This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Independent Living Fund Consultation'.



Councillor Veronica Dunn 
Cabinet Member:  
 
Adult and Culture Services 
 
Cabinet Office 
Our Ref: 
AVD/PRS/Consultation 
Room 254 
Newcastle City Council 
9 October, 2012 
Civic Centre 
 
Newcastle upon Tyne 
Response sent by email to: 
NE99 2BN 
xxx.xxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxx.xx 
Telephone: 0191 211 5154  
 
 
 
ILF Consultation Team 
DWP 
Ground Floor 
Caxton House 
Tothill Street 
London 
SW1H 9NA 
 
 
Dear colleagues, 
 
Consultation on the Future of the Independent Living Fund 
 
Please find attached a response to DWP consultation on the Future of the Independent 
Living Fund.  
 
If you have any queries concerning our comments, please contact Jamie Feather, Lead 
Specialist Practitioner - Personalisation on 0191 211 6305 xxxxx.xxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx  
 
Yours sincerely  
  
 
 
Councillor Veronica Dunn 
Cabinet Member: Adult and Culture Services 



 
 
Consultation on the Future of the Independent Living Fund 
 
 
Response from Newcastle City Council  
 
 
Thank  you  for  inviting  Newcastle  City  Council  to  respond  to  this  consultation.    Our 
responses are detailed below. 
 
Question 1: 
Do you agree with the Government’s proposal that the care and support needs of current 
ILF  users  should  be  met  within  the  mainstream  care  and  support  system,  with  funding 
devolved  to  local  government  in  England  and  the  devolved  administrations  in  Scotland 
and Wales ? This would mean the closure of the ILF in 2015. 
 
Response to question 1: 
We  are  in  broad  agreement  with  this  proposal,  because  it  would  reduce  the  level  of 
outward-facing bureaucracy in maintaining ILF awards. 
 
However, our agreement to the proposal is subject to the following conditions: 
 
•  There must be no additional costs to the local authority resulting from the proposed 
change 
•  The gross cost of existing ILF users’ awards will be honoured to avoid any potential 
distress to Newcastle residents 
 
 
Question 2: 
What are  the  key  challenges  that  ILF  users would  face  in moving  from  joint  ILF  /  local 
authority to sole local authority funding of their care and support needs ? How can any 
impacts be mitigated ?  
 
Response to question 2: 
 
We consider that there are two main potential impacts: 
 
2a)  Fears  of  reductions  in  funding  and  limitations  of  use.
    We  consider  that 
established ILF users will be concerned that the ILF monies will no longer be under their 
sole control.  They will feel vulnerable to the impact of budget pressures and adult social 
care  priorities  in  terms  of  use  of  the  funding  (for  example,  ILF  rules  on  the  kinds  of 
support  that  may  be  purchased  differ  from  local  authority  practices).  This  applies  to 
current ILF users in both group 1 and group 2.   
 
To some extent, this impact is mitigated by the greater flexibility that is offered to eligible 
people via Self-Directed Support / Personal Budgets.  However, unless the gross cost of 
the ILF award (including the value of the person’s ILF contribution) is transferred to the 
local  authority,  reductions  in  funding  (and  therefore  levels  of  support)  are  inevitable, 
because  the  local  authority  will  be  neither  able  to  demand  the  person  pays  the  ILF 
financial  contribution  in  addition  to  any  local  authority  charges,  nor  will  it  be  able  to 
absorb the funding deficit.  Therefore, to mitigate this impact, the gross value of the ILF 
awards must be transferred, and this decision communicated to ILF users in a clear and 
timely manner.  
 
 
 

2b) Unwanted contact with adult social care.  We consider that group 1 people will be 
concerned about having to be assessed by Adult and Culture Services, quite possibly for 
the first time.  The experience of applying eligibility criteria  will be  new to these people 
and  is  unlikely  to  be  welcomed,  since  it  would  reduce  group  1  people’s  level  of 
autonomy.     
 
In the event that the proposal is accepted and acted upon, we consider that the role of 
the ILF visiting social  workers is important.  The impact could be mitigated by effective 
transfer arrangements from ILF social worker to local authority social worker.  ILF users 
would  need  clear  information  about  the  different  assessment  process  for  eligibility  for 
local authority services at an early stage in the process.  
 
 
Question 3 
What impact would the closure of the ILF have on local authorities and the provision of 
care and support services more widely ? How could any impacts be mitigated ? 
 
Response to question 3: 
We have identified three main potential impacts: 
 
3a)  Increased  workload  in  terms  of  administration  of  funds.    A  transfer  of  ILF 
functions  and  resources  would  result  in  increased  administrative  and  processing 
demands  on  local  authority  resources.    We  consider  that  this  increase  needs  to  be 
quantified,  costed  and  factored  into any  transfer  arrangements at an  early  stage  in  the 
process, should the proposal be enacted.  At present, the ILF imposes a number of rules 
in  terms  of  threshold  values  and  ongoing  eligibility.    If  these  rules  are  maintained,  and 
the original ILF awards have to be kept distinct, the additional administrative costs will be 
even higher and this matter needs to be acknowledged and addressed.  
  
3b) Increased workload in terms of assessment and care management.  At least 20 
group 1 people will need to be assessed by Adult and Culture Services in order to admit 
them to our systems.  This will be an additional cost to the local authority which needs to 
be met as part of any resulting transfer agreement.  If the 20 people do not welcome the 
local  authority’s  involvement, then  the  demands  on  worker  time  could  be  considerable.  
Clear  information  and  effective  handover  from  the  ILF  would  be  essential  to  minimise 
such costs and any negative impact on group 1 users.  
 
3c) Increased financial demands resulting from the uncertainty of ongoing funding 
and the risks posed by individual users’ financial contributions to ILF awards.  
We 
note  that  at  this  stage  detail  on  how  much  funding  will  be  transferred  and  crucially  the 
ongoing  nature  of  said  funding  is  scant.    We  consider  that  if  the  decision  is  made  to 
close  the  ILF  this  information  needs  to  be  shared  at  an  early  stage  and  the  scope  for 
further negotiations incorporated into any agreed transfer plans.  For example, on what 
basis and frequency would the funds be paid to the local authority ? 
 
In the event that ILF users die following the transfer, we would expect the value of the 
ILF  awards  to  continue  to  be  paid  to  the  local  authority  and  be  transferable  to  other 
people with complex needs.  We would also seek to ensure that the value of ILF awards 
that were in existence prior to the closure of the Fund to new applications in June 2010, 
but have subsequently ended, be included in any transfer settlement.  Since that date, in 
Newcastle,  pre-existing  ILF  awards  totalling  over  £200,000.00  have  ended  after  ILF 
users  ceased  to  be  eligible  for  various  reasons.    This  money  has  not  been  made 
available  to  other  Newcastle  residents  and  in  the  interests  of  fairness  this  sum  should 
also  transfer.    It  would  also  mitigate  other  cost  pressures  that  local  authorities  have 
borne  since  2010  due  to  the  ILF’s  refusal  to  meet  unit  costs  increases  for  ILF  users’ 
packages.  Turnover between June 2010 and the date of transfer (if such occurs) should 
be  monitored  and  a  settlement  agreed  for  the  benefit  of  Newcastle  residents.    This 
 
 

money and the original aim of improving disabled people’s level of independence should 
not be lost should the ILF close. 
 
 
Question 4: 
What are the specific challenges in relation to Group 1 users ? How can the Government 
ensure this group are able to access the full range of Local authority care and support 
services for which they are eligible ?  
 
Response to question 4: 
Broadly, please see comments in point 2 above.  Group 1 users will need to be 
assessed against FACS 2010 criteria and follow our Self-Directed Support model.  We 
would also actively resist any attempt to net off ILF award transfer amounts based on 
any notional local authority funding responsibilities.  These awards should be preserved 
in full, in the interests of fairness to group 1 users and the broader social care 
population. 
 
 
Question 5: 
How  can  DWP,  the  ILF  and  local  authorities  best  continue  to  work  with  ILF  users 
between  now  and 2015  ?  How  can the ILF best  work  with  individual  local authorities  if 
the decision to close the ILF is taken ? 
 
Response to question 5: 
The  key  to  effective  collaboration  is  clear  communication,  ongoing  dialogue  and 
transparency  in  terms  of  financial  information.    If  the  proposal  leads  to  a  decision  to 
close the ILF, then planning would need to start almost immediately to mitigate any risks 
to ILF users and the local authority.  We consider that ILF communications officers and 
other personnel would have a crucial role.  Communication and engagement would need 
to be localised; retaining and managing the process according to the defined ILF regions 
would be essential.  A centralised approach would hinder effective joint-working because 
the region-specific knowledge and perspective would be lost.