we  explained  in  Chapter  3,  current  Bulgarian  and  Romanian  migrants  in  the  UK  are  generally 
young, with the majority aged between 18 and 34 years old, which is similar to that of workers from 
the EU8 countries which joined the EU in 2004. Men are slightly over-represented. With regard to 
skill levels, the  majority of  EU2  migrants  have  ‘intermediate’  level qualifications, although data on 
skills  is  not  reliable. They are  currently  concentrated  in  occupations  requiring  low  or  intermediate 
qualifications such as trades and crafts. Surveys of Bulgarian workers in countries including the UK 
has found them to be concentrated in four sectors: hospitality, cleaning services, construction and 
trade. 
Some features of the EU2 migrant group: their high levels of self employment, and representation in 
sectors  such  as  construction  and  agriculture  reflect  current  restrictions  and  therefore may  change 
over  time.  Other  features,  such  as  their  young  age  and  settlement  in  London  and  the  South  East, 
may be more stable.  
45 
 
 

 
 
Spain  or  Italy  might  be  considered  to  be  appropriate  reference  points  from  which  to  predict  the 
profile  of  future  Romanian  and  Bulgarian  migrants  to  the  UK.  However,  Spain  and  Italy  were 
destinations of earlier migration from Bulgaria and Romania and there has been considerable family 
migration  to  these  countries.  Another  feature  of  migration  to  Spain  has  been  the  relatively  high 
levels  of  employment  of  migrants  in  private  households.  Although  this  is  likely  to  be  a  source  of 
employment for Bulgarians and Romanians, the case of migration from EU8 countries indicates that 
other sectors may also be significant. 
Despite  current  differences  between  current  EU2  migration  and  EU8  migration,  a  number  of 
characteristics  of  EU2  migrants  are  likely  to  be  similar  to  earlier  migration  from  EU8  countries, 
principally  in  terms  of  age  and  gender  balance.  A  key  factor,  which  cannot  be  easily  predicted,  is 
whether migrants will come alone, or with families and whether they settle. This has a key bearing 
on  whether  the  demands  they  are  likely  to  make  on  services.  As  we  have  explained,  family 
migration,  family  formation  and  long  term  settlement  are  crucial  in  whether  migrants  make 
demands on services such as education, housing and health. Some services, such as social security, 
are only  likely to feel an impact of migration if it is longer-term, while others, for example health, 
may feel some impact in the short term, but considerably more if migrants settle.  
5.3 What can local authorities and service providers do to prepare? 
 There is no doubt that some local authorities in England, Scotland and Wales, were not prepared for 
the scale of migration from the EU8 countries from 2004 onwards and that some services were put 
under pressure as a result. This was, to some extent at least, because they were not used to meeting 
the needs of migrants and did not have infrastructure, for example language services, in place. Some 
years down the line, this is likely to have changed, and local authorities may be better equipped to 
meet the needs of migrants. However, expenditure cuts may now be placing particular pressure on 
services.  
While  all  local  authorities  may  wish  to  ensure  they  are  able  to  meet  the  needs  of  new  arrivals  in 
their  areas  through  services  such  as  translation  and  interpreting,  it  is  unlikely  to  be  necessary  for 
particular  preparations  to  be  in  place  for  arrivals  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania.  We  would  expect 
future EU2 migration to be to London and the South East rather than to follow the previous pattern 
of EU8 migration, which resulted from labour shortages across the UK and the role of employment 
agencies in sourcing and placing EU8 workers.  
The need for local authorities to prepare for a growth in their migrant communities resulting from 
EU2 migration will depend, to a great extent, on the degree to which they settle in the UK, rather 
than engage in temporary migration. As we have explained above, this is dependent on a complex 
interaction of factors and cannot be predicted.  
5.4 Gaps in evidence 
There  are  a  number  of  areas  where  evidence  is  weak  or  non-existent  in  relation  to  current  and 
future migration from Bulgaria and Romania to the UK. The four key gaps in evidence are as follows:  
Data  on  migration  from  Bulgaria  and  Romania  largely  measures  permanent  moves  rather  than 
shorter periods of migration, which characterises much current migration with the EU. The extent to 
which  migrants  make  frequent  moves,  including  to  work  in  several  European  countries,  is  not 
currently  known.  More  research  is  needed  on  the  actual  patterns  of  migrants  from  Bulgaria, 
Romania and other EU countries with mobile populations.  
There are a number of surveys of intentions to migrate among Bulgarians and Romanians, but this is 
an  inherently  unreliable  way  of  predicting  migration,  particularly  because  questions  are  often 
general  and  are  poor  at  distinguishing  between  a  general  desire  and  specific  plans  to  migrate. 
Research is needed which links intentions with actual migration behaviour so that future migration 
levels can be more accurately predicted.  
46 
 
 

 
 
The extent to which migrants use and make demands on services, particularly health and housing, is 
currently unclear because of inadequacies in the data collected on use of these services. Similarly, it 
is  difficult  to  accurately  identify  migrant  children  from  schools  data.  More  uniform  and  consistent 
collection of data on users across all services would help to assess the impact that migrants have on 
services, and any particular demands they make.  
The  costs  of  providing  services  to  migrants,  where  they  require  additional  assistance,  are  rarely 
quantified. While research frequently identifies language services as a particular cost of migration, 
data is almost non-existent.  
Research is therefore needed to answer the following questions: 
Why does much migration appear to be temporary and circular. Is it principally in response to push 
factors  such  as  employment  and,  in  the  case  of  Roma  people  in  particular  discrimination  and 
poverty? Do some individuals see migration as a means to improving their longer-term employment 
prospects  on  Romania  and  Bulgaria?  What  effect  does  economic  recession  have  on  migration 
decisions?  Do  individuals  weigh  up  opportunities  at  home  and  in  host  countries  or  are  decisions 
related more strongly to personal circumstances and social factors? And what are the factors which 
influence  longer-term  stays  and  permanent  settlement  in  the  UK.  To  what  extent  are  these 
economic  or  do  they  include  social  factors  such  as  family  and  social  networks  and  a  sense  of 
attachment to the UK? 
For  Roma  people,  if  one  reason  for  migration  is  to  escape  discrimination  and  poverty,  why  does 
migration  for  Roma  appear  to  be  temporary  and  circular?  Is  it  because  they  also  experience 
discrimination in destination countries, including the UK, and how can this form of discrimination be 
addressed within the UK?  Are UK institutions, including schools and local authorities, meeting the 
needs of the European Roma community? 
Why  do  migrants  work  in  particular  sectors,  for  example  in  construction  and,  in  Spain,  in  private 
households?    Do  their  employment  patterns  reflect  restrictions,  employer  practices,  their  skill 
profile, vacancies and easy entry jobs?  
Why do migrants work at a level below their own qualifications and skills levels? Is this because of 
lack of recognition of qualifications, because they intend to stay temporarily and go for easy entry 
jobs requiring no formal qualifications and limited English language skills?  
What are the barriers which migrants face to moving out of the low paid sectors in which they are 
concentrated and to obtaining more skilled work which matches their education and skill levels? This 
has very important implications for policy, given current concerns in the UK about ‘crowding out’ of 
native workers from jobs in industries such as construction, hospitality and care. 
Many Bulgarian  and Romanian migrants work  in the UK as ‘self employed’, reflecting  employment 
opportunities in sectors such as construction and trade. Can the current pattern of high levels of self-
employment be expected to continue once restrictions on EU2 employment are lifted? 
What additional demands do migrants from Bulgaria and Romania (and from elsewhere in the EU) 
make on services, and what in particular are the costs of translation and interpreting services? Are 
there  also  costs  of  not  meeting  the  needs of migrants  because of  inadequate service  provision  or 
lack of awareness of migrants’ rights to services, among migrants and service providers, for example 
in poor health and housing conditions.  
47 
 
 

 
 
 
References 
Alexe, I. (coord.), Cazacu, A., Ulrich, L., Stanciugelu, S., Bojica, M. and Mihaila, V. (2011), The Forth 
Wave. The Brain Drain Along the Route Between Romania-The West, Fundatia Soros, Bucharest 
Andrews, R., Boyne, G., Meier, K., O’Toole, LJ and Walker, R. (2011), Managing Migration: How some 
councils cope better than others, Public Policy Research, December-February 
Angelov, G. and Vankova, Z. (2011) Bulgarian Labour Migration: Do restrictions make sense? Policy 
Brief, Open Society Institute Sofia  
Arai, L. (2005). Migrants & public services in the UK: a review of the recent literature. Oxford 
Audit Commission (2007) Crossing borders: responding to the  local challenges of migrant  workers, 
London: Audit Commission 
Barbulescu,  R.  (2009),  The  Economic  Crisis  and  its  Effects  for  Intra-European  Movement:  Mobility 
patterns and State responses The Case of Romanians in Spain, paper in New Times? Economic Crisis, 
geo-political  transformation  and  the  emergent  migration  order,  Centre  on  Migration,  Policy  and 
Society, University of Oxford, Annual Conference 2009 
Barrett,  A.  and  McCarthy,  Y.  (2008),  “Immigrants  and  Welfare  Programmes:  Exploring  the 
Interactions  between  Immigrant  Characteristics,  Immigrant  Welfare  Dependence  and  Welfare 
Policy”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy24, 542-59 
 
BBSS  Gallup  International  (2006),  ЕМИГРАЦИОННИ  НАГЛАСИ  (Emigration  attitudes)  Report 
prepared for: Bulgarian Ministry of Labour and Social Policy 
Belcheva D (2011), Migration Experience and Attitudes, Politiki 11/11, Open Society – Sofia 
Boden, P. and P. Rees (2010), Using administrative data to improve the estimation of immigration to 
local areas in England, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, 173/4 
Burns, F., Evans, A., Mercer, C.M, Parutis, V., Gerry, C., Mole, R.C.M., French, R.S., Imrie, J. and Hart, 
G. (2012) Sexual and HIV risk behaviour in Central and Eastern European migrants in London, 
Sexually Transmitted Infection, 2011; 87: 318-324 
Collis, A., Stott, N. and Ross, D (2010) Workers on the Move 3: European migrant workers and health 
in the UK: A Review of the Issues, Keystone development trust 
Cook,  J.,  Dwyer,  P.  and  Waite,  L.  (2008),  New  Migrant  Communities  in  Leeds,  A  research  report 
commissioned by Leeds City Council 
Cook  J,  Dwyer  P,  Waite  L.  (2012),  Accession  8  Migration  and  the  Proactive  and  Defensive 
Engagement of Social Citizenship, Journal of Social Policy, Vol 41 (2)  
Council  of  Ministers  (2008)  National  Strategy  of  the  Republic  of  Bulgaria  on  migration  and 
integration, the 2008 -2015 
Datta  K.  (2011),  Last  hired  and  first  fired?  The  impact  of  the  economic  downturn  on  low-paid 
Bulgarian migrant workers in London, Journal of International Development, vol. 23, no. 4 
48 
 
 

 
 
Department  for  Communities  and  Local  Government  (2007),  Evidence  for  the  Social  and  Wider 
Impacts Strand of the A2 Stock-take 
Department  for  Communities  and  Local  Government  (2012),  Evidence  Review  of  the  costs  of 
homelessness, London: DCLG 
Department for Education (2012), School Capacity 2010/11, Statistical Release, London: DfE. 
Diacon, D., Pattison, B and Vine, J  and Yafai, S (2008), Home from Home: Addressing the issues of 
migrant workers' housing, Building and Social Housing Foundation, Consultation June 24-26 
Dobson, J. M. and Pooley, C. E. (2004) Mobility, Equality, Diversity: a study of pupil mobility in the 
secondary school system, Department of Geography, University College London 
Dustmann, C., Frattini, T. and Halls, C. 2010. Assessing the fiscal costs and benefits of EU-8 migration 
to the UK. Fiscal Studies, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 1-41 
Drew C., Sriskandarajah D. (2006), EU enlargement: Bulgaria and Romania – Migration implications 
for the UK: an IPPR Fact File, IPPR, London 
Drinkwater, S. and Robinson, C. (2011) Welfare Participation by Immigrants in the UK, IZA 
Equality UK (2011) From Segregation to Inclusion: Roma Pupils in the UK. A pilot research project 
European  Commission  (various  years).  Mobility  in  Europe  (various  years,  and  2011  and  2010  in 
particular), Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities, December 2011 
Fic T. (2011), Case studies: Bulgaria and Romania in: Holland et al (2011), Labour mobility within the 
EU, Report to the EC 
Ferri, A. and Rainero, S. (eds.) (2010), Survey of European Union and Return Migration Policies: the 
case of Romanian Migrants, Veneto Lavoro 
Geay, C., McNally, S. and Telhaj, S. (2012), Non-Native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What 
are the effects on pupil performance? Centre for the Economics of Education, CEE DP 137, March 
George, A, Meadows, P, Metcalf, H and Rolfe, H (2012),  Impact of migration on the consumption of 
education  and  children’s  services  and  the  consumption  of  health  services,  social  care  and  social 
services, Report to the Migration Advisory Committee, London: MAC 
Gillingham,  E.  (2010),  Understanding  A8  migration  to  the  UK  since  accession,  Office  for  National 
Statistics 
Gordon, I., Tunstall, R. and Whitehead, C. (2007),  Population Mobility and Service Provision, Report 
to London Councils by London School of Economics 
Green,  A.,  Owen,  D.,  Jones,  P.,  Owen,  C.,  Francis  C.  and  Proud,  R.  (2008)  Migrant  Workers  in  the 
South  East  Regional  Economy,  Report  to  SEEDA  from  Warwick  Institute  for  Employment  Research 
and BMG Research 
Grigorova M. (2010), No increase in those wishing to emigrate, Class  12/2010 
Health Protection Agency (2008) Migrant Workers from the EU Accession countries: A demographic 
overview of those living and working in England and Wales and a comparison of infectious disease 
and immunisation rates in the Accession countries with those in the UK, London: HPA 
49 
 
 

 
 
Holland, D., Fic, T., Rincon-Aznar, A., Stokes, L., Paluchowski, P., (2011), Labour mobility within the 
EU, Report to the European Commission 
House of Commons Home Affairs Committee (2008) Bulgarian and Romanian Accession to the EU: 
Twelve months on, London, HMSO 
House  of  Lords  Select  Committee  on  Economic  Affairs  (2008)  The  Economic  Impact  of  Migration, 
London: HMSO 
Iara  I.  (2010),  The  economic  crisis  and  Romanian  returnees  from  Spain  and  Italy,  presented  at 
European Job Mobility Day, Brussels, November 2010 
Intelligence  Group  (2011),  Къде  и  какво  искат  да  работят  българите?  (Where  and  what  want  to 
work the Bulgarians?), November 2011 
Institute of Community Cohesion (2007) Estimating the scale and impacts of migration at the local 
level, Local Government Association 
Jayaweera,  H.  (2010)  Health  and  access  to  health  care  of  migrants  in  the  UK,  A  Race  Equality 
Foundation  Briefing  Paper,  May,  Race  Equality  Foundation  and  Department  for  Communities  and 
Local Government 
Jayaweera, H. (2011) Health of Migrants in the UK: What Do We Know? The Migration Observatory, 
University of Oxford 
Johnson,  M.  (2006)  Health  and  the  Integration  of  new  migrants.  In  S.  Spencer  (Ed).  Refugees  and 
other  new  migrants:  A  review  of  the  evidence  on  successful  approaches  to  integration.  London: 
Home Office 
Kahanec M (2012), Labour mobility in an Enlarged European Unionm, IZA DP 6485 
Kausar, R ( 2011) Identifying social and economic push and pull factors for migration to the UK by 
Bulgarian and Romanian nationals Department for Communities and Local Government 
Kelly, R., G. Morrell, and D. Sriskandarajah. “Migration and Health in the UK.” IPPR FactFile, Institute 
for Public Policy Research, London, 2005. 
Klodawski,  E.,  and  Fitzpatrick,  J.  (2008),  Estimating  Future  Births  in  the  Capital:  a  discussion 
document, London Health Observatory  
Krasteva  A,  Angelov  G,  Ivanova  D,  Markova  E,  Staykova  E,  Vankova  Z,  Ivanova  I,  Lessenski  M, 
Trifonova  T.  (2010),  Тенденции  в  трансграничната  миграция  на  работна  сила  и  свободното 
движение на хора – ефекти за България (Trends in Cross-border Workforce Migration and the Free 
Movement of People – Effects for Bulgaria), Report, Open Society – Sofia  
Krasteva A, Otova I, Staykova E (2011), Временна и циркулярна миграция (Temporary and circular 
migration) 
Lee E.S. (1966), A theory of migration, Demography, vol. 3, no 1 
Mara I. (2012)- Surveying Romanian migrants in Italy before and after the EU Accession: migration 
plans, labour market features and social inclusion 
Marcu, S. (2011), Romanian Migration to the Community of Madrid (Spain): Patterns of Mobility and 
Return, International Journal of Population Research, vol. 2011  
50 
 
 

 
 
Markova,  E  and  Black,  R.  (2007),  East  European  immigration  and  community  cohesion,  Joseph 
Rowntree Foundation 
Matheson, J. (2009), National Statistician's Annual Article on the Population: a demographic review, 
Population Trends 2009, Office for National Statistics 
Medecins du Monde UK (2007) Project London: Report and Recommendations 2007 
Migration  Advisory  Committee  (2008),  The  labour  market  impact  of  relaxing  restrictions  on 
employment in the UK of nationals of Bulgarian and Romanian member states 
Migration Advisory Committee (2011), Review of the transitional restrictions on access of Bulgarian 
and Romanian nationals to the UK labour market 
Migration Advisory Committee (2012), Analysis of the impacts of migration 
National Assembly for Wales, Equality of Opportunity Committee (2008), Issues affecting migrant 
workers in Wales, their families and the communities in which they live and work, National Assembly 
for Wales 
National Public Opinion Centre (NPOC) (2012), Миграционни нагласи на българите, (Migration 
attitudes among Bulgarians), Sofia: NPOC, September 
Nazarska, G., Mancheva, M and Troeva, E (2011), Migration, gender and intercultural interactions in 
Bulgaria,  Marko  Hajdinjak,  author  and  editor,  International  Center  for  Minority  Studies  and 
Intercultural Relations, Sofia 
Nicholson, C. and Romaszko, A (2008), The Housing Needs of Migrant Workers in Devon. The Anglo-
Polish Organisation of Tiverton 
OECD (various years, and 2011 in particular). International migration outlook 
Orchard, P., Szymanski, A. and Vlahova, N. (2007) A Community Profile of EU8 Migrants in Edinburgh 
and an evaluation of their access to key services, Scottish Government Social Research. 
Pamporov  A.  (2011),  Човекът  е  човек  тогава,  когато  е...  в  чужбина  (A  Man  is  a  Man  When  he 
is...Abroad), Politiki – Number 8/11 OSI Sofia 
Pehoiu,  G.  and  Costache,  A.  (2010),  The  Dynamics  of  Population  Emigration  from  Romania  - 
Contemporary and Future Trends, World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology 66 2010 
Pemberton, S. (2009) Economic Migration from the EU 'A8' Accession Countries and the Impact on 
Low-demand  Housing  Areas:  Opportunity  or  Threat  for  Housing  Market  Renewal  Pathfinder 
Programmes in England? Urban Studies, June 2009, Vol 46/7 
Perry,  J  (2012),  UK  migrants  and  the  private  rented  sector  A  policy  and  practice  report  from  the 
Housing and Migration Network 
Phillimore,  J.,  Goodson,  L.  and  Thornhill,  J.  (2008)  Migrants  from  A8  countries  and  housing  in  the 
East  Midlands,  Centre  for  Urban  and  Regional  Studies  for  Decent  and  Safe  Homes,  University  of 
Birmingham 
Radu,  D.,  Hudson,  M.  and  Philips,  J.  (2010)  Migrant  workers'  interactions  with  welfare  benefits:  A 
review of recent evidence and its relevance for the tax credits system, HMRC Research Report 115 
51 
 
 

 
 
Raphaely, N. and O'Moore, E. (2010) Understanding the health needs of migrants in the South East 
region,  A  report  by  the  South  East  Migrant  Health  Study  Group  on  behalf  of  the  Department  of 
Health 
Reynolds,  G.  (2008)  The  Impacts  and  Experiences  of  Migrant  Children  in  UK  Secondary  Schools, 
University of Sussex, Sussex Centre for Migration Research. Working Paper No 47 
Rincon-Aznar A. and Stokes L. (2011), Local Geography of International Migration to the UK, Report 
to the Department for Communities and Local Government 
Robinson, D (2007), European Union Accession State Migrants in Social Housing in England, People, 
Place & Policy Online 
Robinson, D. (2010) New Immigrants and migrants in social housing in Britain: discursive themes and 
lived realities, Policy and Politics, Vol 38, Pt 1, 57-77 
Rolfe,  H.  and  Metcalf,  H  (2009)  Recent  Migration  into  Scotland:  the  Evidence  Base,  Scottish 
Government  Social Research 
Roman, M. (coordinator), (2012),  Emigratia romaneasca. Implicatii economice  si demografice,  ASE, 
Bucuresti 
Rotila, V. (2008), The impact of the migration of health care workers on the countries involved: the 
Romanian situation, 1/2008 South-East Europe Review 
Rugg, J. and Rhodes, D. (2008) The Private Rented Sector: Its Contribution and Potential. York: Centre 
for Housing Policy 
Rutter, J. and Latorre, M (date) Social housing allocation and immigrant communities, Equality and 
Human Rights Commission Research Report 4 
Sandu, D. (2009), Comunitati romanesti in Spania, Fundatia Soros Romania 
Sandu,  D.,  Radu,  C.,  Constantinescu,  M.  and  Ciobanu,  O.  (2004),  A  Country  Report  on  Romanian 
Migration  Abroad:  Stocks  and  Flows  After  1989,  Study  for  www.migrationonline.cz,  Multicultural 
Center Prague 
Sandu, S., Bleahu, A., Grigoraş, V., Mihai, A., Radu, C., Radu , C., Serban, M., Toth, A., Toth, G., Guga , 
S., Jeler , M., Paun, G. , Stefanescu , M. (2006), Living Abroad on a Temporary Basis. The Economic 
Migration  of  Romanians:  1990-2006,  Fundatia  pentru  o  Societate  Deschisa  (Open  Society 
Foundation), Bucharest 
Schneider, C. and Holman, D. (2009 and 2010) Longitudinal study of migrant workers in the East of 
England, Interim Report to East of England Development Agency 
Scullion, L., Morris, G. and Steele, A. (2009) A study of A8 and A2 migrants in Nottingham, University 
of Salford 
Shima,  I.  (2010),  Return  migration  and  labour  market  outcomes  of  the  returnees  Does  the  return 
really  pay  off?  The  case-study  of  Romania  and  Bulgaria,  FIW  Research  Reports  2009/10  N°  07, 
February 2010 
Scottish Parliament Equal Opportunities Committee (2010) 5th Official Report 
Scullion, L. and Morris, G. (2009a) A study of migrant workers in Peterborough, University of Salford 
52 
 
 

 
 
Scullion, L. and Morris, G. (2009b) Migrant Workers in Liverpool:  A  study of A8 and A2 Nationals, 
University of Salford 
Siar, S. (editor) (2008), Migration in Romania: A Country Profile, edited by Sheila Siar, S. Publisher: 
International  Organization  for  Migration,  ISBN  978-92-9068-482-4,  ISBN  978-92-9068-517-3 
(Migration  in  the  Black  Sea  Region:  Regional  Overview,  Country  Profiles  and  Policy 
Recommendations) 
Sikora,  M.,  Mills,  K.,  Nuttall-Smith  Dicks,  S.,  Green,  R.  (2010)  Exploring  the  Needs  of  New  Migrant 
Communities  in  East  Sussex:  a  scoping  study,  Report  to  East  Sussex  County  Council,  University  of 
Hertfordshire  
Silasi, G. and Simina, O. L. (eds.) (2008), Migration, Mobility and Human Rights at the Eastern Border 
of  the  European  Union–  Space  of  Freedom  and  Security,  ISBN  (13)  978–973–125–160–8,  Editura 
Universităţii de Vest, Timisoara 
Spatial Strategy and Research (2010) The Story of UK Migration: A compilation of the literature on 
immigration  and  emigration  in  the  UK  and  the  implications  for  Hampshire,  Hampshire  County 
Council 
Spencer, S., Ruhs, M., Anderson, B. and Rogaly, B,(2007) Migrants’ lives beyond the workplace, The 
experiences of Central and East Europeans in the UK, Joseph Rowntree Foundation 
Sriskandarajah D, Cooley L, Reed H (2005), Paying Their Way. The fiscal contribution of immigrants in 
the UK. In
stitute for Public Policy Research (ippr) 
Stanciulescu,  M.  et  al.  (2011),    Impactul  crizei  asupra  migratiei  fortei  de  munca,  Friedrich  Ebert 
Stiftung, Bucuresti, 2011 
Stanek, M. (2009) Patterns of Romanian and Bulgarian Migration to Spain, Europe-Asia Studies, Vol 
61, No 9, November, 1627-1644 
Stokes L (2011), Case studies: The UK in: Holland et al (2011), Labour mobility within the EU, Report 
to the EC 
Sumption, M and Somerville, W (2010) The UK's new Europeans: Progress and Challenges five years 
after accession, Equality and Human Rights Commission Policy report 
Survey of Confederation of Labour Support (2012), 83%  flee Bulgaria because of low salaries (83% 
бягат от България заради ниските заплати), January 2012  
The  European  Union  Agency  for  Fundamental  Rights  FRA  (2009),  Положението  на  ромите 
граждани  на  ЕС,  които  се  преместват  и  установяват  в  други  държави-членки  на  Европейския 
съюз  (The  situation  of  Roma  EU  citizens  moving  to  and  settling  in  other  Member  States  of  the 
European Union), report  
UN General Assembly  (1989)  Convention on the Rights  of the Child, United Nations, Treaty Series, 
vol. 1577, p.3 
Uscreates (2008) Improving  Health and Wellbeing in Mid-Essex. London: Uscreates 
Vankova Z (2012), Migration, Open Society Institute Sofia (in Bulgarian) 
Wales Rural Observatory (2006) Scoping Study on Eastern and Central European migrant workers in 
rural Wales. 
53 
 
 

 
 
Wilcox,  S.  (2010)  ‘Constraining  choices:  the  housing  benefit  reforms’  in  Pawson,  H.  and  Wilcox,  S. 
(eds) UK Housing Review 2010/2011. Coventry: Chartered Institute of Housing 
Wilkin, A., Derrington, C., White, R., Martin, K., Foster, B., Kinder, K. and Rutt, S (2010) Improving the 
outcomes for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller Pupils, Department for Education Report RR043, London: 
HMSO 
Wilkinson,  M.  Craig,  G.  and  Gaus,  A  (2010),  A.  Forced  labour  in  the  UK  and  the  Gangmasters 
Licensing Authority
. Hull: The Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation. 
Welsh Local Government Association (2008) Response to NAFW Equality of Opportunity Committee: 
Migrant Workers Inquiry, WLGA/ CLILC. 
Woods,  M.  and  Watkin,  S.  (2008)  Central  and  Eastern  European  Migrant  Workers  in  Rural  Wales, 
Arsyllfa Wledig Cymru/Welsh Rural Observatory, Report 20 
Wright Ch. (2010), The regulation of European Labour Mobility: national policy responses to the free 
movement of labour transition arrangements  of recent EU enlargements, SEER Journal for Labour 
and Social Affairs in Eastern Europe, 2/2010 
Zaronaite,  D.  and  Tirzite,  A  (2006)  The  Dynamics  of  Migrant  Labour  in  South  Lincolnshire,  East 
Midlands Development Agency 
54