This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Contract for Provision of Adult Drug Treatment Services in Cambridgeshire - INCLUSION'.

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, a: Single Point of Contact/Advice and 
Information/Assessment 
 
Method  
Spec 
Method Statement 
Statement 
Reference 
Reference 
number 
1. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
Please demonstrate and detail how this part of the service will 
Sub headings 
SPC/Advice 
work. 
a – c 
and 
 
Information 
Weighting 4 
Service 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
 
Service Outline 
The  Single  Point  of  Contact  (SPOC),  advice,  information  and  assessment  elements  of  the 
Cambridgeshire Adult Drug Treatment Service will operate Monday – Friday 9am until 5pm 
with one late evening until 8pm and Saturday morning opening between 9am and 1pm.  This 
service  will  be  available  from  the  operational  bases  in  Cambridge,  Huntington,  Wisbech, 
St.Neot’s and Ely.  Eligibility criteria for the service will be any adult over the age of 18 in the 
Cambridgeshire area wishing to access recovery-focussed drug treatment services. 
 
Inclusion  regards  open  access  services  of  this  nature  as  central  to  Cambridgeshire’s 
recovery strategy because this service will often be a user’s first experience of treatment and 
the point at which behaviour change is actively considered.  We see our role as facilitators of 
that  change  and  so  this  element  of  service  will  emphasise  the  engage,  assessment, 
motivation enhancement and case management of service users.  The service will also offer 
a safe, warm and welcoming environment for all service users. 
 
Whilst  the  service  will  be  publicised  as  the  ‘front  door’  to  treatment  and  recovery,  we  will 
prioritise  exit  planning  from  the  point  of  engagement.  We  will  explore  the  service  user’s 
educational  and  employment  history,  their  accommodation  status,  their  family  and  social 
networks; we will assist service users to recognise their existing recovery capital and to build 
more. 
 
The service will target specific groups using drugs across Cambridgeshire; 
•  BME groups 
•  Stimulant users  
•  Homeless drug users 
•  Women with children 
•  Service users with complex needs including those with Dual Diagnosis 
 
The  service  will  operate  some  outreach  capacity  in  particular  to  services  where  we  know 
users access.  We will develop links with all community pharmacies and explore the need for 
outreach services to sex  workers in consultation with commissioners, partner agencies and 
service  users.    The  service  will  facilitate  home  visits  where  the  service  user  is  pregnant  or 
 


FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
there are child safeguarding concerns. It is likely that a number of primary alcohol users may 
approach the service.  After a brief screening discussion, we will refer these individuals in to 
the  Addaction  Alcohol  Service.    Our  accommodation  strategy  for  Cambridgeshire  includes 
negotiating with Addaction to take over their existing premises and we intend to offer space 
to  Addaction  Alcohol  Service  staff  under  the  new  arrangements.    This  will  help  to  facilitate 
alcohol referrals from the SPOC. 
.   
Advice, information & support 
We  will  ensure  that  the  service  users  are  given  timely,  accurate  and  relevant  information 
about substance misuse and other related issues. Inclusion recognises that service users will 
access the service often in crisis and be seeking help for problems other than their drug use.  
Service users will be made aware of their rights and responsibilities including our approach 
to  confidentiality,  when  the  service  is  open  and  how  to  access  the  service.    Our  aim  is  to 
provide sound advice, information and support as the first stage in engaging service users in 
our wider service provision. 
 
Needle Exchange & BBV Interventions 
Each service site will  operate needle exchange.  There will be access to needles, syringes 
and sharps bins. Pre-packed injecting packs will be available with sterile swabs, Vitamin ‘C’ 
sachets  and  sterile  water.  All  packs  will  also  include  relevant  harm  reduction  literature.  
Service users will be encouraged to make regular returns.  The service will offer a range of 
condoms alongside sexual health advice and information.  Inclusion will also operate nurse-
led BBV testing and vaccination clinics at each service site. 
 
Assessment, Care-Planning, Reviews & Key Working 
Assessment  and  key  working  processes  will  be  user-friendly  to  ensure  the  engagement 
process is a positive one. We know from experience, that if service user’s initial experience 
of  a  service  is  positive,  this  will  be  relayed  to  other  users.    The  assessment  will  determine 
and prioritise need and be underpinned by clear harm reduction advice and information. All 
service  users  will  receive  an  initial  assessment  with  5  working  days.  However  we  would 
expect the majority of initial assessments to take place that day or the next.  
 
 
Following  assessment  a  Recovery  Plan  will  be  agreed  that  clearly  identifies  the  priority 
needs, short term goals, the interventions or actions required to achieve the goals and who is 
responsible  for  undertaking  each  action  (e.g.  key  worker,  service  user,  other  professional). 
The  plan  will  include  a  contingency  in  relation  to  disengagement.  Recovery  Plans  will 
address  the  four  domains  of  substance  use,  health,  social  functioning  and  offending  also 
taking  into  account  the  gender,  ethnicity,  sexuality  and  cultural  background  of  the  service 
user and any special needs they may have, for example, child care, working hours, religious 
observance. In order to be effective, the service will ensure that the service user is actively 
involved in the formulation of the Recovery Plan. 
 
The Recovery Plan will also: 
•  Consider risks and develop a risk management plan.  
•  Agree information sharing arrangements by gaining a service user’s consent.  
•  Identify a review date and circumstances where an earlier review may be necessary.  
 
 
 


FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Recovery Plan Reviews 
Plans will be reviewed regularly and will include: 
•  The  relevance  of  the  plan  as  it  stands  and  whether  any  new  interventions  or  treatment 
options  need  to  be  added  or  considered.  It  will  also  include  exit  planning  including 
development of an aftercare package and onward referral. 
•  Any unmet needs 
•  The service user’s satisfaction with treatment and interventions received 
•  Review of risks and risk management plan.   
•  Review of information sharing agreements. 
 
Keyworking 
Inclusion  key  workers  will  help  service  users  set  specific,  realistic  and  time-limited  goals, 
which  are  then  reviewed on each  visit.  This gives  the  whole treatment  episode  a  structure, 
on  which  other  interventions  can  be  built.    The  service  will  use  BTEI  node-link  mapping 
techniques, where the service user is encouraged to consider all the potential problem areas 
in  their  life,  and  prioritise  the  ones  that  are  important  to  them  (even  if  these  don’t  relate  to 
drug or alcohol use). This ensures that the whole process is collaborative, and involves joint 
input from worker and service user. 
 
2. Section 2.0 
Aim of the 
Please demonstrate how the telephone reception point will be able 
Sub heading 
Service 
to make appointments for clients in any part of the county. 
2.1 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words 
Contractors response
Booking arrangements for appointments with any element of the Cambridgeshire Adult Drug 
Treatment Service will operate as follows: 
• 
A free phone Single Point of Contact telephone number will be available for callers to 
make all external bookings during normal office hours. 
• 
The  SPOC  telephone  number  will  be  advertised  widely  via  posters,  leaflets  and 
electronic media in a wide range of community venues. 
• 
The  SPOC  line  will  be  operated  by  a  combination  of  practitioner  and  administration 
staff on a rota basis. 
• 
Each booking request via telephone will be screened to ascertain whether the booking 
is for an existing service user or new referral.  Basic advice and information in support of the 
individual taking up the booking will be given during the call. 
• 
The service will operate an electronic diary system covering all service delivery sites 
to ensure that available appointments are easily accessible. 
 
Staff will be trained and expected to uphold basic communication standards when answering 
the SPOC telephone line.  These are: 

Attempts should be made to answer the telephone within five rings  

In circumstances where the telephone is left unmanned, arrangements should be 
made to transfer calls to another member of staff or message system.  

A verbal handshake should be given, e.g. ‘good morning’ and ‘hello’.  

Identify the name of the service.  
 


FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

The person answering the phone should identify himself or herself by name and 
job title.  

If a call needs to be transferred to another person, ascertain the name of the caller 
and the nature of the call  

If  the  caller  needs  to  be  kept  waiting:  keep  them  informed  of  the  progress, 
apologise for any inconvenience and thank the caller for waiting  

If  necessary,  take  accurate  messages  which  should  include:  date  of  call,  time  of 
call,  callers name, agency name, what the call is about, the telephone number of caller 
and the action to be taken, e.g. you will ring back at …  
 
3. Section 2.0 
Objective of 
Please demonstrate the methods by which advice and information 
Sub heading 
the Service 
and referrals will be provided or accepted by the service. E.g., 
2.2 
telephone, verbal, electronic 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words 
Contractors response: 
 
Provision of Advice & Information 
The service will supply a full range of relevant, contemporary, accurate and localised advice 
information in the following forms: 
• 
The  service  will  sign  post  requests  for  advice  and  information  to  other  more 
appropriate services when callers have misunderstood the nature of the service on offer. 
• 
Telephone  advice  and  information  on  drug  use  and  treatment  services  will  be 
available  during  normal  working  hours  to  all  callers.   We  would  expect telephone advice  to 
be provided by a combination of service staff, volunteers and Recovery Mentors.   
• 
Telephone  requests  for  advice  and  information  will  also  be  sign  posted  to  relevant 
internet sites as appropriate.  Telephone callers, particularly family and carers seeking help 
in relation to a love one’s substance use, will be encourage to call into the service for face-to-
face conversations as much as possible to aid potential future referral. 
• 
The  service  will  display  industry  standard  posters  and  wall  charts  relating  to  drugs, 
their use and their effects. 
• 
The  service  will  stock  and  distribute  a  full  range  of  industry  standard  information 
leaflets and pamphlets  available to all service users and other visitors 
• 
The service will maintain a publically accessible computer to enable service users and 
other visitors access to appropriate websites for advice and information purposes 
• 
The service will maintain a closed loop television and video player for the purposes of 
showing advice and information films and marketing materials 
 
Referrals to the service 
The service will accept referrals in the following ways: 
• 
Self Referral 
Any potential service user may ‘drop-in’ to the service during opening times and self-refer on 
the spot.  They will be seen within minutes by a Recovery Mentor who will make them feel 
welcome and provide them with a hot drink and basic information about the building and its 
amenities.  A triage assessment will take place within a maximum of one hour after drop-in.  
Self-referral  may  also  be  made  via  telephone  in  the  first  instance  at  which  point  an 
 


FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
appointment for a triage assessment can be made that day.  If the new service user wishes 
to be accompanied by a family member or carer the service will support and facilitate this. 
• 
Referrals from other services 
The  service  will  take  written  referrals  from  all  other  services  and  professionals  across 
Cambridgeshire.  Telephone referral will be possible when verbal information is back up with 
a completed referral form within 24 hours. 
• 
Criminal Justice referrals 
Referrals  from  all  parts  of  the  Criminal  Justice  System  will  be  accepted.    Where  a  Drug 
Intervention Record can be shared we will encourage this.  
 
The service will develop and circulate a basic referral form to all potential referring agencies.  
It will include the following details: 
• 
Name and address 
• 
Contact telephone number 
• 
GP details if applicable 
• 
Basic details of current drug use 
• 
Any known risk factors 
• 
Service user awareness of referral 
 
Referral forms will be accepted by hand, by fax delivery and by secure email. 
 
4. (Section 3B) 
Aims and 
Please demonstrate the referral mechanisms that will be used 
Section 2.0  
Objectives of 
both internally and externally to the drug treatment system once 
Sub heading 
the Service  
an initial assessment or triage has taken place. 
2.1 – 2.2 
 
 
 
(Section 3A) 
Referral and 
Section 7.0 
Assessment 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
 
Internal Referrals 
Internal referrals between elements of the Cambridgeshire Adult Drug Treatment Service will 
be handled in a uniform manner across all service sites and modalities.  Each referral: 
• 
Can be initially be made verbally  via direct contact between staff in each element of 
service 
• 
All referrals will be accompanied by up to date assessment, risk assessment, recovery 
plan and any supporting documentation via an internal mail system 
• 
All service user records will be updated on the HLAO system in recognition of referral, 
to allow for proper case management and to facilitate NDTMS reporting where appropriate. 
• 
Upon  each  referral,  where  Care  Co-ordination  sits  will  be  reviewed  and  changed  as 
appropriate. 
• 
Each  service  user  will  have  a  disengagement  plan  in  place  should  they  drop  out  of 
service during a referral 
• 
Confidentiality agreements and consent to share information will cover all aspects of 
 


FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
the service to facilitate referral. 
• 
Where service users are expected to access a different locality due to the nature of a 
referral  Recovery  Mentors  will  be  available  to  smooth  the  transition  and  guard  against 
treatment drop outs. 
 
External Referrals 
• 
In-patient Detoxification  
Inclusion  will  ensure  that  the  service  works  closely  with  Cambridgeshire  Alcohol  Treatment 
Service to manage the county’s in-patient detoxification waiting list.  Inclusion recognises the 
value and necessity of in-patient provision for some service users will seek to access current 
hospital based detoxification provided by Cambridgeshire & Peterborough NHS Foundation 
Trust (CPFT).   
To support service users accessing in-patient detoxification we will; 
•  Ensure service users understand the remit if in-patient detoxification 
•  Support service users to prepare for in-patient detoxification through key work and group 
work based interventions 
•  Involve family and carer’s in planning for in-patient detoxification  
•  Agree care co-ordination arrangements with CPFT 
•  Make  treatment  information  available  to  CPFT  in  line  with  confidentiality  agreements 
signed by service users 
•  Ensure comprehensive aftercare is in place for service users after in-patient detoxification 
including  relapse  management,  ETE  provision,  accommodation  advice,  family/carer 
support, links to mutual aid groups and access to social & leisure opportunities. 
 
Residential Rehabilitation 
During  the  implementation  phase  following  contract  award  Inclusion  will  consult  with 
commissioners  and  service  users  to  review  current  residential  rehabilitation  pathways.  
Inclusion’s strategy in respect referral to residential rehabs is likely to include: 
-  Appropriate referral of service users to relevant organisations, local or otherwise, based 
upon  need,  service  user  choice,  available  funding  and  the  host  organisation’s  track 
record in achieving outcomes.   
-  Inclusion  will  develop  excellent  joint  working  relationships  with  those  rehabs  where 
service users are referred.  This will facilitate supportive pre-admission recovery planning, 
service  user  awareness  &  ownership  of  the  rehabs  approach  to  treatment,  robust 
aftercare and contingency planning in the event of an unplanned discharge.  
-  Inclusion  understands  that  a  number  of  service  users  will  arrive  at  local  rehabs 
independent of the local drug treatment system.  This is important in that some of those 
service  users  may  drop  out  of  treatment  and  leave  a  rehab  but  remain  in  the 
Cambridgeshire area still misusing drugs and in need of treatment services.  Inclusion wil 
establish  clear  working  protocols  with  all  rehabs  that  will  encourage  service  users  to 
access the Adult Treatment Aftercare Service when leaving residential treatment.   
-  Where service users not from the local area leave rehabs in an unplanned way, Inclusion 
will  seek  to  engage  this  group  and  where  appropriate,  facilitate  a  return  to  their  normal 
town of residence.  For some this will be inappropriate as they may have left their home 
town as a way of dealing with substance misuse and related issues.  However for some, 
a return to a supportive network of family and friends may be the best option.  This will be 
explored in each service user’s recovery plan.  
 
 
 
 


FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Mutual Aid 
Peer  support  initiatives  will  be  promoted  and  all  staff  will  actively  discuss  mutual  aid  as  a 
referral option.  We will open up service premises for use by NA, AA and Smart groups and 
provide  staff  and  service  users  with  appropriate  training  about  mutual  aid  programmes.  
Where  allowed,  service  users  referred  to  mutual  aid  will  attend  the  first  meeting  with  the 
individual. 
 
5. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please demonstrate how this element of the service will deliver 
Sub heading b 
the service 
“other structured treatment” 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  will  offer  ‘other  structured  treatment’  interventions  at  each  service  site  across 
Cambridgeshire.  It is our intention to have Recovery Mentors available in all reception areas 
to  meet  and  greet  new  referrals  prior  to  initial  assessment.    Other  structured  treatment 
interventions will include: 
 
Harm Reduction  
The  service  will  offer  harm  reduction  interventions  as  a  core  component  of  service  deliver.  
This will include: 
• 
Verbal and written information about tolerance to drugs and safer injection and access 
to sterile injecting equipment. 
• 
Verbal  and  written  information  about  the  physical,  psychological  and  social 
implications of drug use 
• 
Health examinations that will include checks on injecting sites and wound dressing 
• 
Providing  intelligence  about  the  purity  and  contamination  of  illicit  drugs  supplied 
locally. 
• 
Recovery  Mentors  will  be  trained  to  make  harm  reduction  advice  and  information 
available including overdose management. 
• 
Advice and information safer sexual practices and sexually transmitted diseases. 
• 
Advice  and  information  in  relation  to  Blood  Borne  Viruses  including  pre  and  post 
counselling and vaccination opportunities. 
• 
Harm reduction interventions wil always be supported by attempts to engage service 
users in structured treatment where appropriate 
 
Brief Interventions & motivational enhancement 
All  staff  will  be  trained  in  Brief  Interventions  including  Motivational  Interviewing  and  Brief 
Solution Focussed Therapy. These interventions can increase a service user’s motivation to 
address  their  substance  misuse  and  increase  numbers  into  treatment.  We  will  work  with 
service  users  to  consider  how  their  lives  have  been  affected  by  substance  misuse,  look  at 
alternatives  and  plan  for  the  future.    Our  approach  to  enhancing  motivation  is  to  build  the 
individual’s  understanding  of  their  substance  misuse,  raise  the  possibility  of  a  different  life 
style and support the service user in closing the gap between they are and where they want 
to be.  We will do this through; 

Providing feedback to service users in the form of clear advice & information 
 


FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Ensure that the ownership of the need for change is placed on the service user 

Outline the menu of possible courses of action 

Ensure our responses are always empathetic and non-judgmental 

Re-enforce in the self-efficacy inherent in service users 

Developing social and life skills  

Pro-social modelling and ownership of social responsibility 

Peer support from Recovery Mentors during opening hours and via telephone out of 
hours. 

Crack Cocaine and other stimulant specific interventions will be offered in the form of 
short-term, focused sessions.  

Relapse management - for many service users accessing this element of the service 
managing lapses and relapses will be an important skill.  
 
Pathways to other services  
• 
The  service  will  ensure  excellent  links  to  mutual  aid  organisations  including  NA,  AA 
and SMART Recovery are in place and easily accessible for all service users 
• 
Emergency, temporary and longer term accommodation options will be explored. We 
will make advice & information available on access to local Housing Association and private 
sector housing. 
• 
Welfare Benefits advice and information will  be available to help service users claim 
benefits they are eligible for.  Staff will assist with form filling and signposting to services. 
• 
Service users without a current GP practice registration or those who do not routinely 
access  their  GP  will  be  encouraged  to  take  up  general  medical  services  via  primary  care.  
We will advocate and support service users to do this. 
• 
Mental  Health  services.    The  Adult  Drug  Treatment  service  will  liaise  with  the  Home 
Treatment  Team  to  ensure  that  service  users  with  mental  health  issues  access  treatment 
and receive the correct level of care co-ordination. 
• 
Education,  Training  and  Employment  (ETE)  pathways  will  be  open  to  all  service 
users.  Service staff will provide a level of ETE advice and information and we will broker in 
support from ETE agencies in the form of outreach clinics at all service sites. 
•  Referral  and  signposting  to  other  services  including  Genito-Urinary  Medicine  clinics, 
Maternity services and Smoking Cessation advice.  
 
Family & Carer Support 
Inclusions understands the impact that drug misuse can have families and carers including 
the  risk  of  domestic  violence,  accidents  in  the  home,  relationship  problems,  theft,  housing 
and employment problems, lack of money for basic essentials, damage to unborn children, 
hospitalisation, imprisonment or death. The service will identify the needs and risks faced by 
families  and  carers  affected  and  ensure  that  they  receive  appropriate  services.  Wherever 
family  and  carers  will  be  involved  in  engaging  the  drug  user  into  treatment  and  in  the 
Recovery  Plan.    Service  users  will  be  encouraged  to  involve  their  families  and  significant 
others  in  their  care  in  order  to  achieve  successful  treatment  outcomes,  except  in  cases 
where  this  is  not  in  the  interest  of  the  service  user  and  may  hinder  their  treatment.  The 
service user is asked at assessment for written consent that family members or partners can 
be involved treatment and they are named on the confidentiality consent agreement. 
 
Complimentary Therapies 
Inclusion  will  support  the  provision  of  complimentary  therapies  limited  to  Aromatherapy, 
massage, Reflexology and Auricular Acupuncture.  The use of detox and sleep teas will also 
be considered. 
 


FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, b) Harm Reduction, b.i) Needle Exchange 
 
Method 
Spec 
Method Statement 
Statement 
Reference 
Reference 
1. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
Please demonstrate how the service intends to support and retain 
 
the service 
current pharmacies, all associated costs and how it intends to 
Weighting 5 
develop growth in this area. 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
2000 words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion supports the maintenance and further development of pharmacy needle exchange 
across Cambridgeshire and believes the basis of doing this is will be to focus our attention 
on  three  key  themes;  support  for  pharmacies,  reasonable  payments  and  the  provision  of 
training. 
 
Pharmacy Support 
• 
Our  partnership  work  with  community  pharmacies  will  stress  the  valuable  role  they 
play in the county’s overall approach to substance misuse.  Our aim here is to underline the 
important  role  pharmacies  can  play  in  the  aims  and  objectives  of  community  safety  and 
health promotion.   
• 
Pharmacies are businesses and all good businesses want to expand their customer 
base and meet their customer’s needs.  For Inclusion, drug users should be able to access 
pharmacy provision to meet their needs as much as any other group and in this sense we 
have a shared goal – to increase the numbers of people accessing needle exchange and to 
improve  the  quality  of  the  service  they  provide.    Our  support  for  pharmacies  will  facilitate 
this. 
• 
Each  community  pharmacy  taking  part  in  the  needle  exchange  scheme  will  be 
supplied  by  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  with  regular  re-stocks  of  agreed  injecting 
equipment.    The  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  will  also  organise  the  delivery  of  needle 
exchange clinical waste and sharps at regular intervals to be agreed with each pharmacy.  
Re-stocking  procedures  will  be  simple  and  straight  forward  using  weekly  faxed  forms 
detailing delivery requirements. 
• 
Each community pharmacy will be supplied with an agreed proforma for recording all 
needle  exchange transactions.   This  will  include basic  details  relating  to  individual  service 
users  and  will  also  be  used  as  a  record  for  making  payments  to  each  pharmacy  for  the 
exchanges they have carried out.  Where possible, we will encourage pharmacies to record 
this information direct onto a bespoke database they the service will make available. 
• 
We  will  encourage  community  pharmacies  to  be  represented  at  relevant 
Cambridgeshire DAAT forums, meetings and seminars to ensure they play a full part in the 
local strategy and action plans in relation to drug misuse. 
• 
We  will  help  local  pharmacies  plan  their  out-of-hours  opening  rota  by  supplying 
information relating to the opening times of the specialist service. 
• 
A  designated member  of  the  Adult  Drug Treatment Service  staff team  will  regularly 
visit  all  community  pharmacies  engage  in  the  needle  exchange  scheme  to  ensure 
everything  is  operating  well  in  terms  of  equipment  deliveries  and  clinical  waste  collection.  
This will also be an opportunity to discuss any issues with service users, take service user 
feedback and provide ad-hoc advice, information and training to pharmacy staff. 
 


FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
All community pharmacies will be able to on the spot advice and information by using 
the  SPOC  contact  telephone  number  and  the  name  of  a  designated  staff  contact  for  any 
enquiries they may have.  
• 
We will work with pharmacies to assist them to drive up the levels of safe return of 
injecting  equipment.    They  will  be  encouraged  to  urge  all  service  users  to  return  all  the 
equipment supplied on a regular basis using the sharps bins provided. 
• 
The service will supply appropriate harm reduction and health promotion materials to 
all  community  pharmacies  for  distribution  with  injecting  equipment.    Stocks  will  be 
replenished regularly by service staff. 
• 
We will support pharmacy staff to encourage and record service user feedback about 
needle  exchange  interventions  and unmet needs  to  continuously  improve  the  services  we 
can offer across the county. 
• 
We  will  act  as  a  central  ‘library’  of  good  needle  exchange  practice  and  ensure  that 
this  information  is  cascaded  to  all  pharmacies  via  briefings,  ad-hoc  verbal  updates  and 
occasional seminars for pharmacy-based staff. 
• 
Inclusion  is  aware  that  not  all  pharmacy  staff  will  have  a  positive  attitude  towards 
work  with  service  users  accessing  needle  exchange.   In  this  case, we  will  work  with  such 
staff  to  raise  awareness,  answer  any  questions  they  may  have,  underline  the  benefits  of 
needle exchange and drug treatment in an effort to bring them on-board. 
• 
The service will encourage responsible and pro-social behaviours amongst our client 
group as they go about accessing community pharmacy provision.  If a service user present 
a persistent problem in the way they behave this will be address in key work sessions at the 
specialist service. 
 
Pharmacy Payments 
• 
Community pharmacies will not be charged for the supply of injecting equipment or 
the collection of clinical waste generated by the needle exchange scheme.  These costs will 
be  born  centrally  by  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  and  have  been  included  in  the 
annual service budget. 
• 
Community  pharmacies  will  not  be  charged  for  the  supply  of  harm  reduction 
marketing  materials.    These  materials  will  be  supplied  from  stocks  held  centrally  by  the 
Adult Drug Treatment Service and have been included in the annual service budget. 
• 
Inclusion  wil  analyse  all  existing  payment  agreements  with  community  pharmacies 
across Cambridgeshire.  We will negotiate the best prices possible for exchanges but would 
expect to pay each pharmacy an annual retainer somewhere in the region of £xxx and the 
sum of £x.xx for each exchange that is provided.  We will expect each pharmacy to invoice 
the service on a monthly basis and will ensure payment is made in full with 30 days. 
 
Pharmacy Training 
• 
It is possible that community pharmacies may come into contact with some groups of 
drug users seeking needle exchange facilitates that have been under-represented in many 
drug services.  These groups include women and steroid users as well as harder to reach 
groups such as the homeless.  With this in mind, we will ensure that community pharmacies 
carry harm reduction materials relevant to these groups and are strongly encourage to link 
these  types  of  users  in  specialist  services  where  they  can  access  a  broader  range  of 
services.  The training will highlight the risks that these and other groups face in relation to 
their drug and injecting in particular and emphasise the interventions that can be provided. 
• 
The service will work with community pharmacy staff to ensure they understand the 
need  for  confidentiality  in  respect  of  needle  exchange.    We  understand  that  in  busy 
 
10 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
pharmacies that lack space, absolute privacy is sometime difficult to guarantee. 
• 
We will offer training to all pharmacy staff in the safe handling, storage and disposal 
of all injecting equipment. 
 
Developing Pharmacy Needle Exchange 
 
It  is  Inclusion’s  intention  to  audit  the  current  geographical  spread  and  range  of  pharmacy 
needle exchange in Cambridgeshire during the early stages of the contract.  We will consult 
with commissioners, service users and other partners to a pharmacy development strategy 
over the next three years.  The precise nature of the strategy will emerge through analysis 
and consultation but the broad thrust is likely to include; 
• 
Ensuring  that  all  Cambridgeshire  residents  have  access  to  some  form  of  needle 
exchange service within 10 miles of their home. 
• 
In consultation with commissioners, we will consider whether to approach particular 
pharmacies  about  developing  level  2  needle  exchange  services.    This  would  involve  the 
provision of an enhance d service including access to BBV vaccination and would attract an 
additional payment for the pharmacies involved 
• 
Where  a  community  pharmacy  has  the  available  space  but  is  unable  to  provide 
enhanced  services  itself,  Inclusion  will  negotiate  use  of  that  space  to  deliver  Hepatitis  B 
vaccinations,  wound management  clinics  and  advice  and  information  about  safer  injecting 
techniques from one of trained staff. 
• 
We  wil  work  with  all  community  pharmacies  to  expand  the  range  of  injecting 
equipment available unmet needs become apparent.  Inclusion intends to encourage more 
local  injecting  steroid  users  to  access  services  and  this  will  necessitate  pharmacies 
adapting  the  syringes  and  needles  they  offer.    We  will  agree  an  expanded  range  of 
equipment as required with each pharmacy. 
 
2. Section 2.0 
Location of 
Please demonstrate and detail how this service will be delivered in 
Sub headings 
the service 
house, in pharmacies and beyond. 
a – b 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
 
The aims of all Inclusion’s needle exchange provision across Cambridgeshire will reflect the 
service  specification, National Treatment  Agency  (NTA)  guidance and  NICE  Public  Health 
guidance.  Inclusion will deliver needle exchange services that:: 

Reduce  BBV  rates  among  the  local  population  and  encourages  injectors  not 
engaged with services to do so. 

Offers a service that injectors feel comfortable accessing. 

Works with IV users to minimise harm until such time as they can move away from 
injecting. 

Offers a full range of injecting equipment so that the service is relevant to local need  

Promotes  safe  disposal  and  return  of  injecting  equipment  and  discourages 
dangerous discarding 

Proactively delivers harm reduction messages including safer injecting and reduces 
incidences of overdose and high risk poly-drug use 
 
11 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Provides excellent health care interventions for injectors 

Seeks  to  attract  and  retain  IV  users  in  services  to  promote  harm  reduction  and 
encourage service users into structured treatment. 
 
We will meet these aims by delivering needle exchange services in the following ways: 
 
In-House Needle Exchange Provision 
Service users will be able to access in house needle exchange across the 5 fixed service 
sites between 9am and 5pm Monday to Friday, with late opening on at least one evening.  
Services will also be able to facilitate exchanges on Saturday mornings between 9am and 
1pm.    Each  needle  exchange  facility  will  be  covered  by  a  designated,  trained  member  of 
staff  on  a  rota  basis,  supported  by  a  trained  volunteer.    All  service  users  will  be  asked  to 
register  their  basic  details  but  as  a  minimum  needle  exchanges  will  be  recorded  by  each 
service user having a unique identifier made up of their initials and date of birth.  The ‘level 
3’  (as  per  NICE  Guidelines)  needle  exchange  service  that  will  be  made  available  to  all 
service users at fixed sites will include: 
• 
Access to a full range of injecting and associated equipment detail in the answer to 
question 3 below. 
• 
The provision of sharps bins and advice on how to dispose of needles and syringes 
safely. 
• 
Up to date harm reduction advice and information safer injecting practices 
• 
Regular,  on-site  nurse-led  clinics  where  injection-sites  can  be  assesses  and 
infections treated 
• 
Advice and information on overdose prevention and alternatives to injecting 
• 
Access to pre and post test counselling for Hepatitis A, B and C and HIV 
• 
Hepatitis A and B vaccination 
• 
Advice and information about sexual health and the provision of condoms 
• 
Pathways into structured treatment 

Needle  exchange  facilities  will  be  maintained  and  available  via  the  Cambridge  Access 
Surgery clinics at set times to be agreed during contract implementation. 
 
 
Community Pharmacy Needle Exchange Provision 
Service  users  accessing  community  pharmacies  can  do  so  during  their  normal  publicised 
opening hours and late openings that are available on a rota basis.  Service users will  be 
able to access a range of injecting equipment and return used items.  Pharmacy staff wil be 
trained to give basic harm reduction advice and information and signpost service users to 
specialist services.  
 
As  described  above,  Inclusion  will,  in  consultation  with  commissioners  and  service  users, 
review the current geographical spread of community pharmacies offering needle exchange 
but  as  a  minimum,  we  intend  to  continue  to  support  needle  exchange  services  at  the 
following community pharmacies (detailed on the Cambridgeshire DAAT website): 
 
Cambridge City 
Superdrug, 38 Fitzroy Street, Cambridge, CB1 1EW 
Boots, Unit 5-6, Grafton Centre, Cambridge, CB1 1PS 
Petersfield, 56 Mill Road, Cambridge, CB1 2AS 
 
12 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Kumar, 2 Adkins Corner, Cambridge CB1 3RU 
Boots, 237 Cherry Hinton Road, Cambridge, CB1 7DA 
Kumar, 15 Rectory Terrace, Cherry Hinton, CB1 9HU 
Lloyds, 30 Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1QZ 
Superdrug, 59 Sidney Street, Cambridge, CB2 3HX 
Rowlands, 189 Histon Road, Cambridge, CB4 3HL 
Boots, Unit 3, Retail Park, Newmarket Road, Cambridge, CB5 8WR 
 
East Cambridge 
Lloyds, 22 Main Street, Littleport, CB6 1PJ       
Lloyds, 19 High Street, Ely, CB7 4LQ 
Boots, 6-8 Market Street, Ely, CB7 4PB 
Lloyds, 31 High Street, Soham, CB7 5HA 
 
Fenland 
Boots, Unit 15, The Horsefair, Wisbech,PE13 1AR 
R.Fairbrother,5 Church Terrace, Wisbech,PE13 1BJ 
National co-op, 25 St Augustine’s Road, Wisbech, PE13 3AD 
Boots, 8 De-Havilland Road, Wisbech, PE13 3AN 
Boots, 6 Kirkgate Street, Walsoken, Wisbech, PE13 3QR 
Boots, Marylebone Road, March,PE15 8BG 
Boots, 17-19 Broad Street, March, PE15 8TP 
Lloyds, 22-24 High Street, Chatteris, PE16 6BG 
Huntingdonshire 
Boots, 33 High Street, St Neot’s, PE19 1BW 
Tesco, Barford Road, St Neot’s, PE19 2SA 
Lloyds, 20 Great Whyte, Ramsey, PE26 1HA 
Lloyds, Unit 2,Stocking Fenn Road, Ramsey, PE26 1SA 
Lloyds, 5 The Pavement Market Hill, St Ives, PE27 5AD 
Boots, 5-6 Sheep Market, St Ives, PE27 5AH 
J.G.Clifford, 3 The Causeway, Godmanchester, PE29 2HA 
Boots, 42 High Street, Huntingdon, PE29 3AQ 
Lloyds, 72A Ermine Street, Huntingdon, PE29 3EZ 
Boots, 8-10 High Causeway, Whittlesey PE7 1AE 
 
Other Needle Exchange Initiatives 
Inclusion will explore the opportunities for outreach and peer needle exchange.  Outreach 
needle  exchange  can  be  provided  using  portable  supplies  distributed  by  trained  staff  and 
volunteers for example in rural areas. Outreach needle exchange has also been shown to 
be  effective  during  street-level  interventions  with  sex  workers.      Peer  needle  exchange 
services  can  also  be  effective  –  service  users  are  trained  din  needle  exchange  and  then 
through their social networks approach other users and facilitate exchanges & returns. 
 
 
 
13 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
3. Section 3.0 
Objectives 
Please detail what the service intends to offer in terms of 
Sub heading 
of the 
paraphernalia for needle exchange.  
3.2 a – j 
service 
 
Weighting 4 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words  
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  is  an  experienced  provider  of  Needle  Exchange  services  through  specialist 
services  and  the  co-ordination  of  community  pharmacy  exchange  programmes.    The 
principles underpinning our delivery of needle exchange include: 
•  Syringes  larger  than  1ml  or  2ml  should  be  supplied  with  specific  reasons  such  as 
steroid use or where ampoules are being prescribed for injection 
•  Service  users  should  receive  sufficient  equipment  in order  to  ensure  that  they  do  not  
need to share or re-use equipment 
•  Service  users  supplying  equipment  to  others  i.e.  secondary  exchange  should  be 
encouraged and given more equipment to do this.  Staff should also encourage such 
service users to bring the other injectors into the agency.  Time should be spent with 
the Needle Exchange staff to discuss relevant harm reduction information that can be 
cascaded to other injectors they are in contact with.   
 
The range of paraphernalia available will include: 

A range of syringes including 2ml and 5ml 

A range of needles including 0.5ml, 1.0ml, ‘orange’, ‘green’ and ‘blue’ 

Sterets 

A range of sharps bins 

Tourniquets 

Citric acid 

Spoons 

Water ampoules 

Condoms 
 
In addition to injecting equipment, all service users accessing Needle Exchange will receive 
either verbal or written information on: 

Safer injecting techniques 

Their drug of choice; 

The transmission of Blood Borne Viruses 

Information on Hepatitis A/B vaccinations 

Sexual health advice & information 

Overdose prevention  

Safe storage and disposal of injecting equipment 

Referral into structured treatment; 

Other local services 
 
 
 
14 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
4. Section 3.0 
Objectives 
Please evidence the harm reduction messages the service wishes 
Sub heading 
of the 
to promote and the method(s) by which these will be promoted. 
3.2 a – j 
service 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  approach  to  delivering  harm  reduction  messages  is  based  on  the  following 
principles: 
 
• 
People  use  drugs  for  different  reasons  and  interventions  designed  to  reduce  harm 
and  move  an  individual  away  from  drug  use  must  take  into  account  an  element  of  cost-
benefit consideration individuals may make when considering a change in behaviour.   
• 
When  our  services  engage  a  drug  user,  it  should  be  our  aim  to  understand  and 
prioritise  their  needs.    For  some,  very  modest  behaviour  change  may  be  the  first  step 
towards more significant, longer terms changes but even modest changes are of value in of 
themselves.    Consequently  our  goal  setting  must  be  realistic  as  we  do  not  wish  to  set 
people up to fail.  At the same time we expect our services to be ambitious for our service 
users  and  work  with  them  towards  recovery  at  a  sustainable  pace  wherever  this  is  a 
possibility. 
• 
We aim to deliver respectful services at all times.  Whilst we exist to help people to 
change  problematic  behaviour  and  live  more  productive,  happier  lives  we  will  respect  all 
service users human rights and ensure service users experience our unconditional positive 
regard.    The  decision  to  make  changes  involving  drug  use  wil  not  arise  in  a  user  from 
condemning their drug use per se.  
• 
We want to deliver recovery-orientated drug services with abstinence as a goal that 
many  users  can  aspire  to  and  achieve.    However,  we  do  recognise  that  for  some, 
abstinence  may  not  be  realistic  at  a  particular  moment  in  time,  in  which  case  we  will 
continue to work with the individual as supportively as possible. 
• 
We  are  interested  in  identifying  and  delivering  interventions  that  work  rather  than 
endlessly  debating  the  tensions  between  harm  reduction  and  recovery  lobbyists.    For 
Inclusion,  harm  reduction  is  the  foundation  of  everything  we  do  and  this  is  no  way 
comprises our ability to help as many service users strive for abstinence as possible.   
 
With  these  principles  informing  our  approach,  Inclusion  recognises  and  will  effectively 
promote  harm  reduction  messages  based  upon  a  hierarchy  of  goals  for  drug  misuser’s, 
namely: 

Stopping  the  sharing  of  injecting  equipment  –  we  will  highlight  the  inherent  risks  of 
sharing  and  make  every  effort  to  make  it  unnecessary  for  anyone  to  have  to  share 
equipment. 

Stopping  the  use  of  harmful  injecting  sites  –  we  will  explain  the  health  risks  to  IV 
users, provide health-related interventions such as wound care and educate injectors about 
alternatives 

Moving  from  injecting  to  smoking  –  we  will  educate  users  about  the  benefits  of 
stopping injecting and discuss alternatives such as smoking as a short term gain.  We are 
aware  of  the  health  risks  associated  with  smoking  and  will  work  with  users  to  stop  this 
method of use also.  We wil also offer interventions around route transition to prevent the 
move to injecting. 
 
15 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Decreasing  drug  misuse  –  our  interventions  such  as  stabilisation  on  prescribed 
medication,  detoxification  and  psycho-social  interventions  will  be  designed  to  encourage 
service users to reduce their drug use safely and sustainably.  We will work with stimulant 
users to reduce their drug use aimed to counteract the crash from stimulant use 

Abstinence – we will promote the possibility of a drug free life with our service users 
and offer interventions that support individuals to stop their drug use altogether. 
 
We will deliver these harm reduction messages in a variety of ways: 
• 
All  staff  and  volunteers  will  be  trained  in  the  delivery  of  harm  reduction  messages 
and be expected to deliver these at every appropriate opportunity 
• 
All  services  will  display  and  provide  access  to  a  wide  range  of  harm  reduction 
materials including leaflets, posters, information booklets, drug cards and service marketing 
literature. 
• 
We will make other health promotion advice and information available through nurse-
led clinics and written materials  
• 
The  service  will  contribute  to  county  wide  awareness  campaigns  around  harm 
reduction  through  media  involvement,  stalls  at  roadshows  and  support  for  DAAT  led 
initiatives 
• 
Our  Recovery  Mentor  programme  will  include  elements  covering  harm  reduction 
messages  and  Recovery  Mentors  will  be  supported  to  deliver  appropriate  advice  and 
information. 
• 
The  service  will  hold  open  sessions  for  families,  carers  and  other  professionals  & 
agencies where harm reduction messages will be promoted. 
• 
The  service  website  will  carry  harm  reduction  messages  and  links  to  other  web-
based harm reduction resources. 
 
 
5. Section 3.0 
Objectives 
Please demonstrate how the service will engage with service users 
Sub heading 
of the 
in harm reduction interventions such as checking of wound sites. 
3.2 a – j 
service 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion’s work with injecting drug users within our other community and custodial services 
has  highlighted  a  range  of  injecting  related  health  related  issues  that  commonly  occur.  
These include: 

Overdose  as  a  result  of  excessive  amounts  of  a  drug  being  used,  lack  of  user 
tolerance to the drug being used and combining drugs during speed balling for example 

Short term and long term mental health problems associated with drug use 

Damage to the user due to adulterants or contaminants in drug supplies 

Poor injecting practice leading to wounds, bacterial infections and septicaemia 

The  spread  of  Blood  Borne  Viruses  due  to  the  sharing  of  equipment  including 
Hepatitis A, B and C and HIV 

Poor  nutrition  and  unsuitable  accommodation  impacting  upon  a  person’s  immune 
system leading them more susceptible to infections 
 
16 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Sexually acquired infections 
To  deal  with  these  type  of  health  concerns,  the  service  will  run  regular  nurse-led  health 
clinics at each service site offering the following interventions: 
 
• 
All health clinics will re-enforce harm reduction messages via discussion with service 
users and the provision of harm reduction and health promotion leaflets and posters 
• 
Our  approach  to  health  clinics  will  be  to  create  a  ‘one  stop  shop’  format  where 
service users can address as many of their health needs at once. 
• 
Wound-care assessment and basic wound dressing  
• 
Testing for HIV and Hepatitis, including pre and post test counselling and referral to 
specialist services as appropriate 
• 
Hepatitis B Vaccination for all service users regardless of test results 
• 
Doppler  leg  assessments  will  be  under  taken  for  service  users  with  a  history  of  IV 
drug  use  and  Deep  Vein  Thrombosis  and  for  those  service  users  who  are  currently  groin 
injecting 
• 
Any  pregnant  users  will  be  immediately  referred  to  out  Mother  &  Baby  service  and 
linked in with maternity services at Addenbrookes and Hitchingbrooke hospitals. 
• 
The service will also work  with both hospitals to create pathways  into Vascular and 
Tissue Viability services for ongoing care and treatment. 
• 
We  will  offer  nurse  prescribing  to  include  broad spectrum  antibiotics  for  infected 
wounds. This can also be done at pharmacy BBV/wound clinics but only where they have 
an independent pharmacist prescriber.  
• 
On-site Chlamydia testing, condom provision and contraception advice & information 
• 
Nutritional advice  
 
 

6.Section 3.0 
Objectives 
Please demonstrate how the service will ensure the return rates of 
Sub heading 
of the 
exchange are high across the service including pharmacies. 
3.2 e 
service 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1500 words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  understands  the  importance  of  achieving  and  maintaining  high  rates  of  return  of 
injecting equipment.  High rates of return will contribute to the overall objectives of needle 
exchange  services  and  increase  public  confidence  by  helping  to  minimise  the  dangerous 
discarding  of  injecting  equipment  as  described  below.    The  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug 
Treatment  Service  will  achieve  and  maintain  high  rates  of  return  with  the  following 
initiatives: 
• 
All  staff  and  volunteers  operating  needle  exchange  services  will  be  expected  to 
undertake  or  regularly  refresh  training  in  harm  reduction,  safer  injecting  and  exchange 
operation  to  ensure  the  service  is  meeting  service  user’s  needs  and  maximising 
engagement.    We  will  make  this  training  available  to  staff  working  in  community 
pharmacies.    This  training  will  be  adaptable  to  ensure  that  pharmacy  staff  are  able  to 
attend. 
• 
All  needle  exchange  staff  will  undergo  initial  or  refresher  training  in  Motivational 
Interviewing  techniques  as  a  starting  point for  engaging  service  users  in  discussion  about 
 
17 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
injecting  equipment  return  rates.    We  will  adopt  a  contingency  management  approach  by 
‘incentivising’ users to return injecting equipment safely through positive reinforcement and 
in some cases rewarding service users with vouchers. 
• 
We will work with commissioners, service users and other stakeholders to ensure a 
‘mixed economy’ of needle exchange facilitates continues to be available.  In essence this 
will mean maintaining the present spread of exchange capability across the county at drug 
service  sites  and  community  pharmacies.  The  geographical  spread  of  exchange  services 
should  be  complimented  by  co-operation  around  opening  times  to  ensure  coverage  is 
maximised. 
• 
We will ensure that all needle exchange services across Cambridgeshire stock a full 
range  of  recognised  injecting  equipment  as  described  in  the  answer  to  question  3  above.  
This  will  maximise  the  number  of  service  users  engaging  with  the  service  because  the 
range of equipment on offer meets local needs, which in turn, offers the service the chance 
to engage with more users and exploit their social networks to encourage others to return 
injecting equipment safely.  With this in mind we will consult regularly around the range of 
injecting equipment available across the county. 
• 
 Each  occasion  that  a  service  user  accesses  a  needle  exchange  facility  is  an 
opportunity  to  discuss  injecting  equipment  return  rates.    All  staff  and  volunteers  will  be 
trained  and  encouraged  to  raise  the  issue  of  return  rates  during  all  interventions  and 
wherever  possible,  these  discussions  will  take  place  in  a  confidentiality  way  to  increase 
their  impact.    Our  experience  in  other  services  tells  us  that  regularly  repeating  message 
relating to the safe return of injecting equipment does bear fruit – service users will respond 
to such reinforcement.  Indeed, it is possible to exceed a 100% return rate by encouraging 
service users to return needles from their social networks. 
• 
To  ensure  the  safety  of  service  users  and  to  increase  return  rates,  we  will  provide 
impromptu advice relating to the safe handling of injecting equipment.  This advice will be 
reinforced by written information in our service posters and leaflets. 
• 
Needle  exchange  stocks  will  be  monitored  and  replenished  on  a  timely  basis  to 
ensure  the  needs  of  service  users  are  which  in  turn  will  help  to  keep  injecting  drug  users 
engaged. 
• 
All  service  users  will  be  asked  to  speak  with  any  using  friends,  acquaintances  or 
family  members  to  encourage  those  not  engaging  with  needle  exchange  to  do  so.    We 
know that ‘word of mouth’ marketing is very powerful. 
• 
Return  rates  will  be  a  regular  theme  of  supervision  for  staff  working  in  the  needle 
exchanges.    If  services  have  low  rates  of  return  this  will  be  analysed  through  supervision 
and team meetings with action plans put in place to increase return rates.  Similarly, when 
examples  of  good  practice  are  seen,  these  will  be  cascaded  across  the  Cambridgeshire 
service. 
• 
The  service  will  establish  a  needle  exchange  database  accessible  at  all  service 
locations,  capable  of  recording  basic  client  details  including  a  unique  identifier  and  the 
number  and  type  of  equipment  distributed.    The  database  will  also  be  able  to  record  the 
number  and  type  of  equipment  returned  allowing  the  service  to  track  individual  service 
users  and  their  return  rates  as  well  as  producing  monitoring  reports  for  service  managers 
and commissioners. 
• 
The  needle  exchange  database  will  be  capable  of  recording  exchange  data 
generated by external sites including all of Cambridgeshire’s community pharmacies taking 
part  in  the  scheme.    We  will  explore  the  potential  for  databases  to  be  updated  on-site  by 
pharmacy staff and where this is not possible, a manual updating system will be introduced.  
Any  outreach  or  peer-led  needle  exchange  activity  will  be  manually  recorded  and  entered 
 
18 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
on the database as soon as practicable. 
• 
All service users accessing needle exchange services will be given a discreet identity 
card  to  allow  staff  to  retrieve  records  and  update  the  needle  exchange  database 
accordingly. 
• 
All  staff  and  volunteers  operating  in  needle  exchanges  will  be  given  training  in 
database  management.    This  will  include  community  pharmacy  staff  where  on-site 
database updating is possible. 
 
7. Section 3.0 
Objectives 
Please demonstrate how the service will ensure that local 
Sub heading 
of the 
communities will not be affected by the dangerous discarding of 
3.2 h 
service 
injecting equipment. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words  
Contractors response: 
Inclusion will work diligently across Cambridgeshire to ensure that incidences of discarded 
injecting equipment are minimised.  This will be achieved by: 
• 
Ensuring that all staff, volunteers and service users are fully aware that the starting 
point  for  minimising  the  dangerous  discarding  of  injecting  equipment  is  to  maximise 
equipment  needle  exchange  return  rates  across  the  county.    All  our  interventions  with 
service  users  accessing  needle  exchange  will  stress  the  need  for  personal  responsibility 
and  the  safe  return  of  all  injecting  equipment.    The  role  of  Recovery  Mentors  will  be 
important  in  this  respect  as  they  can  reinforce  safe  disposal  messages  from  a  peer 
perspective.    Our  complete  approach  to  maximising  return  rates  is  detailed  above  but  in 
essence  we  will  aim  for  very  high  percentage  return  rates  to  minimise  any  community 
disruption or concern. 
• 
Inclusion  will  seek  to  engage  the  public  across  Cambridgeshire  by  providing 
information  about  the aims  and  objectives  of  needle  exchange.    Its  is  our  experience  that 
when  drug  services  take  public  engagement  seriously,  provide  relevant  information  and 
engage  in  real  consultation,  then  the  public  can  be  supportive  and  understanding  can 
develop.  We believe that previously, drug treatment services have often not engaged with 
the  public,  perhaps  for  understandable  reasons,  but  that  this  has  had  the  effect  of 
‘mystifying’  drug  treatment,  breeding  misinformation  and  mistrust.    By  engaging  with  the 
public,  we  can  spread  the  message  about  the  measures  we  take  to  minimise  dangerous 
discarding of injecting equipment and provide information to the public about what to do if 
they do see discarded equipment. 
• 
Our  community  pharmacy  needle  exchange  services  will  provide  countywide 
opportunities to return injecting equipment.  We will ensure that all community pharmacies 
have  sufficient  equipment  supplies  and  collections  of  clinical  waste  to  facilitate  as  many 
safe returns as possible. 
• 
We  will  make  information  available  in  all  the  sites  we  operate  relating  to  what  the 
public should do if they find discarded injecting equipment.  This will include advice not to 
touch  the  equipment  without  proper  safety  precautions  and  relevant  training.    It  will  also 
include information about how to contact the nearest district environment team managed by 
the County Council to arrange collection. 
• 
The  service  will  liaise  closely  with  the  Community  Safety  Partnership’s  Anti-Social 
Behaviour team to co-ordinate messages relating to the need for high exchange rates and a 
 
19 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
zero  tolerance  policy  towards  dangerous  discarding.    During  the  implementation  phase 
following contract award we will consult with local Police commanders to make them aware 
of the range of injecting equipment we intend to make available and the measures we will 
take to minimize dangerous discarding. 
• 
The  Needle  Exchange  service  will  liaise  with  the  district  environmental  teams  in 
Cambridge,  South  Cambridge,  East  Cambridge,  Fenland  and  Huntingdonshire  to  share 
information.    From  this  we  can  become  aware  of  any  discarding  hotspots  that  arise  and 
work with service users to raise awareness and spread messages about equipment returns. 
We will ask our staff to take part in joint clean up initiatives with district environmental teams 
to increase public confidence and build community good will. 
• 
Inclusion  will  ensure  that  information  posters,  leaflets  and  pamphlets  are  widely 
available  across  Cambridgeshire  in  public  and  community  venues  with  details  of  needle 
exchange services and contact details for district environment teams. 
• 
We  recognise  that  some  members  of  the  public  may  take  it  upon  themselves  to 
remove discarded injecting equipment despite the advice not to do this.  With this in mind 
our marketing materials and general advice via the SPOC contact line will reflect basic good 
practice in relation to safe disposal of equipment namely; 

Waste should be handled very carefully  

Protective gloves and suitable equipment such as brushes should be used. 

Re-sheathing needles is not recommended. 

Sharps boxes should be used if to hand and not over filled. 
• 
Our marketing materials will also carry advice and information relating to needle stick 
injuries and what steps to take including: 

Encourage bleeding by squeezing the wound gently.  

Do not suck the wound.  

Wash area with warm water and soap for several minutes.  

Visit the Accident and Emergency department of your local hospital immediately and 
get advice about any the injury and treatment including immunisation. 
 
8. Section 4.0 
Provision of 
Please demonstrate how the service will deal with the conflict 
Sub heading f 
the Service 
between needle exchange and concurrent specialist prescribing for 
 
some clients. 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1500 words 
Contractors response: 
As  an  organisation  experienced  in  the  delivery  of  both  needle  exchange  and  prescribing 
services, Inclusion is well placed to offer a working solution to this issue.  Our services have 
either  directly  delivered  or  supported  community  pharmacies  to  deliver  needle  exchange 
services at levels 1, 2 and 3 as suggested by NICE Public Health Guidance 18 ‘Needle and 
syringe programmes: providing people who inject drugs with injecting equipment’ and also 
deliver a full menu of prescribing interventions for dependent drug users. 
Our  community  services  have  developed  a  clear  policy  in  regards  to  the  sharing  of 
information in this area, the principles of which are as follows: 
• 
The primary purpose of needle exchange programmes is to promote harm reduction 
and reduce the spread of blood borne viruses. In order to maximise this, confidentiality is an 
important  element  in  ensuring  engagement.    However,  needle  exchange  is  also  an 
 
20 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
important  gateway  into  more  structured  treatment  and  recovery  services  and  it  is  our 
responsibility to promote those pathways. 
• 
To  ensure  that  the  harm  mininisation  and  ‘gateway’  objectives  of  needle  exchange 
are pursued, Inclusion’s approach is as follows:   
 
1.  Those not in receipt of prescribing services 
No case specific information will need to be passed on to other elements of the service or 
other agencies unless we are in receipt of information that is of a child safeguarding nature 
or information that constitutes a potential danger to others.  In such cases the service user 
will  be  informed  that  this  information  will  be  passed  onto  the  relevant  authorities,  except 
where  informing  them  may  potentially  increase  the  risk  to  self  or  others.    The  Adult  Drug 
Treatment  Service  will  operate  a  needle  exchange  database  to  record  basic  details  of 
service users accessing the service and this will be crossed referred to our HALO treatment 
records  to  trawl  for  service  users  who  are  being  prescribed  to,  whilst  using  the  needle 
exchange.  All needle exchange clients will be strongly encouraged to divulge that they are 
accessing prescribing services if they have not previously done so.   
 
2.  Those in receipt of prescribing services 
When we are aware that a service user is in receipt of prescribing services and is accessing 
needle exchange, information will be shared between the different elements of the service 
and  the  key  worker  will  be  informed.    All  service  users  will  be  made  aware  of  this  policy 
from their first engagement with the service.  Information regarding child safeguarding will 
be shared as above.   It is not uncommon, particularly in the early stages of treatment, for 
service  user  to  access  needle  exchange  whilst  stabilising  on  substitute  medication.  
However,  when  the  service  becomes  aware  of  needle  exchange  use  whilst  prescribing  is 
taking  place,  we  will  quickly  organise  a  three  way  meeting  between  the  needle  exchange 
worker, the prescribing key worker and the service user to consider appropriate next steps 
and a review of the recovery plan. 
 
Inclusion are well aware of the conflicts that have existed around the sharing of information 
in  relation  to  service  users  accessing  needle  exchange  particularly  where  concomitant 
prescribing  may  be  taking  place.    We  understand  that  the  history  of  needle  exchange 
provision is closely associated with the societal stigma attached to drug use and infectious 
diseases, most notably HIV/Aids and that historical confidentiality arrangements developed 
to  ensure  engagement  with  needle  exchange  was  not  affected  by  fears  of  information 
disclosure and opprobrium.  However we have arrived at the operational procedures outline 
above because; 
• 
We  believe  that  when  the  need  for  appropriate  information  sharing  is  explained  to 
service users, then this need not dissuade IV users from accessing needle exchange.  Our 
approach  is  to  ‘sell  the  benefits’  of  information  sharing  and  re-assure  service  users  that 
information exchange between needle exchange and prescribing services is not in place to 
punish  the  service  user.    Rather  information  is  exchanged  to  ensure  that  the  treatment 
package  is  safe  and  is  meeting  the  service  user’s  needs.    In  other  words,  if  someone  is 
‘using  on  top’  our  responsibility  is  to  explore  the  reasons  for  this  and  adjust  treatment  if 
necessary.  In some case this may mean an increase in prescribed medication alongside a 
revised package of psycho-social interventions. 
• 
Simultaneous  use  of  needle  exchange  and  prescribing  services  can  also,  in  some 
circumstances,  be  an  indicator  of  the  diversion  of  prescribed  medication.    Our  approach 
here  will  be  to  discuss  any  concerns  we  have  with  the  service  user  and  liaise  with  the 
prescribing key worker to establish control measures if necessary that may include further 
 
21 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
drug testing and supervised consumption. 
 
9. Section 4.0 
Provision of  Please demonstrate how the service will encourage service users to 
Sub heading 
the Service 
access specialist treatment services. 

 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion see harm reduction services and needle exchange in particular as having inherent 
value for their ability to promote service user safety & health and a reduction in the spread 
of  BBV’s.    However,  these  services  are  also  an  excellent  gateway  into  more  structured, 
specialist  treatment  services.    At  the  core  of  the  service’s  ability  to  encourage  users  into 
specialist  services  are  the  skills  of  practitioners.    In  order  to  maximise  engagement  and 
retention in services all staff must be able to: 

Work with clients in a confidential and non-judgmental manner. 

Communicate clearly and empathetically 

Deliver  a  range  of  harm  reduction  and  relapse  management  interventions  including 
facilitating needle exchanges and the provision of condoms 

Understand  the  importance  of  accurate  assessment  and  goal-orientated  recovery 
planning built upon the service users central involvement in these processes 

Understand  the  nature  and  seriousness  of  risks  facing  service  users  and 
professional and contribute to risk management plans and strategies 

Help users develop self-awareness, self-efficacy and self-confidence. 

Handle  effectively  discussions  around  risk  taking  behaviours  and  provide  advice  & 
information relating to BBV testing and vaccination. 

Recognise  that  service  users  often  have  complex  needs  that  one  single  agency 
cannot meet necessitating a partnership approach. 

Work with and contribute to the training of volunteers and Recovery Mentors 

Understand  and  be  able  to  explain  the  range  and  benefits  of  specialist  treatment 
available to service users. 

Maintain excellent service records and case files. 

Ensure regular consultation with each service user. 

Reflect on their own practice through supervision and appraisal, with the completion 
of training courses and academic learning as agreed in professional development planning. 
 
Our aim across Cambridgeshire will be to ensure that staff possess this full range of skills.  
Beyond this Inclusion will look to establish other initiatives to encourage service users into 
structured treatment: 
• 
Inclusion  will  promote  and  establish  a  vibrant  Recovery  Mentor  service  across  the 
county.    Our  approach  to  this  is  described  in  detail  in  the  overarching  service  delivery 
method statements.  Our view is that recovery is all the more realistic for individuals when 
they  can  see  visible  examples  of  how  other  people  have  changed  their  lives  –  recruiting 
Recovery Mentors to work in our services is the best way to do this.  Recovery Mentors will 
be encouraged to approach other service users and discuss their experiences of treatment 
in  an  effort  to  attract  more  people  into  structured  interventions.  The  involvement  of 
volunteers  who  have  graduated  through  the  Recovery  Mentor  programme  will  further  re-
enforce service user’s perception of the possibilities for their own recovery. 
 
22 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
During  the  implementation  phase  we  will  review  all  screening,  assessment  and 
referral processes to ensure that as few barriers to structured treatment exist.  For example, 
we will adopt a common assessment tool to minimise the number of time s a service user 
has  to  answer  the  same  questions and  to maximise  information sharing  between different 
elements of the service. 
• 
The speed with which we assess all service users will be important.  Our emphasis 
will be upon speedy referral and access to structured treatment whether that be substitute 
prescribing, detoxification or day programmes. 
• 
All  service  users  who  are  initially  assessed  will  have  their  information  entered  onto 
the HALO system to support care co-ordination and case management. 
• 
To  maximise  the  uptake  of  structured  treatment  the  service  must  also  minimise 
disengagement.  Each service user will have a re-engagement plan agreed in case they do 
drop out of service.  The re-engagement plan will include: 
-  Each  element  of  the  service  will  have  a  staff  member  whose  remit  will  include 
keeping  re  engagement  issues  on  the  team  agenda.  All  team  members  will  have 
responsibility for encouraging re engagement in relation to their own clients. 
-  At the point of initial assessment all service users will be asked if they are content to 
receive texts, letters or phone calls from their key worker either during their treatment or 
even after completion. 
-  If  a  disengaged  service  user  wishes  to  re-enter  treatment  he\she  will  be  given  a 
shortened assessment and each will be given a priority appointment to ensure that their 
motivation to re-engage does not wane.  
-  Protocols  will  be  agreed,  with  key  partner  agencies  to  include  rapid  response 
systems for referring ex-service users.  
-  We will also consult service users to circulate the message that disengaged service 
users  are  welcome  to  return  to  treatment  programmes  and  to  obtain  feedback  about 
aspects of the service which might not be meeting service user needs.  
• 
The service will deliver a range of ‘pre-treatment’ interventions, via 1:1 and groups, 
designed  to  break  down  some  of  the  barriers  to  taking  up  structured  treatment.    This  will 
cover: 
-  Expectations & fears of treatment 
-  What ‘recovery looks like’ 
-  The pro’s and con’s of treatment 
-  Goal setting 
-  Addressing ambivalence  
-  Engaging others in support – family and carers. 
• 
Our  Structured  Day  Programmes  that  will  be  available  across  the  county  of  are 
designed to be easily accessible to service users making the move into specialist treatment 
interventions.  The programmes are rolling and modular meaning that new referrals can join 
the induction phase of the programme at any point.  The programme will also allow service 
users to attend a small number of individual groups at the start of their structured treatment 
to allow for adjustment and orientation to be consolidated. 
 
 
23 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
10. Section 
Groups 
Please demonstrate how the service will respond to changes in drug 
5.0 
served 
using behaviour, e.g. steroid use. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1500 words  
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  understands  that  the  needs  of  populations  are  dynamic  and  that  individual  drug 
use  and  presenting  issues  can  differ  over  time  and  ward  by  ward.    We  will  adapt  to  the 
changing needs of communities across Cambridgeshire by; 
 
-  Utilising data from assessments, user consultations and partnership working to identify 
emerging trends in drug use and associated areas of need. 
-  Sharing information as widely as possible with partners and commissioners to identify 
areas of unmet need and potential service developments. 
-  Using  an  Action  Research  approach,  piloting  innovative  approaches  to  meeting 
changing needs including aspects relating to accessibility, treatment options, recovery 
planning, referral to other agencies and joint working. 
-  Ensure  that  services  continuously  adapt  and  improve  to  meet  the  needs  of  service 
users  rather  than  expect  service  users  to  fit  within  static,  inappropriate  interventions 
and strategies. 
-  Identifying new training courses and learning materials aimed at emerging drug trends 
and needs and ensure staff and volunteers have access to these 
-  Ensure  that  the  service  is  represented  as  widely  as  possible  at  industry  forums, 
seminars  and  conferences  so  that  topical  information  relating  to  changing  needs  is 
gathered and cascade to teams 
-  Provide  copies  of  industry  magazines,  briefing  papers  and  web-based  sources  of 
information so that all staff can stay abreast of developments in the field. 
 
Swindon Drug Services & Legal Highs 
 
An  excellent  example  of  Inclusion  responding  to  changes  in  drug  taking  behaviour  is  the 
very  recent  response  in  Swindon  to  the  use and  impact  of  'legal  highs'.  Our  staff  were 
noticing very different behaviours in some of our clients, in some cases very passive clients 
were  becoming  aggressive  and  even  violent.  Through  discussions  with  clients  and  by 
monitoring client self report we were able to identify the increased use of 'legal highs' as a 
common  factor.  We  obtained  the  names  of  the  drugs/substances  being  purchased  and 
researched the composition and effects of the substances, both in terms of the effect they 
were  designed  to  mimic  in  relation  to  drug  type  (i.e.  stimulants  etc.)  and  also  the 
behavioural and health effects on individuals. 
  
We  raised  the  concerns  with  the  Community  Safety  Partnership  (CSP)  and  local  other 
agencies and called for toxicology reports to establish inter drug reactions with prescribed 
medications.  We  alerted  the  Police  and  the  Coroner's  Office  through  the  CSP  and 
undertook 'mystery shopper' exercises to confirm outlets were selling legal highs, informing 
the CSP and Police of our findings. 
  
We  issued  a  joint  press  release  with  the  Police  which  was  followed  up  by  the  local  press 
which informed the public of the risks and dangers associated with these substances. We 
 
24 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
have produced and distributed information leaflets for pharmacists and local agencies which 
advises  them  of  the  names  and  descriptions  of  the  substances  known  to  be  available 
locally. The local MP followed up the press release and as a result our work was submitted 
via the Police to the Home Office Minister for Crime Prevention and Anti-Social Behaviour. 
An  email  from  Police  Inspector  Paul  Saunders  of  Swindon  Police  captures  the  excellent 
work our service in Swindon was involved in: 
  
“As you know, Robert Buckland MP raised the issue of legal highs, in 
particular Methoxetamine, with the Home Office due to the concerns that 
have been raised by all of us.  He has now received a reply from 
Baroness Browning, Home Office minister for Crime Prevention and ASB.  I 
only have a hard copy, but shall transcribe the most salient parts: 
 
She has confirmed that this substance is under investigation by the 
ACMD.  She commends us on recognising the threat posed by new psychoactive 
substances and praises the engagement work that we have undertaken, 
stating that our local contribution is helpful to inform the national 
response.  She also states that she will ensure that the ACMD make further contact 
with us to fully establish the local picture so that this can feed into 
the ACMD's recommendations. 
 
I see this as a real step forwards in terms of public safety and the 
protection of the vulnerable in society and would like to thank each of 
you for your valuable contribution to the process of investigating this 
substance.  As it stands we have agreed protocols with the legal outlets 
in Swindon and I have negotiated the withdrawal of powdered legal highs, 
including Methoxetamine, form these stores, and we are looking to target 
the more nefarious suppliers of these substances, though obviously our 
powers are limited in this area”. 
 
The expected outcome in this case is that the ACMD will place Methoxetamine on the 
banned list.  Our Swindon service is developing interventions to engage effectively with this 
group of service users. 
 
Increasing Steroid Use and Adapting Services Accordingly 
In  many  parts  of  the  UK  steroid  use  continues  to  increase  and  is  associated  with 
performance  improvement  in  relation  to  sport  and  bodybuilding,  as  well  as  with  some 
professionals  such  as  doormen  and  security  guards.  For  many  steroid  users  this  is  about 
body  enhancement  and  is  seen  very  much  as  a  positive  thing.    Steroid  users  do  not 
typically associate themselves with the label ‘drug user’.  Consequently this presents needle 
exchange  services  with  the  challenge  of  making  interventions  relevant  and  accessible  to 
this  group.    This  is  important  because  anyone  injecting  steroids  is  at  risk  of  infection  with 
BBV’s if injecting equipment is shared.  Poor injecting practice can also lead to significant 
health problems.   
 
To effectively engage steroid users across Cambridgeshire, the service will 
• 
Map the location of and assertively outreach all bodybuilding gyms to makes link with 
steroid  users  training  at  these  establishments.    The  essence  of  our  approach  will  be  to 
encourage  injecting  steroid  users  to  access  either  the  needle  exchanges  at  Adult  Drug 
Treatment Service sites, or more likely, via community pharmacies 
 
25 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
We will provide training around Steroid Use and Safer Injecting to both adult service 
and pharmacy based staff  
• 
We  will  provide  leaflets  and  targeted  information  to  pharmacies  and  local  gyms 
including posters advertising needle exchange facilities within gyms and fitness centres 
• 
We  wil  develop  a  specific  exchange  pack  for  Steroid  Use  not  containing  Citric  but 
with larger barrels and needles as well as larger sharps bin) 
• 
We will make all staff aware of training cycles and promote return of used equipment 
as users re-present at the end/start of each cycle 
 
11. Section 
Groups 
Please demonstrate how socially excluded groups will be able to 
5.0 
served 
access harm reduction services. 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
2000 words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion services seek to make harm reduction interventions available to excluded groups 
through  social  marketing  techniques.    Social  marketing  places  the  primary  focus  on  the 
service user - on learning what people want and need rather than trying to persuade them 
to  take  what  the  service  happens  to  be  offering.  The  process  takes  the  service  user  into 
account  by  constantly  examining  ways  to  improve  access  and  construct  partnerships  with 
other agencies and stakeholders.  Underpinning our social marketing strategy is recognition 
of the crucial role of research in designing and delivering respectful and effective services: 
Inclusion proposes three research foci: 
 
1.  To discover the perceptions of service users on the nature of their difficulties and what 
the  service  offers  to  assist  with  these  difficulties:  for  example  the  emphasis  disabled 
service  users  place  on  improving  their  housing  and  employment  opportunities,  in 
promoting recovery.  
2.  To  determine  the  activities  and  habits  of  potential  service  users,  as  well  as  their 
experience  and  satisfaction  with  the  delivery  system:  this  will  allow  the  service  to 
pinpoint effective locations, opening hours and potential partner agencies:  
3.  To  determine  the  best  ways  of  reaching  potential  service  users:  for  example  building 
links with other services to build access to excluded groups.  
 
Putting Social Marketing into Practice 
 
Opening  hours,  eligibility  criteria,  the  range  of  services  available  and  contact/referral 
information  will  be  advertised  through  our  project  marketing  literature,  information  posters 
and  via  inter-agency  presentations.  We  will  target  primary  client  groups  by  ensuring  that 
project  literature  is  printed  in  a  range  of  languages  appropriate  to  the  ethnic  make  up  of 
Cambridgeshire.  The  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  will  work  closely  with  other  providers, 
commissioners and partner agencies to disseminate written information outlining the scope 
of services to be offered.  
 
Information posters and programme literature will be strategically placed in public reception 
areas  such  as  GP  waiting  rooms,  Police  custody  cells,  Accident  &  Emergency  suites  and 
local agencies to ensure that as many service users as possible learn about the Adult Drug 
 
26 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Treatment  Service  and  how  to  access  it.  To  ensure  that  referral  agencies  have  a  clear 
understanding  of  the  aims,  objectives,  methodology  and  delivery  of  the  service,  Inclusion 
will  make  presentations  to  all  partner  organisations,  liaise  with  relevant  service  managers 
and arrange the attendance of key referral staff 
 
Inclusion also propose to utilise information technology to market the service including: 
 
-  using text reminders prior to service user appointments 
-  providing  knowledge  access  to  self-help  and  information  websites  that  service  users 
can 
        utilise to increase their awareness of alcohol issues and seek help from the correct 
        agency 
 
Women 
Nationally  women  tend  to  be  underrepresented  in  substance  misuse  services.  This  is 
attributed  to  factors  such  as  stigmatisation  experienced  by  women  users,  child  care 
responsibilities and concerns that they will come to the attention of Social Services plus the 
perception  that  services  are  heavily  orientated  towards  the  needs  of  men.    In  response, 
Inclusion  services  for  women  are  aimed,  through  social  marketing,  at  understanding  the 
different  experiences  of  women  and  to  put  in  place  staffing  structures,  materials  and 
interventions, which have a clear focus on female issues.  
 
In  our  experience  women  users  are  not  a  homogenous  group,  who  have  identical  needs 
simply because of their gender and drug use. Nor should women’s needs be defined solely 
in relation to pregnancy, childcare or ethnic background. Key elements of ensuring that we 
deliver a respectful service to women include: 
 
•  Taking into account the varying needs of women in terms of race, culture, age, sexuality 
and pattern of drug/alcohol use. 
•  Offering  the  choice  of  worker’s  gender,  wherever  possible  and  ensure  that  the  client 
knows when that worker will be available. 
•  Service  provision  will  pay  particular  attention  to  issues  of  low  self-esteem,  domestic 
violence, self injury, eating disorders, sexual abuse and sexual health. 
•  Developing  attractive  written  material  giving  information  specifically  targeted  at  women 
alcohol users. 
•  Staff  are/will  be  trained  in  women  specific  issues,  self  harm,  benzodiazepine 
dependency etc. 
•  Offering single sex provision that will include supports groups and counselling.  
•  Developing  working  relationships;  joint  care  arrangements,  joint  training  and  referral 
pathways with mental health services and women’s counselling agencies. 
•  Design and plan treatment intervention with female service users.  
•  Inclusion would wish to provide an open ended woman’s support group one day a week 
at school friendly times supported by crèche facilities: visiting speakers will be invited. 
 
It is Inclusion’s view that we need to strive not to replicate the dynamics of stigmatisation or 
lack  of  options  experienced  by  many  women  who  have  drug  related  problems.  The 
provision  of  staff  who  understand  the  specific  requirements  of  women  with  drug  problems 
need  to  include  those  from  BME  groups.    Attention  will  be  paid  to  promoting  access  for 
women from  BME  groups.  Inclusion  understands  that  some  will  face  additional  barriers  to 
 
27 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
seeking treatment due to a sense of shame and going against women’s perceived position 
and expected role in their own and wider society.  
 
Monitoring  performance  will  include  female  health  issues  such  as  the  presence  of 
depression,  eating  disorders,  self  injury.  General  health  issues  will  include  antenatal  care 
co-ordination and sexual health linking up with GUM clinics and maternity units. 
 
Inclusion acknowledges that drug services have vital roles in assessing and/or responding 
to  drug  using  parents  and  their  children;  acting  as  advocates  for  service  users  who  have 
responsibility for the care of children and in promoting the welfare of children.  
 
Inclusion  does  not  believe  that  all  drug  users  who  are  women,  necessarily  make  poor 
parents and drug use in itself should not be automatically be taken to imply poor parenting 
or  abuse.  However  lack  of  attention  to  the  possible  effects  of  drug  use  on  parenting  and 
therefore the lives of children may lead to them suffering neglect and/or abuse.  
 
It is essential that our staff are competent and sensitive to the needs of drug using mothers, 
whilst  vigilant  and  uncompromisingly  aware  that  the  needs  of  the  child  is  paramount  and 
must take precedence over any other consideration. We will ensure training and liaison with 
social  services  to  ensure  competency  to  deliver  safe  practice  consistent  with  ‘Safe 
Guarding Children’ and Local Safeguarding Children’s Board guidelines. 
 
BME Service Users 
An  appropriate  strategy  for  implementing  working  with  black  and  minority  ethnic 
communities needs to take account of the local demographics and the impact of drug and 
alcohol  use  within  Cambridgeshire.    To  reach  attract  and  retain  as  many  as  possible 
Inclusion will market the service as follows: 

Provide a welcoming environment, which offers clear information to service users on 
what  is  being  offered,  both  verbally  and  in  writing,  including  provision  of  locally  spoken 
languages. 

Provide access to appropriate interpreting and translation services in order to ensure 
culturally competent and sensitive services to effectively meet need. 

Work collaboratively and develop networks with other services and any specific black 
and  minority  ethnic  groups,  carers  and  advocates  in  order  to  inform  culturally  appropriate 
service delivery. 

Promote services and advertise staff vacancies in black and minority ethnic specific 
newspapers, radio stations, community forums and other services. 

Promote  black  and  minority  ethnic  communities  at  all  levels  of  policy,  planning, 
staffing and provision based on review. 

Provide  evidence  of  involving  and  consulting  black  and  minority  ethnic  community 
groups  and  service  users  in  the  review  and  planning  of  services  and  the  drive  to  improve 
quality. 
Inclusion  has  a  clear  view  that  a  key  way  forward  in  terms  of  appropriate  service 
development for black and ethnic minority residents in Cambridgeshire is via the community 
itself. Inclusion aspires to: 

Develop partnerships with community groups 

Establish satellite services in popular BME venues  

Foster BME volunteer schemes to provide peer support and mentoring 

Secondments into our service from BME community agencies 
 
28 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Second Inclusion workers to BME community agencies to support learning 
 
Perhaps the single most important strand of providing quality services to black and minority 
ethnic people is to recognise the importance of communication and mutual understanding in 
addressing drug related issues and needs. Such communication represents the essence of 
social marketing. 
 
Needs of Service Users with Physical or Sensory Impairments 
Since December 2006 all public bodies and voluntary and private sector organisations that 
provide  services  for  public  sector  organisations,  have  a  legal  duty  to  promote  equality  of 
opportunity for disabled people in all aspects of their work.   To ensure respectful services 
are  delivered  to  disabled  groups Inclusion  will  put  into  practice  social  marketing  principles 
as follows: 
•  Emphasis on specific advice and information to support choice in decision making. 
•  In  order  to  support  service  user  decisions  about  treatment  options  advocacy  will  be 
required. 
•  Support and assist disabled service users to become advocates themselves. 
•  Where there are mobility issues home visits built into care planning. 
•  Assistance with phone calls and other communication tools will be offered. 
Working  closely  with  carers  may  be  important  if  an  impaired  service  user  feels  this  is 
appropriate  and  desirable  to  support  intervention.  More  time  may  need  to  be  spent  with 
young disabled alcohol users in the transition overlap from young person’s services to adult 
services. Flexibility with rules is vital for some e.g. waiving ‘no dog’ policy for service users 
to be accompanied into clinics by a guide dog or a hearing dog.  
Whilst  additional  support  might  well  be  required  to  facilitate  access  and  maintenance  of 
disabled  people  in  treatment  it  is  also  important  to  remember  that  this  needs  to  be 
balanced.  Understanding  ordinary  independence  is  not  about  being  entirely  self-sufficient, 
none of us are, but simply about being in control of what happens to you.  Conveying the 
values  and  practice  as  defined  above  will  be  a  key  component  of  Inclusion’s  approach  to 
the marketing of the service. 
Learning Disabilities 
1.5  million  people  in  the  United  Kingdom  have  a  learning  disability,  which  is  defined  as  a 
neurological disorder that affects the way person learns, communicates and does every day 
tasks. A person has a learning difficulty for all of their life, which can be categorised as mild, 
moderate or severe. There are many types of learning difficulty and some conditions whilst 
not diagnosed as ‘learning disabilities’ affect many alcohol users particularly young service 
users. These include those affected by Asperger’s Syndrome, Autism, Epilepsy, Dyspraxia 
and severe Dyslexia 
 
Some of these conditions can affect some or all areas of development including intellectual, 
emotional,  physical,  language,  social  and  sensory.  Sufferers  appear  to  have  poor 
understanding,  difficulty  relating  to  others  and  present  as  hesitant  and  awkward.  It  is  no 
wonder that some from this group are rejected by their peers and seek comfort in drug use.  
Vigorous  marketing  of  the  service  to  those  experiencing  learning  disabilities  is  especially 
important because of the communication difficulties outlined above. 
 
29 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
12. Section 
Exceptions 
Please detail how the service will adhere to guidance regarding 
6.0 
(Young 
under 18 year olds. 
Sub heading 
People) 
6.1 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion recognises that the age of use of drugs amongst young people continues to drop 
and  that for  a  small  subset  of  young  drug  users,  injecting  is  the  preferred  method  of  use.  
For  this  cohort  access  to  needle  exchange  facilities  remains  an  important  harm  reduction 
intervention.  However, there are specific issues relating to the supply of needle exchange 
services to people under the age of 18.  Therefore the essence of Inclusion’s approach to 
the  provision  of  needle  exchange  services  to  young  people  across  Cambridgeshire  under 
the 18 will be as follows: 
• 
Where a young person under the age of 18 presents to a needle exchange operated 
by  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service,  staff  will  make  every  effort  to  persuade  the  young 
person  to  attend  Cambridgeshire  Adolescent  Substance  Use  Service  (CASUS).    Staff  will 
explain  that  CASUS  are  best  place  to  offer  the  young  person  appropriate  advice, 
information  and  support.    When  the  young  person  accepts  this  advice  we  will  make  an 
immediate  referral  to  CASUS.    Where  practicable,  and  the  young  person  consents,  a 
volunteer will accompany them to CASUS to facilitate a referral. 
• 
When the young person refuses to accept a referral to CASUS and is adamant that 
they wish to access the needle exchange at the adult service, then we will facilitate this with 
the  caveats  described  below.  Our  aim  here  is  to  balance  harm  reduction  with  child 
protection.  Young  people  who  are  16  or  17  are  normally  able  to  consent  to  their  own 
treatment.  When the Young Person is under the age of 16 the ‘Fraser Guidelines’ (Mental 
Health Act 1983 Code of Practice 1999) will be followed, namely that: “Young people under 
16 years of age have a right to confidential medical advice and treatment provided that: 

· The young person understands the advice and has the maturity to understand 

what is involved. 

· The doctor/health professional cannot persuade the young person to inform 

parents/carers with parental responsibility, or allow the doctor to inform them. 

· The young person’s physical and/or mental health will suffer if they do not have 

treatment. 

· It is in the young person’s best interests to give such advice/treatment without 

parental consent. 

· The young person will continue to put themselves at risk of harm if they do not 

have advice/treatment.” 
• 
 If the service decides that the young person is competent and still cannot persuade 
them  to  access  CASUS  then  an  injecting  history  will  be  taken  to  establish  the  young 
person’s needs and any consider any risks involved.  Advice on safer injecting techniques 
will be offered by Needle Exchange staff along with information on safer sex and other harm 
reduction messages. 
• 
 In  line  with  the  operating  protocols  of  CASUS  and  other  young  people’s  needle 
exchange  services,  when  the  adult  service  does  facilitate  needle  exchange  for  a  young 
person,  we  will  only  give  out  a  small  amount  of  injecting  equipment  to  encourage  rapid 
 
30 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
return and a greater frequency of visit.  This will offer the opportunity to actively encourage 
the young person to engage with CASUS.  When we anticipate the return of a young person 
for  additional  needle  exchange  services,  we  will  liaise  with  CASUS.    This  may  involve 
CASUS  assertively  outreaching  the  young  person  at  one  of  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment 
Service venues. 
• 
In  the  unlikely  scenario  that  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  cannot  persuade  a 
young  person  to  access  CASUS  for  longer  term  advice,  information  and  support  we  will 
agree an inter-agency support package for the young person.  The service, in consultation, 
with  CASUS,  will  also  consider  what  steps  need  to  be  taken  in  respect  of  child 
safeguarding. 
• 
All Adult Drug Treatment Service sites will carry range drug related information and 
details  of  CASUS  with  the  explicit  intention  of  ensuring  all  young  people  have  the 
opportunity access an age appropriate service. 
• 
Where  a  young  person  is  in  transition  from  CASUS  to  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment 
Service as they reach the age of 19, and injecting drug use is a current concern, then the 
young  person’s  on-going  recovery  plan  will  reflect  their  injecting  status  and  inform  future 
interventions. 
 
13. Section 
Polices, 
Please provide copies of all policies, protocols and strategies as set 
8.0 
Protocols 
out in Section 8.0. 
 
and Written 
Weighting 4 
Strategies 
 
 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion’s policies have been included: 

Engagement & Re-engagement 

Safer Injecting 

Infection Control Policy 
 
 
 
31 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, b) Harm Reduction: bii) Blood Borne Virus 
Service 
 
Spec  
Method  
Method Statement 
Reference 
Statement 
Reference 

1. Section 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how the service will provide testing and 
2.0 
the Service 
vaccinations for BBV’s. 
Sub heading 
2.2 a – d 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 2000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion  has  significant  experience  of  working  with  drug  users  to  provide  testing  and 
vaccination programmes for Blood Borne Viruses (BBV’s). We have continuously developed 
our BBV interventions and our approach is based on the following principles: 
• 
The main BBV’s of concern to our client group are Hepatitis B virus (HBV), Hepatitis C 
virus (HVC) and Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV). 
• 
HBV and HVC are both highly infectious and can cause chronic liver damage and liver 
cancer.  Both viruses can remain active and a potential source of infection for several weeks 
in dried blood and some body fluids. HIV can lead to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 
(AIDS)  that  causes  a  range  of  serious  infections  and  cancers,  often  becoming  fatal.    A 
person with HIV can remain healthy for many years but be infectious via their blood and body 
fluids.  
• 
All Inclusion staff and volunteers working with drug using populations are encouraged 
to take up HBV vaccination via their General Practitioner, the costs of which are reimbursed 
by the organisation.  Inclusion recognises that day to day social contact with drug users has 
very  little  risk  attached  in  terms  of  BBV  infection.   However  instances  such  as needle  stick 
injuries, working with an open wound, bites and splashes of body fluids should be regarded 
as a potential risk. With this in mind Inclusion staff will always observe basic infection control 
procedures to minimise the risk of infection.  Whilst the safety and protection of our staff and 
volunteers is a high priority, it is important that these infection control procedures are carried 
out sensitively with service users to guard against a climate of fear, mistrust and disrespect. 
• 
Those who inject drugs are at high risk of infection with BBV’s. Delaying  vaccination 
can  do  harm  because  a  drug  user  may  become  infected  before  the  next  visit  or  may  not 
return. If a drug user wishes to be tested the first dose of vaccine should be offered at the 
same time.  Every time a drug user contacts the service, the worker should consider whether 
vaccinations should be offered.  
 
To ensure we delivery excellent BBV interventions across Cambridgeshire the service will: 
• 
Designate a lead member of staff responsible for the promotion, delivery and training 
relating to BBV interventions. 
• 
The  service  will  provide  one  off  vaccinations  as  we  recognise  that  incomplete 
vaccination schedules offer more protection than no vaccination at all. 
• 
The service will ensure that a lack of certainty of vaccination status does not act as a 
 
32 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
barrier to vaccination. 
• 
The service will not rely on an individual’s recall of their history of vaccination. 
• 
The service will use an accelerated schedule of HBV vaccination (0, 1 and 2 months 
or 0, 7 and 21 days). 
• 
Current best practice is to give a booster at twelve months if an accelerated schedule 
is  used.      However  pragmatism  is  best:  when  a  drug  user  attends  the  service  the  worker 
should seize the moment and consider whether this is an opportune time to offer a booster 
dose.  People with an immune disorder, e.g. due to HIV infection, are at higher risk of failing 
to respond and may need regular testing and a booster injection. 
• 
The following steps will be taken to maximise uptake of vaccination: 
-  We  will  prominently  display  posters  and  leaflets  at  all  service  locations  that  promote 
BBV awareness and vaccination programmes 
-  Require  that  BBV screening  takes  place  at  assessment,  medical  reviews  and  key 
working sessions with on-site vaccination sessions being offered at all service sites. 
-  Weekly,  well  publicised  vaccination  clinics  will  be  held  at  all  service  sites  to  augment 
opportunistic vaccination during other interventions. 
-  We  will  ensure  all  staff  and  volunteers  are  trained  in  BBV  prevention  and  infection 
control procedures. 
-  We  will  reinforce  the  importance  of  BBV  vaccination  through  staff  and  volunteer 
supervision & appraisal. 
-  We will work closely with service users to reinforce the importance of BBV vaccination 
programmes. 
-  We  will  liaise  with  partner  agencies  to  promote  BBV  awareness  and  vaccination 
programmes. 
-  Where  a  service  user  has  poor  venous  access,  the  service  will  have  the  capacity  to 
offer dry blood spot testing as an alternative. 
 
• 
Hepatitis A (HVA) Vaccination  
 
Injecting  drug  users  are  at  higher  risk  of  Hepatitis  A  infection  due  to  poor  living  conditions 
with  spread  probably  occurring  through  faecal  contamination  of  drugs  or  injecting 
paraphernalia.  Blood  to  blood  spread  through  needle  sharing  is  also  possible.    HVA 
vaccination  of  users  infected  with  hepatitis  C  and  /  or  with  chronic  liver  disease  has  been 
recommended  for  many  years  because  of  the  risk  of  more  serious  illness  if  they  became 
infected.  The  Public  Health  Laboratory  Service  Advisory  Committee  on  Vaccination  and 
Immunisation expanded this recommendation in 2001 to include all Intravenous Drug Users. 
As for HBV, all service users should be offered HVA vaccine without pre-testing because of 
the risk that the opportunity to vaccinate may be lost. 
  
HVA vaccine is available as a single component vaccine or combined with HBV vaccine. The 
likelihood  of  a  drug  user  returning  for  a  subsequent  dose  needs  to  be  taken  into  account 
when  selecting  the  single  vaccine  or  the  combined  vaccine.    One  dose  of  HVA  vaccine 
confers greater protection against HVA than one dose of the combined vaccine because the 
combined  vaccine  only  has  half  the  amount  of  HVA  antigen  than  the  single  component 
vaccine. For this reason the use of the single component vaccine is recommended. However 
this has to be weighed against the likelihood of the service user attending twice. 
 
• 
BBV Testing 

Inclusion’s approach is to focus on protection through vaccination rather than testing 
per  se.    However,  testing  for  HBV  will  be  routinely  offered  following  discussion  with  the 
 
33 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
service user. 

Inclusion staff will work with service users to ensure fully informed consent is obtained 
before testing for HCV and HIV. Reasons for testing will include;   

Anyone who has ever injected drugs. 

Current injecting drug users. 

Recipients of blood (before Sept 1991), or blood products (before 1986 in the U.K.) – 
if not already tested. 

Regular sexual partners of those with HCV or HIV 

Children born to mothers with HCV or HIV 

People who may have had unsterile medical treatment abroad. 

People who may have had ear piercing, body piercing, tattooing or acupuncture with 
unsterile equipment. 
 
Inclusion staff will explore with service users the potential benefits of testing: 

Testing can allay anxiety even if the result is positive. 

A  positive  test  allows  early  monitoring  and  intervention  by  specialist  treatment 
services if required. 

Opportunity to immunise against Hepatitis B and A. (co-infection significantly worsens 
prognosis). 

Testing can encourage the patient to change patterns of behaviour such as injecting 
drug use or excessive drinking whether the result is positive or negative. 
 
The benefits of testing will be weighed alongside the challenges it may present: 
 
•  HCV  test  is  for  antibodies  only:    Positive  test  indicates  that  there  has  been  infection  at 
some time.  80% continue with active infection – this can only be confirmed by PCR test 
(test of viral load).  A     liver biopsy may be required to decide about treatment. 
•  Antibodies  can  develop  up  to  6  months  after  exposure,  the  ‘window  period’.    Therefore 
negative test may need to be repeated. 
•  Natural  history  and  disease  progression  in  the  majority  of  those  who  become  infected 
with HCV are unaware of it at the time and 20% will clear the virus within 2-6 months. The 
other  80%  will  develop  chronic  hepatitis  C  and  60%  of  the  total  will  develop  some  liver 
disease,  16%  of  these  will  develop  cirrhosis  and  1-2%  may  go  on  to  develop 
Hepatocellular  Carcinoma  or  liver  failure.  Even  without  significant  liver  damage,  some 
people  with  HCV  have  symptoms  of  headache,  chronic  fatigue  etc.  possibly  due  to 
infection of the CNS. 
•  HCV  treatment  is  difficult  to  take  and  has  side  effects,  especially  tiredness  and 
depression. This needs expert referral and assessment at tertiary referral centre.  
•  Life insurance and mortgage issues: A negative HCV test has no impact on ability to get 
life insurance or a mortgage. Positive test may make it more difficult to get life insurance 
policy or mortgage linked to a life policy. 
•  Is the timing right? Negative result could give false reassurance if sample is taken within 
window period.  Are there issues behind request for a test that should be dealt with first 
such as worries about drug use or relationships? 
•  Anxiety whilst awaiting the result. 
•  Coping  with  a  positive  result  will  require  adaptation.  The  uncertainty  of  the  prognosis  of 
HCV,  even  with  treatment,  social  stigma  and  concerns  of  transmitting  the  infection  to 
others  can  cause  depression  and  anxiety  leading  to  risk  of  increased  drug  use, 
relationship  problems.  Rehearse  with  them  how  they  will  feel  if  result  is  positive  or 
negative. 
 
34 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
 
When results of BBV testing are given, it will be based on the following: 
 

Test results ideally in person by the person who has done the test 

The service user may want to have someone with them when they receive result.   

If negative, check if retesting required (window period); discuss and consider how to 
avoid future risk 

If positive review pre-test discussion; check PCR if they haven't had one; and referral 
to specialist. 
 
• 
Staff and Volunteer Training 
-  All  staff  and  volunteers  will  undergo  regular  in-house  training  around  BBV  awareness 
raising, vaccination, testing and counselling. 
-  Recovery  Mentors  will  be  trained  in  BBV  awareness  and  encouraged  to  raise  the 
importance of testing and vaccination in discussions with service users 
  
• 
The  service  will  collect  the  following  data  to  support  the  monitoring  of  the 
effectiveness  of  the  vaccination  programme  and  allow  enhancements  to  be  made  where 
necessary.  
-  The  number  and  percentage  of  drug  users  who  have  received  1  dose  of  hepatitis  B 
vaccine (HBV).  
-  The number and percentage of drug users who have received 2 doses of HBV.  
-  The number and percentage of drug users who have received 3 doses of HBV.  
-  The  number  and  percentage  of  drug  users  who  have  been  offered  hepatitis  B 
vaccination.  
-  The  percentages  of  drug  users  who  have  received  1  and  2  doses  of  Hepatitis  A 
vaccine. 
-  The number and percentage of drug users who have been offered hepatitis C testing.  
-  The number and percentage of drug users who have been offered HIV testing 
 
2. Section 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how this service will ensure service users are 
2.0 
the Service 
supported through their BBV treatment, including hospital based 
Sub heading 
treatment. 
2.2 a – d 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Hepatitis A & Short Term Hepatitis B Infection - Support 
At present, there is no specific treatment for Hepatitis A and short term Hepatitis B and the 
majority  of  users  will  recover  completely  within  a  couple  of  months.  During  this  period  the 
service user should be encouraged to get plenty of rest, eat a balanced diet and avoid the 
use of alcohol whilst the liver repairs itself.   With this in mind, service users who are known 
to be infected with Hepatitis A should be monitored closely through normal key working and 
other interventions taking place as part of their drug treatment recovery plan.  Along side this 
 
35 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
the service user should be encouraged to attend regular health checks. 
Chronic Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Treatment Support 
 
For those users who have contracted chronic HVB or HVC, access to treatment may be an 
option.    It  is  important  to  understand  the  nature  of  these  treatments  and  the  effects  on  the 
person being treated to inform how the service will shape its interventions in support of the 
service user. 
• 
Chronic HBV treatment may include: 
-  Interferon  to  prevent  the  virus  multiplying  inside  the  body,  in  the  form  of  pegylated 
interferon  injected  once  a  week  and  interferon  alfa  injected  three  times  a  week.  These 
treatment can be self-administered by injection.  There are often side effects, such as flu-
like symptoms, especially in the early stages of treatment.  
-  Antiviral  drugs  also  stop  the  hepatitis  B  virus  from  multiplying  in  your  body.  They 
include Lamivudine, Tenofovir, Entecavir, and Adefovir. These may sometimes be taken 
in combination.  During long-term antiviral treatment the virus can become resistant to the 
drug.    It  is  therefore  very  important  that  courses  of  treatment  are  completed.    The  side 
effects  associated  with  these  drugs  include  headache,  fatigue,  dizziness,  nausea  and 
flatulence. 
• 
HIV treatment may include: 
HIV combination therapy using antiretrovirals can slow the progression of the condition and 
prolong life significantly. A combination of medicines is used because HIV can quickly adapt 
and  become  resistant  to  one  single  medicine.      Common  side  effects  of  HIV  medication 
include nausea, ttiredness, diarrhea, skin rashes and mood changes. 
 
Service users accessing treatment for these conditions will require specific support from the 
Adult Drug Treatment Service.  The service will: 
• 
Ensure the lead for BBV interventions has a working knowledge of relevant treatments 
to facilitate support for service users 
• 
Create excellent links with secondary services including hospital liver unit and Genito-
urinary Medicine services. By doing this the service will be fully aware of the pathways into 
treatment for those service users affected 
• 
Create excellent links with the Home Treatment Mental Health service.  Some service 
users  may  not  be  considered  for  treatment  due  to  underling  mental  health  issues  such  as 
depression and anxiety. 
• 
Where  a  service  user  is  receiving  treatment  ensure  that  the  recovery  plan  reflects 
outstanding needs. 
• 
Recovery  Mentors  and  volunteers  will  support  service  users  engaging  in  specialist 
treatment services particularly by accompanying service users to initial appointments to allay 
fears and anxieties. 
• 
The service will facilitate Hepatitis C support groups and work with relevant voluntary 
sector agencies to broker in additional resources and support. 
 
Expert Patient Programmes 
For  service  users  with  long  term  conditions,  Inclusion  will  look  to  establish  pathways  into 
Expert Patient Programmes EPP).  This could include enrolment on an EPP 6 week course 
or  accessing  EPP  materials  on-line.    All  EPP  course  are  designed  to  help  those  with  long 
term conditions manage their condition as well as possible. 
 
36 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
3. Section 
Objectives of 
How will the service encourage clients to complete the programme of 
2.0 
the Service 
Hep B vaccinations? 
Sub heading 
2.2 a – d 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 500 
words 
 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion  services  across  Cambridgeshire  will  encourage  the  uptake  and  completion  of 
Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B vaccination programmes by adopting a contingency management 
approach.    Our  aim  is  to  identify  and  reinforce  health  conscious,  pro-social  and  recovery 
orientated  behaviours.    Drug  users  are  people  and  people  respond  to  incentives.  
Contingency  management  is  recognised  in  NICE  Clinical  Guideline  51  –  Drug  Misuse: 
Psychosocial Interventions.  The service will adopt the following initiatives: 
• 
All  service  sites  will  display  a  full  range  of  eye  catching  harm  reduction  advice  and 
information  relating  to  BBV’s  in  clear,  straight  forward  easily  readable  formats.    This  will 
include awareness raising in relation to BBV’s, the services available and next steps. 
• 
All staff will be trained and supervised to raise approach the issue of BBV’s during all 
interventions from a contingency management perspective.   
• 
The  service  will  offer  vaccination  without  testing  wherever  appropriate.  Delaying 
vaccination  whilst  testing  takes  place  can  do  harm  because  a  drug  user  may  become 
infected before the next visit or may not return to the service at all for other reasons such as 
imprisonment or disengagement. If a service user does wish to be tested then first dose of 
vaccine should be offered at the same time as the test takes place. 
• 
All  staff  and  volunteers  will  the  use  reward  and  recognition  as  part  of  key  working 
interventions in relation to BBV’s.  Where a service user has made strides in changing risky 
behaviour  or  successfully  completes  a  vaccination  programme,  we  will  acknowledge  this, 
remark upon it and compliment the service  user on their progress.  This could also involve 
the use of individual star charts and certificate awards. 
• 
The  use  of  monetary  incentives  will  be  piloted,  following  consultation  with 
commissioners.  This  could  involve  offering  incentives  to  services  users  to  undertake  and 
complete  BBV  vaccination  programmes.    The  incentives  could  take  the  form  of  food 
vouchers or small cash payments in some circumstances. 
• 
The  service  will  offer  vaccinations  to  a  service  user’s  family  or  carers  if  there  are 
concerns about infection. 
• 
The service will adopt a holistic approach to BBV vaccinations for example by offering 
physical  health  checks  and  chronic  disease  management  interventions.  This  would 
encourage services users to engage more regularly with the service therefore creating more 
opportunities for vaccination courses to be completed. 
• 
We  will  use  BTEI  mapping  techniques  to  examine  service  user  attitudes  and 
behaviour in relation to BBV’s and to explore strategies for harm reduction and vaccination 
programme compliance. 
• 
The  use  of  groupwork  can  be  valuable  in  raising  awareness  of  BBV’s  and  the 
importance  &  availability  of  vaccination  programmes.    Some  service  users  may  resist 
discussion  of  BBV  issues  in  1:1  keyworking  due  to  the  perceived  stigma  involved.    Group 
 
37 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
discussions  can  deal  with  the  subject  in  a  depersonalised  way  and  contribute  to  educating 
service users in this area. 
• 
Accurate  health  records  will  be  kept  for  all  service  users  that  include  details  of  BBV 
vaccinations.  These in turn will be used to trigger diary prompts for booster vaccinations. 
 
4. Section 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how the service will work with Pharmacies to 
2.0 
the Service 
assist in the delivery of BBV interventions. 
Sub heading 
2.2 a – d 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion’s  approach  to  working  with  community  pharmacies  across  Cambridgeshire  to 
delivery  BBV  interventions  will  be  one  of  partnership,  joint  working  and  agreeing  common 
goals.  We will do this through: 
• 
Asking all community pharmacies to display the range of harm reduction materials in 
the  form  of  posters  and  leaflets  as  will  be  available  at  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  sites.  
This  will  have  the  effect  of  reciprocal  ‘seed-planting’  with  service  users  exposed  to  more 
relevant  messages  leading  to  positive  action  being  considered.    This  information  should 
include material aimed at cocaine users, who often engage less with drug services and who 
may be unaware of the risks associated with sharing snorting tubes and the risks of infection. 
• 
Working with community pharmacies to influence the needle exchange paraphernalia 
available is important for at least two reasons.  Firstly, the equipment must be relevant to the 
injecting needs of local users to meet their needs and secondly if equipment is not sufficient 
or  readily  available  this  will  impact  on  the  numbers  and  frequency  of  users  accessing 
pharmacies. We will consult with local pharmacies about the menu of exchange equipment 
that is available and the contents of pre-packed exchange kits.  
• 
Similarly,  the  quality  of  advice  and  information  available  to  drug  users  accessing 
community  pharmacies  must  be  of  a  high  standard.    This  will  increase  the  take  up  of 
pharmacy services and build trust between drug users and pharmacy staff. 
• 
Increased  needle  exchange  activity  at  community  pharmacies  also  dictates  that  the 
pathways  into  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  must  be  strengthened.   We  will  work  with 
pharmacy  staff  to  ensure  they  are  signposting  and  referring  drug  users  into  the  Adult  Drug 
Treatment Service at every opportunity. 
• 
To support all community pharmacy based initiatives, relevant training will be provided 
by the service.  We will offer ad hoc and structured training for all pharmacy staff at regular 
intervals.    This  will  include  basic  drug  awareness,  safer  injecting  advice,  BBV  risks  and 
interventions  and  awareness  of  treatment  pathways.    We  will  ensure  that  all  community 
pharmacies  carry  up  to  date  information  about  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  including 
the SPOC contact number, service addresses and opening times. 
• 
Community pharmacy staff will receive advice, information and training about how to 
structure pre and post test counselling.  This is important to ensure drug users are supported 
before, during and after a BBV test and result. 
• 
We  will  agree  the  use  of  a  database  with  all  community  pharmacies  to  capture 
 
38 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
relevant information relating to service uptake and frequency of exchanges.  We will use this 
information  to  identify  areas  of  Cambridgeshire  where  community  pharmacy  provision 
appears  inadequate  so  that  additional  pharmacies  may  become  involved.    This  will  in  turn 
increase the uptake of BBV interventions. 
• 
The use of dry blood spot testing at community pharmacies will be encouraged by the 
service.  We know that barriers to conventional blood testing exist in the form of poor venous 
access, fear and anxiety on behalf of drug users and sometimes staff, a lack of venapuncture 
training and time constraints.  By promoting dry blood spot it is likely that more BBV testing 
can  take  place  in  community  pharmacies  as  the  process  is  quicker,  less  invasive  and 
requires minimal training of staff. 
• 
Inclusion’s  lead  for  BBV  interventions  will  offer  venapuncture  training  to  community 
pharmacy staff to facilitate conventional testing. 
• 
Inclusion  will  provide  opportunities  for  community  pharmacy  staff  to  visit  services 
across the county to broaden their understanding of drug misuse, treatment services and in 
particular the importance of expanding BBV interventions for drug users. 
• 
Inclusion will seek to formalise BBV interventions delivered by community pharmacies 
into existing Service Level Agreements.  
 
 
5. Section 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how the service will support GP’s in the delivery 
2.0 
the Service 
of BBV interventions as part of shared care. 
Sub heading 
2.2 a – d 
 
Weighting 3 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words 
Contractors Response 
As  described  in  our  Shared  Care  method  statements,  Inclusion  see  our  partnership  with 
Cambridgeshire  GP’s  around  BBV  interventions  as  having  some  key  themes  –  training, 
support  and  finance.    We  understand  that  primary  care  professionals  can  have  misgivings 
about working with drug users and in particular BBV interventions including resistance, fear, 
lack  of  knowledge,  lack  of  confidence,  concerns  over  sample  handling,  confusion  about 
referral  pathways,  whether  specialist  treatment  is  available  locally  and  an  unwillingness  to 
perhaps  raise  false  hope  in  patients.    Added  to  this  are  the  frequent  worries  service  users 
have about confidentiality and stigma. 
 
Inclusion remain convinced that expanding and developing primary care based interventions 
for  drug  users  including  for  BBV’s  is  in  the  best  interests  of  all  stakeholders.    Through  the 
provision  of  the  right  training  &  support,  the  agreement  of  policies  &  procedures  and  a 
willingness to overcome barriers, BBV interventions in primary care can: 
-  Provide more opportunistic discussion  
-  Offer more services to women and their children who use primary care more 
-  Offer other necessary healthcare services at the same time 
-  Promote opportunistic immunisation against HAV & HBV 
 
To facilitate this, the service will make the following support available to GP’s 
• 
All GP surgeries wil be supplied with and asked to display a range of harm reduction 
materials  in  the  form  of  posters  and  leaflets  as  will  be  available  at  Adult  Drug  Treatment 
 
39 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Service sites.   
• 
Each  GP  practice  taking  part  in  Shared  Care  will  have  a  designated  liaison  worker 
from  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  attached  to  it.    Liaison  workers  will  operate  on  a 
geographical  patch  basis  allowing  for  efficient  use  of  resources  and  the  development  of 
longer term working relationships 
• 
GP liaison staff will be available outside of their designated primary care sessions via 
telephone and email to offer on-going advice, information and support. 
• 
GP’s engaged in Shared Care will be able to access support, advice and information 
from  the  service  Consultant  Psychiatrist  as  part  of  their  Continuous  Professional 
Development arrangements. 
• 
 The  service  lead  for  BBV  interventions  will  provide  training  for  GP’s  in  BBV 
interventions  and  liaise  with  each  GP  regarding  pathways  into  specialist  hospital  based 
treatments.    It  is  often  the  case  that  GP's  are  better  able  to  establish  links  with  secondary 
care such as liver units and GUM clinics and can facilitate referral for service users.  
• 
Where a GP practice is reluctant to deliver BBV interventions, our BBV lead will offer 
clinics to ‘kick-start’ service delivery at that practice with a view to bringing the GP on board. 
• 
The service lead for BBV interventions will offer training to practice nurses as part of 
their  chronic  disease  management  and  Quality  and  Outcomes  Framework  (QOF).  This 
rewards  practices  financially  for  the  provisions  of  quality  care  and  helps  fund  further 
improvements in the delivery of clinical care. 
• 
GP’s  will  be  able  to  access  training  provided  by  the  service  in  partnership  with  the 
Cambridge Access Clinic.  It is our experience that on occasion GP’s respond better to peer-
led training initiatives. 
• 
The  service  will  work  closely  with  all  GP  practices  engaged  in  Shared  Care  to 
maximise  the  efficient use  of  resources  in  respect  of  the  ordering  of  and  payment for  HVA 
and  HVB  vaccinations.    Ordering  in  bulk  and  operating  a  centralised  system  of  distribution 
can be cost effective. 
• 
Inclusion  will  support  GP’s  to  undertake  the  Royal  College  of  General  Practitioner’s 
(RCGP)  Certificate  in  the  Management  of  Drug  Misuse  Part  1  and  Part  2  to  enhance  their 
knowledge around d BBV interventions.  The service budget contains an element to pay for 
access to local and national courses. 
• 
Inclusion are uniquely placed as our Community Services Lead is Jim Barnard, former 
Substance Misuse Management in General Practice (SMMGP) advisor and now chair of the 
organisation.    Jim  brings  a  wealth  of  experience  to  Inclusion  in  relation  to  engaging, 
supporting and training GP’s. 
• 
Inclusion  will  seek  to  form  a  county  wide  forum  around  BBV  interventions  open  to 
GP’s  and  other  interested professional  to  develop  good practice, policy  and  procedure and 
treatment pathways. 
  
 
 
40 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, b) Harm Reduction, biii) Clinical Waste 
 
Spec  
Method  
Method Statement 
Reference 
Statement 
Reference 

Section biii 
Information to 
Please demonstrate and detail how this service will be 
 
Tenderers 
delivered. 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion and SSSFT will ensure that all waste of is disposed of safely and complies 
with relevant regulations in respect of waste management and recycling.  A specialist 
clinical  waste  collector  will  be  engaged  to  handle  the  collection  and  disposal  of  all 
clinical  waste  products  generated  at  service  sites.    Used  injecting  equipment  will  be 
collected from all community pharmacies taking part in the needle exchange scheme.  
Inclusion  are  aware  that  current  specialist  clinical  waste  collection  services  are 
provided by SRCL.  In consultation with commissioners, Inclusion will in principle look 
to  extend  use  of  this  service  unless  a  better  quality,  better  priced  provider  can  be 
sourced at the contract renewal date. 
 
The principles informing our approach to clinical waste collection are in line with Care 
Quality Commission (CQC) core standard: C4e – ‘clinical waste’, namely “Healthcare 
organisations keep patients, staff and visitors safe by having systems to ensure that 
the  prevention,  segregation,  handling,  transport  and  disposal  of  waste  is  properly 
managed  so  as  to  minimise  the  risks  to  the  health  and  safety  of  staff,  patients,  the 
public and the safety of the environment”. 
 
To meet CQC requirements and the service specification we will: 
• 
Ensure  all  staff  and  volunteers  are  made  aware  of  clinical  waste  policy  and 
procedures 
• 
Routinely review all clinical waste procedures to audit staff compliance 
• 
Provide  all  staff  and  volunteers  working  in  Inclusion  services  with  training 
related to clinical waste procedures including segregation, storage and collection 
• 
All staff and volunteers will be encouraged to minimise the generation of waste 
at source 
• 
All  staff  will  be  encouraged  to  constructively  challenge  colleagues  not 
observing clinical waste policies and procedures 
• 
Ensure all waste is clearly identified as clinical, package correctly, stored safely 
and securely and all documentation relating to its nature and disposal is completed. 
 
All clinical waste will be immediately disposed of into yellow or orange clinical waste 
bags secured in a large metal receptacle.  Most of the waste generated by the service 
will  fall  into  the  orange  bin  criteria  such  as  urine  collection  and  related  waste.  
However  anything  involving  blood  soiling  would  be  disposed  of  in  yellow.      When 
around ¾ full bin liners will be sealed and taken out of the building to a locked area 
waiting collection.  Used sharps will be put into a large sharps bin which when full will 
be sealed, dated and signed and stored in the same area waiting collection. 
 
41 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, c) Specialist Prescribing 
 
Spec  
Method  
Method Statement 
Reference 
Statement 
Reference 

1. Section 1.0 
Information 
Please demonstrate how the service will manage clinical 
 
to 
costs, related to need, whilst keeping within budget. 
Weighting 5 
Tenderers/ 
 
Definition of 
Maximum word 
Service 
count of 2000 
words  
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  is  part  of  an  NHS  Foundation  Trust  that  regularly  scores  an  excellent  for 
financial governance in its ‘Monitor’ ratings and has in the recent past had the accolade 
‘Foundation  Trust  of  the  year’.    This  means  that  we  have  a  very  rigorous  and  robust 
finance  department  who  put  great  effort  into  ensuring  all  services  are  delivered  within 
budget.    Any  overspends  are  highlighted  immediately  and  measures  put  in  place  to 
resolve  these  issues.    Our  finance  department  itself  is  rigorously  scrutinized  through 
internal and external audit.  As a result we have a very detailed and comprehensive set 
of standing financial instructions which can be viewed on our web site 
 
http://www.southstaffsandshropshealthcareft.nhs.uk/getattachment/4071aa28-5e77-
4b3d-b410-e04e6bee40e7/F-RED-01.aspx 
 
Also  as  a  Foundation  Trust  we  also  regularly  score  excellent  on  the  quality  of  our 
services.    This  demonstrates  that  we  have  managed  to  achieve  the  balance  between 
keeping  our  services  on  budget  whilst  meeting  service  user  need.    Our  finance 
directorate advise management what is affordable and possible within budget and also 
give a realistic view of the monies available.  It is a management responsibility to keep 
the  scheme  within  budget.    However  the  finance  department  give  managers  monthly 
reports and will require action plans to resolve any overspends. 
 
In terms of the practical steps that we will take to keep our clinical spend in check, we 
will  ensure  that  we  are  only  meeting  the  clinical  costs  for  substance  misuse  and  that 
other medications are prescribed and paid for by the appropriate agency.   For example 
we  have  previously  carried  out  a  clinical  prescribing  audit  of  one  of  our  new  services 
which was overspent on its prescribing costs.  We found that we were prescribing some 
medications  that  should  have  been  prescribed  by  GP’s  and  some  by  mental  health 
services.  We subsequently ensured that all these prescriptions were transferred which 
significantly reduced our spend.   Ensuring this is carried out also improves quality as it 
means  that  people  will  have  more  contact  with  their  GP,  thus  meaning  more  of  their 
primary  health  care  needs  are  likely  to  be  met  and  more  contact  with  mental  health 
services which also should enhance their overall care. 
 
Also by working to a recovery orientated agenda we would expect that our prescribing 
costs  would  be  lower  per  patient.    This  is  because  people  will  be  spending  a  shorter 
period  in  treatment  than  previously  and  whilst  there  may  be  higher  one  off  costs  for 
drugs  like  Lofexidine  and  Naltrexone  the  overall  medication  costs  will  be  significantly 
lower.  We will in some cases where people are coming into treatment for the first time 
not be considering a substitute prescription but initiating a Lofexidine detoxification with 
 
42 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
a recovery package including structured day programmes and aftercare in place. 
 
We  will  be  assuring  this  approach  through  our  supervision  of  clinicians  and  Recovery 
Workers  which  will  include  reviewing  all  prescriptions  on  at  least  a  monthly  basis  and 
highlighting  where  people  are  ready  to  more  on  to  their  next  stage  in  the  recovery 
journey. Through this process we will be maximising the amount of people exiting drug 
treatment and thus keeping prescribing costs low.  Every year there will be a full clinical 
audit by our audit team which will further identify prescribing issues that may not have 
been addressed 
 
Having said this we  will be prescribing according to clinical need and will not withhold 
medically indicated treatment on the basis of budgetary considerations.  This would put 
us  in  breach  of  NICE  technology  appraisals  on  Methadone,  Buprenorphine  and 
Naltrexone which are audited against to by the Care Quality Commission. 
 
Whist  we  will  be  increasing  the  availability  of  supervised  consumption  in 
Cambridgeshire we will be ensuring that it is only continued post 3 months when there 
is a clinical need.  Keeping people on supervision can be detrimental to their recovery 
especially  in  terms  of  employment,  education  and  training  opportunities.    In  fact  the 
clinical guidelines suggest that supervision can be relaxed before 3 months in order to 
facilitate employment.  We will be flexible with this on a case by case basis.  So whilst 
the  availability  of  supervision  will  be  increased  we  will  ensure  that  it  only  continues 
whilst  clinically  appropriate.    This  is  a  good  example  of  where  cost  effectiveness  and 
quality can go hand in hand. 
 
Weighing  clinical  need  against  budgetary  control  is  a  constant  pressure  for  NHS 
services and our Trust has been regularly assesses as having the right balance in this 
regard. 
 
2. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
How will recovery be promoted throughout this element of 
 
Service 
the service? 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  will  promote  recovery  through  its  specialist  prescribing  interventions  in  the 
following ways: 
• 
Recovery  Workers  will  provide  a  menu  of  options  at  a  service  user’s  initial 
assessment and effectively assess whether substitute prescribing is the best option for 
this  service  user;  we  know  historically  that  prescribing  was  the  first  and  only  option 
some service users were made aware of. We will discuss with service users at an early 
stage their stabilisation, detoxification and maintenance options.  
• 
At  assessment,  our  Recovery  Workers  will  take  in  account  a  service  user’s 
recovery capital whilst completing a thorough assessment of their prescribing and drug 
history. Where the service user only has a recent history of heroin use and at low doses 
we  will discuss and assess whether Lofexidine or symptomatic treatment would be an 
appropriate option instead of substitute opiate prescribing.  
• 
Leaflets  and  DVD’s  on  prescribing  options,  community  detoxification  and 
structured psycho-social interventions will be available in all reception areas to provide 
 
43 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
service  users  with  knowledge;  our  aim  is  to  empower  service  users  by  explaining  the 
choices open to them prior to their initial and medical assessments.  
• 
Recovery  Mentors  and  volunteers  will  be  based  at  all  sites  to  chat  to  new  and 
existing  service  users  about  their  recovery  journey  and  how  they  made  progress  in 
treatment.  Seeing others do well is a great incentive. 
• 
 All  staff  will  be  trained  in  assessment  skills  and  be  able  to  determine  whether 
prescribing  is  the  best  option  for  that  service  user  and  if  so  have  the  knowledge  and 
skills to discuss all possible treatment options with the service user.  
• 
On  going  key  work  will  continually  review  and  assess  service  users  current 
treatment plans and discuss with the service user possible options for detoxification or 
a  slow  reduction  if  their  prescribing  dose  is  too  high  for  a  safe  and  effective 
detoxification.  
• 
We  will  deliver  regular  workshops,  using  staff  and  Recovery  Mentors,  on 
prescribing  for  recovery  and  abstinence.  The  workshops  will  discuss  options  for 
detoxification  and  prepare  service  users  for  what  they  can  expect  throughout  their 
detoxification. For example in our Birmingham service there is a specific workshop for 
those  clients  embarking  on  Lofexidine  detoxification.  This  workshop  is  facilitated  by  a 
Nurse Practitioner and outlines all the necessary health checks and health implications. 
Family and carers are asked to attend this workshop as they play a significant role in a 
service user’s community detoxification.  
• 
Detoxification  handbooks  will  be  made  readily  available  to  all  service  users 
highlighting all the options and pit falls to avoid.  
• 
We  will  encourage  and  motivate  those  service  users  who  are  on  existing  high 
dose  maintenance  or  stabilisation  scripts  whilst  injecting  or  using  illicit  substances  on 
top of their prescription to engage in recovery focused treatment.  Harm reduction work 
is delivered through specific workshops, peer support and key working which results in 
setting new recovery goals. 
• 
All  staff  will  identify  those  service  users  suitable  for  home  detoxification  and 
initiate  a  joint  home  detoxification  plan  with  the  service  user  and  nursing  staff.  Our 
Birmingham service is currently piloting a community home detoxification project where 
service users agree to a prescribed detoxification regime which is flexible to their needs 
and  involves  home  visits  and  reviews  by  their  local  pharmacy.  These  clients  are 
provided  with  structured  psychosocial  support  by  their  key  worker  or  are  engaged  in 
day programmes throughout Birmingham as well as daily nursing and medical support. 
Protocols  and  pathways  have  been  set  up  which  include  working  with  local  GP’s  , 
structured day care services , inpatient rehabilitation and detoxification units and local 
pharmacies.  Service  users  are  supported  through  their  home  detoxification  by 
Recovery Mentors.  
• 
Service  users  currently  stabilising  in  treatment  will  be  provided  with  Recovery 
Mentors to support them through their recovery journey with the aim of discussing goals 
for detoxification and abstinence when appropriate.  
• 
All  service  users  will  have  access  to  wrap  around  services  such  as  family 
support,  supporting  people,  housing,  employment  and  training  and  education.  Our 
Birmingham Service currently provides monthly road shows which are run at the service 
alongside  prescribing  clinics.  Professionals  from  a  range  of  health  and  wrap  around 
services  attend  the  Community  Drug  Team  with  the  aim  of  engaging  the  client  and 
meeting their specific needs.  
• 
All service users have access to nurse clinics where they can have a full health 
“MOT”  including  electro-cardiographs,  liver  function  tests,  sexual  health  advice  and 
 
44 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
testing,  injecting  advice,  wound  care  treatment,  mental  health  awareness  and 
assessment,  alcohol  assessment  and  brief  interventions,  BBV  testing  and  treatment. 
This  specific  service  aims  to  keep  the  service  user  healthy  throughout  their  recovery 
journey  and  link  them  in  with  other  health  related  agencies  such  as  primary  care  and 
specialist centres including alcohol services and specialist liver units.  
• 
All service users will be reviewed by the prescribing team every 3  months as a 
minimum  requirement.  At  this  review  the  key  worker  and  any  other  external  related 
health agencies will be present or sent minutes with the service user’s permission. 
• 
We  will  carry  out  home  visits  to  those  service  users  who  have  acute  physical 
health problems, who are pregnant or have young children. This will allow service users 
to  be  reviewed  regularly  and  provide  them  with  the necessary  support  to engage  in  a 
more recovery focused approach to their treatment.  
• 
All  prescribing  will  be  evidence  based  and  follow  guidance  outlined  in  the 
Department of Health (DOH) Drug Misuse & Dependence – UK Guidelines on Clinical 
Management  (referred  to  as  the  2007  Clinical  Guidelines)  and  in  NICE  guidance 
namely: 

NICE Drug misuse (CG52) Opioid detoxification 

NICE Drug Misuse (CG51) Psycho-social Interventions 

NICE Drug Misuse (TA114) Methadone & Buprenorphine 

NICE Drug Misuse (TA115) Naltrexone 
 
3. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
Please demonstrate how this service will always be 
 
Service 
delivered in conjunction with psychosocial work. 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1500 words 
Contractors response: 
Prescribing will always be delivered in conjunction with psycho-social interventions.  We 
will  approach  service  users  new  to  prescribing  by  opening  alternative  recovery  routes 
that  promote  abstinence  as  a  realistic  option.    For  service  users  who  have  been 
involved  in  substitute  prescribing  for  some  years,  we  will  review  treatment  goals  and 
attempt to raise their aspirations where possible. We will achieve this through: 
•  All  service  users  will  have  a  dedicated  key  worker  who  will  provide  psychosocial 
interventions  such as  motivational  interviewing,  solution focused  therapy  and  BTEI 
mapping interventions. All staff will be trained and regularly updated in all of these 
approaches.  
•  Substitute prescribing will be offered as a treatment option alongside psycho-social 
interventions and not as an alternative.  
•  Service users will have access to time limited structured psychosocial interventions 
such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and counselling therapies provided by fully 
qualified professional staff.   
•  Workshops  will  be  run  in  conjunction  with  prescribing  clinics  and  these  will  look  at 
topical issues relevant to service user need.  
•  Service  users  accessing  prescribing  services  will  have  sessions  provided  by  their 
key worker specifically for psychosocial work as often as their need demands. 
•  Service users will have access to psychological support where necessary 
•  The service will have a specific Dual Diagnosis lead who will be trained in delivering 
psycho-social  work  when  a  mental  health  need  is  identified.  This  may  include 
 
45 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
anxiety, paranoia, stress related illnesses and thought disorder concerns. This work 
will  not  only  be  delivered  in  conjunction  with  substitute  prescribing  but  also 
alongside the service user’s GP and the Home Treatment mental health team. The 
Dual Diagnosis lead will liaise with the service user’s consultant, community mental 
health  nurse  and  GP  so  all  partnership  agencies  involved  can  set  an  agreed  care 
plan.  
•  Key workers and prescribing staff will keep partnership agencies such as GP’s and 
mental health teams updated with medication reviews and changes.  
•  All  staff  will  be  trained  in  BTEI  node  link  mode  mapping  and  a  variety  of  mapping 
tools will be available to all staff to assist in psychosocial work. In our Birmingham 
service all staff including prescribers are trained in BTEI mapping techniques which 
uses  maps  to  challenge  and  change  the  way  service  users  think  about  their 
treatment and recovery as a whole. 
•  Monthly clinical meetings will take place where the prescribing team will be present 
alongside all staff. These meeting will allow key workers to present and review their 
service user’s care and treatment and will ensure that the service users prescribing 
plan compliments the psycho-social work. 
•  As part of a service users prescribing appointment, the prescriber will be trained in 
delivering  brief  psycho-social  interventions.  This  will  involve  motivational 
interviewing  and  can  be  used  to  address  alcohol  use,  anxiety,  relapse  prevention 
and harm minimisation. 
 
4. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
Please demonstrate how the service will engage with clients 
 
Service 
who are reluctant or refuse to engage with Structured 
Weighting 5 
Psychosocial Interventions (SPI) alongside prescribing. 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
 
For those service users reluctant or refusing psycho-social interventions we will: 
•  Our prescribing staff will use Motivational Interviewing techniques and provide Brief 
Interventions as a short term measure to address psycho-social needs and motivate 
the  service  user  to  engage  with  their  key  worker  for  further  psycho-social 
interventions. 
•  Offer  workshops  and  group  work  alongside  prescribing  clinics  providing  psycho-
social interventions on a variety of topical issues related to need. Service users who 
attend their prescribing appointment will be encouraged to take part. The workshops 
can  be  seen  as  a  more  relaxed  approach  to  psychosocial  interventions  by  the 
service user compared to 1/1 Key working.  
•  Home  visits  where  appropriate  will  be  carried  out  to  encourage  service  users  to 
engage in psycho-social work. This may be done in conjunction with a prescriber, in 
particular a Nurse Prescriber.  
•  Volunteers  and  Recovery  Mentors  will  be  used  to  support  these  clients  and 
encourage them to engage in group work, workshops and key working. 
•  Service  users  who  regularly  disengage  with  psycho-social  interventions  will  be 
placed in a specialist supportive prescribing clinic which will run weekly and that will 
allow service users the opportunity to drop in between flexible time slots e.g. 1pm-
4pm  rather  than  a  specific  appointment  time.  Throughout  this  time  Recovery 
 
46 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Workers  will  be  available  to  engage  with  the  service  user  along  with  external 
professionals from housing, employment, family and supportive people.  
•  Weekly team meetings will provide staff with the opportunity to discuss service users 
who do not engage in psychosocial interventions and set plans. These may include 
not posting out prescriptions to pharmacies so that the service user must come into 
the  service  to  collect  their  prescription.  This  will  allow  key  workers  and  Recovery 
Mentors the opportunity to sit down with the service user in an attempt to increase 
engagement 
•  There maybe some cases where a service user is scripted but continuous with very 
heavy illicit use whilst refusing to engage with psycho-social interventions.  In these 
circumstances  we  will  consider  reducing  or  stopping  prescribed  treatment  if  no 
benefit is seen in continuing the script. 
•  During  the  early  stages  of  the  contract,  Inclusion  will  initiate  the  process  of  a  full 
caseload  review  and  this  will  include  analysis  of  those  service  users  refusing  or 
reluctant to engage with psycho-social interventions as part of their treatment.  It is 
our intention, due to the large number of clients transferring, to establish three small 
working groups to drive the caseload review.  In carrying out a full caseload review 
of all clients, we will have in mind the following principles: 
o  Is the service user being seen by the correct service? 
o  Is  a  harm  minimisation  approach  balanced  with  interventions  that  are  recovery-
orientated? 
o  Are interventions being delivered safely? 
o  Are risks understood and appropriately managed? 
o  Are organisational policies and procedures being followed? 
o  Can the client move to nurse-led prescribing? 
o  Are  interventions  for  Criminal  Justice  System  clients  aimed  at  reducing  re-
offending? 
o  Are  the  client’s  mental  health  needs  being  met  and  is  Care  Co-ordination  sitting 
with the correct agency 
o  Is current prescribing in line with clinical guidelines 
o  Are care plan goals co-opting the support of external agencies with an interest in 
recovery and re-integration? 
 
5. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
Please demonstrate how nurses will be utilised in the 
 
Service 
prescribing process. 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words 
Contractors response: 
•  Nurses and Nurse Prescribers will be present in clinics allowing clients to be triaged 
first  by  the  nurse  to  identify  and  carryout  any  necessary  health  checks  and 
procedures  before  they  see  a  Doctor.  This  may  include  monitoring  for  withdrawals 
and  advising  on  titrations.  This  allows  clinics  to  run  more  efficiently  and  for  clients 
who  drop  in  that  day  in  crisis  or  who  are  motivated  to  discuss  detoxification  to  be 
seen.  
•  A  nurse  led  outreach  health  service  will  provide  access  to  general  medical 
assessment for our most physically ill patients. All clients entering the service will be 
offered a general medical consultation by our nurses and include a full clinical and 
 
47 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
physical  examination  including  electro-cardiograph  screening  for  those  clients  on 
more  than  100mls  of  methadone  or  for  those  service  users  reducing  on  a 
detoxification  programme  as  well  as  those  prescribed  antidepressants  alongside 
their methadone script. 
•  All  service  users  have  access  to  nurse  clinics  where  they  can  have  a  full  health 
“MOT”  including  electro-cardiograph,  liver  function  tests,  sexual  health  advice  and 
testing,  injecting  advice,  wound  care  treatment,  mental  health  awareness  and 
assessment, alcohol assessment and brief interventions, BBV testing and treatment. 
This specific service aims to keep the service user healthy throughout their recovery 
journey and link them in with other health related agencies such as primary care and 
specialist centres including alcohol services and specialist liver units.  
•  SSSFT  promotes  nurse  prescribing  within  Inclusion  and  all  are  supported  through 
forums,  training,  ongoing  development  and  regular  supervision.  Inclusion  and 
SSSFT  have  an  independent  nurse  prescribing  lead  who  is  responsible  for  the 
ongoing  support  and  development  of  all  Nurse  Prescribers.    The  Trust  has 
developed a Nurse Prescribing policy and formula. 
•  Supplementary  Nurse  Prescribers  will  run  prescribing  clinics  alongside  the 
Consultant Psychiatrist and carryout reviews, titrations and detoxification for service 
users on substitute medication. The Consultant Psychiatrist will assess the service 
user  and  then  agree  a  treatment  plan  that  will  incorporate  a  clinical  management 
plan. Specific nurse prescribing formulas will be set up with a list of medications that 
can  be  prescribed  depending  on  the  experience  of  the  Nurse  Prescriber.  All 
titrations will follow guidance outlined in the DOH Clinical Guidelines. 
•  In  our  Birmingham  team,  nurse  prescribing  has  been  embedded  within  the  service  
over  the  last  five  years  and  there  have  been  Specialist  Nurse  Prescribing  clinics 
running twice a week producing around 100-150 prescriptions for service users per 
month.  Nurse prescribing has allowed for rapid same day prescribing as it frees up 
medical time that can be spent seeing new referrals and those service users wishing 
to start a detoxification.  
•  Nurses  will  also  play  a  lead  role  in  developing  home  detoxification  throughout  the 
area.  Service  users  will  be  assessed  by  the  Consultant  Psychiatrist  and  a 
prescribing  template  set  up  in  conjunction  with  a  clinical  management  plan.  Nurse 
Prescribers  will  then  be  able  to  visit  service  users  at  their  home  or  in  the  local 
community  and  implement  the  detoxification  regime.  Nurses  will  also  carry  out  all 
the necessary physical health checks required such as daily blood pressure checks 
if the service user is on a Lofexidine detox.  
• 
Home  detoxification  will  be  embedded  within  clinical  governance  as  Nurse 
Prescribers  and  Recovery  Workers  would  be  supported  by  the  Consultant 
Psychiatrist and medical team.  By  working in partnership with GP practices in the 
shared  care  scheme  an  environment  would  be  created  where  clinical  excellence 
and  best  practice  can  flourish  through  continuous  benchmarking.  A  significant 
events audit would be set up allowing any problems to be identified, monitored and 
plans put in place to reduce their reoccurrence.  
 
 
48 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
6. Section 2.0 
Aims of the 
Please demonstrate how the service will manage the 
Sub heading 
Service 
expectation of those prescribed to and ensure that clients 
2.1 b 
understand that prescribing is a short term intervention as 
Weighting 5 
part of a recovery based treatment plan. 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words  
Contractors response: 
Inclusion will manage expectations and promote prescribing as a short term element of 
recovery through: 
•  At  assessment  key  workers  will  discuss  a  service  user’s  recovery  capital  and  from 
this formulate a treatment recovery care plan in agreement with the service user.  
•  Staff  will  inform  service  users  of  all  prescribing  options  with  an  emphasis  on 
detoxification and reduction once stabilisation is reached. Service users who have a 
high degree of existing recovery capital will be encouraged away from maintenance 
and  offered  structured  psycho-social  support  with  Recovery  Mentoring  and  will  be 
linked in with wrap around services such as education, training and employment. 
•  We  will  prescribe  non  opiate  medication  where  appropriate  to  service  users  who 
have  only  a  recent  history  of  opiate  use  or  are  only  using  small  amounts.    This 
cohort will be offered an intense package of psycho-social interventions and social 
support  alongside  medical  and  nursing  support  where  options  of  Lofexidine  and 
symptomatic medications will be offered.  
•  Service  users  will  be  linked  in  with  Recovery  Mentors  who  will  support  the  service 
user in achieving their recovery goals by attending meetings with them such as NA, 
and  programmes.  Service  users  will  be  encouraged  to  engage  in  peer  support 
groups and share their experiences and how their recovery journey is progressing.  
•  Service users will be encouraged to Structured Day Programme group sessions on 
topical  recovery  issues  such  as  detoxification,  coping  with  anxiety  and  adopting 
healthy lifestyle choices. 
•  Service users will be given recovery information packs and leaflets on detoxification 
to  take  home  and  we  will  promote  service  user  involvement  projects  such  as  the 
allotment project running in our Birmingham service.  
•  We  will  involve  wrap  around  services  by  having  them  provide  road  shows  at  the 
service.    This  wil  include  agencies  from  employment,  housing,  family  centres  and 
other support groups.  
•  Service  user  involvement  will  be  promoted  in  the  form  of  peer  support  group, 
workshops and a local SUI newsletter as part of the recovery journey.  
•  Key  workers  will  incorporate  a  service  user’s  prescribing  plan  into  their  recovery 
plan  and  discuss  options  such  as  reduction  and  detoxification.  Prescribers  will  be 
involved as part of this review.  
•  For those service users on existing long term maintenance scripts, key workers will 
engage  them  in  more  structured  psycho-social  interventions  with  the  aim  of 
increasing  a  service  user’s  motivation  to  make  small  recovery  steps  with  slow 
reductions off their substitute medication where appropriate.  
 
 
49 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
7. Section 2.0 
Aims of the 
Please demonstrate how the service will ensure that a 
Sub heading 
Service 
culture of short term, recovery focused prescribing has been 
2.1 b 
understood and will be practiced by staff, rather than long 
Weighting 5 
term maintenance prescriptions. 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion will promote a culture of short term, recovery focused prescribing through: 
• 
Recovery  training  packages  –  training  staff  in  the  effective  provision  of  recovery-
orientated  opioid  substitution  and  other  drug  treatments  as  part  of  broader 
personalised  recovery  plans.  For  some  individuals  with  heroin  addiction,  the  best 
treatment  may  include  substitute  medication,  while  or  others  this  may  be 
inappropriate or unnecessary. In all instances, the objective is to enable individuals 
to  achieve  their  fullest  personal  recovery.  Staff  will  be  trained  and  provided  with 
support  to  gain  the  competences  to  improve  the  quality  of  regular  review  and 
restructuring of personalised care to support recovery.  
• 
Ensure that staff are trained and supervised to deliver psychosocial interventions of 
a  type  and  intensity  appropriate  to  their  competence.  Effective  keyworking  entails 
not  only  recovery  care  planning,  case  management,  advocacy  and  risk 
management, but also collaborative interventions designed to raise the insight and 
awareness  of  patients  and  help  them  plan  and  build  a  new  life.  This  will  often 
involve attention to employment and housing 11. Review the quality of recovery care 
planning and take steps to improve it, through staff supervision and team meetings.  
•  For staff to be updated in new prescribing options and access Inclusion prescribing 
training  which  provides  specific  training  on  prescribing  for  recovery  and  considers 
detoxification options. 
•  The  service  to  set  up  clinical  protocols  to  guide  staff  including  prescribers  so  they 
can help individuals make progress towards personal recovery, improve support for 
long-term  recovery,  and  avoid  unplanned  drift  into  open-ended  maintenance 
prescribing.  The  service  will  review  its  mission  statement,  aims  and  objectives  to 
reflect  the  move  to  recovery  based  treatment  provision.  The  following  will  be 
considered 
•  The  prescribing of any  medication  especially  opiate  substitute  medication must  not 
be  allowed  to  become  detached  and  delivered  in  isolation  from  other  crucial 
components of effective treatment. These include individual recovery care planning, 
psychosocial  interventions  and  integration  with  mutual  aid  and  peer  support.  All  of 
these, in different combinations with different patients, and adjusted over time, can 
and do support recovery. 
•  A comprehensive assessment of need is an essential early and ongoing step in the 
planning  of  personalised  treatment  and  it  should  also  be  an  integral  part  of  the 
therapeutic process. 
•  A  recovery care plan that results from the assessment  when progress is reviewed, 
must  be  developed  collaboratively  so  that  it  is  personally  relevant  and  ‘owned’  by 
the patient. This will increase the likelihood that they commit to, and are motivated 
by,  a  personal  recovery  care  plan  that  is  meaningful  to  them.  Repeated  reviews 
should  result  not  only  in  a  personalised  assessment  but  also  the  optimised 
treatment  for  the  individual.  This  should  include  –  but  certainly  not  be  limited  to  – 
attention  to  elements  of  the  medication  component  of  treatment.  If  an  individual  is 
 
50 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
deriving  little  or  no  benefit  from  an  intervention,  then  it  should  be  modified  and 
tailored in partnership with the patient so that the provision of the treatment delivers 
identified and valued benefit. 
•  Supervision  and  appraisals  -  staff  to  have  formal  supervision  on  a  monthly  basis 
from  their  manager  to  review  how  they  are  adapting  to  a  new  recovery  focused 
model.  Staff  to  also  have  a  clinical  mentor  who  they  can  go  to  for  specific  clinical 
and prescribing support and advice.  
•  Performance  management  –  For  those  staff  who  are  struggling  to  change  their 
practice  to  incorporate  recovery  into  their  practice  to  be  managed  and  supported 
through performance management procedures.  
•  Audits – regular caseload audits to be done by management to review service user 
progress  through  treatment.  The  audit  will  also  review  whether  the  service  user  is 
making progress on opiate substitute medication. 
 
8. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how home detoxification will be 
Sub heading 
the Service 
delivered and supported. 
2.2 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
2000 words  
Contractors response: 
The service will be led by Inclusion Nurse Prescribers. Service users will be assessed 
and clinical management plans for controlled drug medications will be signed off by the 
Consultant  Psychiatrist  and  nursing  team.  Nurse  Prescribers  will  then  carryout  the 
detoxification  in  the  home  and  be  supported  by  the  team  who  will  ensure  regularly 
health checks are carried out and that psycho-social interventions are provided.  
 
Detoxification  will  be  offered  utilising  3  different  medications.    Methadone, 
Buprenorphine  and  Lofexidine.    NICE  (2007)  recommend  that  service  users  are 
detoxified  using  Methadone  or  Buprenorphine  as  first  line  treatments.    In  deciding 
between the two the team will take into account: 
A) Which of the two (if any) the service user has been stabilized on 
B) The preference of the service user. 
 
Some  service  users  prefer  to  be  transferred  to  Buprenorphine  from  Methadone  to 
complete  detoxification.  NICE  found  no  evidence  for  the  effectiveness  of  this  but  it  is 
catered for through service user choice and Inclusion will be offering that option. 
 
Lofexidine is the third line treatment recommended by NICE.  NICE state it should be 
considered for people who: 
o  Have  made an  informed and  clinically  appropriate decision  not  to use methadone 
or Buprenorphine 
o  Have  made  an  informed  and  clinically  appropriate  decision  to  detox  in  a  short 
timeframe 
o  Have mild or uncertain dependence (including young people). 
 
Lofexidine  may  also  be  used  as  an  adjunct  to  Methadone  and  Buprenorphine 
detoxification  either  as  a  tool  for  more  rapid  detoxification  or  at  the  final  stages  to 
 
51 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
increase comfort. 
 
Home  detoxification  maybe  be  identified  as  a  suitable  treatment  pathway  at  initial 
assessment.    All  referrals  will  then  be  examined  by  a  specialist  nurse  to  ensure 
suitability. 
 
Community (home) opioid detoxification should be a readily available treatment option 
and forms a key part of the recovery journey. Opioid detoxification refers to the process 
by  which  the  effects  of  opioid  drugs  are  eliminated  from  dependent  opioid  users  in  a 
safe and effective manner, such that withdrawal symptoms are minimised. This process 
varies  from  person  to  person  but  recommendations  are  4-12  weeks  in  a  community 
setting. In some cases this may be shorter depending on the level of dependence. 
 
Effective  preparation  and  service  user  selection  is  key  to  a  good  outcome.  It  is 
important to have informed consent and detailed information about the detox. 
•  Service  users  will  be  provided  with  detailed  information  about  the  physical  and 
psychological  aspects  of  opioid  withdrawal  and  with  information  on  managing 
symptoms 
•  Service users  will be made aware of the risks following detoxification including the 
loss of tolerance and overdose 
•  Service  users  will  be  made  aware  of  the  risks  of  increased  alcohol  and 
benzodiazepine consumption post detoxification 
•  Service  users  will  be  made  aware  of  the  importance  of  continued  support  and 
possible pharmacological interventions such as Naltrexone 
•  Advice  will  be  given  on  lifestyle  choices  whilst  detoxifying  e.g.  exercise,  sleep 
hygiene, diet, and hydration. 
•  We will ensure there are good key working systems in place – key workers have a 
central role in co-ordinating a care plan including social and psychological support.  
This  includes  offering  day  services  and  aftercare  support  our  Structured  Day 
Programme and SPOC.  An aftercare package will be in place for all service users 
accessing detoxification 
 
 
An ideal home detox candidate will be a service user that: 
•  Is fully committed, informed and motivated to detoxification 
•  Is aware of the potentially high risk of relapse 
•  Has a supportive and stable social environment 
•  Has stable physical and mental health 
•  Is aware of risks of loss of tolerance post detox and potential overdose 
•  Has no concurrent poly-drug use such as alcohol or benzodiazepines 
 
In  line  with  NICE  Guidelines  (2007)  exclusions  to  community  detoxification  would 
include service users who: 
•  Have not benefited from previous community detoxification 
•  Are reluctant to engage in detox – coercion is likely to lead to relapse 
•  Have  significant  social  circumstances  which  limit  the  benefit  of  community  based 
detox 
•  Have severe mental health problems 
•  Have significant physical health problems  
•  Have complex poly drug use 
 
52 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
With  concurrent  benzodiazepine  dependence  NICE  recommend  that  usually 
benzodiazepine  detoxification  should  be  prioritized  so  that  opioids  are  maintained 
during the benzodiazepine detox. Whether this is done separately or concurrently is the 
service user’s preference and the severity of dependence should be considered. 
 
With  concurrent  alcohol  dependence  NICE  state  that  in  a  community  setting  alcohol 
detoxification  should  be  offered  first  and  this  should  be  done  before  opioid 
detoxification.  If  people  desire  concurrent  alcohol  and  opioid  detoxification  this  should 
be done in an inpatient setting.   Inpatient opiate detoxification is an option to consider 
for service users for whom community detox is unsuitable. 
 
Detoxification using Methadone -The Clinical Guidelines (DH 2007) state: 
 
‘Following  stabilisation  on  methadone  the  dose  can  be  reduced  at  a  rate  which  will 
result in zero in around 12 weeks. This is usually a reduction of around 5 mg every one 
or two weeks.  Patients often prefer a faster reduction at the beginning although there is 
no  research  evidence  to  indicate  the  superiority  of  a  linear  or  exponential  dose 
reduction.’ 
 
Inclusion  are  aiming  to  detoxify  more  rapidly  than  12  weeks.    As  a  result  we  are 
recommending  that  service  users  only  enter  detoxification  when  they  are  down  to  a 
dose  of  30mg  of  methadone.    We  will  consider  people  on  up  to  40mg  after  careful 
assessment.  A typical methadone detoxification would last 6 weeks reducing by 5mg a 
week  from  30mg.    There  will  be  flexibility  within  this  and  the  rate  of  reduction  can  be 
accelerated  or  slowed  down  according  to  service  user  need  and  preference.    If 
accelerated we will consider the concurrent use of Lofexidine which has been shown in 
our other services to increase comfort in those circumstances. Lofexidine may also be 
considered in the last week of detoxification. 
 
Buprenorphine is also a useful option for home detoxification from heroin/methadone. It 
has  a  high  safety  profile  and  service  users  report  that  they  can  detoxify  more  rapidly 
and  more  comfortably  on  this  although  NICE  found  no  difference  in  effectiveness  for 
detoxification  between  Buprenorphine  and  Methadone.    Buprenorphine  will  be 
considered  for  service  users  who  are  currently  prescribed  Buprenorphine,  have  made 
an  informed  choice  to  swap  to  Buprenorphine  from  Methadone  and  for  people  using 
street  heroin  entering  treatment  for  detoxification  without  stabilization  first.  We  would 
require those currently prescribed Buprenorphine to have already reduced to a dose of 
no more than 16mg. 
 
Lofexidine  with  or  without  adjunctive  symptomatic  medication  can  be  used  for  those 
people  who  have  successfully  decreased  down  to  around  20-30mls  Methadone  and 
8mg  or  less  of  Buprenorphine,  and  from  this  want  to  detox  with  appropriate 
pharmacological support.  The detox will last between 7-10 days but can be extended 
up to 14 days. The service user must be reviewed daily  whilst the dose is titrated up. 
Once the dose is stable or reducing, the service user must be reviewed twice a week or 
as needed. A detailed physical health history will be taken by the nursing team prior to 
detoxification taking place.  
 
In recognition of the inherently destabilizing effect of a detox regime, every effort will be 
made  to  ensure  the  service  user’s  prescribing  is  continuous  and  the  detox  is  not 
 
53 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
interrupted.  Service users will be marked as ‘vulnerable’ for the period of the detox to 
ensure  they  have  same  day  access  to  a  clinician.  However,  in  some  circumstances  it 
will be necessary to stop the detox. These may be: 

Persistent non attendance at detox appointments 

Persistent use of illicit drugs or alcohol during the detox period.  

Change in stability of social circumstances. 
In  this  situation,  titration  back  to  stability  with  the  opiate  substitute  of  choice  is 
recommended. 
 
Relapse  Prevention  -  Naltrexone  will  be  offered  to  service  users  on  completion  of 
Opiate detoxification as recommended by the NICE technology appraisal on Naltrexone 
(NICE 2007).  Prescribing of Naltrexone will commence 7 -10 days after completion of 
the  detoxification.    This  will  need  to  be  continued  by  the  persons  GP  or  other 
prescribing  doctor.    In  order  to  be  suitable  for  Naltrexone  treatment  service  users  will 
need to be highly motivated to remain in an abstinence programme and have access to 
adequate supervision in taking it ideally from a family member or significant other, but 
also possibly by a community pharmacist  
 
It  is  important  that  detoxification  is  seen  as  one  step  to  recovery  and  abstinence  and 
not the final process. Should the detox fail at any point the service user must be offered 
seamless access back into treatment 
 
Aftercare  -  All  Service  users  will  have  a  care  plan  with  a  robust  package  of  recovery 
support post detoxification. This will have been developed prior to detoxification.  There 
will  be  a  range  of  support  options  available  including  1-1  support,  peer  recovery 
support, group work and residential rehabilitation. Serviced users will be encouraged to 
access self help groups such as Narcotics Anonymous. 
 

9. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please identify the risks associated with home detoxification 
Sub heading 
the Service 
and what mechanisms will be put in place to reduce such 
2.2 
risks. 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
Proper  detoxification  preparation  is  important.    We  will  ensure  that  service  users 
receive  structured  planning  prior  to  their  detox  and  aftercare  on  completion  to  guard 
against relapse. Key workers, detox nurses and prescribing staff will discuss the service 
users  individualised  detox  plan  to  ensure  that  the  service  user  understands  the 
process,  pitfalls  and  what  to  do  if  they  are  struggling.  Service  users  will  be  given  a 
community detoxification handbook which provides information on the following 

Why do a detox? What can Inclusion do to support you? 

Methadone and Buprenorphine detox  - the options 

General advice for a Methadone, Buprenorphine and Lofexidine detox. 

Managing withdrawals (symptomatic relief) 

How can I choose which is best for me? 

Is a community detox appropriate for me? 

Advice on Residential detox and rehabilitation. 
 
54 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Doing a detox 

My Community detoxification plan. 
 
•  Destabilisation  -  In  recognition  of  the  inherently  destabilizing  effect  of  a  detox 
regime,  every  effort  must  be  made  to  ensure  the  service  user’s  prescribing  is 
continuous  and  the  detox  is  not  interrupted.  Service  users  will  be  marked  as 
‘vulnerable’  for  the  period  of  the  detox  to  ensure  they  have  same  day  access  to  a 
clinician.  However,  in  some  circumstances  it  will  be  necessary  to  stop  the  detox. 
These may be: 
o  Persistent non attendance at detox appointments 
o  Persistent use of illicit drugs or alcohol during the detox period.  
o  Change in stability of social circumstances. 
 
In  this  situation,  titration  back  to  stability  with  the  opiate  substitute  of  choice  is 
recommended.    It  is  important  that  detoxification  is  seen  as  one  step  to  recovery  and 
abstinence and not the final process.  Should the detox fail at any point the service user 
must be offered seamless access back into treatment. 
 
• 
Risk  of  relapse  -  Naltrexone  will  be  offered  to  service  users  on  completion  of 
Opiate detoxification as recommended by the NICE technology appraisal on Naltrexone 
(NICE  2007).   Prescribing  of  Naltrexone  will  commence  7-10  days  after  completion of 
the  detoxification.    This  will  need  to  be  continued  by  the  persons  GP  or  other 
prescribing  doctor.    In  order  to  be  suitable  for  Naltrexone  treatment  service  users  will 
need to be  
o  Highly motivated to remain in an abstinence programme 
o  Have  access  to  adequate  supervision  in  taking  it  ideally  from  a  family 
member or significant other, but also possibly by a community pharmacist.  
 
•  Aftercare - All service users will have a care plan with a robust package of recovery 
support  post  detoxification.  This  will  have  been  developed  prior  to  detoxification.  
There  will  be  a  range  of  support  options  available  including  1-1  support,  peer 
recovery support, access to structured day programmes, group work and residential 
rehabilitation.  This is a matter for detailed discussion and planning with the service 
user.  Serviced  users  will  be  encouraged  to  access  self  help  groups  such  as 
Narcotics Anonymous. 
•  Unplanned Discharge – service users who drop out of the detoxification and then do 
not  engage  back  with  the  service  will  be  visited  at  home  by  their  key  worker  and 
nurse prescriber to attempt to re engage back into treatment quickly and reduce the 
Service  user  feeling  a  sense  of  lack  of  self  worth  and  that  they  have  let  people 
down. 
•  A  common  problem  associated  with  detoxification  is  underlying  psychological 
disorders.  Access  to  psychology  and  structured  day  care  would  support  Service 
Users through their community detoxification. 
•  Community  opioid detoxification  should be a  readily  available  treatment  option  and 
forms a key part of the recovery journey. Opioid detoxification refers to the process 
by which the effects of opioid drugs are eliminated from dependent opioid users in a 
safe and effective manner, such that withdrawal symptoms are minimised.  
•  Provide  the  service  user  with  detailed  information  about  the  physical  and 
psychological  aspects  of  opioid  withdrawal  as  well  as  information  on  managing 
symptoms 
 
55 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
Make  service  users    aware  of  risks  following  detoxification  –  loss  of  tolerance 
and overdose  
• 
Make  service  users  aware  of  risks  of  increased  alcohol  and  benzodiazepine 
consumption post detoxification 
• 
Make service users aware of the importance of continued support and possible 
pharmacological interventions such as Naltrexone 
• 
Advise  on  lifestyle  whilst  detoxifying  e.g.  exercise,  sleep  hygiene,  diet,  and 
hydration. 
• 
Ensure there are good key working systems in place – key workers have central 
role  in  coordinating  a  care  plan  including  social  and  psychological  support.    This 
includes offering day care and aftercare support.  An aftercare package must be in 
place for all service users accessing detoxification. 
 
An ideal community detox candidate would be one who: 

Is fully committed, informed and motivated to detoxification 

Is aware of high risk of relapse 

Has a supportive and stable social environment 

Has stable physical and mental health 

Is aware of risks of loss of tolerance post detox and potential overdose 

Has no concurrent poly - drug use such as alcohol or benzodiazepines 
 
NICE (2007) have suggested that exclusions to community detoxification would include 
service users who: 

Have not benefited from previous community detoxification 

Are reluctant to engage in detox – coercion is likely to lead to relapse 

Have significant social circumstances which limit the benefit of community based 
detox 

Have severe mental health problems 

Have significant physical health problems  

Have complex poly drug use 
 
With  concurrent  benzodiazepine  dependence  NICE  recommend  that,  usually 
benzodiazepine  detoxification  should  be  prioritized,  so  that  opioids  are  maintained 
during  the  benzodiazepine  detox. Whether  this  is  done  separately  or  concurrently  the 
person’s  preference  and  the  severity  of  dependence  should  be  considered.      With 
concurrent  alcohol  dependence  NICE  state  that  in  a  community  setting  alcohol 
detoxification  should  be  offered  first  and  this  should  be  done  before  opioid 
detoxification. If people wish concurrent alcohol and opioid detoxification this should be 
done in an inpatient setting. 
 
10. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please demonstrate how the service will use titration to 
Sub heading 
Service 
ensure effective levels of medication. 

 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words     
Contractors response: 
 
 
56 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Methadone 
There is a need to start at a low dose and titrate up until an optimal dose is reached, 
but too high an initial dose and/or too rapid increases also add to overdose risk in this 
period because of the accumulative effect before steady state is reached. This titration 
process  and  the  reason  for  being  cautious  must  be  explained  to  the  patient.  The 
starting dose of methadone should be between 10 and 30 mg daily, depending on the 
amount  of  heroin  or  other  opiates  being  used,  and  titrated  upwards  to  optimal  levels, 
usually between 60 and 120 mg.  
 
Start  with  10  to  30  mg  methadone  daily,  based  on  the  assessment  of  the  person’s 
opioid tolerance, the frequency of use, the route of administration and the use of other 
drugs  such  as  benzodiazepines  and  alcohol,  whilst  bearing  in  mind  the  long  but 
variable  half-life  of  methadone  of  between  13  and  112  hours  in  first  few  days.  If 
tolerance  is  low  or  uncertain,  then  starting  doses  of  10  to  20  mg  should  be  used  and 
increased more slowly. 
 
Methadone increases of between 5 and 10 mg a day, with a maximum of 30 mg a week 
for  the  first  two  weeks,  are  recommended.  After  that  the  increases  can  be  slightly 
quicker.  When undertaking induction, it is preferable to see the patient frequently at the 
outset , so that a series of further assessments can be made to judge the cumulative 
dosing effects. Nurse Prescribers will do this alongside the medical team.  Involve the 
pharmacist who is providing supervised consumption in the assessment process during 
titration. 
 
Patients who have a long history of use, including past and current injecting heroin use, 
and higher levels of drug use, those who are well known to services and those in whom 
there  is  clear  evidence  of  high  tolerance  may  benefit  from  a  slightly  faster  induction.  
Patients who are non-injectors, have a shorter history of drug use and /or lower levels 
of drug use, and in whom evidence of high tolerance is lacking need a more cautious 
approach. 
 
Risk of overdose is increased by low opioid tolerance, too high an initial dose, too rapid 
increases and concurrent use of other drugs, particularly alcohol, benzodiazepines and 
antidepressants.  Daily  assessment  by  a  pharmacist  using  supervised  consumption  is 
the best safeguard to prevent undetected over-sedation in a patient, and arrangements 
should  be  made  to  ensure  sharing  of  this  information  in  a  secure  and  confidential 
manner. 
 
Methadone  patients  should  be  informed  of  the  ‘increasing  effect  of  a  dose’  as  steady 
state  is  achieved,  so  that  they  do  not  excessively  ‘top  up’  with  street  drugs.    During 
induction, psychological factors and psychiatric morbidity/ illness need to be taken into 
consideration on the premise that depression may contribute to suicidal ideation. 
 
Buprenorphine 
To avoid precipitated withdrawal, delay the first dose of Buprenorphine until the patient 
is  experiencing  features  of  opioid  withdrawal  (This  typically  means  at  least  eight  and 
preferably 12 hours after last heroin use, or 24 to 48 hours after last methadone use.)   
Titration on to Buprenorphine from heroin or low-dose methadone (30 mg or below) can 
usually be accomplished with minimal complications, although restlessness, insomnia, 
headache,  diarrhoea  and  other  mild  opioid  withdrawal-like  symptoms  are  not 
 
57 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
uncommon in the first one to three days. 
 
Lofexidine  may  be  helpful  with  these  unpleasant  effects.  Steady  state  in  the  blood 
concentration levels of Buprenorphine is reached after about five to eight days. Advice 
about  sleep  hygiene  should  be  given.    Nurse  prescribers  to  see  the patient frequently 
throughout  the  week  and  increase  the  Buprenorphine  dose  on  subsequent  days,  or 
later  the  same  day.    Dose  increases  of  2  to  4  mg  per  day  at  a  time  are  usually 
adequate, although dose increases of up to 8 mg are safe and can be used. 
 
Ensure  frequent  review  of  the  patient  and  supervision  of  doses,  where  available, 
through induction and until stability.  Provide a full explanation to the patient and their 
partner/carer, if appropriate, supported by written information to include: the properties 
of the drug, how it works, the induction period and the possible side effects (Provide a 
patient information leaflet).   
 
Ensure that patients understand that most people take several days to stabilise on their 
medication, particularly if transferring from methadone (where stabilisation can take one 
to two weeks). Precipitated withdrawal will also be explained. 
 
Lofexidine  
Lofexidine  with  or  without  adjunctive  symptomatic  medication  can  be  used  for  those 
people  who  have  successfully  decreased  down  to  around  20-30mls  methadone  and 
8mg  or  less  of  Buprenorphine,
  and  from  this  want  to  detox  with  appropriate 
pharmacological support. Lofexidine will not be started If BP < 100/<60 and Pulse <55 
bpm. 
 
Treatment  with  Lofexidine  should  start  at  200-400  micrograms  twice  a  day,  increased 
daily  as  necessary,  to  control  withdrawal,  in  dosage  increments  of  200–400 
micrograms,  to  a  maximum  of  2.4  mg  daily  in  2-4  divided  doses.  The  dose  is  then 
gradually  reduced  over  subsequent  days  as  withdrawal  eases.  This  avoids  rebound 
hypertension.  Failure of Lofexidine detoxification regimes is often due to under-dosing. 
 
Precipitated withdrawal occurs only on the first dose, and the longer after the last opiate 
use this first dose is taken, the lower this risk.  To achieve this, give the first dose (only) 
of Buprenorphine to the patient as a take-home dose to be taken at an appropriate time 
of  their  choosing  as  the  onset  of  withdrawal  occurs.    Commence  with  an  initial 
Buprenorphine dose of between 4 and 8 mg. 
 
Please see the table below highlighting 2 possible dosing regimes.  The first reaches a 
maximum of 8 tablets (total daily dose1.6mg) on day 3.  A typical regime detox regime 
using Lofexidine 0.2mg: 
Day 
of  Maximum 
Maximum tablets  Maximum 
Maximum  tablets 
detox 
tablets am 
lunch 
tablets 6pm 
at night 










 
58 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 




















 
The second reaches a maximum of 12 tablets (total daily dose 2.4mg – the maximum 
licensed dose) on day 5.  
 
Day 
of  Maximum 
Maximum tablets  Maximum 
Maximum  tablets 
detox 
tablets am 
lunch 
tablets 6pm 
at night 













































10 




 
It  is  important  that  this  regime  allows  for  flexibility  and  each  service  user’s  symptoms 
are taken into account with dosage increased accordingly if necessary. A typical detox 
lasts from 7-10 days with Lofexidine. If a service user is struggling this can be extended 
up  to  14  days.  Withdrawal  from  heroin  is  at  a  maximum  at  day  2  and  methadone 
withdrawal is at a maximum at day 3 to 5. 
11. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please demonstrate and detail how the service will ensure 
Sub heading 
Service 
that current provision within the Cambridge Access Surgery 

(CAS) is maintained and developed 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1500 words 
Contractors response: 
From  our  tender  research  it  is  clear  that  the  Cambridge  Access  Service  plays  an 
important role in the local drug treatment system, particularly with homeless drug users.  
 
59 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Consequently  we  will  seek to develop an excellent working relationship with CAS and 
continue to develop the service through: 
•  Meeting  with  CAS  during  the  implementation  phase  to  agree  an  action  plan  which 
would honour the current agreement, review systems and carryout a needs analysis 
to  explore  any  areas  of  service  development.   We  will  review  the  current  payment 
schedule with CAS to ensure maximum value for money is being obtained. 
•  Inclusion will instigate and lead regular quarterly meetings with CAS to ensure good 
communication  pathways  are  in  place  and  to  facilitate  continuous  service 
development and treatment improvements. 
•  Ensuring  a  Shared  Care  Monitoring  Group  is  set  up  and  represented  by 
commissioners,  service  managers,  CDIP,  shared  care  GP’s,  GPwSI’s  and  a  lead 
pharmacist. These meetings will be used to discuss prescribing practice not only in 
shared care but throughout the whole treatment system and will be the forum where 
prescribing  audits,  protocols  and  pathways  such  as  those  for  community 
detoxification are discussed and improved.  
•  Agreement  that  CAS  carryout  clinical  audits  which  are  then  fed  back  to  the  wider 
treatment service and Shared Care Monitoring Group.  
•  Discuss the possibility of CAS providing peer mentoring / supervision to GP’s in the 
shared  care  scheme.  In  Birmingham  this  has  proved  an  effective  way  of  engaging 
other GP’s to enter the shared care scheme. 
•  We  will  ensure  that  all  payments  due  to  CAS  are  made  promptly  in  line  with  the 
service level agreement.  Payments will be made quarterly in arrears.   
 
Inclusion expects the range of services available to service users via CAS to include: 
• 
Advice, information & support 
• 
Needle exchange & BBV interventions 
• 
Assessment, recovery planning, reviews & key Working 
• 
Care co-ordination 
• 
Substitute prescribing 
• 
Psycho-social interventions 
• 
Recovery Mentoring 
• 
Referral to the Structured Day Programme 
• 
Support for home detoxification and referral to in-patient detoxification 
• 
Referral to Residential Rehabilitation 
 
CAS  clinics  will  continue  to  be  supported  by  staff  from  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment 
Service – one designated worker  will act as lead for communication with CAS and be 
the  point  of  contact  for  all  day  to  day  issues.    We  will  detail  Recovery  Workers  to 
facilitate CAS clinics as follows: 

Tuesday – 10am until 12 noon and 2pm until 6pm 

Wednesday - 10am until 12 noon 

Thursday – 10am until 12 noon and 2pm until 6pm  

Friday – 10am until 12 noon 
 
• 
Inclusion  will  make  contact  with  all  homelessness  agencies  across  Cambridge 
and surrounding areas to build and improve pathways into relevant support services for 
 
60 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
this group.  This will include strong links with CRI’s Street Outreach Team to encourage 
referral of homeless drug users into treatment.  We will explore with CRI the option for 
CAS  staff  to  accompany  their  staff  on  specific  outreach  sessions  to  market  the  drug 
treatment  service  with  homeless  service  users.    Similarly,  we  will  invite  CRI  outreach 
staff  to  shadow  treatment  staff  at  CAS  to  enhance  their  understanding  of  local 
treatment services and improve future joint working and information sharing. 
• 
 Our  understanding  is  that  CAS  staff  currently  provides  health-related  advice, 
information  and  training  to  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  staff.    As  a  large  health 
provider and specialists in drug treatment our approach would be to engage CAS staff 
in  meeting,  in  partnership  with  ourselves,  the  wider  educational  needs  of  shared  care 
staff  across  Cambridgeshire.    As  we  have  described  in  other  method  statements,  our 
aim  is  develop  shared  care  across  the  county  and  CAS  staff  could  play  an  important 
educational and support role along side Inclusion. 
 
12. (Section 
Provision of 
Please demonstrate how service users will be reviewed and 
3B) 
Service 
that client’s prescriptions will be regularly monitored.   
Section 3.0 
 
Sub heading e 
 
 
Care Planning 
(Section 3A) 
Section 7.0 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words 
Contractors response: 
We will ensure prescriptions are regularly reviewed and monitored through: 
•  Medical  reviews  will  be  carried  out  every  3  months  as  a  minimum  requirement 
however in order to meet recovery goals and objectives these reviews should where 
possible take place more frequently.  
•  Nurse  Prescribers  will  ensure  that  all  service  users  they  are  prescribing  for  are 
reviewed by a member of the medical team every 3 months. 
•  At  each  service  user’s  prescribing  review,  the  prescriber  will  discuss  recovery 
focused treatment options such as reduction and detoxification if the service user is 
stable on their treatment. A service user’s key worker will be present at the review. If 
a  service  user  is  deemed  as  making  little  progress  on  the  prescription  and  they 
continue  to  use  illicit  substances  on  top,  further  structured  psycho-social 
interventions  will  be  discussed  with  the  service  user  as  well  as  a  review  of  their 
social needs. The key worker will then update the service user’s care plan to reflect 
any new recovery goals and objectives set.  
•  A full clinical audit will be undertaken yearly.  
•  Monthly audits will be carried out reviewing prescribing and key workers caseloads 
and this will be fed back as part of staff’s supervision. The audit will focus on service 
user’s progression in relation to their recovery journey and whether their prescribing 
reviews  reflect  this.  At  supervision,  action  plans  will  be  drawn  up  to  support  the 
member  of  staff  in  adopting  a  more  recovery  focused  treatment  plan  with  their 
service  users.  If  staff  continue  to  make  no  progress  then  options  such  as 
performance management will be considered.  
•  Staff will discuss individual cases at monthly clinical meetings where all staff will be 
 
61 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
present. Staff in conjunction with the medical team will review the case in a person 
centred way ensuring  that all areas of a service user’s treatment and recovery are 
reviewed.  
•  Key workers will be responsible for monitoring their service user’s prescriptions and 
liaising with the pharmacist on a regular basis to review dispensing and compliance. 
•  We  will  undertake  partnership  working  with  local  pharmacies  to  build  strong 
communication  links  and  protocols  to  be  set  where  pharmacies  will  contact  the 
service to report missed pick ups or any concerns they have.  
 
13. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please demonstrate the mechanisms that are in place to 
Sub heading 
Service 
ensure that clients are not prescribed controlled medication 

from more than one source. 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1500 words 
 
Contractors response: 
We  will  ensure  controlled  medications  are  not  prescribed  concurrently  by  more  than 
one source through:  
•  We  have  robust  checks  to  ensure  that  correct  medication  is  prescribed  by  our 
services.  Prescriptions are checked by a doctor, administrator, drug  worker, client 
and  pharmacist  before  issue  and  every  prescription  number  is  logged  on  our 
medicine cards.  
•  Preventing  prescriptions  also  being  issued  by  other  doctors  is  more  complex.   We 
use  a  range  of  measures  concerning  this  which  we  outline  below.    However  since 
the end of the Addicts Index in 1996 no national check list is available.  So whilst our 
systems  are  robust  for  checking  for  double  prescribing  in  a  locality  if  a  person 
manages  to  get  a  prescription  from  a  doctor  outside  of  the  area  or  a  private 
practitioner then it is very hard to find out apart from through word of mouth.  In this 
case,  where  we  know  a  service  user  has  a  local  connection  elsewhere  we  will 
contact treatment agencies there to check whether the person is known to them and 
in receipt of medications. 
•  In  one of Inclusion’s other prescribing services in Birmingham  we utilise a system 
known  as  the  NDTMS  prescribing  check  where  all  agencies  fax  a  form  requesting 
prescribing information and this goes to a central database.  Services then receive a 
fax  back  confirming  if  any  other  agencies  in  the  West  midlands  conurbation  (as 
opposed to the region) have prescribed for this service user in the last 12 months.  
As far as we are aware this system is only currently available in Birmingham.  We 
will negotiate with the East of England NDTMS to see if a similar arrangement can 
be  set  up  for  Cambridgeshire.    This  system  provides  as  robust  information  as  is 
possible within the present system.   
•  At treatment entry a  letter is sent off to  each  service user’s GP to inform them of 
the opiate  substitute medication  that  we  are  prescribing  to  ensure  that they  do  not 
double script. 
•  When clients are being transferred from outside agencies, we ask for a copy of their 
current prescription to confirm handover dates. The pharmacy is then contacted and 
informed  of  the  transfer.  The  referring  agency  is  contacted  when  the  service  user 
attends their first prescribing appointment to avoid any double scripting.  
 
62 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
•  Once the service user has attended their initial assessment, a list of all services in 
the  local  area  is  used  to  telephone  agencies  to  ensure  no  other  prescribing  is  on-
going for that service user.  
•  PACT data provided from the PCT would highlight which GP’s are prescribing opiate 
substitute medication per se - we would ask if this information could be supplied to 
us  or  others under  the  auspices  of  the  Shared  Care  Monitoring  Group.   We  would 
contact  each  practice  prescribing  controlled  drugs  outside  of  the  shared  care 
scheme  to  assure  ourselves  that  individuals  prescribed  for  were  not  ones  that  we 
engaged with the Adult Drug Treatment Service.    
•  We  will  monitor  any  service  users  we  become  aware  of  that  are  prescribed  out  of 
area  or  by  private  health  clinics.      Such  information  usually  comes  to  us  through 
word of mouth from other service users. Mindful of confidentiality we will investigate 
any such claims that are made. 
•  We  would  engage  in  any  national  initiatives  that  attempted  to  make  this  system 
more robust.  However it is our experience that since the GP contract began nearly 
all GP’s now only prescribe through shared care enhanced services and as long as 
the  shared  care  systems  are  robust  then  double  scripting  is  very  unusual.    Within 
our shared care schemes this is prevented by all service users being entered on our 
secure database which highlights any double entries.  In order to make the system 
in Cambridgeshire robust we would also need to have details of peopled prescribed 
through  Cambridge  Access  Surgery  entered  on  our  database  or  details  cross 
referenced.    The  simplest  answer  would  be  for  us  both  to  use  the  same  database 
but  we  would  not  wish  to  pre-empt  negotiations.   This  will  be  a  matter  that  we  will 
negotiate  during  our  discussions  with  CAS  prior  to  set up and  will  form part  of  our 
service level agreement with them.    
 
 
 
63 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, d) GP Shared Care  
 
Spec  
Method  
Method Statement 
Reference 
Statement 
Reference 

1. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
Please demonstrate how the service will support 
 
Service 
GP’s working within shared care to retain clients. 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  believes  that  primary  care  is  the  most  appropriate  venue  to  treat  the 
majority  of  service  users.    Within  our  management  team  we  have  expertise  of 
helping  to  develop  GP  involvement  in  treatment  throughout  the  country.    This 
experience  and  our  research  on  GP’s  needs  identifies  the  elements  GP’s  need  in 
place in order to feel able to take on and retain service users in shared care. 
 
The number one thing that GP’s identify themselves as needing is ‘competence’ in 
other  words  training.    Inclusion  would  enable  all  GP’s  working  in  shared  care  to 
undertake  the  Royal  College  of  General  Practitioners  (RCGP)  part  1  certificate  in 
the  Management  of  Drug  Dependency  which  is  the  qualification  all  GP’s  should 
undertake before entering into this line of work.  We would also encourage GP’s to 
undertake 
other 
certificates 
provided 
by 
the 
RCGP 
such 
as 
‘The 
RCGP Certificate in  Reducing  Harm; Maximising  Health,  Recovery  and Well Being 
for  People  Using  Drugs  and  Alcohol’  and  the   ‘The  RCGP  Certificate  in  the 
Detection,  Diagnosis  and  Management  of  Hepatitis  B  and  C’.    We  would  also 
expect GP’s to undertake a certain level of Continuing Professional Development in 
this  field  (the  RCGP  recommend  4  hours  per  year  for  shared  care  GP’s)  and  this 
would  be  covered  either  by  attendance  at  one  of  the  regular  RCGP  Continuing 
Professional Development (CPD) events or at CPD events that we will provide on a 
regular  basis  (we  would  also open  these  events  to  pharmacists and  other primary 
care staff). 
 
Some  GP’s  may  develop  a  special  interest  in  this  area  and  if  so  we  would 
encourage  them  to  undertake  the  RCGP  certificate  part  2.    We  would  also 
encourage them to undertake a greater amount of CPD (the RCGP recommend 15 
hours a year for GP’s with a special interest (GPwSI’s)).  Inclusion has its finger on 
the  pulse  of  what  is  available  through  the  RCGP  as  our  Community  Service  lead 
Jim  Barnard  is  the  chair  of  Substance  Misuse  Management  in  General  Practice 
(SMMGP)  who  develop  the  certificate  courses  for  the  college,  organise  the  CPD 
events and organise the college’s annual conference. 
 
Secondly GP’s feel they need adequate support to provide services.  We would be 
offering  bespoke  drug  worker  support  to  practices  involved  in  shared  care.    The 
amount  of  support  required  will  vary  due  to  the  complexity  of  clients  and  the 
expertise  of  the  practice.    Whilst  we  will  offer  to  take  clients  back  into  specialist 
services if the GP feels they can no longer manage them we will  do all we can to 
support the practice to retain them.  Our experience is that nearly all clients can be 
managed  in  primary  care  with  the  right  level  of  support  and  the  right  level  of  GP 
 
64 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
confidence  and  competence.    A  good  example  is  in  our  services  in  Swindon  we 
manage  some  of  the  most  challenging  patients  that  we  have  in  a  shared  care 
arrangement with the violent patients’ practice where the GP (who is now a GPwSI) 
works  alongside  one  of  our  most  experienced  workers.    This  has  proved  very 
successful  with  one  of  the  patients  being  nominated  by  the  GP  for  one  of  our 
recovery awards. 
 
Thirdly GP’s say they need to feel safe medico-legally to undertake this sort of work 
due to perceived risks of General Medical Council action.  This will be addressed by 
high  quality  support  form  our  drug  workers,  expert  medical  advice  from  our 
specialist  doctors  or  non-medical  prescribers  and  production  of  clinical  protocols 
and shared care guidelines based on sound national good practice and evidence for 
them  to  refer  to.    Finally  what  has  proved  successful  in  many  areas  are  peer 
support/group supervision sessions for GP’s involved in shared care.  We will offer 
these on a quarterly basis. 
 
Fourthly GP’s feel that they need to feel what they are doing is worthwhile and that 
they are genuine stakeholders in the treatment system.  We will always emphasise 
the important role primary care has to play and that people are best treated in their 
own  community  by  their  own  GP  where  they  have  access  to  the  whole  range  of 
primary care medical services as well as easier referral routes to specialist medical 
services.    We  will  ensure  that  all  GP’s  in  shared  care  receive  the  free  quarterly 
SMMGP newsletter which champions the value of primary care based treatment as 
well as keeping abreast of the field.  We will ensure there is a robust Shared Care 
Monitoring Group (SCMG) which involves all stakeholders such as GP’s, the LMC, 
pharmacists, the LPC and commissioners.  Through the SCMG we will ensure that 
GP’s feel they have ownership of the scheme rather the being dictated to by us. 
 
The  fifth  main  thing  that  GP’s  identify  as  important  for  them  is  appropriate 
remuneration  for  the  work  that  they  do.   We  would  ensure  that  our  administration 
systems are robust so Local Enhanced Scheme payments are correct and on time.  
We have an efficient finance department who will ensure this.  We will also review 
the  current  payment  scheme  and  discuss  potential  improvements  with  GP’s  –  for 
instance we could explore introducing a higher payment for GPwSI’s who take on a 
larger workload and deal with more complex cases. 
 
Finally other members of the primary care team need to be engaged in the process.  
We will encourage practice nurses and health visitors to take an interest and attend 
our CPD events.  Pharmacists are critical in the provision of high quality services as 
they often see clients on a daily basis and as well as inviting them to CPD events 
we  will  provide  bespoke  training.    Another  crucial  group  are  receptionists.    Short 
training events for receptionists prove effective in changing attitudes and creating a 
positive  atmosphere  within  practices.    We  would  be  offering  training  events  for 
practices  primarily  aimed  at  receptionists  for  all  practices  in  shared  care  and  for 
those thinking of joining. 
 
To  put  it  simply  what  we  will  be  developing  will  be  a  confident  and  competent 
General  Practice  workforce  that  feels  that  they  are  major  stakeholders  in  the 
scheme, have support to do the job, are safe in doing the job and are valued both 
professionally and financially. 
 
65 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
2. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
Please demonstrate and detail how the service will 
 
Service 
recruit more GP’s to shared care. 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion recognises that Shared Care across Cambridgeshire is under-developed.  
We believe that the preferred location for the treatment of drug dependency should 
always  lean  towards  primary  care  by  developing  the  expertise  and  capacity  of 
general practices to work with substance misuse.  We also believe that this cannot 
be  done  effectively  or  safely  without  recognising  clear  principles  of  primary  care 
development and adhering to them.   
 
Inclusion has extensive experience of developing and operating primary care based 
treatment  systems:    Our  Community  Services  Lead,  Jim  Barnard,  is  also  currently 
Chair  of  the  Substance  Misuse  Management  in  General  Practice  (SMMGP) 
network, in partnership with the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and 
the National Treatment Agency (NTA).  Previously Jim spent 8 years as an SMMGP 
Advisor, building shared care schemes across England and developing the RCGP 
certificate courses for GP’s. 
 
There are several reasons why primary care is the optimal venue for treatment: 
 
•  Drug  misuse  carries  with  it,  for  many  people,  a  wide  range  of  other  physical, 
psychological and social problems: in many ways it is an ‘all aspects of your life' 
problem,  therefore  the  ideal  medical  practitioner  to  manage  these  problems  is 
one  specialising  in  general  medicine.    In  primary  care  all  the  many  physical 
health  problems  can  be  addressed  such  as  Blood  Borne  Virus  screening  and 
vaccination,  wound  care,  sexual  health  intervention  as  well  as  other  general 
health need often neglected within a drug using lifestyle. 
•  Secondly,  people  stay  with  their  general  practice  often  for  life:  this  not  only 
means the practice will have known the patient and their family for many years 
and will have a greater understanding of their social situation but will always be 
there, once they have completed treatment.   
•  Thirdly  it  is  more  local  and  convenient  for  users.    Travelling  to  a  central 
treatment  centre  can be  very  disruptive  to  someone’s  life,  especially  on  a  long 
term basis. 
•  Research has shown that treatment in general practice, in terms of purely drug 
dependency outcomes are equally good to those in specialist treatment. 
•  It  normalises  drug  use.    In  other  areas  of  medicine  people  are  referred  to 
specialists for clinical opinion and sometimes stabilisation of their condition after 
which ongoing treatment is conducted by their general practitioner: Increasingly 
this  expert  opinion  and  stabilisation  is  provided  by  a  local  GP  with  a  special 
interest.    There  is  no  reason  that  drug  use  should  not  be  treated  in  the  same 
way. 
•  Drug users when surveyed overwhelmingly prefer being treated by their G.P. 
 
 
66 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
With  this  philosophy  in  mind,  Inclusion  will  seek  to  recruit more GP’s  and  develop 
Shared Care across Cambridgeshire by: 
 
•  Ensuring that Shared Care takes into account local treatment needs.  Having a 
predefined  model  of  Shared  Care  which  is  imposed  on  a  locality  is  usually 
doomed  to  failure.    Models  need  to  be  developed  through  consultation  with  all 
stakeholders. 
•  Providing  GP’s  with  appropriate  support,  dependent  on  their  experience  and 
level of need.  This support needs to be credible, timely and appropriate to need.  
Such  support  will  be  provided  by  the  Consultant  Psychiatrist  and  other 
experienced Adult Drug Treatment Service staff. 
•  Ensuring GP’s receive appropriate remuneration.  The mechanisms for this are 
dealt with below. 
•  Involving  Primary  Care  stakeholders  in  the  planning  and  development  of  the 
local scheme to increase levels of ownership.  We will promote this through the 
Shared  Care  Monitoring  Group,  local  strategic  planning  forums  and  bilateral 
practice level meetings. 
•  Designing  clear  referral  pathways  to  ensure  service  users  receive  the  level  of 
care they need, in the right place at the right time.   
•  Agreeing robust local guidelines, protocols and supervision arrangements within 
our clinical governance framework to ensure GP’s feel safe medico-legally.   
•  Developing  the  competence  of  General  Practitioners  in  primary  care  through 
access  to  the  level  of  training  appropriate  with  their  role.    This  will  be 
underpinned  by  arrangements  for  continuing  professional  development  and 
appraisal. 
•  Encouraging  those  GP’s  involved  in  Shared  Care  to  talk  to  professional 
colleagues who are not.  In our experience, GP’s are better placed to decide to 
join Shared Care schemes when hearing first hand from other GP’s about their 
experiences. 
 
Inclusion also see the development of other Primary Care based staff as important 
in driving the involvement of more GP Practices: 
 
• 
Practice  nurses  may  choose  to  take  a  special  interest  in  drug  dependency 
treatment.  Nurses  are  encouraged  to  take  a  special  interest by  the  Department  of 
Health  and  are  able  to  access  RCGP  training.    Their  role  may  vary  from  offering 
general  healthcare  and  harm  reduction  such  as  immunisation  or  sexual  health 
advice, to supporting the treatment process itself. 
• 
Reception staff have an important role to play as they are in the front line.  If 
receptionists are welcoming and accepting to drug users, particularly those entering 
treatment  for  the  first  time,  this  will  increase  the  likelihood  of  successful 
engagement  in  treatment.    Training  for  reception  staff  can  help  to  reduce  conflict 
and enable staff to understand and take pride in their role as well as contribute to a 
good quality treatment environment. 
• 
Health visitors, midwives and district nurses may develop a special interest in 
drug  use,  particularly  in  specialist  practices.    Community  nurses  can  be  crucial  in 
the identification of a drug or a potential drug problem in a family and can facilitate 
access into treatment.  As providers of support to families and carers of drug users 
in  and  out  of treatment  they  are  ideally  placed  to  offer  health education and  harm 
 
67 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
reduction advice. 
 
Inclusion seeks to maximise support to all primary care based staff and encourages 
them  to  develop  their  roles.    We  have  expertise  in  the  development  of  training 
programmes for  reception  staff  and employ  specialist midwives  and  health  visitors 
in our services. 
 
3. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how the service will provide 
Sub heading f 
Service 
GP’s with necessary training. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
 
Contractors response: 
As  outlined  in  section  1  we  will  be  expecting  all  GP’s  in  shared  care  to  have 
undertaken  the  RCGP  part  1  certificate  in  drug  dependency  or  equivalent.    These 
can be delivered either by going to a national RCGP event or by delivering it locally 
using  an  accredited  RCGP  trainer.    We  have  accredited  RCGP  trainers  in  our 
service  and  we  will  be  running  the  RCGP  certificate  locally  (one  of  our  team  was 
one  of  the  authors  of  the  course)  although  we  would  also  facilitate  GP’s  going  to 
national  events  on  an  individual  basis.    The  GP’s  also  had  to  do  some  online 
learning to complete the course. 
 
We  will  encourage  GP’s  to  undertake  other  certificates  provided  by  the  RCGP 
outlined  above.    We  would  also  expect  GP’s  to  undertake  a  certain  level  of 
Continuing  Professional  Development  in  this  field  (the  RCGP  recommend  4  hours 
per  year for  shared  care  GP’s)  and  this  would  be  covered  either by  attendance  at 
one of the regular RCGP Continuing Professional Development (CPD) events or at 
CPD  events  that  we  will  provide  on  a  regular  basis  (we  would  also  open  these 
events  to  pharmacists  and  other  primary  care  staff).    GP’s  with  a  Special  Interest 
will  be  encouraged  to  undertake  the  RCGP  certificate  part  2  and  make  a  lager 
commitment to CPD. 
 
We will run regular CPD events ourselves on a variety of topics which  will include 
blood borne virus prevention and treatment, prescribing for recovery (which involves 
an interactive session with peer mentors and other drug users in recovery) and drug 
misuse  in  pregnancy.    However  we  expect  the  agenda  for  CPD  events  to  be  set 
largely by the GP’s themselves. 
 
We  will  provide  short  (2  hour)  training  events  for  practice  staff  in  particular 
receptionists.    However  we  will  be  encouraging  GP’s  to  attend  these  as  our 
experience is that their attendance helps practice cohesion on the issue.  Also such 
events  will  be  instructive  for  GP’s  whose  practice  is  deciding  whether  to  join  the 
scheme or not. Our experience is that offering these sessions encourages practices 
into  schemes  and  this  will  be  one  of  our  strategies  for  further  developing  shared 
care. 
 
In  terms  of  funding  the  training,  this  is  a  matter  for  negotiation  between  Inclusion 
 
68 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
and GP’s. We will set aside a budget for GP training and we will negotiate with GP’s 
on  an  individual  level  basis  regarding  who  pays  for  what.    We  will  also  arrange 
sponsorship for events that we run to offset the cost. 
 
In terms organisation a member of staff will have responsibility for GP and primary 
care training and development.  They will be supported by our central administrator 
in  terms  of  booking  people  onto  the  course  and  booking  venues.    They  will  have 
access  to  the  range  of  expert  professionals  within  Inclusion  who  can  both  deliver 
the training and advise on topics and strategy.   
 
In  the  fist  3  months  of  the  projects  life  we  will  do  a  primary  care  training  needs 
analysis and produce a primary care training strategy for presentation to the shared 
care monitoring group. 
 
4. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please evidence the funding proposals for GP 
Sub heading a 
Service 
Shared Care payments. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
As  stated  above  GP’s  require  an  appropriate  level  or  remuneration  to  provide 
treatment  for  drug  dependency,  as  this  is  an  enhanced  service  under  the  GP 
contract.  We acknowledge that without a fair remuneration scheme we will not be 
able to substantially develop shared care.  
 
It  would  be  wrong  on  two  counts  to  state  at  this  point  what  funding  structures  we 
would  implement  in  Cambridge  for  shared  care.    Firstly  we  will  need  to  negotiate 
any  changes to existing  funding  arrangements  with  local  GP’s or  risk  destabilising 
the existing shared care arrangements.  Secondly, through experience, just taking a 
funding  model  that  has  been  seen  to  work  elsewhere  and  imposing  it  on  a  local 
primary care system nearly always ends in failure -  a model needs to take account 
of  local  need,  history  and  politics  to  be  successful  with  knowledge  of  other  areas 
providing a useful pool of knowledge to draw on. 
 
We will, on start up, initially honour the existing LES payment system for GP’s. We 
will convene the shared care monitoring group at the earliest opportunity and under 
their  auspices  conduct  a  shared  care needs analysis  and  construct  a  shared  care 
strategy using the principles outlined in previous sections.   
 
Part  of  the  needs  analysis  will  be  whether  the  current  payment  system  is  fit  for 
purpose  or  needs  to  be  renegotiated  to  better  utilise  the  resources  within  primary 
care.    We  are  aware  of  a  whole  range  of  LES  payment  models  throughout  the 
country,  in  previous  employment  one  of  our  mangers  regularly  researched  and 
published  on  this  subject. We  will  use  this  experience  and  the  particular  needs  of 
Cambridge  to  suggest  a  payment  model  for  the  future.    Examples  of  the  types  of 
schemes we might consider are a two tier payment system dependent on workload, 
competence and the complexity of cases and paying for ‘treatment slots’ for shared 
care as opposed to a headcount payment. 
 
69 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Whatever  system  of  payments  we  end  up  recommending  for  Cambridge  will  have 
been developed alongside GP’s and will ultimately need to be signed up to by the 
GP’s themselves ideally through the Local Medical Committee 
 
We  will  register  all  GP’s  involved  in  shared  care  with  our  finance  department  and 
initially  use  existing  activity  reporting  structures  to  trigger  payments.    However  we 
will review these structures within 3 months of start up, again under the auspices of 
the shared care monitoring group, to assure ourselves that activity reports are fit for 
purpose and that we are getting value for money. 
 
We  have  set  aside  monies  in  our  budget  for  financing  the  existing  shared  care 
scheme  and  some  extra  monies  for  further  development.    We  aim  to  develop 
shared  care  to  the  fullest  extent  possible,  and  given  our  expertise  in  this  area  we 
are  very  optimistic  about  success.  In  order  to  develop  beyond  the  limits  that  our 
fund for development allows we will find efficiencies within the service.  Shared care 
development will in itself present opportunities for efficiency savings. 
 
5. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please demonstrate how shared care will be 
Sub heading c 
Service 
delivered alongside other interventions. 
 
Weighting 3 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
People  in  shared  care  will  have  access  to  the  same  range  of  interventions  as  all 
clients  of  the  service.   We  will  have  dedicated  experienced  staff delivering  shared 
care  support  to  GP’s  and  offering  1:1  psycho-social  interventions  to  clients.    As 
need is identified the member of staff will be able to facilitate access to all the other 
additional services in the same way as other staff.  In particular our structured day 
care  service  will  be  useful  for  those  who  have  stabilise  but  are  now  ready  to 
consider moving on in their recovery and coming off their prescribed medication. 
 
Those  in  shared  care  in  theory  can  have  better  access  to  service  provision  as  all 
their  general  health  needs  are  more  likely  to  be  met  through  regular  contact  with 
their practice.  It is a particularly effective venue for ensuring BBV interventions are 
carried out as well as  wound care and referrals to specialities such as hepatology 
and pain clinics. 
 
Those in shared care are often those with the most recovery capital and the highest 
likelihood  of  achieving  sustainable  recovery.    We  have  developed  a  Red  Amber 
Green  audit  tool  which  identifies  those  who  have  more  or  less  complex  needs.  
Those  who  score a  green  are  the  ones  we  will  mostly  prioritise for  more  intensive 
interventions aimed at recovery and we expect many of these to be in shared care.  
Due  to  this  we  will  be  supporting  home  detoxification  within  the  general  practice 
setting.  We have already developed robust community detoxification protocols for 
use  in  primary  care  covering  all  the  pharmacological  options  and  their 
recommended regimes. We, as we have elsewhere, will  link this to structured day 
care,  where  intensive  recovery  preparation  work  will  be  undertaken  utilising  peer 
support  through  peer  mentors  and  volunteers.    We  will  support  GP’s  through  the 
 
70 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
medical  aspects  of  detoxification  and  we  will  have  provided  training  to  them 
beforehand  if  needed.    Post  detoxification  support  will  continue  in  structured  day 
care  and  peer  self-help  groups.  Clients  may  then  choose  to  join  our  volunteer 
scheme. 
 
We  would  expect  many  of  the  clients  in  shared  care  to  engage  in  our  Recovery 
Mentor  schemes  and  help  in  the  peer  support  of  other  clients  who  have  not 
progressed  as  far  in  their  recovery.    We  will  be  running  a  service  user  awards 
scheme for those who have progressed in their recovery.  This has proved a great 
success in our other community services.  What was also inspirational were service 
users  being  nominated  for  awards  by  their  GP  and  some  of  those  GP’s  attending 
the event.  This is something we will encourage. 
 
In short there will be no difference between what a client in shared care can expect 
from  us  from  other  clients  except  perhaps  better  access  to  services  from  their 
surgery  and  an  even  greater  focus  on  recovery  as  opposed  to  stabilisation.    Also 
they will not be discharged by their GP practice once recovered one of the biggest 
advantages of treatment in primary care.  
 
6. (Section 3B) 
 
Please demonstrate the referral arrangements that 
Section 5.0 
 
will be in place between GP shared care and other 
 
Onward 
modalities within the treatment system. 
(Section 3A) 
referral/Aftercare 
Section 10.0 
and support 
Sub heading 
10.1 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
People  treated  in  shared  care  will  have  access  to  the  whole  range  of  services 
offered within the treatment system.  The shared care worker will be offering one to 
one support but will be able to refer into all other services we reply like all our other 
workers.  However we would expect services such as Blood Borne Virus prevention 
and treatment would be delivered within the practice, however if not we will deliver 
the  service  to  them  ideally  in  the  practice  on  an  outreach  basis.    As  described 
above clients will have access to the full range of structured day care opportunities. 
 
GP’s or shared care workers will also be able to refer into our central services for a 
specialist  medical  review  and  for  restabilisation  if  necessary.    However  in  most 
cases  we  expect  to  be  able  to  support  GP’s  to  retain  patients  in  their  practices 
throughout  their  treatment  journey  through  expert  liaison  support  and  specialist 
medical advice from our doctors.  We run a shared care scheme in Swindon where 
this arrangement works very well and transfers back in to our specialist doctors are 
very low. 
 
Services such as home detoxification will be delivered alongside the GP as already 
described and specialist nursing support will be available. 
 
71 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Should  a  service  user  in  shared  care  become  pregnant  they  will  immediately  be 
referred  to our mother  and baby  worker  in  the  same  way  as  other  clients  with  the 
advantage that being already closely involved with their GP surgery they will find it 
easier to access the range of ante natal services on offer. 
 
GP’s  are  in  a  better  position  to  refer  to  many  services  outside  of  the  treatment 
system  and  we  will  try  and  maximise  this  opportunity  to  benefit  clients.    One 
example  that  we  have  found  useful  is  referral  to  primary  care  counselling  (IAPT) 
services  which  provide  CBT  for  anxiety,  depression  and  post  traumatic  stress 
disorder.    Many  of  our  clients  find  this  very  beneficial  as  many  suffer  from  these 
conditions.    We  have  had  to  fight  for  their  right,  like  any  other  citizen,  to  access 
these services in the past.  These services almost always require a GP referral 
 
All clients whether in shared care or not will have robust care plans developed with 
them  and  their  needs  for  services  within  and  without  the  treatment  system  will  be 
identified.    If  an  external  referral  is  necessary  that  will  be  done  as  for  any  other 
client and an internal referral the same. 
 
We will run one integrated drug treatment service, where you’re medical treatment 
is delivered will not effect the range of service available to be accessed.  The only 
difference  will  be  the  possibly  wider  range  of  external  services  our  shared  care 
clients can access due to close contact with their GP practice.  
 
 
72 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, e) Supervised Consumption 
 
Spec  
Method  
Method Statement 
Reference 
Statement 
Reference 

1. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
Please demonstrate how the service will increase the number of 
 
the Service 
pharmacies offering Supervised Consumption in Cambridgeshire. 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  conduct  a  geographical  needs  analysis  under  the  auspices  of  the  Shared  Care 
Monitoring Group, to establish where the county needs to have supervised consumption services 
in place.  This will take account of the need for provision in rural areas as well as urban.  We will 
combine  this  with  a  needs  analysis  looking  at  the  potential  of  pharmacists  to  become  involved 
the  scheme.    In  the  first  instance  though  and  as  part  of  our  needs  analysis  we  will  visit  local 
pharmacies  not  involved  in  the  scheme  to both  gauge  their  needs  and  encourage  them to  join 
the  scheme.    Our  experience,  having  done  this  elsewhere,  has  shown  us  that  these  visits  are 
best undertaken by a doctor and we will assign one of the service doctors to do this work. 
 
We will then negotiate with local pharmacies and the Local Pharmaceutical Committee (LPC) to 
agree where more services can be provided.  Our experience has shown us that national chains 
such as Boots and Lloyds are very enthusiastic to expand this side of their business and Lloyd’s 
in particular has a national substance misuse strategy.  We would engage with these and other 
pharmacy providers at a regional level.  We will also engage with smaller pharmacy businesses 
on a local level, in particular where the pharmacy is in an important strategic location. 
 
We will offer robust support to pharmacies.  This will include a dedicated pharmacy phone line 
for an immediate response to any issues around dispensing or concerns about clients.  We have 
established such a service in Swindon and this has proved very popular with local pharmacies; 
all  pharmacies  in  Swindon  are  engaged  in  supervised  consumption.    We  will  also  assign  a 
member  of  staff  to  take  a  lead  on  pharmacy  liaison  who  will  regularly  visit  pharmacies  and 
ensure that we are meeting their needs. 
 
As with General practitioners the main reason pharmacists cite for not being in involved in this 
form  of  work  is  lack  of  competence.    Therefore  we  will  offer  various  training  opportunities.  
Initially we will offer an expert session from a leading pharmacist non-medical prescriber who is 
employed  by  SSSFT  and  this  will  be  aimed  at  enthusing  pharmacists,  give  them  basic 
knowledge and this will be delivered jointly with specifically trained Recovery Mentors.  Research 
has  evidenced  that  the  more  positive  the  pharmacist’s  attitude  the  more  rewarding  they  find  it 
and the less problems they experience.  A particularly important point that will be stressed is the 
proven  role  supervised  consumption  has  played  in  the  reduction of  methadone  related deaths.  
We  will  offer  access  to  the  RCGP  certificate  part  I  alongside  GP’s.    We  would  also  expect  all 
Pharmacists to do the distance learning/on-line CPPE course on substance misuse which is the 
basic  course  all  pharmacists  should  do  in  this  field.    Pharmacists  will  also  have  access  to  the 
CPD events we will organise for GP’s and we will organise other events purely for pharmacists if 
a need is highlighted. 
 
We  will  also  be  offering  training  to  pharmacy  staff  similar  to  that  we  will  be  offering  to  GP 
 
73 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
practice staff aimed at making them feel more confident and positive about offering services to 
drug users.   
 
We  will  negotiate  with  the  LPC  using  the  present  contract  as  a  baseline  to  eventually  agree  a 
new  contract  for  Cambridgeshire  concerning  all  aspects  of  substance  misuse  service  delivery 
including supervised consumption. 
 
Some  pharmacists  do  not  deliver  supervised  consumption  due  to  the  lack  of  a  private  area  to 
deliver  the  service.    Our  experience  is  that  with  some  innovation  this  problem  can  usually  be 
overcome.  Examples of this include curtaining off a corner of a pharmacy, applying for grants or 
convincing the pharmacy to invest in building work (this is usually more successful with the large 
chains). 
 
Possibly  the  most  crucial  aspect  in  developing  supervised  consumption  is  our  attitude  to 
pharmacists.  We see pharmacists as a crucial part of the treatment team and we always ask for 
their  involvement  in  care  planning  and  case  reviews.    The  pharmacist  sees  many  clients  on  a 
daily  basis  and  can  often  develop  an  excellent  picture  of  a  service  user’s  progress.    We  will 
always  be  emphasising  how  invaluable  pharmacists  are  in  the  delivery  of  a  successful  drug 
service and helping them to understand their own importance in the local strategy. 
 
2. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
Please describe what an effective working relationship with 
 
Service 
pharmacies looks like. 
Weighting 3 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
• 
An  effective  working  relationship  with  pharmacies  is  characterised  by  the  pharmacist 
understanding they are a crucial and competent member of the treatment team who is involved 
in  care  planning  and  case  review  and  the  delivery  of  a  range  of  services  to  drug  users.    The 
pharmacist will be seeing many of the clients daily, in particular those with the highest levels of 
need and will be in contact with appropriate members of the drug treatment service on a regular 
basis about many matters including the progress of the client, client behaviour, dispensing and 
prescription issues. 
• 
This  relationship  will  be  facilitated  by  robust  training  for  pharmacists  and  their  staff  as 
outlined  above.    This  will  increase  their  confidence  and  competence  in  operating  in  this  field.  
Also they will feel well supported by regular liaison from a named lead worker, contact with our 
doctors  and  non-medical  prescribers  and  a  rapid  response  to  any  urgent  issues  that  arise  (we 
intend to provide this through a dedicated phone line).   
• 
The  pharmacists  will  feel  that  they  are  fairly  treated  and  a  service  level  agreement  will 
have  been  agreed  by  their  representatives  under  locally  enhanced  services.    If  working  for  a 
chain they will feel fully supported by their regional management to undertake this activity.  They 
will value the service as a business opportunity. 
• 
Drug  service  staff  will  see  pharmacists  as  an  important  member  of  the  team  and  be 
contacting them on a regular basis to discuss progress but also see them as a resource to gain 
pharmacological information. 
• 
Pharmacists  will  be  engaged  in  strategic  meetings  (usually  the  shared  care  monitoring 
group)  where  developments  and  issues  with  the  service  are  discussed  in  an  open  and  honest 
manner and works with other stakeholders to resolve issues and take developments forward 
 
74 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
Pharmacists would feel valued and engaged with this line of work and recognise their own 
importance to the system.  Some pharmacists would develop a special interest in this field and 
go on to provide a wider range of services which would include brief interventions, non-medical 
prescribing and blood borne virus interventions. 
• 
Pharmacists would have full confidence in the medical expertise of the drug service and 
its medical staff and feel confident that they will get a respectful response at all times as well as 
access to high quality medical advice.  At the same time they would feel confident to bring their 
own ideas to the care planning of clients and be able to challenge any prescriptions they found 
unusual or that they didn’t understand. 
• 
Pharmacists  would  use  their  power  to  change  minor  mistakes  in  prescriptions  but  be 
confident enough to challenge the service if they felt they were breaking the law by dispensing. 
• 
In  summary,  an  effective  working  relationship  is  where  pharmacists  feel  they  are  a 
member  of  the  team,  are  valued,  seen  as  competent  and  as  able  to  contribute  as  any  other, 
bringing their own expert knowledge and training into play for the benefit of the service  and its 
users. 
 
3. Section 2.0 
Aims and 
Please demonstrate how the service will promote a recovery 
Sub heading b 
Objectives of 
focussed model.  
 
the service 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
All  our  training  events  described  above  will  have  a  recovery  focus  and  impart  our  vision  of 
recovery  to  pharmacists.    We  will  be  delivering  our  initial  training  for  pharmacists  with  service 
users  in  recovery  utilising  SSSFT’s  expert  pharmacist.    The  best  way  to  imbue  any  group  of 
people with a recovery focus is for them to interact and be trained by service users in recovery 
and we will work with Recovery Mentors to do this. We will also be offering more in depth CPD 
days on recovery which will be open to both GP’s and pharmacists 
 
We would also expect pharmacists to pick up more about our recovery focused model through 
regular interaction with our staff whether it be Recovery Workers, the designated liaison workers 
or  our  doctors  and  management.    They  would  also  witness  ‘recovery  in  action’  through 
involvement in care planning and case reviews. 
 
All  pharmacies  will  receive  our  pharmacy  liaison  pack  which  we  will  tailor  to  the  needs  of 
Cambridgeshire;  this  will  explain  our  model  and  protocols  and  outline  what  we  expect  from 
pharmacies  involved  in  the  scheme  and  what  they  can  expect  from  us  (and  reflect  existing 
service level agreements).   
 
We will be expecting trained pharmacists to be interacting with clients on a regular basis giving 
them encouragement towards reaching their goals of abstinence through brief recovery focussed 
interventions  as  well  as  useful  advice  and  information  on  basic  recovery  tips  as  well  as  on 
medication,  issues  around  blood  borne  viruses  and  other  pharmacological  matters.    Some 
pharmacies will develop a special interest and may take a greater role in aspects of therapy and 
prescribing  (should  they  become  NMPs)  and  we  will  offer  enhanced  support  to  these 
pharmacists  and  offer  supervision.    We  have  developed  a  very  effective  pharmacy  based 
community detoxification service in Swindon based on this approach which has proved popular 
with service users due to its accessibility, locality and the expertise of the pharmacist. 
 
75 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
We will also encourage and facilitate the development of a pharmacy peer support group so that 
pharmacists  can  learn  from  each  other,  share  experiences  and  swap  ideas.    This  has  proved 
successful elsewhere especially with pharmacists who develop a greater interest in the field. 
 
We  will  be  assuring  that  our  pharmacies  are  delivering  recovery  focused  services  through 
feedback  from  our  service  user  group  who  will  be  in  contact  with  our  service  users.    Any 
problems with service delivery we will address by visiting pharmacies and offering more support 
and  training.    If  ultimately  pharmacies  persistently  fail  to  deliver  the  services  needed  then  we 
reserve the right not to buy services off them. 
 
4. Section 2.0 
Aims and 
Please demonstrate how the service will ensure that the pharmacist 
Sub heading f 
Objectives of 
will contribute to the client’s care plan and also provide support with 
 
the service 
brief interventions. 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion consider pharmacists as part of the treatment team.  As such they will have a copy of 
the care plan and be encouraged to contribute to it where appropriate.  In many cases this will 
be  through  face  to  face  communication  with  service  users  and  phone  communication  with  the 
key  worker.    Sometimes  it  will  be  appropriate  that  the  pharmacist  is  physically  present  at  the 
care  plan  review  –  this  may  be  because  the  case  is  particularly  complex  or  because  the 
pharmacist has a special interest and wants to have a more intensive role in delivering the care 
plan – in such cases we would endeavour to hold the review at the pharmacy. 
 
Service users will sign a confidentiality agreement at the start of treatment which will include the 
agreement  to  share  all  relevant  information  with  their  pharmacist,  this  is  necessary  for  the 
pharmacist to play an active role.  We note that at the moment there is a three way agreement in 
place  in  Cambridgeshire  between  the  service  user,  drug  worker  and  pharmacist.    If  the 
pharmacists wish this to continue it we will consider it.  However this document like most others 
like it focuses a lot on the behaviour of users and to quote one of our service users ‘you sign an 
unwritten contract as soon as you walk into a pharmacy, or any shop, not to misbehave or nick 
stuff – why do we need to sign this?
’.  We do find these documents somewhat discriminatory and 
prefer  to  have  information  sharing  agreements  and  patient  information  leaflets  outlining 
procedures such as why dispensing might cease if pick ups are missed (loss of tolerance) and 
why  medication  cannot  be  dispensed  if  someone  is  intoxicated.    We  will  negotiate  with 
pharmacists on this issue 
 
The pharmacist will be in regular contact with the Recovery Worker, especially in more complex 
cases or where a detoxification is under way.  This regular contact will be vital in informing the 
care  planning  process  as  the  pharmacist  usually  has  the  better  picture  of  the  person’s  real 
progress due to the frequency of contact. 
 
Our initial training package, delivered by SSSFT’s expert pharmacist alongside service users in 
recovery  which  has  been  described  above  will  cover  among  other  things  the  delivery  of  Brief 
Interventions  that  can  be  used  in  pharmacies  with  service  users.    These  will  be  recovery 
focussed brief interventions in line with NICE guidance: 
 
 
76 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
“Opportunistic  brief  interventions  focused  on  motivation  should  be  offered  to  people  in  limited 
contact  with  drug  services  (for  example,  those  attending  a  needle  and  syringe  exchange  or 
primary  care  settings)  if  concerns  about  drug  misuse  are  identified by  the  service  user  or  staff 
member. These interventions should:  
• normally consist of two sessions each lasting 10–45 minutes   
•  explore  ambivalence  about  drug  use  and  possible  treatment,  with  the  aim  of  increasing 
motivation to change behaviour, and provide non-judgemental feedback. 
 
 
As per the NICE guidance Brief Intervention may be most useful when directed at people using 
the  needle  exchange  service  and  not  in  touch  with  the  treatment  service.    However  we  would 
extend  this  to  people  who  are  having  difficulty  in  engaging  in  the  service,  those  with  complex 
needs and those new to the service – Brief Interventions would form part of their care plan.  We 
would also see a role for Brief Interventions for people who are going through detoxification or 
have completed detoxification (and potentially picking up prescriptions for Naltrexone) to bolster 
confidence, motivation and enthusiasm. 
 
Experience elsewhere has shown us that pharmacists who engage with clients and deliver Brief 
Interventions  improve  the  outcomes  for  clients  and  increase  referral  rates  into  structured 
treatment.  We would encourage some pharmacists to take on a special interest and to seek to 
deliver more than just brief interventions.  We would also expect all pharmacists to already to be 
able  to  deliver  competent  advice  and  information  on  medicines  and  medicines  management.  
We will negotiate with pharmacist’s remuneration they may require for these services as part of 
our negotiations around supervised consumption. 
 
5. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please detail how the service envisages working with the LPC to 
Sub heading a 
service 
deliver this element of the service. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion would seek to meet with the LPC at the earliest opportunity once we have completed 
our needs analysis of pharmacy service provision.  The agreement of the LPC to any scheme is 
usually  crucial  to  its  success  as  their  agreement  makes  the  job  of  ‘selling’  the  concept  of 
delivering  services  for  substance  misuse far  easier. We  would  undertake  these negotiations  at 
senior management level with a member of our finance department present. We would use the 
present contracting arrangements as a starting point and discuss future arrangements in the light 
of the needs analysis and budgetary affordability.   
 
We  have  a  great  deal  of  experience  within  our  senior  management  of  negotiations  with  LPC’s 
and we will bring this expertise to the table. We understand the need to respect pharmacies as 
businesses  that  must  be  profitable  but  also  balancing  that  against  our  duty  to  get  value  for 
money for commissioners and service users.  
 
Having agreed contracts with the LPC we would hope to have ongoing formal meetings with the 
full group on at least a yearly basis where we would normally give a presentation on our service 
progress  and  then have  a  feedback  session.   We  have  found  these  invaluable  in  our  Swindon 
service for gauging the satisfaction of pharmacists that we work along side. 
 
77 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
We would also expect to meet a representative of the LPC on a regular basis at the shared care 
monitoring  group.    We  will  take  responsibility  for  ensuring  this  group  exists  and  is  functional.  
This group needs to oversee the development and smooth running of services in primary care.  
When the new contract starts, there will be much to discuss, negotiate and put in place and we 
would  expect  this  group  to  meet  at  least  monthly  in  the  first  6  months  of  the  contract  with  the 
potential for sub-groups to be created to ensure action on specific topics which may well include 
pharmacy provision.  In the first instance a representative of our senior management will attend 
these groups; subsequently this role will be delegated to the Cambridgeshire Service Manager. 
 
6. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please demonstrate what processes the service has in place to 
Sub heading c 
service 
ensure that pharmacies will raise any concerns regarding 
 
vulnerable adults and child protection. 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1500 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
Pharmacists  have  a  duty  like  all  professionals  to  raise  concerns  regarding  child  protection  and 
vulnerable  adults.    The  Royal  Pharmaceutical  Society  of  Great  Britain  has  published  guidance 
for pharmacists on both topics and is quite clear about the duties of pharmacists: 
 
“Pharmacists  and  pharmacy  staff  regularly  come  into  contact with children and  their  families  in 
the  course  of  their  work  and  may  come  across  families  who  are  experiencing  difficulties  in 
looking after their children.  Child protection legislation places a statutory duty on organisations 
and  professionals  to  work  together  in  the  interests  of  vulnerable  children.    All  healthcare 
professionals, including those who do not have a role specifically related to child protection, have 
a  duty  to  safeguard  and  support  the  welfare  of  children.    This  means  actively  promoting  the 
health  and  well-being  of  children  and  also  protecting  vulnerable  children  in  collaboration  with 
other organisations and authorities. Pharmacist need to be alert to potential indicators of abuse 
and  neglect,  be  familiar  with  local  procedures  for  promoting  and  safeguarding  the  welfare  of 
children, and understand the principles of patient confidentiality and information sharing
.  
 
Similarly: 
 
“Pharmacists  and  registered  pharmacy  technicians  are  likely  to  have  regular  contact  with 
vulnerable adults or their carers, and in the course of their professional duties may be become 
aware  of  situations  where  a  vulnerable  adult  is  at  risk  of  abuse,  or  is  being  abused.  It  is 
important that pharmacists and registered pharmacy technicians are alert to signs of abuse and 
take appropriate action to safeguard vulnerable adults. 
 
Inclusion  will  have  an  expectation  that  pharmacists  will  fulfil  their  duties  in  this  respect.    To 
assure  ourselves  that  this  is  the  case  we  will  make  it  part  of  our  service  level  agreement  that 
pharmacies have up to date local safeguarding and POVA training at the appropriate level.  We 
will require evidence of completion.   
 
We would also expect and assure ourselves that all pharmacies have copies of Cambridgeshire 
child protection protocols. Staff will ask to see copies during our liaison visits. 
 
Obviously  pharmacies  have  a  duty  to  report  child  protection  concerns  to  Social  Services.  
 
78 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
However  we  would  expect  to  have  ongoing  feedback  about  any  information  regarding  the 
children  of  our  service  users  and  our  Recovery  Workers  will  routinely  bring  this  up  in  their 
discussions with pharmacists.  If Pharmacists want any guidance about child protection concerns 
they can also call SSSFT’s expert child protection service based at Trust headquarters. 
 
In  terms  of  vulnerable  adults  we  would  expect  concerns  to  be  discussed  with  our  Recovery 
Workers and a decision made as to whether we would involve Social Services.  This would be 
informed  by  whether  there  was  anything  we  could  do  practically  to  remove  the  risk  of  abuse 
ourselves.   We  have  robust  procedures  for  dealing  with  vulnerable  adults  and  all  our  staff  are 
trained  in  both  child  protection  (to  at  least  level  2)  and  the  Protection  of  Vulnerable  Adults.  
However all of this will be carried out within the framework of locally agreed POVA protocols. 
 
As  part  of  the  training  we  deliver  to  pharmacists  we  will  cover  their  responsibilities  regarding 
these  issues  and  through  our  pharmacy  liaison  visits  we  will  assure  ourselves  that  all 
pharmacists are aware of their responsibilities and know the procedures to follow. 
 
If  any  pharmacist  fails  in  their  duty  regarding  either  of  these  issues  we  will  raise  it  as  a  major 
concern  to  commissioners  and  in  the  case  of  pharmacy  chains  to  their  regional  management.  
This is an issue that is wider than just their duties within our LES contract.  We have experience 
of  a  case  where  a  pharmacist  for  a  major  chained  expressed  the  wish  ‘that  our  clients  were 
dead’  –  we  reported  it  to  commissioners  and  regional  management  and  the  pharmacist  was 
subsequently removed from the post. 
 
All of these duties and responsibilities will be make quite clear in our service level agreement. 
 
7. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please evidence the payment schedules that will be put in place for 
Sub heading g 
service 
pharmacies. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion intends to honour the existing pharmacy payment schedules until we have completed 
our needs analysis of provision across the county.  We will then negotiate with the pharmacists 
and  the  LPC  to  agree  a  payment  structure  as  necessary  to  fit  with  the  need  to  develop  the 
scheme.    To  lay  down  a  payment  structure  without  negotiation  with  local  pharmacists  and 
without having done an analysis of the needs of Cambridgeshire would be foolish and doomed to 
failure.    We  have  knowledge  of  payment  schemes  around  the  country  and  we  will  bring  this 
experience to inform the kind of model we propose as a result of the needs analysis. 
 
Most payment schedules for supervision are paid for on a ‘per dispense basis’.  However other 
types of payment do exist such as payment per ‘client supervised’,  a lump sum payment for the 
service,  a  mixture  of  a  lump  sum  and  ‘per  dispense’  payment,  and  giving  pharmacists  a 
percentage  of  an agreed overall  pot based on  the amount  of  work  they  do.   We  would  tend  to 
favour the per dispense fee as it is less open to abuse in our experience and is simpler. 
 
The  existing  payment  structure  also  has  a  £4.00  payment  for  making  a  phone  call  to  report 
missed pick ups.  In our relatively wide experience we have never heard of this type of payment 
 
79 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
being  delivered  before.    This  is,  in  our  experience,  always  considered  to  be  a  safety  issue 
regarding the enhanced service of supervision and should be delivered as a core duty within that 
service  just  as  pharmacist  will  alert  GP’s  of  any  dangers  they  perceive  concerning  other 
medications they dispense.  However, what should be being paid for is Brief Interventions over 
and  above  the  interventions  one  would  expect  during  supervised  consumption,  as  we  have 
outlined above, in addition to the range of other services Pharmacies can provide.   
 
Payments  will  be  made  through  registering  all  participating  Pharmacists  with  our  finance 
department  who  will  make  payments  on  a  monthly  basis  based  on  submitted  payment  returns 
evidencing  services  provided.    We  have  calculated  a  budget  for  this  based  on  the  existing 
payment structures but with capacity to expand numbers of service users and pharmacists in the 
scheme. 
 
8. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please describe the process which will ensure this service will be 
Sub heading h 
service 
provided within budget. 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion  are  part  of  an  NHS  Foundation  Trust  that  regularly  score  an  excellent  for  financial 
governance in its ‘Monitor’ ratings and has in the recent past had the accolade ‘Foundation Trust 
of the year’.  This means that we have a very rigorous and robust finance department who put 
great  effort  into  ensuring  all  services  are  delivered  within  budget.    Any  overspends  are 
highlighted  immediately  and  measures  put  in  place  to  resolve  these  issues.    Our  finance 
department  itself  is  rigorously  scrutinized  through  internal  and  external  audit.    As  a  result  we 
have  a  very  detailed  and  comprehensive  set  of  standing  financial  instructions  which  can  be 
viewed on our web site 
 
http://www.southstaffsandshropshealthcareft.nhs.uk/getattachment/4071aa28-5e77-4b3d-b410-
e04e6bee40e7/F-RED-01.aspx 
 
This will mean in the first instance all formal negotiations with LPC’s and pharmacists generally 
will have  a member of our finance directorate present to advise management what is affordable 
and  possible  within  budget  and  also  give  pharmacists  a  realistic  view  of  the  monies  available.  
This  will  assure  that  whatever  package  is  agreed  is  possible  to  deliver  within  budget.  
Subsequent  to  this  it  is  a  management  responsibility  to  keep  the  scheme  within  budget.    To 
support this, our finance department give managers monthly reports and will require action plans 
to resolve any overspends.  
 
Inclusion  recognise  the  importance  of  supervision  consumption  to  treatment  systems  and  will 
look  to  develop  the  scheme  wherever  possible.    By  promoting  a  recovery  orientated  treatment 
system service users will spend less time in prescribing services bringing costs down in the long 
run.    We  will  ensure  that  pharmacy  services  are  utilised  appropriately  within  this  strategy  and 
always within budget. 
 
 
80 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
9. Section 6.0 
Competencies  Please demonstrate what training will be provided to both members 
Sub heading a – b  and Training of 
of staff and pharmacists working within this element of the service. 
 
Staff 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion will expect that all Pharmacists involved in the scheme will have completed the latest 
version  of  the  Centre  for  Pharmacy  Postgraduate  Education  (CPPE)  open  learning  package.  
This is the basic, bottom line training that all pharmacists should undertake to operate enhanced 
services in this field.   
 
Like  GP’s  the  main  reason  pharmacists  cite  for  not  being  in  involved  in  enhanced  service 
provision  in  this  field  is  lack  of  competence.    We  will  offer  various  training  opportunities  to 
address  this.    Initially  we  will  offer  an  expert  session  from  a  leading  pharmacist  non-medical 
prescriber employed by SSSFT.  This will be aimed at enthusing pharmacists into the field and 
give  them  basic  knowledge  and  include  training  on  delivering  brief  recovery  focussed 
interventions  with  service  users.  This  will  be  delivered  jointly  with  service  users  in  recovery.  
Research has evidenced that the more positive the pharmacists attitude the more rewarding they 
find it and the less problems they experience, meeting positive service users who talk positively 
about recovery will help to bolster a positive attitude .  A particularly important point that will be 
stressed  is  the  proven  role  that  supervised  consumption  has  played  in  the  reduction  of 
methadone related deaths.  We will also facilitate access to the RCGP certificate part I alongside 
GP’s.  We would also expect all Pharmacists to do the distance learning/on-line CPPE course.  
Pharmacists  will  also  have  access  to  the  CPD  events  that  GP’s  will  attend  and  will  encourage 
them  to  go  to  a  CPD  session  Inclusion  will  deliver  on  recovery  orientated  services.  We  will 
organise other events purely for pharmacists if a need is highlighted. 
 
Informal,  on  the  job  training  will  be  delivered  via  our  pharmacy  liaison  workers  who  will  be 
ensuring that pharmacists understand our recovery focussed services and understand our aims 
and objectives. 
 
We  will  also  be  offering  training  to  pharmacy  staff  similar  to  that  we  will  be  offering  to  GP 
practice  staff  aiming  at  making  the  feel  more  confident  and  positive  about  offering  services  to 
drug service users.  This is very important because in some cases they will be seeing more of 
our  service  users  than  the  pharmacists.    We  have  found  such  training  very  useful  elsewhere.  
This will also give a chance to imbue all pharmacy staff with our vision for recovery.  The training 
covers  basic  drug  awareness  including  information  on  substitute  medications  and  the  basic 
concepts  of  recovery  focussed  treatment  and  medical  and  psycho-social  interventions  within 
that. 
 
Inclusion will not levy a charge against Pharmacists for the in-house training provided.  Payment 
for external training will be a matter of negotiation between the service and pharmacists. 
 
 
 
81 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, 3f) Structured Psychosocial Interventions 
 
Spec  
Method  
Method Statement 
Reference 
Statement 
Reference 

1. Section 2.0  Objective of 
Please detail how the service will promote a recovery focus model 
Sub heading 
Service 
throughout all Structured Psychosocial Interventions. 
2.2 a – i 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion’s approach to delivering community drug services, in line with national and local 
policy imperatives recognises the need to: 
 

Engage drug users in treatment. 

Hold drug users in treatment long enough to make a difference. 

Reintegrate drug users into a life style, which is not characterised by dependence   
 
Our approach to recovery is summarised as a typical journey in the diagram below: 
 
"A t ypical journey to recovery”
SPOC Referral 
Access to Rapid 
Assessment
treatment  if
Peer 
required
Support
Available
At 
Allocation to Recovery Worker
Every 
& Recovery Mentor
Stage 
Via 
Recovery
Coach’s
Recovery plans addressing health, social & psychological needs 
including prescribing, detox, coaching, groupwork,
keyworking & joint work with other agencies
Ongoing recovery & aftercare 
Treatment Exit
& links  to Mutual Aid
 
 
From our local research and reading of the tender documentation Inclusion is clear that the 
existing  substance  misuse  workforce  must  undergo  significant  development  if  it  is  to 
deliver improved reintegration and recovery outcomes.  It is likely that areas of workforce 
good practice and quality in service delivery exist.  However, it is clear that many staff will 
need  to  broaden  their  skills  and  knowledge  as  the  nature  of  services  moves  from  the 
relatively  static  provision  of  pharmacological  therapies  characterised  by  a  culture  of  low 
 
82 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
expectation  to  a  more  dynamic,  holistic  service  delivering  a  menu  of  psycho-social 
interventions  that  challenges  service  users  to  make  positive  changes  in  their  lives.    In 
short,  Inclusion  will  expect  its  staff  to  become  Recovery  Workers  capable  of  raising  and 
meeting the aspirations of service users. 
 
Developing a recovery orientated workforce will require a concerted approach involving: 
 
• 
Strong leadership starting at the point of consultation and transfer with staff subject 
to TUPE or for those recruited to any vacancies.  Our aim is to win the hearts and minds of 
new staff and have them buy into our reintegration and recovery vision. 
• 
Excellent supervision and objective setting in support of reintegration and recovery 
• 
Tailored  learning  and  development  for  all  members  of  staff  particularly  around  the 
delivery of psycho-social interventions. 
• 
Individual  performance  management  and  additional  support  for  those  members  of 
staff struggling to make the transition to a recovery orientated culture. 
• 
We will establish a Recovery Practice and Quality Assurance post within our staffing 
structure. We see this role as crucial in supporting the Cambridgeshire Service Manager in 
developing a recovery culture.  The role will be responsible for an initial ‘recovery audit’ of 
the inherited service, followed by a programme of practice observation that feeds into staff 
supervision.  Findings from the recovery audit and staff observations will contribute to an 
overall  training  needs  analysis  and  subsequent  delivery  of  a  comprehensive  training 
programme that will enhance reintegration and recovery outcomes. 
 
Worker Client Relationships 
We know that service users ‘buy into’ services and engage in treatment when they feel that 
they  are  being  listened  to,  understood,  and  are  being  given  helpful,  positive  responses. 
The ‘therapeutic alliance’ between key worker and client is consistently found to have more 
influence  on  treatment  completion.    Rapport,  therapeutic  alliance  and  empathy  are  all 
features of positive relationships that help individuals to move forward. It is our expectation 
that staff: 

Recognise  the  differing  needs  that  people  have  and  respond  to  each  client  as  an 
individual. 

Understand what is important to an individual and that there are no short cuts. 

Fully  acknowledge  that  problem  drug  use  means  that  for  some  will  require  many 
attempts to fully engage with the treatment process. 

Respect a person’s decision to continue to use whilst continuing to work creatively 
with them to limit risk. 

Be aware that there could be gender generated difference that may require different 
responses e.g. some women may need an emphasis on feeling cared for, whilst some men 
may value helpfulness more. 

Be  aware  and  do  not  make  assumptions  about  difference  in  terms  of  disability, 
sexuality, gender, culture, ethnicity, religion, social class, age. 

Remember  people  like  to  feel  respected  and  understood,  drug  users  are  not 
different. 

Ease  of  interaction  and  accuracy  of  information  is  crucial,  fostering  good  personal 
communication skills can contribute to positive engagement.  

Where clients do not have the concentration skills &/or are not articulate enough to 
engage  well  with  verbal  interaction  seek  different  ways  of  conveying  harm  reduction 
messages. 

At all times, even under pressure be respectful. 
 
83 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
In terms of the delivery of psycho-social interventions on a daily basis, the Cambridgeshire 
Adult Drug Service will develop: 
•  An approach to individual care planning that builds on the recovery capital held by 
service users.  
•  Much better integration with local recovery networks and mainstream services. 
•  Service user involvement in service planning, delivery and monitoring. 
•  Minimising the number of unplanned exits. 
 
Alongside  these  our  workforce  learning  &  development  initiatives  and  service  delivery 
improvements we will establish a peer-led approach to service delivery and development in 
Cambridgeshire.    We  are  convinced  that  recovery  in  local  communities  is  more  likely  to 
succeed when those prospering and graduating from drug treatment are visible to people 
still coming to terms with addiction and dependency.  To this end we will seek to establish 
a  network  of  Recovery  Champions drawn  from  local  peer  mentors,  volunteers  and family 
members with an active interest in supporting local recovery.  Training in supporting people 
through  drug  treatment  and  on  recovery  journeys  will  be  given  to  Recovery  Champions 
along  with  opportunities  to  have  learning  recognised  with  formal  qualifications  where 
possible.  Recovery Champions will be offered support and supervision with clear links to 
the  objectives  contained  in  individual  recovery  plans.    Once  trained,  our  Recovery 
Coaches will; 
o  Be  present  in  services  to  help  engage  service  users,  offer  pertinent  advice  and 
information and remove barriers to treatment entry 
o  Take  an  active  role  in  delivering  elements  of  recovery  plans  particularly  where 
access to partner agencies and community resources is objective 
o  Contribute  to  service  development  through  participation  in  meetings,  training 
provision and the facilitation of group programmes 
 
Mutual Aid 
Take  up  of  Mutual  Aid  is  actively  promoted  across  all  our  services.    We  will  open  up 
service premises for use by NA, AA and Smart groups and provide staff and service users 
with  appropriate  training.    Inclusion  recognises  that  whilst  12  step  and  SMART  recovery 
options are not suited to all clients, that there is emerging evidence suggesting that support 
from peer networks is a central component of successful recovery journeys. 
 
2. Section 2.0 
Objective of 
Please detail the range of Structured Psychosocial Interventions 
Sub heading 
Service 
that will be delivered. 
2.2 d 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 500 words  
Contractors response: 
Delivery of psycho-social interventions will include; 
Motivational Interviewing 
Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an approach that is a characteristic of all our interventions.  
Staff  will  be  trained  in  MI  techniques  and  encouraged  to  help  develop  the  motivation  to 
 
84 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
change  in  our  service  users  through  exploring  and  addressing  ambivalence  towards  on-
going  substance  use.    This  is  achieved  by  employing  open-ended  questions,  reflective 
listening,  and  helping  individuals  to  balance  decisions.    In  these  ways,  staff  will  assist 
service users to consider thoughts, feelings, triggers and future choices. 
Brief Interventions  
Brief Interventions will be utilised across services but are likely to have particular value with 
people  around  risky  drug  or  alcohol  consumption  before  dependent  patterns  of  use  are 
established.    Our  aim  here  will  be  to  set  small  goals  for  service  users  following  the 
provision  of  accurate  advice  and  information  relating  to  their  use  of  substances;  our 
experience tells us that where individuals set relatively modest goals they are likely to go 
on to make further positive changes. 
Node-link Mapping 
Mapping is now routinely used in many of our services.  We have trained a range of staff in 
both International Treatment Effectiveness Programme (ITEP) and Birmingham Treatment 
Effectiveness Initiative  (BTEI)  mapping  techniques  and  currently  employ  mapping as  part 
and  parcel  of  recovery  planning.    Node-link  mapping  has  been  shown  to  be  effective  in 
increasing  treatment  engagement,  recovery  plan  ownership  amongst  service  users  and 
subsequent treatment outcomes.  
Groupwork 
Our groupwork programme is explained in detail in method statement 3B3g. In summary, 
entry to group work will be on a rolling basis to avoid long waiting times.  Group work will 
include: 
-  Recovery fears and expectations 
-  Addressing ambivalence  
-  Physical & psychological effects of drugs, depression and anxiety management. 
-  Triggers, high-risk situations and cravings 
-  Mistaken beliefs, decision making and scenario planning. 
-  Positive self-statements, core beliefs and psychological traps 
-  Dealing with lapse/relapse 
-  Recognising and deploying recovery capital  
 
Contingency Management Approaches 
 
Contingency Management (CM) is recommended in the NICE guidelines on psycho-social 
interventions, being the most effective intervention reviewed.  CM is also recommended in 
clinical guidelines and the latest national drug strategy.  Inclusion see CM as a useful tool 
in drug services because it; 
 
•  Is a reward based system aiming to promote positive outcomes rather than punish 
poor compliance 
•  Is  cost-effective  involving  very  small  rewards  -  as  little  as  £2  has  been  shown  to 
bring significantly improved outcomes. However NICE recommend rewards of £10. 
•  Can  be  deployed  across  a  range  of  interventions  including  Blood  Borne  Virus 
vaccination.  
•  Reinforces a sense of achievement for clients. 
•  Improves engagement with service. 
 
85 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
3. Section 2.0 
Objective of 
Please demonstrate how the service will assess and manage care 
Sub heading 
Service 
for dual diagnosis clients. 
2.2 g 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 2000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
For  clarity,  Inclusion  understands  the  term  Dual  Diagnosis  to  refer  to  service  users  who 
have co-existing mental health and substance misuse problems which can be due to: 
• 
A  primary  mental  health  problem  precipitating  and  leading  to  an  episode  of 
substance misuse 
• 
An increase in the use of illicit substances which has an effect on the 
service user’s mental health 
 
Inclusion,  as  part  of  South  Staffordshire  &  Shropshire  Foundation  Trust  (SSSFT),  have 
invested  heavily  in  developing  policies  and  procedures  to  support  the  assessment, 
management  and  care  co-ordination  of  service  users  with  Dual  Diagnosis.    All  Inclusion 
staff  receives  regular  Dual  Diagnosis  training  as  part  of  their  professional  development.  
Staff  subject  to  TUPE  transfer  from  Addaction  and  Phoenix  Futures  will  have  their  Dual 
Diagnosis learning needs audited immediately post-transfer. 
 
As part of our service implementation in Cambridgeshire, Inclusion will seek to agree joint 
working  protocols  and  information  sharing  arrangements  with  the Home Treatment Team 
at  the  Mental  Health  Service.    However,  our  experience  in  other  localities  indicates  the 
following approach is most likely to succeed in Cambridgeshire: 
 
Referrals to the Cambridgeshire Adult Drug Service 
• 
Where referrals are clearly inappropriate, signposting to another suitable service will 
take  place.    Inclusion  will  agree  a  list  of  other  agencies  for  this  purpose  as  part  of  its 
service implementation. 
• 
For seemingly appropriate or unclear referrals, the Single Point of Contact (SPOC) 
will undertake an initial screening and risk assessment immediately.  If practicable, a joint 
screening and risk assessment with a Mental Health worker can be arranged. 
• 
Where  the  initial  screening  and  risk  assessment  indicates  that  any  mental  health 
problems  are  directly  attributable  to  drug  misuse  and  hence  anticipated  to  be  of  short 
duration then a worker from the Adult Drug Service will assume the role of care coordinator 
and responsibility for delivery of all care and interventions.  The Adult Drug Service will in 
this  case  seek  ad  hoc  advice  from  an  identified  Mental  Health  worker  in  the  Home 
Treatment Team as necessary. 
• 
Where the initial screening and risk assessment indicates that there are significant 
mental health problems requiring specialist input and high level drug/alcohol use, a Mental 
Health  worker  will  be  identified  as  the  care  co-ordinator  under  the  Care  Programme 
Approach (CPA).  A joint assessment of substance misuse and mental health needs will be 
carried out.  Arrangements will be put in place for treatment/specialist input from the Adult 
Drug Service.  There will be close joint working by the Mental Health care co-ordinator and 
the Adult Drug Service, with a Drug Worker attending all subsequent case reviews. 
 
86 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
Where  the  initial  screening  and  risk  assessment  indicate  that  there  are  significant 
mental  health  problems  requiring  specialist  input  but  there  are  low  levels  of  level  of 
substance misuse then a referral will be made to the Home Treatment Team on the day.  
The  Mental  Health  service  will  assume  the  role  of  care  co-ordinator  under  the  CPA,  and 
also  responsibility  for  the  delivery  of  all  care,  with  ad  hoc  advice  from  an  identified  Drug 
worker  as  necessary.    If  required  the  Adult  Drug  Service  can  provide  relevant  education 
and regular supervision with attendance at case reviews as necessary. 
 
Care Programme Approach 
 
Working  to  these  protocols  it  follows  that  at  no  stage  will  Cambridge  Adult  Drug  Service 
staff act as Care Co-ordinators under the CPA.  However, it is important to demonstrate a 
clear understanding of the CPA and how it will affect services users also in receipt of drug 
treatment services.  Inclusion understanding of the CPA is as follows: 
 
The term Care Programme Approach has been used since 1990 to describe the framework 
that supports and co-ordinates effective mental health care for people with severe mental 
health  problems  in  Secondary  Mental  Health  Services.  In  2007/08  the  Care  Programme 
Approach  was  subject  to  a  national  review  and  in  March  2008  the  Department  of  Health 
published  ‘Refocusing  the  Care  Programme  Approach’  –  Policy  and  Positive  Practice 
Guidance’  
 
The  review  removes  the  two-tier  CPA  system  (Standard  &  Enhanced)  but  reinforces  the 
need  for  the  Care  Programme  Approach  for  Service  Users  with  complex  needs.      Those 
Service  Users  with  less  complex  or  straightforward  needs  will  not  come  under  the  Care 
Programme Approach requirements although the requirement for care planning and record 
keeping  standards  remain.    The  support  for  people  with  less  complex  needs  will  be 
delivered  via  a  process  referred  to  as Standard  Care  (SC).   The CPA  and  SC  are at  the 
heart of an inclusive and effective Health & Social Care Mental Health service which aims 
to optimise service user’s health and well being whilst supporting carers and families. The 
principle  of  person  centred  care  is  key  to  the  operation  of  CPA.  Individuals’  accounts  of 
their  needs  and  their  views  and  wishes  must  be  at  the  centre  of  all  decisions  that  are 
made.  The  strengths  and  abilities  that  individuals  can  bring  to  bear  on  their  needs  and 
circumstances  must  be  acknowledged  and  taken  into  account,  together  with  an 
identification  of  any  external  or  environmental  factors  that  may  have  precipitated  or 
exacerbated their mental health needs.  
 
The main requirements of the CPA are:  
 
 
• 
An  assessment  of  the  service  user’s  health  and  social  care  needs,  including  an 
assessment of any jeopardy to their safety or the safety of others.  
• 
A multi-disciplinary care plan stating how the assessed needs are going to be met, 
including crisis and contingency plans.  
• 
Allocation of a Care Co-ordinator to oversee the implementation of the plan of care 
and to link the Service Users to other appropriate Services as necessary  
• 
Regular Reviews to ensure the continuing appropriateness of the plan of care.  
 
CPA is a process for managing complex and serious cases; there are a number of 
characteristics to consider when deciding if support of CPA is required. The key areas are;  
 
 
87 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
Mental Disorder  
• 
Current or potential risks  
• 
Current or significant history of severe distress/instability or disengagement  
• 
Presence of non-physical co-morbidity  
• 
Multiple service provision  
• 
Currently/recently detained under MH Act or referred to CRHT  
• 
Significant reliance on carer(s) or has significant caring responsibilities  
• 
Experiencing disadvantage or difficulty  
 
The  assessment  process  therefore  ensures  the  systematic  assessment  of  an  individuals’ 
health and social care needs and for those service users accepted into Secondary Mental 
Health  Services,  the  development  and  review  of  a formal detailed  outcome focused  well-
being/Recovery Plan to address the eligible needs  
 
What People should expect from Specialist Mental Health Services  
  
• 
At the point of referral Specialist Mental Health Services will undertake a screening 
assessment.  If  the  outcome  indicates  that,  the  person  requires  the  further  intervention  of 
Secondary  Mental  Health  Services  they  will  be  invited  to  engage  in  an  assessment  that 
examines their circumstances in greater depth.  
• 
The  referral  process  will  include  the  opportunity  for  people  to  carry  out  a  self-
assessment. The self-assessment will inform subsequent assessments.  
• 
The  assessment,  and  any  subsequent  planning  process,  will  aim  to  meet  service 
user’s aims and choices. The assessment process will be undertaken collaboratively with 
service  users,  and  where  appropriate,  carers  and  examine  the  range  of  their  health  and 
social care issues.  
• 
The  outcome  of  the  assessment  will  determine  whether  the  support  of  specialist 
mental  health  services  is  required  and  if  so  at  what  level,  Standard  Care  or  the  Care 
Programme Approach.  
• 
Outcomes of assessments will be communicated to service users,  and referrers in 
ways in which they understand.  
• 
All Service Users will receive a statement of what their identified needs are, what is 
required to support them in addressing those needs, who is responsible for actions relating 
to requirements and provided with a date when they will be asked to feedback whether the 
interventions are effective or not.  
• 
Service Users will be offered the opportunity to complete the statement themselves. 
If they decline the offer, it will be the responsibility of the Care Co-ordinator to complete the 
statement on the service user’s behalf. In either case it will be the responsibility of the Care 
Co-ordinator  to  ensure  that  statements  of  care  are  entered  on  informatics  systems,  and 
copies forwarded to relevant parties.  
• 
Reviews  of  statements  of  care  will  be  co-ordinated  to  promote  inclusion  and 
participation.  Their  composition,  location,  and  timing  will  take  into  account  the  individual 
needs  and  responsibilities  of  service  users  and  carers.  The  outcomes  of  reviews  will  be 
communicated to all relevant parties and records will be amended to reflect their content.  
• 
Practitioners  should  always  work  to  the  principles  of  recovery  and  personalisation 
and assist service users in moving away from reliance on service providers.  
• 
Service users and carers should lead the assessment and intervention process as 
equal  partners  with  professionals  and  others  who  may  be  involved  in  the  provision  of 
support.  Any  decisions  made  during  clinical  processes  should  be  preceded  by  a 
 
88 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
consultation with service users and carers, consultations should be meaningful and enable 
all parties involved to present their opinions in an atmosphere of co-operation. Any differing 
opinions  or  disagreements  should  be  clearly  documented  and  service  users  and  carers 
should  be  fully  informed  of  the  compliments  and  complaints  processes  and  procedures 
implemented  by  provider  organisations  and,  where  required,  supported  in  submitting 
compliments or complaints.  
 
Case Load Audit During Implementation 
As part of our service implementation Inclusion would undertake a full clinical audit of the 
inherited  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug  Service  case  load.    We  will  audit  all  cases  for 
evidence of co-existing substance misuse and mental health issues, ensure that care co-
ordination sits with either Home Treatment Team or the Adult Drug Services as described 
above and review all psychiatric medications prescribed by the service medical staff. 
 
4. Section 2.0 
Objective of 
Please demonstrate how the Treatment Outcome Profile Tool 
Sub heading 
Service 
(TOPs) will be used as part of this service. 
2.2 h 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion’s  brings  a  nuanced  understanding  of  the  use  of  the  Treatment  Outcome  Profile 
(TOP) in drug treatment services.   We understand that when used properly TOP can be: 
• 
Utilised by the National Treatment Agency to monitor and assess the effectiveness 
of the national drug treatment system 
• 
Analysed by Cambridgeshire commissioners to drive improvements in the local drug 
treatment system 
• 
A  useful  motivational  tool  and  adjunct  to  the  case  work  carried  out  with  service 
users.  
By incorporating the use of TOP into 1:1 interventions, staff in Cambridgeshire Adult Drug 
Service will be able to increase service users understanding of their drug use and enhance 
their motivation to change.  TOP can be used to show service users how their scores have 
changed during treatment episodes (the Progress Tracker adds visual impact here), care 
plans can be modified where TOP progress is less obvious and TOP can be utilised as a 
staring  point  for  key  work  sessions  drawn  from  the  key  domains  of  substance  use,  risky 
injecting behaviour, criminality and health & social functioning.   
 
The  use  of  the  TOP  Progress  Tracker  lends  itself  well  to  further  key  working  sessions 
using Node Link Mapping.  We have described the use of Node Link Mapping more fully in 
method statement 3B3f. 
 
To ensure TOPs compliance Inclusion have developed a number of initiatives that include 
management  checks,  administrative  overview  and  computer  system  validation  that  offer 
Cambridgeshire  commissioners  assurance  that  we  can  meet  the  100%  target  of  TOPs 
completion for starts, reviews and exits. 
 
 
89 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
All new clients that enter the Cambridge Adult Drug Service will receive a full assessment 
and this will include the initial start TOP forms (unless they have transferred from another 
service  that  has  started  the  TOP  process,  then  a  review  form  will  be  completed  at  this 
stage).  In  our  other  community  services,  Inclusion  operates  a  computerised  client  record 
system  (HALO)  which  requires  the  completion  of  TOP  before  a  new  or  transferred  client 
can be entered on the system. 
 
Within the Cambridgeshire administration team there will be a nominated “TOP Champion” 
who  will  record  all  new  assessments  that  have  taken  place  and  run  weekly  checks  to 
ensure that all those that have been assessed have all the required paperwork completed 
and  that  this  has  been  accurately  recorded  on  HALO.  If  there  are  missing  fields  on  the 
record  or  missing  paperwork  that  needs  completing  then  the  caseworker  will  be  notified 
and  asked  to  fill  in  any  gaps.  This  will  be  followed  up  at  weekly  team  meetings  where 
missing paperwork is highlighted. 
 
At  the  point  of  upload  to  the  National  Drug  Treatment  Monitoring  System  (NDTMS)  data 
will be checked again to ensure that it meets the data set requirements and this will include 
TOP  requirements  for  new  starts,  reviews  and  exits.  If  a  problem  arises  with  individual 
case record the caseworker will be asked to address this as a matter of urgency. 
 
Within  line  management  supervision  TOP  completion  will  be  routinely  discussed  with 
individual  workers.  If  the  “TOP  Champion”  identifies  individual  workers  that  are  not 
completing  starts,  reviews  or  exits  on  time  or  accurately  then  this  will  be  raised  with  that 
individual as a performance issue. 
 
A  similar  system  will  be  put  in  place  for  reviews.    HALO  will  send  a  notification  to  the 
nominated  key  worker  that  a  review  is  due.  A  similar  message  will  be  sent  to  the  “TOP 
Champion” who will send an email reminder to the worker. They will also prepare a list of 
reviews  that  should  have  taken  pace  each  week  for  discussion  at  the  weekly  team 
meetings.    Within  supervision  any  missing  reviews  will  be  discussed  with  the  individual 
worker and an explanation for the delay and a timeframe to get the review completed will 
be agreed.  
 
Before  a  client  case  can  be  closed  a  TOP  exit  form  must  be  completed.    HALO  will  not 
allow  the  case  to  be  closed  without  a  TOPs  exit  form.  All  closed  cases  will  need  to  be 
checked and signed off by one of the management team and this includes confirmation of 
the exit form being completed. 
 
To  ensure  that  cases  are  not  left  artificially  open  by  individual  case  workers  the  “TOP 
Champion” will also run checks on HALO for clients that have not had any contact for over 
four  weeks.  This  identifies  clients  that  have  not  been  in  contact  with  the  service  and 
highlights these discrepancies to both the individual case worker and their line manager. 
 
These  systems  are  currently  utilised  in  our  services  in  Swindon  and  Birmingham.  Both 
regularly achieve 100% compliance against TOPs. The figures for Birmingham community 
team  in  August  were  89%  for  new  starts  and  100%  for  reviews  and  exits.  Inclusion 
average, across a twelve month period, over 90% compliance in starts, reviews and exits. 
 
These  systems  have  proved  effective  and  ensure  that  TOP  completion  is  seen  by  staff 
members as a core requirement of their work. By discussing it in supervision and weekly 
 
90 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
team meetings, and designing the systems around the need to complete these returns, it 
has ensured that TOP is fully embedded within the daily work of individual staff rather than 
seen as an additional task. 
 
 
 
91 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, 3g) Structured Day Programmes 
 
Spec  
Method  
Method Statement 
Reference 
Statement 
Reference 

1. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
Please demonstrate how this service will deliver Structured Day 
 
Service 
Programmes (SDP). 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1500 words 
Contractors response: 
We  intend  to  delivery  a  full  modular,  rolling  Structured  Day  Programme  in  the  Cambridge, 
Huntingdon  and  Wisbech  localities.    The  configuration  of  the  programme  comprises 
Induction, Aiming for Abstinence and Re-integration & Recovery phases.  It is our proposal to 
deliver the Induction phase of each programme from within the service hubs: this is because 
by definition, the Induction phase involves engaging and stabilising service users in a group 
work programme and by delivering on-site, we aim to minimise barriers to involvement and 
maximise progression to the Aiming for Abstinence phase.  The Aiming for Abstinence and 
Re-integration  &  Recovery  phases  will  be  delivered  away  from  the  service  hubs  at 
community venues.  These elements of the programme are designed to consolidate the early 
treatment gains that are made by a service user and explore each person’s potential for full 
recovery. 
 
During  the  contract  implementation  period  Inclusion  will  identify  rentable  space  in  suitable 
community venues in Cambridge, Huntingdon and Wisbech from which to deliver the Aiming 
for Abstinence and Re-integration & Recovery elements of the programme.  We will consult 
with  commissioners,  new  partners,  the  existing  staff  team  and  service  user  reps  before 
securing  appropriate  accommodation.   We are  likely  to  target  community  venues,  churches 
and perhaps space in partner agencies.  By splitting the Structured Day Programme in this 
way  Inclusion  believes  we  can  meet  the  service  specification,  incentivise  engagement,  use 
scarce resources most efficiently and deliver the best recovery outcomes for service users. 
 
Referral into the Structured Day Programme will need to be via the Single Point of Contact or 
one  of  the  other  Cambridgeshire  service  elements  –  it  will  not  be  possible  to  refer  directly 
from  an  external  agency.    When  a  direct  referral  is  made  the  SPOC  wil  process  this  and 
referral  into  the  Structured  Day  Programme  maybe  agreed.    All  service  users  subject  to  a 
Drug  Rehabilitation  Requirement  (DRR)  will  join  the  same  group  as  voluntary  referrals.  If  a 
comprehensive  assessment  has  not  been  carried  out  at  the  point  of  referral  it  will  be 
completed by programme staff.  This will include an updated risk assessment.  All recovery 
plans will reflect engagement with the programme, its goals and an evaluation of progress.   
 
The service will deliver groups every day from Monday to Friday between the hours of 11 am 
and 4pm at the three locations.  Ideally all elements of the programme would be available at 
other  service  locations  across  the  county.    However,  for  the  programme  to  be  viable  and 
affordable within the service budget, we feel a three-site delivery model is the best fit.  The 
service  will  operate  between  9am  and  5pm  –  staff  time  not  spent  delivering  groups  will  be 
taken up with keyworking and individual sessions in support of the programme delivery.  It is 
likely that one group per site per week will run on an evening basis and a weekend support 
group will operate on Saturday mornings will operate at each site.  Any mutual aid meetings 
 
92 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
that run from service sites will be over and above our stated programme commitments.  We 
are confident that our delivery proposals can accommodate 200 annual programme starts. 
 
Although  the  overall  programme  delivery  is  configured  with  Induction  at  service  sites  and 
Aiming  for  Abstinence  &  Re-integration  &  Recovery  in  community  venues,  we  see  the 
programme  as  a  whole  entity  that  addresses  drug  use  and  related  needs  in  a  holistic  and 
common  sense  fashion  utilising  a  cognitive  behavioural  approach.    The  aim  of  each  phase 
are as follows: 
 
Induction 
The aim of the induction phase is to encourage service users to engage with the programme, 
develop their motivation for taking part in structured treatment and begin to set future goals.  
For  many,  the  induction  group  will  be  a  challenge  and  we  will  ensure  that  all  service  users 
become  familiar  and  adhere  to  the  basic  requirements  of  the  programme  including 
timekeeping  and  acceptable  behaviour  ground  rules.    Service  users  will  be  able  to  join  the 
induction phase at any point due to its rolling, modular nature.  It will take 6 weeks for service 
users  to  attend  all  of  the  sessions on offer.   Sessions  can  be  repeated  as  required  and  for 
those that require it, the Induction phase can be repeated in full. 
 
Aiming For Abstinence  
As service users complete the induction phase and satisfy the progression criteria they can 
move into the Aiming for Abstinence phase.  We have purposely entitled this phase ‘Aiming 
for  Abstinence  to  encourage  just  that  aspiration  amongst  service  users.  This  phase  will 
involve programme delivery at sites separate to the main service base.  It will take 6 weeks 
for  service  users  to  attend  all  of  the  sessions  on  offer.    As  we  expect  service  users  to  be 
involved in other interventions outside of the service for example appointments with Offender 
Managers,  the  modular  rolling  nature  of  the  programme  will  allow  group  sessions  to  be 
designed  around  a  service  user’s  other  commitments  as  they  progress  in  treatment.  
Sessions can be repeated as an individual’s progress and recovery plan demand. 
 
Re-integration & Recovery 
Once  a  service  user  has  successfully  negotiated  the  Induction  and  Aiming  for  Abstinence 
phases  they  will  move  into  the  Re-integration  &  Recovery  phase.    Having  made  significant 
progress  in  terms  of  drug  use  and  associated  offending  behaviour,  the  Re-integration  & 
Recovery  phase  will  allow  service  users  to  broaden  their  horizons  and  build  skills  and 
knowledge in a wider range of living skills to facilitate full community re-integration.  The Re-
integration  &  Recovery  phase  will  once  again  utilise  a  combination  of  1:1  keyworking  and 
group based work, but will be somewhat less structured in the sense that service users will 
‘pick and mix’ which areas to concentrate upon.  This also makes allowance for service users 
increasing  their  responsibilities  elsewhere  such  as  volunteering,  educational  course 
attendance or work placements.  No set time scale is attached to Re-integration & Recovery 
involvement.  However, recovery plan goals will be regularly reviewed and the service will not 
become  a  day  by  day  ‘drop-in’  for  those  who  have  completed  the  programme  but  are  not 
constructively moving on. 
 
2. Section 2.0 
Aims of the 
Please demonstrate the range of interventions that will be 
Sub heading 
service 
delivered within this service. 
2.1 
 
Weighting 4 
 
93 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words 
Contractors response: 
The Structured Day Programme service will deliver individual and group based interventions.  
These will include: 
 
Key Working & ad hoc Psycho-social Interventions. 
Individual key working for all service users accessing the Structured Day Programme will be 
a  condition  of  successful  engagement.    Key  working  will  include  all  assessment,  risk 
assessment,  recovery  planning,  reviews  and  reporting  to  outside  agencies  such  as 
Probation.  The service will employ a combination of Inclusion’s assessment tool and the full 
range of BTEI mapping tools for recovery planning. Key workers will also be able to provide 
ad-hoc,  opportunistic  psycho-social  interventions  along  side  of  group  work  in  support  of 
recovery plan goals including contingency management.  In this way, key work sessions can 
serve  as  useful,  short-span  group  preparation  and  de-briefing  to deal  with  issues  that  arise 
for a service user.  The Structured Day Programme will act as Care Co-ordinators as agreed 
with elements of the service. 
 
Induction Group Work 
Our aims in the induction phase are to introduce, stabilise and retain service users.  We will 
build  on  the  work  under  taken  in  pre-treatment  service  user  development  groups  that  will 
include: 
-  Awareness of personal skills 
-  Awareness of time management 
-  Stress management 
-  Dealing with criticism 
-  Self-confidence 
-  Body language 
-  The ‘passive/aggressive’ pendulum. 
 
The additional work will include sessions designed to address: 
-  The ‘passive/aggressive’ pendulum 
-  Service user expectations and programme rules 
-  Substance awareness 
-  Recognising triggers, managing cravings, coping strategies 
-  Reflections  on  current  situation  including  debt  management,  housing,  health  & 
offending 
-  Addressing ambivalence to change 
-  Recovery goal setting 
-  Family and friend support networks 
 
Aiming for Abstinence Group Work  
During the Aiming for Abstinence phase we want to deliver groups that consolidate treatment 
progress and prepare service users for a life without drugs.  Groups delivered will include: 
-  Maintaining motivation 
-  Improving communication skills 
-  Improving social networks/relationships 
-  Managing emotions 
 
94 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
-  Problem solving & thinking skills 
-  Improving time management 
-  Budgeting 
-  Healthy lifestyles & nutrition 
-  Relapse prevention/management 
 
Re-integration & Recovery Elements 
The  elements  of  the  Re-integration  &  Recovery  phase  will  help  to  equip  service  users  with 
skills  for  life  and  open  up  opportunities  for  re-integration  in  to  the  community  and  a  life 
without drugs.  The elements on offer will include 

Relapse management 

Mutual Aid & SMART Recovery groups 

Recovery Mentoring & volunteering training programmes 

Education, Training & Employment (ETE) pathways 

Accommodation advice, information and advocacy 

Welfare benefits 

Independent living skills  
 
Stimulant Work 
Programme  staff  will  offer  stimulant,  in  particular  crack/cocaine  interventions  using 
Conference on Crack and Cocaine (COCA) materials.  Sessions will look at: 

How crack and cocaine work 
 
 
 
 

Health implications of its use 
 
 
 
 

Patterns of use 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Triggers 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cravings 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Euphoric recall 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Crack / cocaine and offending 
 

Coping strategies   
 
 
 
 
 

Harm reduction 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Section 2.0 
Aims of the 
Please demonstrate the evaluation criteria that will be used for 
Sub heading 
service 
clients accessing this service 
2.1 
 
Weighting 3 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words 
Contractors response: 
 
We  have  detailed  how  the  induction  phase  will  be  delivered  within  the  main  services  sites 
with  the  Aiming  for  Abstinence  and  Re-integration  &  Recovery  components  delivered  in 
physically  separate  surroundings.    To  enable  service  users  to  join  the  programme  and 
progress from one phase to another the entry level criteria for all phases are: 
 
Entry to the Induction Phase 

The Structured Day Programme must identified in recovery plan as a goal 

Completed  risk  assessment  with  no  serious  concerns  about  engagement  in  a  group 
 
95 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
must be in place 

Positive  feedback  from  attendance  at  service  user  development  sessions  must  have 
been received 

Each  candidate  must  demonstrate  some  basic  treatment  compliance  including  drug 
testing and supervised consumption if considered clinically appropriate 
 
Progression to the Aiming For Abstinence Phase 
Progression  to  the  Aim  for  Abstinence  phase  will  not  simply  be  a  matter  of  attending  each 
group work session in the induction phase.  Progression will be a discursive decision made 
by  the  programme  staff,  the  service  user  and  in  the  case  of  service  users  attending  the 
programme  as  part  of  a  Drug  Rehabilitation  Requirement  (DRR),  their  Offender  Manager 
from Probation.  Progression is likely to be based on: 

Good time management and attendance at sessions 

Good feedback about group participation and respect for others 

Some evidence of a positive change in drug use such as test results  

TOP scores 

A  demonstrable  understanding  of  treatment  completed  so  far  and  an  appreciation  of 
what has been learned 

Engagement in key working  

Tangible progress in terms of recovery goals identified in each plan 
 
Progression to the Re-integration & Recovery Phase 
As with the induction phase, movement into the Re-integration & Recovery phase will require 
tangible evidence of progression.  Service users will need to demonstrate: 

Good time management and attendance at sessions 

Good feedback about group participation and respect for others 

Discontinued use of illicit drugs confirmed by test results  

TOP scores 

Evidence of reductions in re-offending 

A demonstrable understanding of treatment so far and what has been learned 

Engagement in key working  

Tangible progress in terms of recovery goals identified in each plan 
 
Service Use Contracts 
All  service  users  taking  part  in  any  phase  of  the  Structured  Day  Programme  must 
understand,  accept  and  sign  a  programme  contract  covering  their  treatment.    This  will 
include: 

Behaviour and attendance expectation 

Exclusion criteria 

Recovery plan goals 

Recovery Mentor & volunteer support arrangements 

Drug testing regime 

DRR compliance and reporting (if CJS client) 

Rights & Responsibilities 

Named key worker 

Signatures of service user and key worker 
 
 
96 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
4. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how the service will provide preparation 
Sub heading 
the service 
groups prior to SDP. 
2.2  b 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words  
Contractors response: 
To enable service users to engage fully with Structured Day Programmes we will operate a 
‘development’  approach  in  the  form  of  pre-treatment  groups  that  are  consolidated  in  the 
induction  phase  of  the  programme.  These  development  groups  will  consider  the  following 
elements: 
• 
Awareness of personal skills 
We  will  encourage  service  users  to  map  and  understand  their  own  strengths  and 
weaknesses.  Importantly this process is validated by the need to feed back to others and the 
necessity to provide a rational for self-assessment.  Where the exercise indentifies strengths 
these will be acknowledged and consolidated.  Where weaknesses are identified, the service 
user will be encouraged to think of ways of striving for improvement.  A simple example might 
be to ‘count to 10’ before reacting to a perceived criticism from another person. 
• 
Awareness of time management 
For  many  service  users,  fully  appreciating  that  they  have  responsibilities  around  the 
management of their daily routines can be a challenge.  This aspect will look at positive ways 
to  manage  time,  consider  strategies  for  minimising  time  wasting  or  procrastination  and 
reinforce the responsibility to others of managing time well. 
• 
Stress management 
Managing stress is an important tool for all, no less a service user undergoing drug treatment 
and most likely dealing with a number of daily stressors.  Sessions will cover what stress is, 
how techniques for dealing with stress can be learnt by everyone and the consequences of 
leaving  stress  unchecked,  particularly  the  links  to  relapse.    Learning  two  or  three  simple 
stress management techniques can have a positive impact upon self-confidence and help to 
reduce anxiety. 
• 
Dealing with criticism 
For many service users, criticism will be part of daily life as will unhelpful responses to it.  Our 
work  here  will  seek  to  consider  why  people  criticise  others,  how  to  deal  with  a  reasonable 
level of criticism and some self-awareness relating to justified criticism.  We will explore some 
of the psychological traps that people fall into in the face of criticism that often lead to further 
drug use. 
• 
Self-confidence 
Many users will present with obvious issues around self-confidence whilst others will employ 
a number of tactics to convince those around that they are self-confident.  We will encourage 
service users to reflect on what a sustainable level of self-confidence entails and how this will 
affect their dealings with other people. 
• 
Body language 
Sessions  will  look  at  the  various  ways  in  which  people  communicate  non-verbally  and  how 
other people perceive different types of body language.  Our emphasis will be on generating 
self-awareness amongst service users, promoting congruence between what someone says 
and how they present themselves and the encouragement of appropriate body language for 
use in the treatment setting and beyond. 
 
97 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
The ‘passive/aggressive’ pendulum 
For many service users, a swing between outwardly passive and aggressive presentation is 
common.  Programme facilitators will consider what properly assertive behaviour looks like, 
using  ‘I’  statements,  influencing  others  in  constructive  ways  and  learning  to  ‘agree  to 
disagree’.    We  will  attempt  to  model  assertive  behaviours  and  demonstrate  how  these  are 
perceived by others. 
 
5. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate the pathway for individuals who are 
Sub heading 
the service 
completing Residential Rehabilitation or detoxification who want 
2.2   
to access SDP 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words  
Contractors response: 
It is crucial that recovery plans reflect the need to provide effective support post-detoxification 
or  as  residential  rehabilitation  programmes  come  to  an  end.      Inclusion  will  ensure  that 
keywork,  psycho-social  interventions  and  aftercare  options  are  available  to  service  users 
completing  detoxification  or  rehab  programmes.    We  recognise  post-detoxification  and 
rehabilitation  as  a  vulnerable  time  for  service  users  with  the  possibility  of  relapse  and 
overdose  present.    However,  we  will  seek  to  build  on  the  confidence  service  users  derive 
from completing detoxification and rehabilitation programmes through access to diversionary 
activities,  engagement  with  mutual  aid  groups  and  the  use  of  education,  training  and 
employment opportunities including volunteering within our own services. 
When  a  service  user  is  preparing  for  detoxification,  whether  in  the  community  or  as  an  in-
patient, a detoxification risk assessment will take place and this will consider key indicators of 
likely  success  including  accommodation,  family  &  friends  and  peer  support.    The  detox 
aftercare  plan  will  include  reference  to  the  Structured  Day  Programme  and  specific  joining 
details  for  the  service  user  upon  completion  of  the  detox  programme.    All  service  users 
undergoing  detoxification  will  have  support  from  Recovery  Mentors  and  volunteers  that  will 
include  regular  home  on  in-patient  visits  (to  fit  in  with  in-patient  visiting  restrictions)  and 
accompanying  the  service  user  to  the  Structured  Day  Programme  during  their  early 
engagement. 
For those service users entering Residential Rehabilitation programmes we will ensure that 
all post-treatment aftercare plans include access to Structured Day Programmes.  As part of 
the service user’s engagement with Residential Rehab, a member of staff will act as a named 
link  worker  for  the  rehab and  wherever  practicable, be  involved  in 3  way  meetings  with  the 
rehab provider and service user to review treatment progress.  As the treatment programme 
nears completion, the service user will be introduced to a trained volunteer who will act as a 
‘buddy’  to  promote  take  up  of  the  Structured  Day  Care  programme  and  accompany  the 
service user from the rehab back home. 
 
 
98 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
6. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please describe how clients can access mutual aid groups. 
Sub heading 
the service 
2.2 d 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words  
Contractors response 
 
The Cambridgeshire service will pro-actively promote pathways into mutual aid opportunities 
for as many Structured Day Programme clients as possible.  We will do this in a number of 
ways: 
• 
By ensuring that up to date information about mutual aid groups is readily available in 
all service locations 
• 
By  ensuring  that  all  staff  are  fully  cognisant  of  the  remit  of  mutual  aid  groups  and 
actively sell the benefits of such groups to service users during key working sessions 
• 
By  encouraging  all  staff  to  deepen  their  own  understanding  of  mutual  aid  groups 
through reading, discussion and attendance at local ‘open’ meetings. 
• 
We understand that a number of 12 step groups are in existence across the county at 
o  Cocaine  Anonymous  group  currently  operates  from  the  Vestry  Christchurch 
Street, Cambridge  
and that Narcotics Anonymous groups operate from  
o  Mill House, Mill Road, Cambridge 
o  Bermuda Road Community Room, Histon Road, Cambridge 
o  Neighbourhood Centre, Ross St, Cambridge 
o  St Columba’s Hall Downing Street, Cambridge 
o  St Mary’s Church, Brook Street, St Neot’s 
o  Maple Centre, 6 Oak Drive, Huntingdon 
 
Wherever  practical,  we  will  continue  to  support  these  groups  by  making  service  premises 
available for meetings and encouraging service users to attend. 
 
For those service users not wishing to engage with 12 step groups or for service users who 
may  want  to  attend  additional  support  along  side  12  step  meetings,  we  will  facilitate  the 
delivery  of  Smart  Recovery  at  all  Structured  Day  Programme  sites.      Smart  Recovery  is  a 
secular, cognitive behavioural alternative to 12 step mutual aid and is growing in popularity.  
Our approach to developing Smart Recovery across Cambridgeshire will be twin-track: 
• 
The  service  will  identify  6  treatment  graduates  annually  to  go  forward  for  Smart 
Recovery  Training.    We  will  provide  funding  and  support  to  these  peer  group  leaders  and 
encourage the development of Smart Recovery groups. 
• 
Smart  Recovery’s  experience  across  the  UK  is  that  the  ad-hoc  training  of  small 
numbers of peers is worthwhile but can take a long time to spread across an area.  Therefore 
to supplement the training of individual peer group leaders Inclusion proposes to become a 
SMART Recovery ‘partner’ in Cambridgeshire.  This entails staff members having access to 
20 hours of on-line SMART Recovery training that equips them with the skills and knowledge 
to  ‘kick-start’  SMART  Recovery  groups  and  to  become  ‘Champions’.    In  turn,  as  groups 
become  established,  more  peer  group  leaders  can  be  trained  and  the  network  of  SMART 
Recovery groups will grow across the county. 
 
 
99 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
7. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how the service will link with non-drug 
Sub heading 
the service 
organisations in their contribution to SDP. 
2.2 e 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
 
Part of our strategy for involving non-drug organisations in increasing the effectiveness and 
capacity  of  the  structured  programme  will  be  to  generally  raise  the  profile  of  treatment 
services.  In doing this we aim to create a positive image in the minds of the local community 
and influence local people.  To do this we will engage with; 

Local businesses 

Residents near services 

Parish and County Council representatives 

Neighbourhood teams and residents associations 

Churches and faith based groups 
 
The  Structured  Day  Programme  will  develop  a  series  of  excellent  working  links  with  a 
number of non-drug provider agencies to enhance the delivery of re-integration and recovery 
services across the county.  These links will include: 
 
Local & National Educational, Training & Employment (ETE) Services  
Establishing sound pathways for service users into ETE opportunities will be a central feature 
of the programme.  It is our proposal that all Structured Day Programme Project Workers will 
have  an  ETE  element  to  their  role.    Where  ETE  related  recovery  goals  are  identified  and 
agreed,  then  the  Project  Worker  will  seek  to  broker  in  services  to  meet  the  service  user’s  
ETE  needs.    During  the  Re-integration  &  Recovery  phase  of  the  programme  on-going  key 
work  and  group  sessions  will  help  to  clarify  needs  in  terms  of  basic  skills  and  knowledge, 
motivation,  barriers  to  employment,  personal  interests  and  strategies  to  increase 
employability  via  relevant  education  and  training  opportunities.  We  will  also  consider 
employment  potential  by  looking  at  previous  experience  and  qualifications,  recovery  capital 
and  opportunities  within the local  labour market.    Service  users  will  have  access  to  internet 
enable  computers  to  utilise  the  world  wide  web  for  job  searches,  CV  and  application 
preparation, research and presentations. 
 
The Locality Manager with a development brief for structured programmes and project staff on 
the  ground  will  make  and  maintain  links  with  external  ETE  organisations  across 
Cambridgeshire  as  well  as  national  resources  and  will  build  a  library  of  relevant  information 
within the project.  We will develop partnerships with: 

Jobcentre Plus 

Ingeus & Seetec for access to The Work Programme 

Learn Direct 

Direct.gov Next Step 

Cambridge & Peterborough Learning Trust 

Community colleges and learning centres 
 
 
 
100 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Housing Services  
Our proposed staffing structure retains the current Homelessness Co-ordinator role and our 
expectation is that Project Workers in the structured programme will be able to offer advice, 
information and limited case work in respect of accommodation issues with consultancy and 
advice from the Homelessness Co-ordinator in support of this.  Beyond that, we will look to 
broker in support from a number of housing related services including: 
The meeting will comprise of the following agencies:  

Street Outreach Mental Health Outreach Team  

Cambridge City Council Housing Options and Advice  

Riverside Tenancy Sustainment Team 

Housing  providers  including  Granta,  Stonham,  Riverside  ECHG,  Cyrenians,  Jimmy’s 
Night Shelter, and King Street Housing. 
 
The Structured Programme through a combination of in-house key working, in-reach advice 
& information clinics provided by external agencies and links with accommodation providers 
will build excellent resettlement and re-housing support to service users. 
 
Welfare Benefits Advice & Information 
We  will  approach  the  Citizen’s  Advice  Bureaux  and  negotiate  for  them  to  deliver  regular 
clinics  at  structured  programme  locations  to  provide  service  users  with  advice  and 
information about welfare benefits.  The service will also establish good relationships with all 
local  Benefits  Agency  offices.    All  members  of  project  staff  will  be  trained  in  basic  welfare 
rights issues and completion of benefit claim paperwork. 
 
Health Services 
The service will form excellent pathways into a range of health provision including: 

The Home Treatment Mental Health Team 

Cambridge Access Clinic 

GUM clinics 

Dentistry services 

GP surgeries 
 
Family Support Services 
The  service  will  link  with  family  support  organisations  including  those  working  with  Black  & 
Minority Ethnic population groups. 
 
8. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how the service will utilise volunteers and 
Sub heading 
the service 
Recovery Mentors within this service. 
2.2 g 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion’s general approach to utilising Recovery Mentors and volunteers is covered in detail 
in the overarching method statements.  Specifically, the Structured Day Programme will too 
include Recovery  Mentor and volunteer input.  Inclusion see this as important in enhancing 
the service to clients but also in providing excellent opportunities for Mentors and volunteers 
 
101 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
to develop their own skills and knowledge as well as ‘put something back’.  To this end we 
will  recruit  Recovery  Mentors  and  volunteers  to  take  part  in  all  aspects  of  our  day  care 
programme. 
 
Inclusion is very clear  about the distinction between Recovery Mentors and volunteers.  By 
definition  Recovery  Mentors are  still  service  users,  albeit  ones  who  have  made  progress  in 
treatment, have stabilised and decreased their drug use, have undergone a specific Mentor 
training  programme  and  induction.    Mentors  all  report  to  an on-site  named  member  of  staff 
who  supervises  the  Mentor.    By  contrast  volunteers,  who  may  include  former  Recovery 
Mentors that have graduated from their mentoring placement and completed treatment, are 
by definition, no longer service users.  Volunteers are similarly required to undergo training 
and are supervised by the Volunteer Co-ordinator.  Consequently, volunteers are able to take 
part  in  a  wider  range  of  duties  than  Recovery  Mentors  and  we  see  this  as  an  incentive  in 
itself towards recovery. 
 
In  terms  of  Structured  Day  Programme  delivery  the  types  of  tasks  Recovery  Mentors  and 
volunteers will take part in include: 
 
Status 
Types of task 
Recovery Mentor 
• 
Reception, meet and greet duties 
 
• 
On-site mentoring of other service users 
 
• 
Support for groupwork delivery 
 
 
Volunteer 
• 
Administration duties 
 
• 
Off-site buddying, social support and advocacy 
 
• 
Co-delivery of all aspects of the day programme 
 
• 
Detoxification and Residential Rehabilitation link work 
 
 
 
Each  of  the  three  service  delivery  locations  for  Structured  Day  Programmes  -  Cambridge, 
Huntingdon  and  Wisbech  will  have  a  minimum  of  5  trained  Recovery  Mentors  and  5 
volunteers  available  to  support  service  delivery  at  any  one  time.    This  will  ensure  that  the 
service has adequate coverage each day of the week and allow volunteers to leave site as 
they undertake outreach type duties. 
 
Training 
Recovery  Mentors  will  under  go  training  in  the  following  subjects  before  they  can  support 
aspects of the Structured Day Programme.  This will include: 

Role of the Mentor & Mentor Contract 

Basic Drug & Alcohol Awareness/ Harm Minimisation

Supervision & Support 

Communication Skills 

Group Work Skills. 

Motivational Interviewing 

Assertiveness  

Mentoring in Support of Recovery Goals  

Safeguarding 

Managing Challenging Situations. 

Equality & Diversity.  
 
102 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
 
Volunteers  will  also  undergo  a  specific  training  programme.    The  programme  will  have 
similarities  in  content  to  the  Recovery  Mentor  training  put  will  be  pitched  differently  to  take 
account of the cohort’s ‘volunteer’ status.  The training will include: 
The training course will include session on: 

Role of the Volunteer & Volunteer Contract 

Basic Drug & Alcohol Awareness/ Harm Minimisation 

Supervision & Support 

Communication Skills 

Group Work Skills. 

Motivational Interviewing 

Assertiveness  

Volunteering in Support of Recovery Goals  

Safeguarding 

Managing Challenging Situations. 

Equality & Diversity 

OCN/NVQ Orientation 
 
9. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how the service will encourage SDP clients 
Sub heading 
the service 
to become recovery mentors or volunteers. 
2.2 h 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
The  Structure  Day  Programme  will  encourage  service  users  to  become  Recovery  Mentors 
and/or  then  volunteers  by  highlighting  the  progression  pathway  available  to  all  and  the 
opportunities  that  this  will  bring.    We  have  talked  in  other  method  statements  about  the 
inherent value and basic requirement to have a range of service user involvement initiatives 
in  place to  improve  service  delivery  and  aid service  development.   However,  Inclusion also 
regards  meaningful  service  user  involvement  as  the  foundation  stone  upon  which  the 
Recovery  Mentor,  volunteering  and  Education,  Training  and  Employment  (ETE)  pathway  is 
built.  Without a commitment to service user involvement that includes tangible opportunities 
to  take  part,  it  is  all  the  more  difficult  to  encourage  service  users  to  become  Recovery 
Mentors and volunteers by completing the necessary training & induction and consolidating 
learning that these roles require. 
 
For many service users, making the transition to Recovery Mentor status is a significant step.  
Whilst some service users may achieve this spontaneously or be fortunate enough to be able 
to  call  on  existing  skills  and  knowledge  that  have  fallen  into  disuse,  others  need  to  look 
specifically  at  the  sorts  of  attributes  that  they  will  need  to  develop  to  take  part  in  future 
Recovery Mentor or volunteer training courses with a reasonable chance of success.   
 
In taking part in the Structured Day Programme, service users will witness at first hand, how 
Recovery  Mentors  and  volunteers  have  been  given  the  opportunity  to  support  programme 
delivery.  Service users will be able to talk to Recovery Mentors and volunteers about their 
experience  of  taking  part,  what  the  training  experience  was  like  and  the  rewards  that  each 
individual has gained from their involvement.  They will be able to explore some of the pitfalls 
 
103 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
faced  by  others  and  make  an  informed  choice  about  their  own  involvement  in  Recovery 
Mentor or volunteer programmes in future.   
 
Inclusion will encourage service users to become Recovery Mentors and volunteers through: 
• 
All  service  sites  will  display  posters  and  leaflets  marketing  Recovery  Mentor  and 
volunteer  opportunities.    Information  will  include  an  outline  of  the  role,  the  service’s 
expectation  of  someone  taking  part  and  the  potential  benefits  to  those  completing  the 
training. 
• 
 All  service  staff  will  talk  to  service  users, families  and  carers  regularly  to  encourage 
involvement  in  one  of  the  training  programmes.    We  will  help  service  users  who  have 
concerns about their ability to learn by providing access to education course including literacy 
and numeracy. 
• 
We  recognise  that  making  the  leap  from  being  a  service  user  to  a  Recovery  Mentor 
can be a significant challenge.  We will facilitate peer network meetings at all Structured Day 
programme sites where service users interested in undergoing Recovery Mentor training can 
meet and discuss the opportunity with other service users who have become mentors. 
• 
To  meet  our  governance  and  safeguarding  requirements  all  Recovery  Mentors  and 
volunteers will need to undergo CRB checks.  We will stress to potential Recovery Mentors 
and  volunteers  that  possessing  a  criminal  history  is  far  from  being  an  automatic  barrier  to 
taking up a mentor role.   
• 
As  service  users  progress  in  their  treatment  they  will  have  access  to  the  Recovery 
Mentor  and  volunteer  programmes  as  described  in  overarching  method  statements  28  and 
29. 
 
10. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please demonstrate what the structure of the service will look 
Sub headings  
service 
like. 
a – d 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words 
Contractors response: 
The Structure Day Programme service will be comprised of: 
 
 
104 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Cambridgeshire  
Service Manager 
Cambridgeshire 
Locality x 2 
Managers 
Cambridge 
Huntingdon  
Homeless 
Wisbech 
Volunteer 
Team Leader 
Team Leader 
Co-ordinator 
Team Leader 
Co-ordinator 
SDP Project 
SDP Project 
SDP Project 
Vols  & Recovery 
Worker x 3 
Worker x 2.5
Worker x 2.5 
Mentors 
 
 
 
 
• 
Locality Manager 
In Inclusion’s re-modelled management structure, one of the Locality Managers will assume 
a  Structured  Day  Programme  development  lead.    The  Locality  Manager  will  work  with  the 
Service  Manager  and  the  Implementation  manager  to  enhance  the  current  programme 
through  identification  and  procurement  of  community  venues,  programme  re-design,  staff 
training and brokering in support from other mainstream agencies. 
 
• 
Team Leaders 
  Team  Leaders  will  have  significant  relevant  experience  of  developing  and  delivering  'front 
line' treatment and support services to substance misuser’s in the community and will have 
experience  of  delivering  PSI’s  plus  an  appropriate  qualification.  They  will  also  require 
previous  experience  of  managing  staff  teams  and  developing  partnership  working  and 
developing programmes.  
    
• 
SDP Project Workers 
SDP  Workers  will  be  required  to  have  demonstrable  experience  of  delivering  front  line 
substance misuse services, group work skills and knowledge of individual care planning with 
substance misuser’s. They will have a relevant qualification and will be skilled in a range of 
current  structured  intervention  strategies  including  mapping  techniques.    Each  SDP  Project 
Worker will have a generic brief of basic ETE and accommodation advice & information. 
 
• 
Homelessness Co-ordinator 
The Homelessness Co-ordinator role will offer Project Workers in the structured programme 
consultancy  and  guidance  around  providing  advice,  information  and  limited  case  work  in 
respect of accommodation issues to service users.  The role will lead on developing a range 
of pathways into local housing provision. 
 
• 
Volunteer Co-ordinator   
 
105 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
The VMC will have previous experience of co-ordinating volunteers and demonstrable people 
management skills.  Volunteers will play an important role in the delivery of the service and 
the Co-ordinator will be required to develop and integrate these programme elements. 
 
• 
Volunteers & Peer Mentors 
The  service  will  seek  to  recruit  a  number  of  volunteers  and  Recovery  Mentors  to  actively 
support programme delivery and development.  Supervised by the Volunteer Co-ordinator or 
other named members of programme staff, volunteer and Recovery Mentors will be expected 
to take part in relevant learning & development opportunities as part of their own progression. 
 
11. Section 3.0 
Provision of 
Please demonstrate how some elements of SDP will be 
Sub headings  
service 
available for individuals who are not engaged with SDP as a 
a – d 
whole. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words 
Contractors response: 
There are some elements of the Structured Day Programme that will be accessible to service 
user who are not necessarily engaged with programme as a whole.  A range of interventions 
will  be  available  to  these  groups.    The  service  will  still  expect  interventions  to  be  part  of  a 
service user’s recovery plan. The groups that this likely to apply to will include: 

Service  users  leaving  prison  who  are  drug  free  and  wish  to  consolidate  their 
community re-integration 

Residential Rehabilitation returners who have completed their programme 

Cannabis  users  who  wish  to  access  certain  aspects  of  aftercare  following  a  Brief 
Intervention 

We have described above those service users who are not yet able to engage with the 
full  structured  programme  –  we  will  run  development  groups  as  a  way  of  readying  these 
services users for enrolment on the programme. 
 
12. Section 6.0 
Onward 
Please detail the referral pathway into Aftercare from the 
Sub headings 
Referral/Afterca
service. 
A – b 
re and Support 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words 
Contractors response: 
As  explained  in  the  previous  method  statement  response,  our  Structured  Day  Programme 
includes  a  bespoke  Re-integration  &  Recovery  phase.    All  service  users  engaging  with  the 
programme  will  have  access  to  the  structured  Re-integration  &  Recovery  phase  that 
includes: 

Relapse management 

Mutual Aid & SMART Recovery groups 

Recovery Mentoring & volunteering training programmes 

Education, Training & Employment (ETE) pathways 
 
106 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Accommodation advice, information and advocacy 

Welfare benefits 

Independent living skills  
 
Involvement in the Re-integration & Recovery phase is in theory open ended and designed to 
meet all the outstanding needs of service users. 
 
 
107 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, 3h Family Support 
 

Spec  
Method  
Method Statement 
Reference 
Statement 
Reference 

1. Section 2.0 
Aim of the 
Please demonstrate how the service will identify 
Sub heading 2.1 
service 
family members and significant others for this 
 
service.  
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Our  vision  for  Cambridgeshire  is  to  create  a  “think  family  approach”  and 
encourage  the  engagement  of  families  and  carers  in  a  service  user’s  treatment 
along side the provision of family and carer support services. Families and carers 
will be identified and engaged in support services through the following 
•  A clear communication strategy will be devised to attract media attention to the 
impact  of  substance  misuse  upon  family  members.  These  media  messages 
will  ensure  that  our  strategy  for  meeting  the  needs  of  families  and  carers  is 
communicated to a wide audience. 
•  Through the use of digital media there will be a link on the service website with 
a link to a film exploring the issues for those affected by substance misuse and 
explaining  the  pathways  into  accessing  the  family  support  service,  relevant 
carers group meetings and the SPOC phone number 
•  Information  and  advice  about  substance  misuse  and  treatment  including 
written  publications  and  fact  sheets  will  be  made  available  at  all  service 
locations to encourage families and carer’s to identify themselves and access 
support. 
•  Recovery mentors and volunteers will talk to service users about how their use 
has impacted on their significant others and if interested offer to contact family 
members  to  encourage  them  to  take  up  the  support  offered  by  the  family 
service, or at the very least provide them with literature and more information. 
•  Each service area will host a family and carers group monthly. This will allow 
families  and  carers  to  come  forward  as  stigma  is  reduced  by  the  knowledge 
others are in the same situation – this will increase engagement.  
•  Our  assessment  tools  will  have  specific  questions  relating  to  families  and 
carers  and  trigger  whether  the  service  user  would  like  a  member  of  staff  to 
contact them to offer support. 
•  Service  users  will  be  asked  for  consent  for  us  to  provide  information  about 
drugs and support services to their carers and family. 
•  All  staff  will  be  briefed  on  Social  Behaviour  Network  Therapy.  This  therapy 
seeks to encourage family and carers to become actively involved in a persons 
treatment which in turn can help with their own needs. 
•  We  will  ask  Tier  1  services  such  as  GP’s,  Probation,  Maternity,  prison  visitor 
centres  and  hospital  Accident  &  Emergency  departments  to  display  posters 
and leaflets advertising the service.  
•   We will seek to advertise the service through mediums such as local radio and 
through local community networks such as faith groups and the lesbian & gay 
 
108 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
community. 
•  We  will  consult  with  families  and  carer’s  who  have  already  accessed  support 
services  to  ascertain  what  works  for  them  and  importantly  what  barriers  they 
think  exist  to  other  family  and  carers  accessing  support.    Our  aim  will  be  to 
provide support to all that identify outstanding needs. 
 
2. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how the service will provide 
Sub heading 2.2 d 
the service 
the one to one sessions within this service. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Once  identified,  the  service  will  offer  an  assessment  of  need  to  the  family 
member(s) and develop a support plan.  The assessment will consider: 
-  What sort of information or support the family member requires as a result of 
the person’s drug use. 
-  The dynamics of the family member’s relationship with the person in treatment 
-  How the person’s drug use or offending behaviour is affecting family life 
-  The impact of the person’s drug use upon any children in the family 
-  What  coping  strategies  the  family  member  has  developed  in  the  face  of  the 
persons drug use 
-  How to meet the family member’s outstanding needs through a support plan. 
 
Support plans will be structured and identify what measures the service will put in 
place,  how  and  where  these  will  be  delivered  and  by  whom.    The  service  will 
regularly  review  the  family  members  support  plan.    From  our  experience  of 
working with family members, support plans are likely to include aspects such as: 
-  strategies  for  dealing  with  risk  in  relation  to  the  home  environment  and  the 
person’s drug use 
-  self-care  in  terms  of  physical  and  psychological  health  with  advice  on 
relaxation techniques, nutrition and exercise 
-  generating  ideas  for  gathering  additional  resources  and  increasing  social 
networks 
-  Confidence and self-esteem building interventions 
-  Practical  support  and  help  to  access  education,  training  or  employment 
opportunities, accommodation support or welfare benefits. 
 
For  families  with  a  high  level  of  need  six  structured  counselling  sessions  will  be 
available  delivered  by  trained  counselling  staff.    Through  the  use  of  the  Clinical 
Psychologist based at our Birmingham service an appropriate carers assessment 
scale  will  be  devised  to  ascertain  those  most  in  need  to  be  prioritised  for  these 
intensive  sessions.  To  augment  the  formal  counselling  staff  operating  in  the 
service  we will explore involving second year counselling degree volunteers who 
wish to gain practical experience from placements at the service.  
 
3. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate what training/information will 
Sub heading 2.2 e 
the service 
be provided. 
 
109 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion’s  approach  to  training  families  and  carers  will  involve  using  a 
combination  of  project  staff,  Recovery  Mentors  and  volunteers  (ideally  including 
some  with  experience  of familial  drug  use)  and  external  agency  professionals  to 
deliver regular workshops at all our operational sites.  The workshops will be very 
much  designed  to  empower  family  and  carers  in  their  ‘management’  of  a  loved 
one’s drug use and highlight skills, knowledge and resources to meet family and 
carer’s own needs.  We will run workshops including: 
 
Harm Reduction 
The provision of harm reduction information is important in equipping families and 
carers with an improved understanding of drug misuse and treatment, as well as 
helping  family  members  who  maybe  using  drugs  as  a  coping  mechanism  to 
consider  there  own  treatment  needs.    We  will  train  families  and  carer’s  in  drug 
awareness, broaden their understanding of treatment interventions, look at issues 
relating to safer injecting, BBV’s and sexual health. 
 
Overdose training 
Overdose training will be made available to service users and their families.  The 
basics relating to drug tolerance, signs & symptoms, recovery positions and next 
steps  will  be  covered.    In  consultation  and  agreement  with  local  commissioners, 
Inclusion  are  also  able  to  provide  Naloxone  training  for  families  and  carer’s  who 
are  in  contact  with  someone  potentially  vulnerable  to  an  opiate  overdose.  The 
training will cover the context for Naloxone use, administration and basic first aid 
principles.   
 
Domestic Violence 
As we have articulated in other method statements there is often a link between 
drug  and  alcohol  misuse  and  the  incidence  of  Domestic  Violence.    It  is  for  this 
reason  that  families  and  carers  can  benefit  from  training  in  Domestic  Violence 
issues.    We  will  raise  awareness  of  Domestic  Violence  support  services  and 
resources  so  that  family  or  carers  faced  with  Domestic  Violence  can  make 
informed choices about how to resolve the situation. 
 
The setting and maintaining of boundaries 
For  the  families  and  carers  of  those  with  substance  misuse  issues,  setting  and 
maintaining appropriate boundaries can be a major challenge.  Whilst the nature 
of the actual boundaries that an individual family put in place will  vary, there are 
some common skills and knowledge that will assist in this important area.  We will 
deliver  workshops  that  help  families  and  carers  to  develop  planning  and  coping 
strategies,  problem  solving  skills,  dealing  with  change,  confidence  building  and 
assertiveness.  By helping families to develop their own recovery capital in these 
ways,  families  will  be  better  placed  to  consider  what  boundaries  are  in  the  best 
interests  of  the  service  user  and  themselves  and  to  keep  such  boundaries  in 
 
110 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
place.  An important example of this will be for families estranged from the service 
user  who  wish  to  re-establish  a  relationship  contingent  upon  progress  in  drug 
treatment. 
 
4. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please detail how the service will encourage 
Sub heading 2.2 i 
the service 
family members to identify themselves as carers. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
The service will encourage the self-identification by families and carer’s through: 
 

Information  and  advice  about  drug misuse and treatment  including  written 
publications  and  fact  sheets  will  be  made  available  in  all  service  sites  to 
encourage families and carer’s to access support. 

Recovery Mentors and volunteers will talk to service users about how their 
use has impacted on their significant others and if interested offer to contact them 
to encourage them to take up the support offered by the family service, at the very 
least provide them with literature. 

Service  sites  will  carry  marketing  information  about  Cambridgeshire 
Families  Anonymous  contact  line  and  support  groups  as  an  alternative  pathway 
for  families  and  carers  seeking  support.    ADFAM  materials  will  also  be  made 
available. 

Inclusion will replicate and further develop the current network of family and 
carer  support  group  meetings  taking  place  across  the  county.    This  will  be  an 
opportunity  for  anyone  concerned  about  the  drug  use  of  a  family  member  to 
identify  themselves  and  seek  support  through  self  or  other  agency  referral.    The 
groups  will  be  open  to  all  and  widely  publicised.  Groups  will  run  monthly  during 
early  evening  times  at  locations  in  Cambridge,  Ely,  Huntingdon,  Wisbech  and 
Chatteris. 

Inclusion  understands  that  carers  may  be  entitled  to  receive  a  local 
authority  carer  assessment.    If  considered  appropriate  a  support  plan  can  be 
agreed  by  the  County  Council  and  this  will  include  links  to  local  voluntary 
agencies and groups providing support. In some limited circumstances the carer’s 
assessment may provide access to allowances and grants.  Inclusion will ensure 
that this source of potential support is known to all carers and that the Adult Drug 
Treatment  Service  has  excellent  relationships  with  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Social 
Care Team to ensure that this pathway is utilised. 

All staff and volunteers will be trained in Adult Social Care team processes 
in  respect  of  carers.  Information  will  be  placed  on  the  website  and  in  service 
locations. Service users will be encouraged to pass this information to significant 
others.    Staff  and  volunteers  will  be  able  to  discuss  fully  the  benefits  that  may 
apply  to  them  through  accessing  this  assessment  such  as  ensuring  that  their 
support  needs  are  met  via  local  agencies  or  access  to  personal  budgets  for 
example to allow them respite time away from their everyday situation. 
 
5. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
Please demonstrate how the service will utilise 
 
111 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Sub heading 2.2 k 
the service 
volunteers within this service. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion is committed to the use of volunteers throughout its services.  The family 
support element of the Adult Drug Treatment Service will utilise volunteers in the 
following ways: 
• 
We will explore the potential for establishing a small number of counselling 
placements  for  students  studying  for  relevant  counselling  qualifications  at  local 
education  centres.    Ideally,  working  towards  United  Kingdom  Register  of 
Counsellors  (UKRC)  recognised  qualifications  2nd  year  counselling  students 
offering long term placements will be targeted and they will support the work of the 
counselling staff employed by Inclusion. 
• 
We  will  facilitate  monthly  family  and  carer  support  groups  across  the 
county.    These  will  be  lead  by  a  combination  of  staff  and  trained  volunteers.  
Volunteers  will  be  drawn  from  our  local  pool  and  will  include  people  who  have 
personal experience of drug use or supporting a drug user in their family. 
• 
Recovery  Mentors  and  volunteers  will  be  trained  to  co-facilitate  training 
workshops  for  families  and  carers  in  harm  reduction,  overdose  prevention, 
Domestic  Violence  and  boundaries  along  side  project  staff  and  external  agency 
professionals. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
112 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, 3i) Drug Intervention Programme including 
 3j) Drug Rehabilitation Requirement (DRR) 
 
Spec  
Method  
Method Statement 
Reference 
Statement 
Reference 

1. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
How will the service work with partners within the 
Sub headings a – c 
Service 
criminal justice sector to ensure all appropriate 
 
adult drug misusers are referred into DIP? 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1500 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion’s  approach  to  working  with  drug  misusing  offenders  is  to  assertively 
outreach  and  engaged  with  all  aspects  of  the  criminal  justice  system  and 
maximise  the  timely  movement  of  service  users  into  our  recovery  services.   We 
are clear that the criminal justice agencies we work with are partners with whom 
we seek to find common ground and agreed ways of joint working in the interests 
of offenders with substance misuse problems and the wider community.   
Prisons
CARAT’s
DIP
IDTS
IOM
Service User
Police
Probation
Case Management
DRR
Drug Testing
Tough Choices
Courts
 
Cambridgeshire  Drug  Interventions  Programme  (CDIP)  staff  employed  by 
Inclusion  will  contribute  to  the  aims  of  the  programme  through  a  commitment  to 
partnership work.   We will work in partnership with agencies from across the CJS 
including: 

Cambridgeshire Constabulary 
 
113 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Probation Trust 

Courts Service 

Crown Prosecution Service 

HM Prison Service 

CDIP  will  work  closely  with  these  key  partners  as  part  of  an  Integrated  Offender 
Management approach that has proved successful in reducing re-offending rates. 
By  being  part  of  a  de-facto  single  entity  response  to  substance  misuse  related 
offending, the service can provide a range of interventions to enable and support 
offenders  to  engage  with  recovery  based  treatment  options  at  all  possible  entry 
points within the CJS.  By supporting rapid access to treatment from the point of 
arrest  the  service  will  enable  DIP  to  engage  offenders  in  psycho-social  and 
pharmacological  treatment  as  early  as  possible  to  contribute  to  reductions  in 
offending  with  service  users  assessed  and  commencing  prescribing  within  3-4 
days. 
 
Examples of partnership working are: 
-  Development of excellent working relationships at operational level in custody 
suites, courts, PPO teams and all other settings. 
-  Agreed working protocols that will ensure the provision of an effective service 
that  targets  in  particular  trigger  offences  and  PPO’s  through  a  clear 
understand of agency roles and responsibilities 
-  Participation in Police special operations as required 
-  Support  Probation  staff  with  timely  information  sharing,  assessment  and 
recovery pathways.  
-  The  provision  of  accurate  and  timely  information  to  support  sentencing  and 
case dispersal options in the community. 
-  Efficient and timely compliance testing for service users on court ordered Drug 
Rehabilitation Requirements. 
-  Ensuring employees are vetted and security cleared as necessary to maximise 
staff deployment 
 
There are a variety of ways in which we  will  ensure drug misusing offenders are 
referred into CDIP, assessed and offered interventions: 
• 
Police  Custody  –  CDIP  staff  will  screen  and  assess  offenders  identified 
through 
o  Offenders testing positive or requesting an intervention following Voluntary 
Drug Testing on Detention (VDOD)  
o  Those given DIP Conditional Cautions or where a Required Assessment is 
imposed  
Our aim with custody suite interventions is to ensure that CDIP staff are present 
when offenders are available to be seen.  We will work closely with Police custody 
suite  staff  to  develop  a  clear  understanding  of  offender  flows  and  build  our  staff 
shifts around peak times.   
• 
Court – CDIP staff will screen and assess offenders indentified through 
o  Restrictions on Bail imposed following arrest in other DIP areas for people 
returning to a Cambridgeshire court 
o  DRR assessments will be completed by CDIP staff 
The key to CDIP’s success here will be to ensure that all agencies contributing to 
the programme are integrated including co-location, agree working protocols and 
 
114 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
information sharing agreement. 
• 
Probation 
o  CDIP will accept referrals for all clients on a Probation License or as part of 
a community order.  
o  CDIP will ensure Probation Bail Hostels can make referrals 
• 
Prison 
o  CARAT’s  –  Referrals  from  carats  in  prisons  to  engage  in  treatment  at  DIP 
on release. 
• 
Other referral routes: 
o  Prolific & Priority Offender team 
o  Integrated Offender Management team 
o  Self-referral  
• 
SPOC 
The  CDIP  SPOC  will  be  widely  publicised  and  offer  a  free  phone  number  to  all 
agencies  can  contact  during  normal  working  hours.    Out  of  hours  calls  to  the 
SPOC will be picked up by staff on a rota. 
 
CDIP Staff Team 
The CDIP staff team, lead by the county wide DIP Manager will be co-located with 
CJS  partner  agencies  in  a  continuation  of  the  existing  arrangements  and  be 
deployed in two teams – Central and Southern.  Operational coverage will include: 
-  Arrest  referral  coverage  at  Parkside  and  Huntingdon  custody  facilities  to 
maximise contact with drug misusing offenders 
-  Coverage  of  courts  including  Cambridge,  Ely,  Wisbech  and  Huntingdon  as 
agreed with Probation and commissioners 
-  Generic  CDIP  staff  working  across  locality  teams  to  ensure  all  duties  are 
covered  including  Required  Assessment,  Restrictions  on  Bail  Assessment, 
DRR  &  ATR  screening  and  suitability  assessments,  input  to  PPO  &  IOM, 
prison in-reach and resettlement. 
-  Refresher training of all staff with each owning their own development plan 
-  ‘Custody  and  court  craft’  workshops  for  those  staff  new  to  criminal  justice 
environments 
-  Ownership  of  service  targets  by  all  operational  staff  through  team  briefings, 
information provision and objective setting in supervision and appraisal 
-  The  effective  use  of  Management  Information  to  ensure  the  optimal 
deployment  of  staff  and  the  identification  of  under-performance  and  remedial 
measures. 
 
2. Section 2.0 
Objectives of 
How will the service motivate drug misusing 
Sub heading 2.2 a 
the service 
offenders in the Cambridge custody suite to 
 
engage with the service? 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
CDIP  staff  will  operate  in  the  main  Parkgate  custody  suite  in  Cambridge  and 
utilise  the  following  methods  of  maximising  the  opportunity  to  engage  and 
motivate drug misusing offenders: 
• 
Staff will ensure they operate at times agreed with the Police to maximise 
 
115 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
the chances of engagement.  CDIP will agree and widely publicise staffing rota’s 
and contact details to ensure custody suite staff can maintain communication as 
necessary 
• 
CDIP  staff  will  consult  custody  notice  boards/sheets  to  identify  those 
arrested  for  trigger  offences,  priority  crimes  and  those  already  known  to  CDIP. 
Inclusion will ensure that all CDIP staff are able to access custody records by prior 
negotiation and agreed with the Police to actively target drug misusing offenders 
• 
CDIP staff will pro-actively see the benefits of information sharing and gain 
written consent of service users for the purposes of effective case management, 
recovery planning and onward referral. 
• 
CDIP  staff  will  always  where  their  SSSFT  and  Cambridgeshire 
Constabulary ID badges making clear who they are to both detainees and custody 
suite staff, increasing the incidence of opportunistic engagement 
• 
Inclusion  will  provide  DIP  and  arrest  referral  awareness  workshops  for  all 
custody suite staff on a regular basis to promote the aims of the programme and 
maximise support from custody staff. 
• 
CDIP  staff  will  understand  and  comply  with  all  legal  process  and  custody 
suite  procedures  to  ensure  the  service  is  respected  and  supported  by  custody 
suite staff.  This will include taking advice in relation to safe working in the custody 
suite at all times. 
• 
CDIP staff will conduct regular cell sweeps and engage target prisoners in 
conversations about treatment at every opportunity.  CDIP staff will liaise closely 
with  custody  suite  staff  in  terms  of  VDOD  procedures  and  the  use  of  private 
interview rooms.   
• 
CDIP  will  make  service  promotional  materials  available  at  all  times  in  the 
custody  suite  and  will  approach  custody  staff  about  stencilling  CDIP  contact 
details on the walls of holding cells. 
 
When  a  CDIP  worker  interviews  an  offender,  building  the  motivation  to  engage 
with  treatment  will  be  our  priority.    CDIP  staff  will  explain  that  there  are  not 
custody  staff,  are  there  to  provide  advice,  information  and  support,  referral  into 
treatment and can offer a confidential service. CDIP workers will explain that they 
are bale to co-ordinate care for detainees beyond the custody suite and broker in 
a range of support services to meet their needs.  
 
CDIP  workers  will  use  Motivational  Interviewing  (MI)  techniques  in  the  custody 
suite.  The purpose of using MI will be to: 

Expressing empathy with service users.  Our role is not to make judgments 
about an individual’s dug use or offending but to explore the circumstances which 
led  the  detainee  to  be  where  they  are,  build  rapport  and  trust  with  the  detainee, 
understand  there  drug  treatment  and  wider  needs  and  agree  a  plan  of  action  to 
begin to address those needs either in custody or the community depending upon 
the outcome of the arrest. 

Developing discrepancy in service users.  We will do this by using arrest as 
a  window  of  opportunity  to  explore  with  the  detainee  their  current  situation  and 
their aspirations for the future focusing on the gap between these two states.  

Rolling with the service user’s resistance.  CDIP workers will acknowledge 
the  ambivalence  of  many  service  users  to  changing  their  circumstances  and 
rather than confront this head on, will seek to work with ambivalence and offer an 
alternative perspective.   
 
116 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Supporting  self-efficacy.    CDIP  workers  will  recognise  that  all  detainees 
have  some  choice  in  their  future  actions.    This  includes  how  they  decide  to 
interact with the CJS for example by accepting a Conditional Caution or returning 
for a Required Assessment and whether or not to engage with treatment in both 
the short and long term.  We will aim to build confidence in detainees that life can 
be different in future because they decide to invest in behaviour change. 
 
CDIP staff will also seek to engage and motivate detainees through the provision 
of  practical  advice,  information  and  support.    By  providing  practical  help  and 
assistance  CDIP  workers  will  build  rapport  with  detainees  and  increase  the 
chances of further engagement.  We will provide information about: 

Harm reduction information covering drug tolerances, safer injecting, safer 
sex, BBV’s and general health  

Pathways  into  primary  health  care,  emergency  accommodation,  welfare 
benefits and ETE opportunities. 

CDIP  workers  will  be  bale  to  assist  in  detainees  attending  initial 
appointments  either  though  direct  transportation  subject  to  staff  availability  and 
risk assessment or through limited travel expenses. 
 
3. Section 5.0 
Referral and 
How will the service work with prisons and 
Sub heading  
Assessment 
predominantly HMP Peterborough to facilitate 
a – c 
the referral process into DIP to minimise the drop 
 
out of clients between the two services? 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  understand  the  importance  of  ensuring  that  service  users  leave  prison 
and are picked up CDIP with no drop outs.  Our experience in this area has been 
developed  through  provision  of  specific  prison  in-reach  services  across  the 
Birmingham conurbation linking HMP Birmingham releases in local DIP teams. 
 
CDIP will ensure minimal attrition between prison and community services through 
a number initiatives: 
• 
CDIP will deliver an in-reach function to HMP Peterborough and will ensure 
that all CDIP staff are trained and able to offer in-reach via prison visits or through 
specifically negotiated wing-based pre-release clinics if activity levels suggest this 
is  necessary.    We  will  aim  to  engage  with  prisoners  well  before  release  to 
maximise service take up.  Where possible volunteers will be used to augment in-
reach duties. 
• 
We  will  work  closely  with  prison  CARAT  administrators  to  ensure 
procedures  are  place  to  refer  all  Cambridgeshire  prisoners  to  the  DIP  SPOC  at 
the earliest moment 
• 
All prison releases will have a named DIP worker as their primary contact in 
the community 
• 
All prison releases will have an up to date recovery plan in place to ensure 
continuity of care and support resources available in the community.  If the stay in 
custody has been very short and no comprehensive assessment exists this will be 
completed prior to release if possible but if not, immediately post release. 
 
117 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
CDIP will use a case management approach to track all DIP service users 
by  gathering  and  recording  court  dates,  prison  release  dates  and  an  up  to  date 
location within the prison system for all service users. 
• 
Where a DIP client has taken part in prison based group work relating tot 
heir  substance  misuse  and  offending,  CDIP  staff  will  attend  reviews  where 
possible but at a very  minimum seek written feedback fro programme facilitators 
as to treatment progress. 
• 
Where  a  prisoner  is  being  prescribed  substitute  medication  CDIP  will 
arrange for this to be continued in the community.  CDIP staff will liaise with prison 
Healthcare to ensure a smooth transition from prison to the community.  We will 
do  this  by  sharing  prescribing  information  and  organising  appointments  with 
prescribing services immediately post-release  
• 
Where a DIP service user will access a residential rehabilitation placement 
straight  from  prison,  CDIP  will  liaise  with  CARAT’s  and  the  rehab  provider  to 
ensure  tracking  information  is  updated  and  post-placement  aftercare  is  in  place 
including a re-engagement strategy should the service user leave  the placement 
before completion. 
• 
Gate  pick  ups  will  be  considered  for  particularly  vulnerable  clients  where 
there are concerns about drop out immediately prior to release.  The process for 
this will include: 
o  A release plan and risk screening will be completed 
o  Risk screening  will be  undertaken by CDIP in conjunction with the CARAT 
service utilising the prison LIDS system wherever possible 
o  Gate  pick  ups  will  be  undertaken  by  two  workers  and  this  can  include  a 
trained volunteer 
o  Upon  completion  of  the  risk  screening,  a  gate  collection  risk  minimisation 
plan will be agreed. 
 
• 
When a DIP service user does drop out of contact during the transition from 
custody to community we will assertively outreach the service users in an attempt 
to re-engage them in treatment. 
4. Section 6.0 
Assessment 
How will the service ensure clients who are not 
Sub headings 
engaging effectively are encouraged to do so, 
a – c 
including how the service will work with criminal 
 
justice partners to ensure non engagement is 
Weighting 5 
communicated to ensure risk of re-offending is 
 
mitigated. 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Encouraging Engagement 
Successfully  engaging  service  users  is  critical  at  the  beginning  of  recovery 
journeys.  We  will  do  this  through  combining  a  harm  reduction  approach  with 
enhancing  motivation  and  raising  the  aspirations  of  service  users  towards 
recovery  and  re-integration.    By  addressing  priority  needs  such  as  injecting 
behaviour, we are laying the foundation for future recovery. 
 
Harm reduction advice, information and interventions will be inherent to all service 
delivery.  From the first contact, staff will address harm reduction with all service 
 
118 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
users  utilising  an  educational  and  motivational  approach.  We  will  develop  and 
deliver: 
-  Written and verbal information explaining tolerances and safer injecting  
-  Information on problematic or contaminated supplies of street drugs 
-  Advice and information about safer sex and sexually transmitted diseases. 
-  Advice  &  information  regarding  Blood  Borne  Viruses  (BBV),  pre/post 
counselling and immunisation programmes 
-  Education  about  the  physical,  psychological  and  social  impact  of  problematic 
drug use. 
-  Sterile injecting equipment and the return of used injecting equipment  
-  Distribute appropriate injecting paraphernalia as specified in Section 9a of the 
Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 
-  Advice on the storage, handling and use of injecting equipment. 
-  Offer  health  examinations,  including  checks  on  injecting  sites,  dealing  with 
minor infections and dressings or referral to appropriate services. 
-  Advice that prevents or curtails the transition into injecting for current injectors 
and smokers of substances that can be injected.  
-  CDIP staff will be creative about providing access for service users – we can 
use  a  variety  of  venues  for  interventions  including  public  places  and  other 
agencies  where  service  users  may  go.    We  can  meet  service  users  at 
pharmacy  needle  exchanges,  hostels,  community  centres,  job  centres  and 
doctor’s surgeries. 
-  All  staff  will  be  trained  in  brief  interventions  including  Motivational  Interview 
and  Brief  Solution  Focussed  Therapy.  This  can  increase  a  service  user’s 
motivation  to  address  their  substance  misuse  and  increase  numbers  into 
treatment.  We  will  work  with  service  users  to  consider  how  their  lives  have 
been  affected  by  substance  misuse,  look  at  alternatives  and  plan  for  the 
future.   
-  CDIP  staff  will  actively  use  Recovery  Mentors  and  volunteers  to  approach 
those not engaging well or at all so that the benefits of treatment and recovery 
can be spelt out. 
-  Where  a  service  user  is  in  receipt  of  a  prescription  but  is  otherwise  not 
engaging it will be made clear by CDIP staff that failure to pick up after a 3 day 
break  will  mean  the  scripts  are  likely  to  be  withheld  until  the  service  user 
presents and engages. 
 
Our approach to enhancing motivation and increasing engagement is to build the 
individual’s  understanding  of  their  substance  misuse  and  offending  behaviour, 
raise the possibility of a different life style and support the service user in closing 
the  gap  between  where  they  are  and  where  they  want  to  be.    We  will  provide 
feedback  to  service  users  in  the  form  of  clear  advice  &  information,  ensure  that 
the ownership of the need for change is placed on the service user and outline the 
menu  of  possible  courses  of  action.    We  will  ensure  our  responses  are  always 
empathetic and non-judgmental in a way that re-enforces self-efficacy. 
 
Communication with the CJS 
When a  CDIP  service  user  is engaging  poorly  we  recognise  our  responsibility  to 
our CJS partners to communicate clearly about this.  We will: 

Ensure all service users are tracked through the use of case management 
principles as they move through the CJS. 
 
119 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Ensure that CDIP and the wider Adult Drug Treatment Service are signed 
up to local information sharing protocols and that all staff are fully  aware of their 
responsibilities in respect of information sharing 

We will ensure that the Police are made aware of progress when a service 
user  is  instructed  to  engage  with  DIP  via  a  Conditional  Caution  or  a  Required 
Assessment is imposed  

All  Offender  Managers  will  be  kept  informed  of  how  service  users  are 
engaging with treatment including drug test results.  When a service user does not 
attend  we  will  communicate  immediately  with  the  Offender  Manager  to  enable 
Probation Service breach procedures to be followed where appropriate. 

Where  CDIP  provide  services  to  PPO  or  IOM  referrals,  CDIP  provides 
regular reports as to the service user’s progress or otherwise in treatment. 

Where  CDIP  are  clear  a  service  user  has  disengaged  and  a  re-
engagement  plan  is  in  place,  this  must  be  agreed  with  CJS  partners  are  timely 
update reports provided. 
 
5. (Section 3B) 
Onward 
Please demonstrate how the service will ensure 
Section 9.0 
Referral/ 
clients who are stable within treatment and no 
 
Aftercare and 
longer suspected of offending are moved on to 
(Section 3A) 
Support 
mainstream services 
Section 10.0 
 
Weighting 3 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
It  is  important to ensure  that  service  users who  have  ceased offending  move  on 
appropriately  from  CDIP  so  that  their  outstanding  needs  are  met  by  an 
appropriate  service(s)  and  to  ensure  that  CDIP’s  caseload  does  not  continue  to 
grow unnecessarily and block access for new CJS referrals. 
 
When a CDIP service user has ceased offending and is stabilised in treatment the 
case wil be closed by CDIP and care co-ordination assumed by the element of the 
service  best  placed  to  do  this.    To  facilitate  moving  the  service  user  into  other 
services we will: 

Update  the  service  users  risk  assessment  to  reflect  any  changes  in  their 
situation and communicate these to services or agencies that become involved 

Re-visit the recovery plan to ensure goals remain relevant, challenging and 
achievable. 

Prepare the service user for the move into new services by discussing with 
them  progress  made,  any  anxieties  they  may  have,  practical  suggestions  for 
dealing  with  change  and  updating  information  sharing  &  consent  to  share 
agreements 

Where possible a 3 way meeting involving the CDIP, the service user and 
the new service or agency to discuss handover and on-going recovery needs.  An 
up to date assessment, recovery plan and other relevant information such as drug 
test results will be made available. 

With  the  service  users  consent  we  will  discuss  the  movement  into  new 
 
120 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
services  with  their  families  or  carer.    This  will  help  to  provide  additional  support 
and encouragement for the service user.  

When  a  service  user  is  attending  a  new  service  for  the  first  time,  we  will 
use volunteers to accompany them to the first appointment. 

Transition to mainstream services can be a time of potential relapse as the 
nature of support changes.  We will ensure all service users know how to access 
additional  short  term  support  if  needs  be  including  input  from  the  SPOC,  by 
dropping  into  any  of  the  service  venues,  through  volunteers  and  also  with 
information about national telephone help lines. 

Some  service  users  will  find  long-term  benefit  by  participation  in  12  step 
fellowship groups.  We will therefore encourage and host AA / NA meetings at the 
service or support clients to access 12 step meetings in the community.  For those 
service users unable to engage with the 12 step approach Smart Recovery will be 
developed.  Smart Recovery is a mutual aid movement based on a form of CBT, 
which developed as an alternative to 12 step based fellowships such as AA / NA. 
Smart  Recovery  groups  are  facilitated  by  a  service  user  familiar  with  the 
approach, initially with the support of a professional but aiming to be freestanding 
over time.   
 
6. Section 10.0 
DIP Additional 
Please demonstrate how the service will ensure 
Sub heading e 
provision: 
that referrals from prison are able to access 
 
Specialist 
emergency clinic appointments to facilitate 
Weighting 4 
Prescribing 
continuation of prescribing if released to the 
 
community with limited notification. 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
Where  a  prisoner  is  being  prescribed  substitute  medication  in  prison  this 
medication has to be continued in the community.  Each prison Healthcare service 
will provide prisoners with their medication on the day of release from custody.  A 
smooth transition from prison to the community is essential because service users 
are  potentially  at  their  most  vulnerable  on  release from prison  with  an  increased 
risk of overdose.  Support has been a constant whilst a service user has been in 
custody so continuation of care reduces anxiety, decreases the risk of relapse into 
illicit drug usage, and decreases overdose risk. 
 
Inclusion’s approach to facilitating the continuity of prescribing will be: 
• 
Each  week  a  small  number of  prescribing  clinic  appointments  will  be  kept 
open and dedicated to prison releases in particular on Fridays.  This arrangement 
will cover the majority of prison releases. 
• 
If for some reason a service user cannot be seen by a prescribing doctor or 
a Non Medical Prescriber in the service, a bridging prescription can be issued for 
up  to  but no  longer  than  7  days.    Good  practice  around  bridging  prescriptions  is 
described below. 
• 
The  prescription  will  be  available  for  the  service  user  to  collect  from  the 
CDIP team on the day of or the day after their release.  
• 
A bridging prescription will be dated to start the day after a service user’s 
release, as they receive their final dosage from the prison on the morning of their 
release,  prior  to  release.  Prescribing  records  from  the  prison  healthcare  team  is 
required so that the prescribing Doctor at DIP can verify exactly what medication 
 
121 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
and what dosage has been prescribed for the service user whilst they have been 
in prison.  
• 
A continuation of this medication will be prescribed, until the date that the 
service user can be next seen by a Doctor in a clinic at DIP. 
• 
NDTMS  prescribing  register  checks  must  be  completed,  to  ensure  that 
there are no treatment concurrent prescribing at other local services.. 
 
Procedure for Arranging a Bridging Prescription 
 
• 
An alert form will act as the referral for the service user 
• 
Court or prison release date will be confirmed 
• 
Prescribing information will be requested by fax from Prison Healthcare to 
CDIP Team 
• 
Communication with NDTMS prescribing register by fax to ensure that the 
service user is not being scripted by any other agencies.  
• 
A  further  prescribing  clinic  appointment  will  be  arranged  within  7  days  of 
release date. 
• 
A bridging prescription request form is completed 
• 
Communicate  with  nominated  pharmacy  to  ensure  that  they  supervise 
consumption.  Checks made that the pharmacy is open on a Saturday. 
• 
All documentation is passed to the prescribing doctor and the prescription 
double checked on receipt. 
 
Good practice around issuing  a Bridging Prescription 
 
• 
Obtain a urine sample to check current drug use 
• 
Always  provide  harm  reduction  information  regarding  tolerance  levels  and 
overdose risk  
• 
Contact pharmacy and ensure that the service user can collect from there. 
 
 
j)      Drug Rehabilitation Requirement (DRR)  
7. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
Please demonstrate how the service will work 
 
Service 
with Probation Services and Courts to ensure the 
Weighting 4 
appropriateness of offenders for DRR 
 
assessment. 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion will agree a joint assessment tool with our CJS partners to ensure that 
suitable  DRR  candidates  are  identified  and  a  community  disposal  can  be 
considered for disposal.  Any comprehensive DRR assessment will include: 

 Basic details and demographic data 

Treatment history 

Offending history 

Recent drug use and drug use history 

Physical & mental health 

Social functioning and support  
 
122 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Areas of current need 

Recovery goals 
 
Assessment  for  DRR  requires  informed  decision  making  by  the  treatment 
provider, the Probation Service and the court officers and therefore suitability for 
an order will be determined by a range of factors including: 

Problematic  drug  use  most  likely  Heroin  and/or  Crack  Cocaine.  In  some 
limited circumstances other drug use maybe suitable for a DRR. 

The  offender’s  drug  use  must  be  shown  to  be  clearly  linked  to  their 
offending behavior; 

The offender’s drug use must be susceptible to drugs treatment 

There  is  demonstrable  evidence  of  willingness  and  motivation  to  comply 
with  a  DRR  including  likelihood  of  keeping  appointments,  programme 
engagement  
Joint  training  of  all  stakeholder  staff  involved  in  identifying  suitable  DRR 
participants  will  ensure  that  consistent  and  required  quality  standards  are 
achieved  and  maintained.  Joint  assessments  between  staff  will  contribute  to 
developing consistency within the assessment process. This will also ensure that 
the requirements of both parties are met so that the Probation Service are able to 
meet  core  standards. The  offender,  as  a  service  user  of  the  DRR  programme  is 
also central to the DRR assessment process. It is important that all aspects and 
requirements of the DRR programme are clearly explained and understood so that 
the  offender  is  supported  in  making  an  informed  appropriate  choice  (within 
acceptable  parameters)  regarding  whether  to  undertake,  request  or  decline  the 
offer of a DRR. 
 
Similarly  it  is  important  that  Solicitors  and  Magistrates  are  fully  informed  of  the 
requirements  and  provision  of  the  options  available  within  sentencing  to  a  DRR. 
By providing training to these key groups the service will support the assessment 
and  sentencing  of  appropriate  DRR's  which  meet  the  requirements  of  the  court, 
the  Probation  Service,  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service,  the  offender  and  the 
wider  public. 
 
By  working  closely  with  the  court,  Offender  Manager  and  the  IOM  team, 
assessment  for  DRR  will  dovetail  with  existing  or  newly  formed  packages  of 
support  for  offenders.  By  assessing  the  offender’s  ability  to  respond  to  different 
types  of  intervention,  the  DRR  can  be  tailored  within  acceptable  parameters  to 
meet the specific requirements of the individual offender that will, in turn, provide 
the best opportunity for a successful outcome.  
 
Where an offender has had a previous DRR or Drug Treatment & Testing Order 
(DTTO), the outcomes of these will be discussed within the assessment process 
to  determine  which  elements  were  more  effective,  as  well  as  what  areas  need 
more detailed work.  Assessment for DRR will need to be informed of previous or 
current plans for the offender under IOM.  PPO status will need to be taken into 
consideration as will the nature and types of offences committed.  Any continuing 
requirements from the IOM programme of support for the offender will need to be 
considered when identifying the appropriateness and intensity of the DRR.  
 
 
123 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Current and previous drug treatment will also be examined within the assessment 
process in order that the most effective treatment interventions can be identified. 
The assessment process may also at this stage begin preparing the offender for 
drug treatment, indeed the offender may already be in treatment in which case the 
DRR  programme  will  need  to  be  pre-eminent  within  the  overall  treatment 
programme that the offender undertakes. 
 
Clear,  precise  and  effective  communication  between  all  parties  involved  in  the 
delivery,  monitoring  and  reporting  of  the  DRR  is  essential.  This  will  include  the 
communication  between  the  service,  the  Probation  Service,  the  courts  and  IOM. 
The service will provide where required contributions toward pre-sentence reports 
to  enable  those  involved  in  determining  the  intensity  of  the  DRR  to  make  a 
suitable and appropriate decision. 
 
8. Section 1.0 
Definition of 
How will the service work with the Probation 
 
Service 
Service Offender Managers to ensure that the 
Weighting 4 
relevant and appropriate drug treatment 
 
interventions, including drug testing and clinical 
Maximum word 
appointments are structured to meet the needs 
count of 1000 
of the client and the minimum hours of the level 
words 
of order applied by the court? 
Contractors response: 
Inclusions  strategy  for  engaging,  retaining  and  delivery  high  quality  treatment 
interventions for offenders sentenced to DRR’s in Cambridgeshire is based upon 
each  offender  having  full  access  to  our  Structured  Day  Programme.    The 
programme  is  described  in  full  in  the  SDP  method  statements.    However  in 
summary service users subject to a DRR will have access to: 
 
Key Working & ad hoc Psycho-social Interventions. 
Individual  key  working  for  all  service  users  accessing  the  Structured  Day 
Programme  will  be  a  condition  of  successful  engagement.    Key  working  will 
include all assessment, risk assessment, recovery planning, reviews and reporting 
to outside agencies such as Probation.  The service will employ a combination of 
Inclusion’s assessment tool and the full range of BTEI mapping tools for recovery 
planning.  Key  workers  will  also  be  able  to  provide  ad-hoc,  opportunistic  psycho-
social  interventions  along  side  of  group  work  in  support  of  recovery  plan  goals 
including contingency management.  In this way, key work sessions can serve as 
useful, short-span group preparation and de-briefing to deal with issues that arise 
for a service user.  The Structured Day Programme will act as Care Co-ordinators 
as agreed with elements of the service and co-ordinate drug testing. 
 
Induction Group Work 
Our  aims  in  the  induction  phase  are  to  introduce,  stabilise  and  retain  service 
users.    We  will  build  on  the  work  under  taken  in  pre-treatment  service  user 
development groups that will include: 
-  Awareness of personal skills 
-  Awareness of time management 
-  Stress management 
-  Dealing with criticism 
-  Self-confidence 
-  Body language 
 
124 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
-  The ‘passive/aggressive’ pendulum. 
 
The additional work will include sessions designed to address: 
-  The ‘passive/aggressive’ pendulum 
-  Service user expectations and programme rules 
-  Substance awareness 
-  Recognising triggers, managing cravings, coping strategies 
-  Reflections  on  current  situation  including  debt  management,  housing, 
health & offending 
-  Addressing ambivalence to change 
-  Recovery goal setting 
-  Family and friend support networks 
 
Aiming for Abstinence Group Work  
During  the  Aiming  for  Abstinence  phase  we  want  to  deliver  groups  that 
consolidate treatment progress and prepare service users for a life without drugs.  
Groups delivered will include: 
-  Maintaining motivation 
-  Improving communication skills 
-  Improving social networks/relationships 
-  Managing emotions 
-  Problem solving & thinking skills 
-  Improving time management 
-  Budgeting 
-  Healthy lifestyles & nutrition 
-  Relapse prevention/management 
 
Re-integration & Recovery Elements 
The  elements  of  the  Re-integration  &  Recovery  phase  will  help  to  equip  service 
users  with  skills  for  life  and  open  up  opportunities  for  re-integration  in  to  the 
community and a life without drugs.  The elements on offer will include 

Relapse management 

Mutual Aid & SMART Recovery groups 

Recovery Mentoring & volunteering training programmes 

Education, Training & Employment (ETE) pathways 

Accommodation advice, information and advocacy 

Welfare benefits 

Independent living skills  
 
Stimulant Work 
Programme staff will offer stimulant, in particular crack/cocaine interventions using 
Conference on Crack and Cocaine (COCA) materials.  Sessions will look at: 

How crack and cocaine work 
 
 
 
 

Health implications of its use 
 
 
 
 

Patterns of use 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Triggers 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cravings 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Euphoric recall 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Crack / cocaine and offending 
 
 
125 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 

Coping strategies 

Harm reduction 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The  DRR  care  plan  will  be  a  three  way  agreement  between  the  Offender 
Manager,  the  client  and  the  service.  Regular  three  way  meetings  will  be  held  to 
ensure  that  all  are  informed  of  the  progress  of  the  DRR.  The  exact  nature  and 
structure of these meetings will be determined by agreement between the service 
and  the  Probation  Service.  It  may  be  that  these  are  meetings  between  the 
Offender Managers, the DRR worker and the client or i may be that the Probation 
Service  nominates  and  Offender  Manager  to  be  the  Single  Point  of  Contact 
(SPOC) for discussing cases with the Inclusion service. 
 
Within  the  agreed  care  plan  for  the  DRR  the  requirements  of  the  Probation 
Service  National  Minimum  Standards  will  need  to  be  met,  ensuring  where 
appropriate  daily  contacts  with  a  review  at  8  weeks  and  16  weeks  to  determine 
progress. Testing is an integral part of the programme and reports will be regularly 
provided  to  Offender  Managers,  together  with  attendance  at  appointments  for 
drug treatment. This allows the Offender Managers to monitor compliance with the 
requirements of the order.  
 
DRR  clients  benefit  particularly  from  peer  support  and  peer  challenge.  This  is 
provided  very  effectively  in  group  based  interventions.  The  use  of  group  work 
programmes using the BTEI node mapping tools is proven to be effective in this 
regard.  The  system  provides  a  diagrammatic  representation  of  the  behavioural 
changes the client makes against a developed baseline which is individual to the 
client  based  upon  their  own  responses  against  a  range  of  areas  including  drug 
use,  offending  behaviour,  anxiety  and  depression.    The  BTEI  assessment 
identification  of  anxiety  and  depression  issues  offers  a  further  opportunity  to 
identify  the  potential  need  for  referral  or  engagement  with  the  mental  health 
services.  This  is  particularly  important  for  the  high  proportion  of  offenders  in 
Cambridgeshire identified as lacking appropriate mental health support.  
 
By utilising group work it is possible to provide the required number of hours and 
the  appropriate  level  and  type  of  intervention  to  meet  client  need  and  Probation 
Service  requirements.    The  service  will  provide  where  required  contributions 
toward  pre  sentence  reports  to  enable  sentencer’s  to  determine  whether  a  low. 
Medium or high intensity DRR is appropriate. 
 
9. Section 4.0 
Access to the 
Please demonstrate how the service will provide 
Sub heading h 
Programme 
feedback to the Probation Service in respect of 
 
progress made, emerging needs or non 
Weighting 3 
compliance with the order. 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words  
Contractors response: 
The  service  will  liaise  closely  with  Probation  Service  Offender  Managers  and 
provide  regular  information  on  the  progress  of  those  service  users  subject  to  a 
DRR through the following initiatives:   

We  will  submit  weekly  proforma  attendance  sheets  to  demonstrate 
 
126 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
attendance and compliance with the requirements of the order.   

As  soon  as  staff  become  aware  of  a  service  user’s  absence  this  will  be 
reported by telephone immediately on the day to enable the Probation Service to 
work within its service standard framework should a breach be necessary.  

Weekly  drug  test  results  for  each  service  user  will  be  provided  to  the 
Offender Manager.  

We will provide regular summary updates on each service user’s progress 
against the agreed recovery plan goals 

We will provide the required 8 week and 16 week reviews to each Offender 
Manager with detailed information on the progress of the DRR. 
 
The service will conduct its own review with the client after week 4 and week 12 in 
addition  to  those  conducted  with  the  Probation  Service  at  week  8  and  week  16. 
This will enable the service and the service user to discuss (the lack of) progress 
and determine appropriate action. In addition where clients are non-compliant with 
treatment early motivational based interventions will be delivered in an attempt to 
enable the client to engage. 
 
The DRR care plan will be a three way agreement between the Probation Officer, 
the service user and the service. Regular three way meetings will be held between 
the service and the Probation Service and the service user to ensure that all are 
informed  of  the  progress  of  the  DRR.  The  exact  nature  and  structure  of  these 
meetings will be determined by agreement between the service and the Probation 
Service. It may be that these are meetings between the OM, the DRR worker and 
the  client.  It  may  be  that  the  Probation  Service  nominates  and  OM  to  be  the 
Single Point of Contact (SPOC) for discussing cases with the Inclusion service. 
 
10. Section 6.0 
Care Planning 
On completion of the DRR, how will the service 
Sub headings  
ensure the client is encouraged to maintain 
6.1 – 6.2 
contact with DIP or mainstream services to 
 
support future recovery? 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
When  a  Cambridgeshire  offender  successfully  completes  a  DRR  sentence,  then 
they  may  be  referred  back  into  CDIP  or  via  the  SPOC  services  and  taken  back 
onto the case load to access on-going treatment or aftercare services in a bid to 
meet  outstanding  needs  and  consolidate  reintegration  and  recovery.      We  will 
encourage  this  to  happen  by  ensuring  that  all  recovery  plans  recognise  the 
impending end of the DRR by reviewing recovery goals.  All service users will be 
encouraged  to  understand  that  whilst  the  completion  of  the  DRR  is  a  significant 
achievement  that  are  likely  to  have  outstanding  needs  and  will  also  have  more 
time on their hands following completion of the sentence.  This will require thought 
and  planning  and  in  all  likelihood  result  in  take  up  of  aftercare  services  to  help 
avoid relapse. All DRR completers can become Recovery Mentors and volunteers 
as described elsewhere and will have access to aftercare services including: 
 
• 
.Mutual Aid & SMART Recovery 
 
127 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
The  Cambridgeshire  service  will  pro-actively  promote  pathways  into  mutual  aid 
opportunities for as many service users as possible.  We will do this in a number 
of ways: 
-  By  ensuring  that  up  to  date  information  about  mutual  aid  groups  is  readily 
available in all service locations 
-  By ensuring that all staff are fully cognisant of the remit of mutual aid groups 
and  actively  sell  the  benefits  of  such  groups  to  service  users  during  key 
working sessions 
-  By  encouraging  all  staff  to  deepen  their  own  understanding  of  mutual  aid 
groups through reading, discussion and attendance at local ‘open’ meetings. 
-  Wherever practical, to work jointly with mutual aid groups: for example to make 
service  premises  available  for  meetings,  to  facilitate  attendance  at  team 
meetings  and  the  share  information  appropriately  in  support  of  recovery  and 
re-integration recovery plan objectives. 
 
• 
Education, Training & Employment (ETE) 
ETE support aftercare will include: 
o  learning and support plans with service users 
o  provision of on-going individual support 
o  access to further appropriate learning  
o  identification of employment opportunities 
o  Information Advice and Guidance  
o  Psychometric testing 
o  Labour market information  
o  Personal and social development 
o  Preparation for work 
o  confidence and motivation building 
o  CV and interview preparation,  
o  identifying and negotiating work placements 
o  positive disclosure training 
o  Communication and team work skills 
 
• 
Housing 
Aftercare  service  will  offer  general  advice  and  information  relating  to  local 
accommodation opportunities but will also seek to broker in support from housing 
agencies  including  Cambridgeshire  County  Council’s  Home  Link,  Registered 
Social Landlords and Housing Associations.   
• 
Benefits 
We  wil  ensure  that  all  service  users  have  access  to  a  comprehensive  range  of 
advice and information relating to welfare benefits.  This will be available from the 
staff team in general but will be supplemented by specific benefits clinics held in 
the service by the Citizen’s Advice Bureaux and The Benefits Agency. 
• 
Independent Living Skills 
The service will offer service users support in a range of independent living skills 
including;  personal  budgeting  and  managing  bills,  nutritional  advice,  cooking, 
accessing leisure and cultural facilities and managing relationships. 
 
 
128 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
 
Method Statement Section 3B, 3k HMP Whitemoor 
 
Spec  
Method  
Method Statement 
Reference 
Statement 
Reference 

1. Section 1.0 
Overarching 
How will this service be delivered and made 
Sub headings 
Provision 
accessible to all prisoners? 
a – i 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1500 
words  
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  are  experienced  providers  of  non-prescribing  and  prescribing  drug  and 
alcohol  services  across  the  prison  estate.    In  preparing  our  response  to  these 
method  statements,  we  have  considered  the  Category  A  status  of  HMP 
Whitemoor and the needs of the prison population including those housed within 
the Dangerous & Severe Personality Disorder and Close Supervision Units.  Our 
proposals  are  designed  to  build  on  the  work  of  the  current  service  provider, 
Phoenix  Futures,  and  utilise  our  own  organisational  expertise  in  prison  based 
treatment to drive service improvements and better outcomes for prisoners. 
 
Services  that  will  be  made  available  to  prisoners  within  HMP  Whitemoor  will 
include: 
• 
A replica of the current staffing arrangements namely, two on-site Inclusion 
staff,  one  seconded  Prison  Service  practitioner  and  a  Prison  Service 
Administrator.    Upon  award  of  contract,  Inclusion  will  seek  to  ensure  these 
secondment  arrangements  are  preserved  through  negotiation  with  HMP 
Whitemoor.    Inclusion  will  provide  access  to  our  own  training  programmes  for 
those  seconded  staff  to  promote  shared  understanding  and  joint  working.    The 
service will operate Monday to Friday for 37.5 hours to fit in with the core regime 
hours.  
• 
To  ensure  satisfactory  staffing  cover  during  annual  leave  and  sickness 
absence, Inclusion will establish a small bank of staff, employed in the community 
element of the Cambridge Adult Drug Service, with security clearance to operate 
in HMP Whitemoor.  This bank of staff will be trained in prison based policies and 
procedures.    These  arrangements  will  provide  continuity  of  service  and  care  for 
HMP  Whitemoor  prisoners  and  promote  mutual  understanding  and  awareness 
between  community  and  custodial  staff.    Inclusion  will  explore  the  feasibility  of 
longer  fixed  term  ‘job  swaps’  between  community  and  custodial  based  staff 
following contract implementation.   
• 
As  with  all  our  prison-based  treatment  services,  Inclusion’s  approach  to 
service  delivery  is  to  recognise,  understand  and  work  within  the  local 
establishment  regime.    We  will  develop  excellent  working  relationships  and  joint 
working  protocols  with  all  HMP  Whitemoor  departments  and  seek  to  build 
organisational influence whilst advocating for the needs of prisoners.  Inclusion is 
very clear, that at all times, security-related matters are the absolute priority for all 
staff operating within the prison. 
 
129 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
Inclusion  delivers  recovery-orientated  services  that  do  not  overlook  the 
need  to  deliver  robust  harm  minimisation  interventions.    We  help  prisoners  to 
strive  for  recovery  through  goal  setting,  challenging  unhelpful  thinking  and 
behaviour, raising aspirations and working towards positive change.  At the same 
time,  we  recognise  that  some  prisoners  arrive  at  treatment  with  abstinence  and 
recovery someway in the future.  With this in mind we will work with the prisoner 
‘where  they  are’,  so  this  will  include  accurate  harm  minimisation  information  and 
advice.    In  essence  we  will  always  challenge  prisoners  to  change  but  never  set 
anyone up to fail by imposing unrealistic expectations upon any individual. 
• 
Prisoners  will  be  able  to  easily  self-refer  to  the  service  using  the  normal 
prison  application  process.    Referrals  will  also  be  taken  from  all  other  prison 
departments  and  the  Visitor’s  Centre.    We  will  work  closely  with  the  Prisoner 
Action  on  Drugs  (PAD)  movement  to  promote  service  uptake.    The  service  will 
seek  every  opportunity  to  promote  the  service,  its  objectives  &  the  types  of 
treatment  available  for  prisoners,  to  staff  working  in  other  departments  & 
disciplines  who  have  direct  prisoner  contact.  We  will  deliver  staff  awareness 
sessions as part of the establishment’s staff training calendar.  Staff will then be 
ideally placed to inform prisoners & encourage referrals. 
• 
The  service  will  operate  using  a  case-management  approach.    This  will 
entail  individual  and  group-based  interventions  available  to  all  prisoners  as 
required  alongside  referral  to  a  range  of  other  prison-based  supports  including 
Healthcare, Education, employment & skills for life services.  Inclusion recognises 
that substance misuse issues are often only part of the presenting needs of many 
prisoners and as such care plan goals must address the whole person and their 
needs.    We  will  refer  into  the  FOCUS  high  intensity  programme  to  address 
substance related offending, specific to the high security estate.  
• 
The  service  will  deploy  Substance  Misuse  Node  Mapping  Assessment  (I-
MAPS)  and  Structured  Care  Planning  (Care  Plan  and  I-Plan)  for  all  prisoners 
accessing  the  service.    Confidentiality  agreements  will  be  fully  explained  and 
informed  consent  statements  signed  by  all  prisoners  accessing  the  service.    All 
interventions will be recorded on Casework Record Sheets. 
• 
All  interventions  will  be  delivered  within  a  care  plan  built  upon  SMART 
objectives identified during individual sessions. Care Plans will be reviewed on a 
regular  basis  to  measure  progress  against  agreed  objectives  –  this  will  ensure 
interventions remain focussed and relevant.  Reviews may highlight the need for 
new objectives to be agreed.  Each prisoner accessing the service will receive a 
copy  of  his  care  plan  with  a  further  copy  passed  to  each  prisoner’s  Offender 
Manager. 
• 
The  service  will  be  marketed  throughout  the  prison  to  ensure  that  all 
prisoners and staff within HMP Whitemoor understand what the service offers and 
how  it  can  be  accessed.    This  will  include  the  times  the  service  is  available  to 
prisoners, and what to do if an issue arises outside of these times.  We will audit 
existing  service  marketing  materials  and  advertising  locations  to  ensure 
contemporary information is available to all prisoners and staff.   
• 
A range of literature & posters advertising the service will be developed in 
‘easy  to  understand’  pictorial  style,  in  eye  catching  colours  designed  to  attract 
drug & alcohol users with language & literacy difficulties. Leaflets will be printed in 
English & in the main non-English languages found in the prison. For those who 
are  blind/visually  impaired,  audio  recordings  will  be  available  containing  all  the 
‘need to know’ information. Bright eye catching colours printed in cartoon style are 
 
130 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
more likely to attract those with learning difficulties. The posters & leaflets will be 
displayed  in  all  key  locations  such  as  Healthcare,  in  the  prisoners’  library, 
reception and wings. 
• 
Inclusion  will  ensure  that  clear  referral  criteria  are  advertised  to  all 
prisoners  and  prison  staff.    Establishing  clear  referral  criteria  is  important  in 
reducing  the  number  of  inappropriate  referrals  which  could  otherwise  waste 
valuable  resources. The  service  will  participate  in  the  prisoner  induction  process 
to ensure that all prisoners are fully aware of the service when they first arrive at 
the prison. 
• 
We know from experience that written marketing materials must be backed 
up by regular staff briefings and by our involvement in sentence planning, Home 
Detention Curfew applications and Release on Temporary Licence boards where 
appropriate.  It is also our intention to ensure that the service is represented and 
plays  a  full  part  in  HMP  Whitemoor’s  wider  drug  strategy  and  supply/demand 
reduction meetings. 
• 
With  a  small  staff  team  in  operation  it  is  impossible  to  state  categorically 
that staff ethnicity will reflect that of the prison population.  However Inclusion will 
ensure  that  all  staff  receives  excellent  training  in  Equal  Opportunities,  Diversity 
and  Anti-Discriminatory  Practice  as  part  and  parcel  of  delivering  culturally 
sensitive services.   Staff will attend ‘Challenge It, Change It’ training to ensure we 
work within the prison’s Diversity awareness guidelines. 
• 
Inclusion  will  work  with  the  prison,  commissioners  &  partner  agencies  to 
ensure  that  prisoners  who  do  not  speak  English  can  access  interpretation  when 
required. We will work creatively with Disability Liaison, the Diversity Board & faith 
group leaders to lend their support & help us develop a service that is attractive to 
& respectful of disability & to diverse religious, cultural & ethnic groups. 
• 
It  is  our  intention  to  negotiate  with  HMP  Whitemoor  to  retain  use  of  the 
current office on B Wing and the designated groupwork room (we understand that 
there  are  on-going  discussions  regarding  service  co-location  with  IDTS  and 
Inclusion  would  seek  to  contribute  to  these  discussions).    The  service  would  be 
delivered  as  it  is  currently,  with  staff  using  landing  interviews  rooms  following 
liaison  with  discipline  staff  to  allow  for  unlocking  of  prisoners  and  subsequent 
return to cells (Inclusion would not seek to have staff draw cell keys). 
• 
For  those  prisoners  housed  in  the  Dangerous  &  Severe  Personality 
Disorder and Close Supervision Units within HMP Whitemoor, a service will still be 
provided.  Inclusion staff will liaison closely with Prison staff to provide structured, 
time  limited  1:1  interventions  utilising  isolation  booths  and  taking  into  account 
multiple-staff  unlocking  procedures.    Where  security  advice  allows,  groupwork 
sessions may also be provided. 
• 
1:1  interventions  will  be  offered  to  all  prisoners  accessing  the  non-
prescribing  drug  and  alcohol  service.  The  range  of  interventions  on  offer, 
delivered  by  appropriately  trained  staff  will  include  Motivational  Interviewing, 
Solution Focussed Therapy, focussed harm minimisation work, Brief Therapy and 
key working and relapse prevention sessions. 
• 
Groupwork will be available to all prisoners subject to liaison and approval 
from  the  Security  Department.    Groups  will  include  work  on  Harm  Minimisation, 
Relapse Prevention, motivation to change and peer support opportunities.   
• 
The  service  will  link  prisoners  into  Healthcare  for  the  provision  of  Blood 
Borne Virus testing and Hepatitis B immunisation.   
 
131 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
The  service  will  offer  limited  Auricular  Acupuncture  interventions  to 
prisoners to promote anxiety management and relaxation.  Auricular Acupuncture 
is  viewed  as  a  complimentary  therapy,  and  not  a  replacement  for  structured 
psycho-social interventions and case work. 
• 
The service  will be clear as to what prisoners can expect.  We explain all 
treatment  options  to  prisoners  and  enable  them  to  develop  their  own  achievable 
recovery goals.  We expect our staff to work alongside prisoners so that they are 
in  control  of  their  treatment  and  are  aiming  for  the  goals  they  have  set  for 
themselves. 
 
2. Section 3.0 
Objectives of 
How will this service work with the prison visitors 
Sub heading 3.2 m 
the service 
centre to provide advice and information? 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum word 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion recognises the importance of close links with the Visitor Centre at HMP 
Whitemoor.    Through  the  provision  of  accurate  advice  and  information  to  the 
family  members  of  prisoners  with  substance  misuse  issues,  we  can  improve 
service  take  up  and  encourage  family  members  to  support  their  loved  one’s 
recovery journey.  For long term prisoners, the added motivation of family support 
in  overcoming  dependency  may  be  of  central  importance.    The  non-prescribing 
drug and alcohol service will develop and maintain such links through a range of 
initiatives: 
• 
Marketing information about drug and alcohol services will be provided for 
display  in  both  the  Visitor  Centre  and  within  the  visit  room  so  that  prisoners’ 
families  can  understand  the  range  and  availability  of  support  services  within  the 
prison.    This  information  will  be  visually  impactive  and  use  straight  forward 
language. 
• 
The  free  availability  of  service  marketing  literature  will  naturally  raise 
questions  for  many  visitors  in  relation  to  drug  and  alcohol  services.    In  our 
experience,  the  opportunity  to  answer  such  questions  presents  an  excellent 
opportunity  to  engage  with  families  and  carer’s  and  promote  services.    Inclusion 
will  ensure  that  staff maintain  a  presence  in  the  Visitor  Centre  at  well  publicised 
times  so  that  direct  contact  can  be  made  with  visitors  wanting  information  and 
advice.  Typically this is likely to be for short periods between the opening of the 
Visitor Centre at 12.15pm and the actual start of visits at 2pm.  Service staff will 
make  them  visible  and  approachable  and  provide  confidential  advice  and 
information as required. 
• 
Inclusion  understands  that  visitors  wanting  drug/alcohol  advice  and 
information may not necessarily approach staff directly at first until some degree 
of  trust  is  established.    With  this  in  mind,  Inclusion  will  ensure  that  staff  are 
equipped with information and advice relating to a range of prison-related issues 
that  may  prove  helpful  to  visitors:    this  could  include  local  transport  details,  the 
prison  regime  and  security  requirements,  as  well  as  visiting  times  and 
frequencies. In this way, without replacing the role of Visitor Centre staff, we can 
build  rapport  with  visitors  and  promote  the  drug  and  alcohol  service.    We  are 
aware  of  the  particular  need  to  perhaps  tread  carefully  with  the  visitors  of 
 
132 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
Category  A  prisoners  who  may  seek  a  higher  degree  of  confidentiality  before 
engaging with the service. 
• 
 Our  service  will  take  part  in  the  HMP  Whitemoor  Visitor  Centre  annual 
Family  Day.    We  would  take  along  marketing  materials  and  staff  a  stall  on  the 
Family Day and be available to answer questions raised on the day. 
• 
We  will  work  closely  with  Visitor  Centre  staff  and  volunteers  to  provide 
informal support and advice relating to substance misuse issues.  This make take 
the form of information about the signs of drug or alcohol use, the role of families 
in treatment and recovery, or procedures for supporting referral to services.  
• 
At all times, Inclusion staff offering any information or advice in the Visitor 
Centre  will  be  governed  by  the  same  attitude  to  the  absolute  priority  of 
maintaining prison security. 
• 
We  know  that  families  can  be  extremely  reluctant  to  engage  in  the  visits 
centre.    As  a  way  of  addressing  this  at  Swinfen  Hall  where  we  provide  services 
currently, families come in for a look around at the prison and meet the staff who 
will be looking after and working with their son.  The families who accept the invite 
to this visit are typically the ones who are engage in the support and rehabilitation 
work.    For  this  reason  it  is  good  practice  for  our  staff  to  be  visible  at  case 
conferences and post treatment reviews where the family is invited to take part.  
 
3. Section 4.0 
Client Group 
What safeguards will be employed for those 
Sub heading d 
Served 
prisoners who are excluded from the service? 
 
Weighting 3 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
The  decision  to  exclude  a  prisoner  from  taking  up  the  non-prescribing  drug  and 
alcohol  service  will  never  be  taken  lightly.    When  the  team  receives  information 
relating  to  a  prisoner’s  history  that  casts  doubt  upon  them  receiving  a  service,  a 
risk  assessment  will  be  under  taken  and  appropriate  information  shared  with 
Security and other prison departments before the decision to exclude is taken. 
 
The  starting  point for all  attempts to  safeguard  prisoners  who  are  excluded from 
the service must be the provision of harm minimisation advice and information.  If 
the opportunity presents itself to deliver this information in a 1:1 intervention or a 
group setting it will be taken; indeed our staff will approach the engagement of all 
prisoners  on  the  working  assumption  that  contact  time  may  be  limited  to  one 
session for unforeseen reasons.  However, it is more likely that the information will 
have  to  be  provided  in  the  form  of  leaflets  and  other  service  literature,  easily 
accessible to all prisoners. 
 
As  such,  our  service  will  seek  to  prioritise  the  delivery  of  harm  minimisation 
messages that include: 
• 
Advice  and  information  on  a  wide  range  of  drugs,  their  effects  and  safer 
use including alcohol 
• 
Advice and information relating to primary & poly-drug use including alcohol 
consumption 
 
133 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
• 
Health promotion advice and information 
• 
Advice  and  information  relating  to  overdose  prevention,  blood  borne 
viruses, safer sex & sexual health 
• 
Information around treatment services and referral pathways both in prison 
and in the community 
• 
Brief  motivational  interventions  designed  to  reinforce  harm  minimisation 
messages and promote the subsequent uptake of treatment services. 
• 
Specific information around the risks of using in prison i.e. debt, diversion 
and misuse of controlled substances for example crushing Subutex and storing in 
the mouth to be sold later, hooch, missing medication meant for someone else. 
 
 
Where prisoners are not able to access interventions from non-prescribing service 
staff  we  will  promote  the  uptake  of  Peer  Support.    Many  prisoners  believe  the 
most credible people to support & advise them are other users. Inclusion supports 
this  where  Peer  Supporters  are  well  motivated  and  properly  trained.    From 
experience,  we  know  that  effective  peer  support  can  contribute  to  safer  prisons, 
improve  health  &  reduce  anxiety.  In  several  of  our  prison  services  we  have 
established Peer Supporter networks as follows:  
 
• 
Peer Supporter prisoners give up to date advice, information & support on 
drug and alcohol issues. 
• 
They encourage other prisoners to engage in their own self-care and take 
up other services where possible. 
• 
They  provide  an  informal  listening  service  to  prisoners  with  drug  and 
alcohol issues. 
• 
They  can  encourage  regular  compliance  testing  &  be  committed  to  the 
Compact Based Drug Testing programme (voluntary drug testing). 
• 
They promote referral to the service 
• 
They can access the hard to reach prisoners who may not wish to engage  
 
Inclusions takes the view that Peer Supporters: 
• 
Must be committed to abide by the confidentiality guidelines.  
• 
Are vetted by the security department. 
• 
Undertake basic training in listening & communication skills. 
• 
Are supervised by an identified worker on a regular basis. 
• 
Attend monthly peer supervision meetings. 
• 
Positively advertise the service 
 
Where a prisoner is excluded from the non-prescribing drug and alcohol service, 
we will ensure that they are signposted to other relevant services within the prison 
that may help to meet their needs.  Such sign posting will, where appropriate, be 
accompanied by information sharing that includes reasons for exclusion. 
 
4. Section 6.0 
Liaison with 
How will the service work with Healthcare to 
Sub heading 6.3.1 
other service 
ensure prisoner’s treatment is recovery focussed 
iv 
and regular joint care plan reviews are 
 
conducted? 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum word 
 
134 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
count of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  understands  that  the  majority  of  prisoners  will  have  already  undergone 
detoxification before arrival at HMP Whitemoor.  However, for those prisoners who 
do detoxify  on-site, are  in  receipt of  some form of  substitute prescribing  or  other 
clinical intervention delivered by the prescribing service staff based in Healthcare, 
the  service  will  prioritise  recovery-focussed  joint  working.    This  will  also  apply  to 
any prisoner identified as being at risk of self harm or suicide.  Inclusion are clear 
that  prescribing  and  non-prescribing  prison  services  must  work  in  close 
collaboration  in  the  interests  of  the  prisoner  and  the  wider  establishment.  We 
understand  that  there  is  a  possibility  of  co-locating  the  prescribing  and  non-
prescribing services in future and Inclusion will actively support this in principle. 
 
To foster recovery focussed joint working we will: 
• 
Agree working protocols with Healthcare managers & staff and ensure that 
these  are  ratified  by  the  Establishment  Drug  Co-ordinator,  with  regular  reviews 
taking place. 
• 
Supply  a  copy  of  the  confidentiality  agreement  in  all  cases,  and  offer  a 
copy of the care plan where treatment is an agreed objective to inform continuity 
of care and avoid duplication of advice and information 
• 
Agree  resource  contribution  to  strands  of  joint  working,  which  should 
include staff cover arrangements in times of sickness absence.  
• 
Establish  joint  planning  structures  involving  Inclusion  managers,  Head  of 
Healthcare  Russ  Edwards  and  front  line  staff  to  support  communication,  debate 
and problem solving. 
• 
Agreed areas of activity between ourselves and Healthcare. 
• 
Develop a clear understanding of boundaries: this is particularly important 
to ensure good working relations. 
• 
Jointly agreed target setting and jointly agreed objectives. 
• 
Agree a system to evaluate the joint work and working arrangements on a 
regular basis. 
• 
Jointly  developing  a  system  which  incorporates  seeking  the  views  of 
service users and others regarding interagency collaboration. 
• 
We  know  that  effective  multi-agency  partnership  work  based  on  good  will 
and  a  shared ethos  to  deliver  the  best provision  will  reduce fragmentation  within 
the treatment/care system. However written agreements and regular meetings are 
of  little  worth  if  there  does  not  exist  a  deeper  understanding  and appreciation  of 
the  values  and  roles  of  partner  agencies.  We  believe  that  energy  put  into 
understanding  partner  agencies  early  in  the  start-up  phase  will  prevent  a  silo 
mentality emerging and will further reduce the risk of fragmentation.  The team will 
also be encouraged to attend the RCGP1 certificate to gain an understanding of 
treatment planning and prescribing processes. 
• 
Ensure  that  the  non-prescribing  drug  and  alcohol  service  retains  a  clear 
case  management  lead  for  all  prisoners  who  are  receiving  prescribing  or  other 
clinical interventions. 
• 
Facilitate  joint  team  meetings  involving  prescribing  and  non-prescribing 
service  staff  at  regular  intervals  to  promote  information  sharing,  discussion  of 
good practice, case reviews and service development. 
• 
For those prisoners undergoing detoxification, ensure a robust package of 
 
135 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
psycho-social interventions are delivered throughout the detoxification period and 
beyond. 
• 
Operate an agreed, joint approach to record keeping to ensure all prisoners 
have up-to-date case files detailing all substance misuse related interventions and 
relevant case histories.  This will be of particular importance upon prisoner release 
where  communication  with  CJIT’s  is  of  high  priority  to  ensure  continuity  of 
treatment. 
• 
We  will  ensure  that  Healthcare  staff  involved  in  prescribing  and  other 
clinical interventions are familiar with the full suite of node link maps used by the 
service. 
• 
Clearly defined exit strategies will be agreed with all those involved in care 
packages including Healthcare, Offender Management Unit, Compact Based Drug 
Testing team and Safer Custody.  
• 
Where  possible,  we  will  seek  opportunities  to  co-facilitate  groupwork 
sessions with the prescribing service to promote harm minimisation, support care 
plan goals and develop joint transfer/release plans.   
• 
Where  resources  allow,  non-prescribing  service  staff  will  maintain  a 
presence  within  the  Healthcare  Unit  specifically  to  allow  joint  working  with 
prisoners receiving prescribing or other clinical interventions. 
• 
Conversely,  we  will  expect  all  prisoners  in  receipt  of  prescribing  or  other 
clinical  substance  misuse  interventions  from  Healthcare  to  have  a  named  Nurse 
assigned  to  their  care  to  promote  communication,  information  sharing  and  joint 
working. 
• 
As  an  experienced  provider  of  both  community  and  custodial  prescribing 
and  other  clinical  services  we  are  in  the  position  to  offer  Healthcare  colleagues 
training  at  different  levels  as  required.    This  can  include  general  educative 
information around  substance  misuse,  recovery-orientated  prescribing  packages, 
Blood  Borne  Virus  information,  Relapse  Prevention,  Overdose  prevention,  and 
substance  misuse & mental health.   Training\support can also be delivered on a 
more informal basis; this can include providing Healthcare staff with opportunities 
to  spend  time  in  the  Cambridge  Adult  Treatment  Service  observing  clinics, 
dispensing  &  shadowing  practice.   These opportunities  can  also help  to  improve 
experience  of  recognition  of  physical  &  emotional  indicators  of  withdrawal, 
problematic  alcohol  issues  such  as  delirium  tremens  or  coping  with  aggressive 
behaviours,  recognising  injecting  sites,  wounds  &  infections  associated  with 
intravenous drug use, recognition of those who are still intoxicated, differences in 
the way drug users present, cold like symptoms for those who sniff crack/cocaine, 
runny nose and general nose irritation. 
 
5. Section 6.0 
Throughcare 
How will the service ensure that prisoners are 
Sub heading 
effectively referred on to another prison 
6.3.5 
establishment and care coordination/treatment 
 
planning is maintained on transfer? How will 
Weighting 4 
CJIT be informed of any changes? 
 
Maximum word 
count of 500 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  is  an  experienced  provider  of  prison-based  prescribing  &  non-
prescribing  treatment  services  and  the  Drug  Intervention  Programme  in  the 
 
136 

FOI 1719 APP4 – March 2012 
 
community.    We  are  therefore  well  placed  to  ensure  that  effective  care  co-
ordination  and  treatment  planning  is  maintained  when  prisoners  move  within  in 
the  prison  estate,  through  effective  working  procedures  and  information  sharing 
agreements.    Given  the  nature  of  the  Category  A  population  within  HMP 
Whitemoor,  we  understand  that  prisoner  transfer  destinations  are  likely  to  be 
numerous and well dispersed across the country, rather than a significant number 
of  purely  local  releases.    With  this  in  mind,  robust  communication  with  a  wide 
range of receiving establishments and CJIT’s will be required.   
 
To ensure effective prisoner transfer arrangements are in place we will: 
• 
Develop  and  maintain  excellent  working  relationships  with  Observation 
Categorisation  &  Allocation  (OCA)  at  all  times  to  promote  the  flow  of  timely, 
accurate  information  about  planned  prisoner  transfers  and  an  awareness  of 
overcrowding drafts and security-related transfers in and out of HMP Whitemoor.  
The service will also cultivate effective links and develop protocols with Security, 
Offender Management and other prison departments influencing prisoner transfer. 
• 
In  all  cases,  completed  prisoner  Transfer  Plans  will  be  included  in  the 
Prisoner  Core  Record  upon  transfer,  or  in  cases  where  transfer  has  taken  place 
before we have been informed (this is quite likely in a high security estate due to 
the  issues  surrounding  secure  escorting  -  transfer  often  take  place  quickly  and 
covertly), using recorded mail delivery systems within 5 days of the actual transfer 
taking  place.    The  receiving  prison  Single  Point  of  Contact  (SPOC)  will  also  be 
notified via secure email.  At this point, the relevant CJIT will be informed of the 
prisoner transfer.  Wherever practicable, the Transfer Plan will be completed with 
the prisoner present to ensure ownership, completeness and continuity of care.  . 
• 
The  service  will  ensure  it  completes  are  relevant  ‘alert  forms’  in  the 
stipulated timescales and share this information promptly with the relevant CJIT. 
• 
Where prisoners are transferred into HMP Whitemoor, the non-prescribing 
drug and alcohol service will see the prisoner within 5 working days and take up 
outstanding  assessment,  care  planning  and  case  work  interventions  as 
appropriate  to  each  prisoner.    Where  relevant,  joint  working  with  Healthcare 
around prescribing and other clinical needs will be prioritised. 
• 
Ensure all case files are accurate and up-to-date upon transfer to another 
establishment.  This will give the receiving prison the best possible opportunity to 
build  on  the  prisoner’s  progress  to  date  and  should  include  information  such  as 
completed  assessments,  current  care  plan  and  progress  against  agreed  goals, 
psycho-social interventions delivered and testing results. 
• 
Given the geographical nature of the wide range of CJIT’s HMP Whitemoor 
is likely to liaise with, attendance at community forums and CJIT meetings will be 
limited.  However, this will place the emphasis upon clear lines of communication 
using  email,  fax,  telephone  and  post.  DIP  workers  can  be  invited  in  visit  and 
telephone assessments can be arranged prior to release.   
• 
The Administrative support provided to the service by HMP Whitemoor will 
serve  an  important  function  with  respect  to  transfer  arrangements.    Our 
expectation  is  that  the  Administrator  will  enjoy  good  relations  with  a  range  of 
prison  departments,  in  particular  OCA,  and  these  relationships  will  help  relevant 
information flow to and from the service as required. 
 by writing ‘Note 
 
 
137