This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Contract for Provision of Adult Drug Treatment Services in Cambridgeshire - INCLUSION'.

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
Method Statement – Section 3A Overarching Provision 
 
Method  
Spec Reference 
Method Statement 
Statement 
Reference 
number 
1. Section 
Definition of Service 
How will this service be delivered in line with an agenda 
1.0 
towards recovery? 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500  
Contractors response
 
Inclusion’s vision for Cambridgeshire Adult Drug Service is to develop, with local partners; a 
recovery orientated integrated system that provides service users, their families and carers 
with  information,  treatment,  support  and  evidenced-based  interventions.    Across  the 
services, our focus will be upon supporting service users to actively address their substance 
misuse, associated offending behaviour and underlying psycho-social issues: our goals are 
demonstrable  recovery  and  re-integration  underpinned  by  significant  improvements  in 
individual health and social functioning.  
 
Inclusion  brings  an  organisational  track  record  of  combining  a  choice  of  pharmacological 
treatments with robust psycho-social interventions delivered by highly motivated staff teams, 
who  are  well  trained  and  effectively  managed.    As  a  semi-autonomous  member  of  the 
specialist directorate of South Staffordshire & Shropshire Foundation Trust (SSSFT), we are 
able  to  offer  Cambridgeshire  County  Council  a  unique  combination  of  sound  clinical 
governance  &  safety,  the  assurance  of  operating  as  part  of  a  large  Foundation  Trust, 
together  with  the  ability  to  innovate,  work  collaboratively  and  respond  dynamically  to 
changing  local  needs.    Inclusion  offers  the  dynamism  of  the  Third  Sector  with  the 
infrastructural support of the NHS. 
 
At Inclusion, we believe that service users are capable of changing their lives and that our 
role  is  to  facilitate  that  change  through  enhancing  motivation  and  providing  alternatives  to 
addiction.  Consequently, we challenge service users to address their substance misuse and 
any  related  offending  through  accurate  assessment,  goal-orientated  recovery  planning  and 
the provision of clear pathways into a range of mainstream public services,  opportunities to 
learn, train & gain employment and links to mutual aid and self-help groups.   
 
Inclusion  have  fully  embraced  the  recovery  agenda  whilst  retaining  a  clear  commitment  to 
the  principles  of  harm  minimisation  and  will  adopt  this  approach  in  Cambridgeshire  Adult 
Drug  Service.   We  have  developed  a  recovery  focussed  approach  through  listening  to  our 
service users and learning lessons from the range of services we deliver.  We bring a strong 
commitment to meaningful service user involvement, peer-led recovery & re-integration and 
opportunities to volunteer.  We strive to raise and meet the aspirations of our service users 
along their recovery journeys. 
 
At Inclusion we recognise that one agency cannot meet all the needs of those presenting for 
substance  misuse  treatment  and  this  drives  our  pro-active  approach  to  working  in 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
partnership  in  solution-focussed  ways.  We  will  advocate  for  service  users,  create  and 
develop recovery pathways and add value in collaboration with other organisations including 
health  and  social  care  agencies,  the  Criminal  Justice  System  and  voluntary  &  charitable 
organisations.    We  will  work  with  all  stakeholders  to  develop  a  service  that  meets  local 
needs rather than imposing a pre-designed service model.  
 
We will increase: 
-  Those that enter and complete effective treatment   
-  Those that reintegrate socially 
-  Those that complete BBV vaccination programmes and access healthcare interventions 
-  Those that move towards recovery following long term substitute prescribing 
 
We will reduce: 
-  Drug related deaths  
-  Offending behaviour related to substance misuse 
-  Those re-presenting for treatment following relapse through sustained abstinence 
-  Dependency amongst service users upon welfare benefits 
 
 
2. Section 1.0 
Definition of Service 
Please demonstrate and detail what evidence base you 
 
are modelling your service on 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000  
Contractors response: 
Inclusion’s  approach  to  service  delivery  in  Cambridgeshire  will  seek  to  combine 
pharmacological  treatments  with  psycho-social  interventions  that  promote  recovery  whilst 
equipping  all  service  users  with  clear  harm  minimisation  advice  and  information.    In  doing 
this the evidence base we will call upon includes: 
 
• 
NICE Guidance & Technology Appraisals 
Inclusion  incorporate  National  Institute  for  Clinical  Excellence  (NICE)  Guidance  & 
Technology  Appraisals  that  are  designed  to  standardise  good  practice  and  increase  cost 
effectiveness  into  our  services  and  are  a  way  of  assuring  we  provide  effective  and  safe 
evidence  based  interventions.    NICE  Guidance  &  Technology  Appraisals  are  based  on 
sound  evidence  of  the  benefits  of  an  intervention  in  the  broadest  sense.  This  includes  the 
impact  of  interventions  on  a  service  user’s  quality  of  life  and  include  specific 
recommendations  for  defined  groups.  This  gives  service  providers  confidence  in  the 
treatment we deliver and the methodology used. It is the basis of good governance. 
 
Specifically, our services work to: 

NICE Drug misuse (CG52) Opioid detoxification 

NICE Drug Misuse (CG51) Psycho-social Interventions 

NICE Drug Misuse (TA114) Methadone & Buprenorphine 

NICE Drug Misuse (TA115) Naltrexone 
 
To demonstrate Inclusion’s familiarity with NICE Guidance and how this can be deployed in 
Cambridgeshire  to  drive  the  recovery  agenda,  reference  to  CG52  Opioid  Detoxification  is 
helpful,  particularly  when  considering  the  setting  for  detoxification  and  the  role  of  psycho-
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
social interventions in the process.  It is Inclusion’s experience that detoxification is a vastly 
underused intervention and when it is made available is often delivered in isolation, without 
psychological support, with the result of poor outcomes for service users. 
 
CG52 clearly states that: 
“Staff should routinely offer a community-based programme to all service users considering 
opioid detoxification’ and ‘this should normally include: 

prior stabilisation of opioid use through pharmacological treatment 

effective coordination of care by specialist or competent primary practitioner 

the provision of psychosocial interventions, where appropriate, during the stabilisation 
and maintenance phases” 
Inclusion  will  ensure  that  community  detoxification,  underpinned  by  effective  psycho-social 
interventions is widely available across Cambridgeshire to all service users providing that the 
NICE exclusion criteria do not apply, namely: 

needs  medical  and/or  nursing  care  because  of  significant  co-morbid  physical  or 
mental health problems 

requires  complex  polydrug  detoxification,  for  example  concurrent  detoxification  from 
alcohol or benzodiazepines 

are  experiencing  significant  social  problems  that  will  limit  the  benefit  of  community-
based detoxification 
• 
Department of Health (DOH) Drug Misuse & Dependence – UK Guidelines on Clinical 
Management (referred to as the 2007 Clinical Guidelines) 
 
As a provider of drug treatment, Inclusion takes full account of the 2007 Clinical Guidelines in 
the  delivery  of  its  services.    Inclusion  understands  and  recognises  the  status  of  the  2007 
Clinical Guidelines in that they comprise best evidence and best practice rather than being a 
set of intervention protocols that dictate clinical decision making.  However, Inclusion is clear 
that when a clinician operates outside of the clinical guidelines, then there ought to be a clear 
rational for this.  So whilst the 2007 Clinical Guidelines do not have statutory status, it is clear 
that  all  clinicians  must  “be  familiar  with  relevant  guidelines  and  developments,  keep  up  to 
date  with,  and  adhere  to  the  relevant  laws  and  codes  of  practice  and  provide  effective 
treatments  based  on  the  best  available  evidence”  (The  General  Medical  Council  2006).  
Should concerns arise about the practice of any clinician then adherence to these guideless 
will form a central feature of any performance assessment. 
 
Details  of  Inclusion’s  specific  pharmacological  and  psycho-social  interventions,  covered  by 
the  2007  Clinical  Guidelines  are  included  in  other  method  statements.    However,  the  ‘key 
points’ governing our service delivery are: 
-  Psycho-social Interventions (PSI’s) 
o  Treatment should always involve a psychosocial component. 
o  Developing a good therapeutic alliance is crucial  
o  Keyworking is a term to describe overall case management and should be 
accompanied by recognised PSI’s 
-  Pharmacological  
o  Titration should aim to achieve an effective dose whilst guarding against too rapid 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
an increase. 
o  Supervised  consumption  should  be  available  for  all  patients  for  a  length  of  time 
appropriate to their needs and risks. 
o  Service users must be made fully aware of the risks of their medication and of the 
importance 
o  Methadone,  Buprenorphine  and  Lofexidine  are  all  effective  in  detoxification 
regimens. 
o  Opioid detoxification  should  be  offered  as part  of  a  package  including  preparation 
and post-detoxification support to prevent relapse. 
o  Benzodiazepines prescribed for their dependence should be at the lowest possible 
dose to control dependence and doses should be reduced as soon as possible. 
o  There  are  no  effective  pharmacological  treatments  to  eliminate  the  symptoms  of 
withdrawal from stimulants  
o  Injectable  opioid  treatment  may  be  suitable  for  a  small  minority  of  patients  who 
have failed in optimised oral treatment. 
 
Inclusion  services  also  reflect  the  general  principles  of  drug  treatment  captured  in  the 
Guidelines namely; 
-  Drug treatment should be based on local need and evolve as those needs change over 
time 
-  Service users present with a range of health and social needs often beyond the capability 
of  any  one  agency  to  meet.    For  this  reason  a  partnership  joint-working  approach  is 
optimal 
-  Doctors need to have a range of competencies 
-  Sound clinical governance systems must be in place 
-  Service  users  must  be  actively  involved  in  their  treatment  –  this  clearly  improves 
outcomes 
-  Families and carer’s must also be involved in treatment services both as support for their 
loved ones but also in recognition of their own needs. 
 
3. Section 1.0 
Definition of Service 
Please demonstrate how service users are able to 
 
access the service at differing points of their recovery 
Weighting 4 
journey 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of  1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
The  location  and  opening  times  of  all  services  are  detailed  in  method  statement  8  and  the 
Single Point of Contact arrangements are described in method statement 3B1.  However, it 
is Inclusions’ belief that the essence of accessibility is the ability to engage with service users 
at the time and stage they present; this means tailoring interventions to be needs-led and to 
be  flexible  enough  to  offer  help  to  all  service  users  at  whatever  stage  of  their  recovery 
journey  they  find  themselves.    This  in  turn  requires  the  staff  and  volunteer  team  to  be 
capable  of  delivering  a  wide  range  of  services  effectively.    With  this  in  mind,  the 
Cambridgeshire service will provide the following: 
Engagement 
If a user presents at one of our services for the first time, or is returning to treatment after a 
previous episode, the emphasis is upon the service to engage the individual and break down 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
any barriers that exist.  We will do this through: 
• 
Ensuring  that  services  are  open  access  or  ‘low  threshold’  with  as  few  hoops  as 
possible for service users to have to jump through.  For some users, engagement may only 
come  about  through  our  ability  to  offer  assertive  outreach;  we  will  develop  links  with  other 
agencies  where  our  client  group  can  be  found  to  do  this.    To  this  end  our  links  with  the 
Criminal Justice System will be strong. 
• 
Deploying  Recovery  Mentors  across  all  sites  so  that  service  users  are  met  by 
someone who has personal knowledge of services and the emotional challenges of engaging 
with  treatment.    Knowing  that  recovery  is  possible  by  seeing  someone  who  has  made 
progress is a powerful tool. 
• 
Providing 1:1 brief motivational interventions – we recognise that when a service user 
presents for treatment there is a window of opportunity that the service must capitalise upon 
by enhancing motivation and the appetite for recovery 
• 
We will deliver harm minimisation interventions as a core component of everything we 
do,  rather  than  as  an  add-on.    Harm  minimisation  interventions  will  be  offered  from  first 
engagement.  Our aim is to agree realistic treatment goals and for some service users this 
will  initially  involve  using  drugs  more  safely,  enhancing  motivation  and  raising  recovery 
expectations.    Harm  minimisation  interventions  will  include  advice  around  tolerance  levels, 
safer injection, access to needle exchange, health checks including wound sites, intelligence 
around street drug supply, Blood Borne Viruses vaccination and advice, overdose, safer sex, 
poly-drug use, health promotion and nutrition.  We want to keep people safe long enough for 
them to make longer term behavioural changes on the road to real recovery. 
• 
Along  side  harm  minimisation  our  aim  is  to  introduce  service  users  to  other  support 
they may need during their recovery.  This is likely to include advice, information, signposting 
and  referral  to  emergency  accommodation,  housing  options,  welfare  benefits,  general 
medical services in primary care and mental health services. 
• 
Our  ultimate  aim  is  to  engage  service  users  into  more  structured  treatment  options 
and provide pathways out of treatment and away from drug use.  For some, such as many 
stimulant  users,  this  may  entail  a  brief  episode  of  treatment.    For  others,  longer  term 
structured treatment will be necessary before sustained recovery is possible. 
 
Structured Treatment 
For  those  service  users  whose  recovery  intentions  are  better  established  and  who  want  to 
fully engage  in structured treatment, the service  will offer the following interventions across 
the county: 
• 
Needs led assessment and recovery planning by well trained, well motivated staff who 
will  agree  meaningful  recovery  goals  with  each  service  user.    Goals  will  be  regularly 
reviewed. 
• 
Access to a menu of prescribing options that facilitate stabilisation whilst allowing the 
service user to engage fully in a rounded treatment package 
• 
The opportunity to undergo community or in some cases, in-patient detoxification, with 
robust support pre-detox, during detox and after drug use has ceased. 
• 
Access to recognised psycho-social interventions that will help service users manage 
emotions,  tackle  self-defeating  behaviours  and  improve  future  decision  making.  This  will 
include relapse management techniques, dealing with stress & anxiety, building self-reliance 
&  self-efficacy,  problem  solving  skills  and  creating  a  different  vision  of  the  future  that  does 
not  include  problematic  drug  use.    Psycho-social  interventions  will  be  delivered  in  1:1  and 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
rolling-programme group work formats. 
• 
Pathways  to  other  crucial  components  of  recovery  will  be  readily  available  to  all 
service  users.    These  will  include  adult  education,  vocational  skills  training,  employment 
opportunities  and  leisure  pursuits.  We  know  from  our  work  with  service  users  that  these 
pathways are vital in providing alternatives to drug use, developing self worth and promoting 
social inclusion.  In short, these are pathways to sustained recovery.  
• 
Engaging families and carers is important and all service users will be encouraged to 
involve  their  loved  ones  in  supporting  them  during  treatment.    We  will  provide  information 
relating  to  drug  use  &  treatment  and  include  families  &  carer’s  in  recovery  plan  goals.  
Inclusion sees family and carer involvement as an effective way of increasing our treatment 
capacity and an important feature of recovery. 
 
Sustaining Change & Recovery 
When  progress  in  treatment  has  occurred,  many  service  users  will  wish  to  consolidate  the 
changes  they  have  made  by  accessing  further  ‘aftercare’  support.    We  will  provide  or 
facilitate: 
• 
Opportunities  to  ‘give  something  back’  in  the  form  of  Recovery  Mentor  placements 
and volunteering opportunities across the Cambridgeshire services 
• 
In-house peer support and aftercare meetings to enable service users to consolidate 
changes  and  listen  to  others  describe  how  they  deal  with  every  day  issues  during  their 
recovery 
• 
Links to mutual aid groups such as Narcotics Anonymous, Alcoholics Anonymous and 
SMART  recovery  groups.    Wherever  possible,  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  premises  will 
be made available to mutual aid groups to run meetings and group sessions during evenings 
and weekends to encourage involvement 
• 
The  service  will  promote  the  development  of  further  Education,  Training  & 
Employment (ETE) pathways and independent living skills to enable service users to sustain 
the progress they have made and become less reliant on services over time.   
 
4. Section 1.0 
Definition of Service 
Please demonstrate how the service will be shaped and 
 
developed by local need and the views of the service 
Weighting 4 
user. 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of  1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion is committed to involving our service users, their carers and service user groups in 
the  continuous  improvement  of  the  services  we  deliver.    Service  users  and  families  bring 
their own experience of substance misuse with some having used services for considerable 
lengths of time bringing knowledge of a range of interventions, engagement approaches and 
treatment journeys; service users help us identify what does and doesn’t work. Our approach 
to service user involvement includes: 
 
Supporting Involvement 
Through working with service users and families Inclusion has found that experience of the 
drug field alone is not always enough; we often find that developing and keeping motivation 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
alongside  encouraging  effective  input  are  important.  Service  users  and  carers,  particularly 
when  newly  involved,  require  support,  training  and  guidance  and  need  to  be  regular 
attendees at meetings, which then become a familiar setting to them. Simply inviting service 
user and family views occasionally is ineffective.  
 
However  articulate  and  able  to  represent  their  own  views  and  those  of  their  peers,  an 
individual  who  is  not  used  to  organising  or  speaking  at  meetings  or  in  public  can  feel 
intimidated.  If  Inclusion  failed  to  recognise  our  responsibilities  to  provide  support  we  risk 
losing the valuable contributions users and carers make as well as their good will. 
 
An example of service user and family/carer support within Inclusion is that designated staff 
members  have  responsibility  for  regularly  running  training  groups  to  support  service  users 
and  carers  who  wish  to  make  a  contribution  to  support  service  development.  Ongoing 
supervision is also provided by the designated staff members.  These strategies help to build 
confidence  and  to  facilitate  the  direct  involvement  of  service  users  and  carers  in  policy 
development at  a  strategic  level.  To  have  a voice  in  our  decision making  makes  a positive 
impact on service delivery and supports an individual’s feelings of self worth.  
 
Flexible Involvement 
Within  Inclusion  we  understand  that  not  all  service  users  and  carers  who  have  something 
important  to  say  about  our  services  choose  or  want  to  be  involved  with  formal  processes 
such as attending meetings and/or user and carers groups.  We believe that it is important to 
use  a  range  of  flexible  methods  to  gather  opinion  and  ideas  generated  by  users  to  bring 
about service improvement. We do this through: 
 
-  Periodical  satisfaction  surveys:  questionnaires  are  left  in  waiting  areas  for  those  who 
prefer  to  remain  anonymous  and  in  counselling/consultation  rooms.    For  those  who 
choose it, support from Recovery Mentors to complete the questionnaire will be available.  
-  ‘Our  Shout  Your  Shout’  boards  where  users,  carers,  family  members  and  others  can 
chalk up their comments and questions; staff can then chalk up their responses. 
-  Comments  book  and  suggestion  boxes  with  paper  contribution  slips  available  in  key 
areas.  For  example,  within  our  South  Birmingham  Community  Team,  service  user 
feedback  about  the  introduction  of  BTEI  mapping  techniques  has  been  extremely 
positive.  
-  The  comments  and  responses  are  recorded  and  are  a  standing  agenda  item  at  regular 
team meetings, which are attended by service user representatives in most of our teams. 
Where  changes  result from  the  aforementioned  strategies  within  individual  services,  the 
information is cascaded throughout Inclusion for consideration by other teams.  
 
Recovery Mentors 
The  role  of  Recovery  Mentor  provides  a  supported  learning  opportunity  for  current,  stable 
service users to access a training programme combined with practical experience; this is a 
very  real  way  for  local  people  to  shape  service  delivery.  Recovery  Mentors  are  a  valuable 
asset  as  they  bring  by  definition,  similar  experiences  to  others  in  substance  misuse, 
offending  behaviour,  and  homelessness,  offering  experience  of  ppersonal  change  and 
achieving success in treatment programmes. 
 
Clearly, it is crucial that prospective Recovery Mentors can demonstrate a level of stability to 
ensure  their  readiness  to  participate.    Inclusion  understands  that  many  people  with 
experience  of  treatment  services  will  want  to  ‘give  something  back’  and  for  some  this  will 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
include  going  onto  employment  in  the  health  and  social  care  fields.    For  the  majority 
however, a move into wider education, training and employment opportunities will arise. 
 
In summary, Inclusion’s approach to Recovery Mentors includes: 
• 
Participants are stable and free from illicit drug use for 3 months prior to beginning the 
training course.  ‘Stable’ includes maintained or reducing medication (30 mls methadone or 
lower) and the ability to engage with the learning process.  
• 
Completion  of Inclusion’s  bespoke  training  course  and  undergoing  a  service  specific 
induction 
• 
Close monitoring and support.  
• 
Supervision from a named staff member  
• 
Progression to wider volunteering roles when: 
o  Substitute medication has stopped 
o  Positive placement reports are received 
o  Any relevant substance misuse related court order has been completed 
 
Volunteering 
For those successfully completing Recovery Mentor placements and for the general public in 
Cambridgeshire  there  will  be  opportunities  to  volunteer  in,  and  therefore  shape,  Inclusion 
services.  Our approach to volunteering includes: 
• 
Pre-recruitment screening interviews to assess suitability and outline roles 
• 
Structured interview and CRB checking 
• 
Completion of Inclusion Volunteer training course 
• 
Placement in an Inclusion service 
• 
Regular supervision and support from a Volunteer Co-ordinator 
• 
Opportunities to enrol on Open College Network and NVQ qualifications. 
 
Inclusion services offer a range of volunteering opportunities including: 
• 
Needle Exchange 
• 
Social Support 
• 
Outreach 
• 
Administrative duties 
 
Changing Needs 
Inclusion  understands  that  the  needs  of  populations  are  dynamic  and  that  individual 
substance use and presenting issues can differ over time and ward by ward.  We will adapt 
to the changing needs of communities across Cambridgeshire through; 
 
• 
Utilising  data  from  assessments,  user  consultations  and  partnership  working  to 
identify emerging trends in drug use and associated areas of need. 
• 
Sharing information as widely as possible with partners and commissioners to identify 
areas of unmet need and potential service developments. 
• 
Using  an  Action  Research  approach,  piloting  innovative  approaches  to  meeting 
changing  needs  including  aspects  relating  accessibility,  treatment  options,  recovery 
planning, referral to other agencies and joint working. 
• 
Ensure  that  services  continuously  adapt  to  meet  the  needs  of  service  users  rather 
than expect service users to fit within static, inappropriate interventions and strategies. 
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
5. Section 
Location of service 
How will you deliver this service in collaboration with 
2.0 
partner agencies? 
 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 500 words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion understands that substance misuse affects individuals, their families and the wider 
community  and  that  the  success  of  the  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug  Service  will  hinge  upon 
forming  effective  local  partnerships  and  joint  working  approaches  to  achieve  excellent 
outcomes  for  service  users.    To  this  end,  Inclusion’s  Implementation  Team  will  build  upon 
our local pre-tender research and develop a Cambridgeshire stakeholder map to inform how 
we integrate and embed the Adult Drug Service within existing delivery systems across the 
area.  Inclusion  recognises  that  as  a  new  service  provider  in  Cambridgeshire  it  is  our 
responsibility to be pro-active in achieving this aim.  
 
Our approach to integrating and embedding the Adult Drug Service will revolve around three 
key themes; stakeholder engagement, service marketing and joint working protocols: 
 
Stakeholder engagement 
Our Implementation Team will map all stakeholders across Cambridgeshire and proactively 
contact  each  agency.    We  will  meet  with  key  staff  from  all  stakeholders  and  build  an 
understanding  of  each  agency  in  terms  of  its  remit,  resources  and  interface  with  the  Adult 
Drug  Service.    Inclusion’s  approach  is  to  build  trust  with  new  partners  through  identifying 
common aims and objectives.  We also recognise that agencies sometimes adopt conflicting 
approaches and as a new provider our focus will be on what is best for service users. 
 
Service Marketing 
As we engage with stakeholders, Inclusion will also take every opportunity to market the new 
Adult  Drug  Service.    Our  experience  of  establishing  new  services  across  the  UK  indicates 
that  partners  need  to  fully  understand  the  role  of  the  new  service;  this  includes  clear 
information  detailing  eligibility  criteria,  referral  pathways,  locations,  opening  times,  care  co-
ordination,  service  user  rights  &  responsibilities  and  clarity  around expected outcomes. We 
will  market  the  service  using  written  materials,  social  media  and  through  regular  visits  to 
partner agencies and attendance at local meetings. 
 
Joint working protocols 
Having engaged our key stakeholders and marketed the new service, Inclusion will seek to 
agree  joint  working  arrangements  that  support  access,  engagement,  retention  and  positive 
outcomes  for  service  users.    Successful  joint  working  protocols  are  likely  to  include  clear 
information  sharing  arrangements,  assertive  outreach  with  referring  agencies,  shared 
recovery planning and supported transitions between agencies. 
 
Our  pre-tender  research  has  also  highlighted  the  following  key  agencies  across 
Cambridgeshire as important partners: 

Addaction Alcohol Service 

Home Treatment Team, Mental Health Services 

Emergency Duty Team, County Council 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 

Sexual Health Advice Centre (SHAC) 

Community Pharmacy providers including Boots, Lloyd’s & Superdrug 

Women’s Resources Centre 

Citizen’s Advice Bureaux 

Cruse Bereavement Care 

DHIVERSE 

Drinksense 

Lifecraft 

Gamblers Anonymous 

Women’s Aid 

St.Neot’s Abuse Programme (SNAP) 

Cyrenians 

Wide range of House Associations 

Cambridgeshire Children’s Trust 
 
6. Section 2.0 
Location of Service 
Please demonstrate and detail how (if applicable) any 
 
partnership/sub contracting arrangements will work in 
Weighting 5 
practice across the whole service. 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 2000 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion’s bid does not involve any formal partnering or sub-contracting arrangements. 
 
7. Section 3.0 
Aims and Objectives of 
Please detail the communication strategy that will be 
Sub heading 
the Service 
used for relevant stakeholders, including responses to 
3.2 
community concerns and promotion of services to all 
a – b 
communities within Cambridgeshire.  Please include 
 
examples of strategies you have utilised. 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 2000 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion’s  approach  to  communication  across  Cambridgeshire  will  be  informed  by  our 
Trust’s Engagement Strategy.  SSSFT’s vision is to demonstrate to our communities and our 
commissioners  that  we  succeed  in  being  Positively  Different  through  positive  practice  and 
positive partnerships.  Our 3 core values are 
  
• 
People  who  use  our  services  are  at  the  centre  of  everything  we  do.    They  are  our 
reason for being.  
• 
We value our staff.  We cannot deliver effective services  without well supported and 
trained Staff.  
• 
Our partnerships are important to us.  Services which work together on common goals 
deliver better results. 
 
SSSFT have developed an Engagement Strategy for the following reasons: 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
-  To plan communications and give consistency to the message.  
-  Effective engagement contributes to delivery of services and a strategic approach  
-  It sets out a vision for Trust engagement - highlighting core principles.  
-  It helps us understand our relevant audiences.      
-  It helps guide the development of our internal and external relationships.  
-  It acts as a reference document 
 
We  understand  stakeholders  to  include  all  those  affected  by  the  decisions  of  the 
organisation,  or  whose  decisions  may  affect  the  organisation.    It  goes  without  saying  that 
some stakeholders will be more active than others.  We need to understand the needs and 
importance  of  different  groups  and  this  is  a  core  principle  in  delivering  an  appropriately 
targeted  communication.    Mapping  our  stakeholders  is  key  to  our  communication  strategy 
and we will follow the principles in the table below: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Meet Their Needs 
Key Players 
 
 
 
Influence 
 
& power of 
 
 
stakeholder 
 
 
 
 
Less Important 
Show Consideration 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interests of Stakeholders 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As a part of SSSFT, Inclusion services have access to specialist communications advice and 
support which we will utilise across Cambridgeshire.  The work of Communications Team 
can include: 
 
Area Of Communications 
Examples 
 
Media Relations   
Deliver the press office function, includes:  
- Identifying proactive opportunities.  
- Issuing press releases.  
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
- Reactive responses/providing spokespersons. 
Public Affairs   
Support the Trust in public affairs, includes:  
- Parliamentary Enquiries.  
- SHA/DH requests for information.  
- Organising VIP visits as appropriate.  
- Support FOI process.  
- AGM – Trust documents 
Staff Communications   
Lead on strategic/operational internal communications 
activities, including:   
- Intranet communications sections.  
- Ad hoc briefings.  
- Other modern communication methods.  
- Advising management on effective methods  
of communication 
NHS Identity/Branding   
Lead on development of corporate identity and advising on its 
application. Maintaining an overview of all materials to ensure:  
- Consistency.  
- Relevance.  
- Appropriate language.   
Web platforms   
Strategic lead for Trust website content and development 
Involvement   
Closely support public and patient involvement objectives. 
Emergency Planning &  
Lead on communications elements related to 
emergency/preparedness and responding to a major incident. 
Business Continuity  
 
Advise   
Advise on all communication/engagement plans  
 
Miscellaneous   
Event organisation – e.g. conferences 
 
 
Evaluation of Communications Strategy 
 
Evaluation not only helps to check if communication and engagement activities have worked 
but  can  also  provide  an  evidence  base  for  decisions  on  whether  or  not  to  continue  with  a 
campaign, or initiative and how best to improve it.  Evaluation is best seen as a key strategic 
planning tool and to be most useful it must be planned in from the beginning.  Inclusion will 
use a range of methods of evaluating how we communicate: 
• 
Service users and carers   
 Team based working feedback, Annual Patient Survey, internet forum response, information 
leaflets,  audits  (including  no  notice  inspections),  local  and  national  surveys,  focus  groups, 
complaints, feedback to PALs, CQC ‘Annual Health check’, patient/carer stories, open days, 
feedback from Members meetings.  
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
• 
Staff  
Annual  Staff  Surveys,  focus  groups,  CEO/Chair  roadshows,  intranet  forum,  no  notice 
inspections, feedback from presentations/briefings.  
• 
External  
Success of article placement in media, feedback from external focus groups, clinician liaison 
forums.  
• 
General  
 Awards, number of web site hits, number of people attending forums, feedback from partner 
stakeholders, feedback from TUs, formal specific project research.    
  
Service Marketing 
All  services  need  to  ensure  that  they  effectively  communicate  to  the  target  audience, 
stakeholders  and  other  providers  the  core  purpose  of  the  project  and  how  to  access  the 
provision. The traditional methods of leaflets and posters remain important, and these will be 
developed  in  a  range  of  languages  and  widely  distributed.    However  it  is  vital  to  recognise 
the  importance  of  new  technology  as  a  way  of  communicating  core  messages  to  a  wider 
group of people. 
 
The  internet  would  be  a  key  element  of  Inclusion’s  plan  to  market  the  service.  A  high 
proportion of clients and key stakeholders will use the internet as a source of information and 
will  expect  there  to  be  detailed  information  specific  to  this  service  available  on  the  net.  As 
part  of  the  development  strategy  Inclusion  will  look  to  develop  a  website  that  is  specific  to 
this service with clear links to related sites.  
 
On  this  site  there  will  be  detailed  information  about  the  service,  opening  times,  contact 
details  and  how  to  make  a  referral  or  access  the  service.  Where  possible  the  website  will 
also include information in a variety of languages to allow stakeholders from a range of BME 
backgrounds to access information. As the website develops it may also be possible to have 
a  range  of  materials  available  on  the  site  as  well  as  a  feedback  section  and  some  data 
relating to the project. 
 
The  service  will  also  look  to  target  specific  groups  as  part  of  the  marketing  strategy  and 
increase  the  engagement  of  all  under-represented  groups.  These  groups  will  be  targeted 
with  specific  literature  and  information  and  the  project  will  develop  specific  elements  of  the 
service to appeal to these target groups. 
 
Ensuring other providers are fully aware of the project is vital. Initially, information will be sent 
to other providers giving background information, the website address and contact details for 
key  staff.  During  the  implementation  stage  visits  to  other  providers  will  be  arranged  to  talk 
about  the  planned  service  and  to  answer  and  queries  that  they  have.  Once  the  project  is 
established each worker will act as a link worker for other providers and will be responsible 
for keeping these agencies up to date with the project and any changes to the structure of 
the service. 
 
Once clients have engaged with the service it is important that this is maintained. Inclusion 
would  propose  developing  a  text  reminder  service  for  clients  to  keep  them  informed  of  the 
appointment times. 
 
Communication In Action  
An  excellent  example  of  Inclusion’s  approach  to  developing  a  communication  strategy  that 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
addresses  a  common  community  concern  is  the  procurement  of  new  premises  and  the 
securing  of  planning  consent  that  this  often  entails.    Our  Cambridgeshire  accommodation 
strategy  is  based  upon  taking  over  the  leases  of  existing  premises  from  Addaction  all  with 
existing  planning  consents.    However,  in  circumstances  where  one  or  more  new  service 
premises were required, a ‘change of use’ planning application is likely to be necessary.  It is 
the  experience  of  Inclusion  and  many  other  drug  treatment  providers  that  such  planning 
applications  can  raise  considerable  anxiety  and  objection  from  local  people.    Inclusion  is 
experienced at dealing with these concerns and of managing public consultation events.  We 
would  adapt  our  communication  strategy  used  in  other  areas  for  Cambridgeshire  and  this 
would include: 

Meeting local planning officers to discuss in outline our intentions to find, procure and 
apply  for  ‘change  of  use’  planning  consent.    This  will  begin  to  build  relationships  and 
understand the local planning priorities 

Providing a full written brief and project explanation to accompany all formal planning 
applications 

Making  ourselves  available  to  meet  ward  councillors  and  members  of  the  public  to 
share information about the service and ‘demystify’ drug treatment. 

Where a significant number of objections to an application are raised, we will convene 
and run a public consultation meeting open to all local residents and businesses to discuss 
our services and reduce anxieties and concerns 

Describing how our premises are managed very proactively and that service users are 
not  allowed  to  congregate  outside  venues.    We  will  also  make  clear  the  behaviour 
expectations placed upon all service users. 

We  will  answer  directly  all  objections  that  are  raised  and  try  to  re-assure  objectors 
about their concerns. 

Should  an  application  be  ‘called  in’  and  not  dealt  with  under  the  planning  officer’s 
delegated powers, we will attend any relevant planning committee meetings and answer all 
Elected Members questions in order to support the planning process. 

Once planning consent has been granted and the venue is open we will invite all local 
residents  and  businesses  to  an  open  session  to  develop  relationships  and  explain  the 
services we are offering. 
 
8. Section 5.0 
Provision of the Service 
How will the Service be delivered across the localities? 
Sub headings 
 
a – k 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
Accommodation Strategy 
 
To  fully  service  the  service  specification  and  ensure  the  needs  of  service  users  are  met 
during  contract  transition  and  beyond,  Inclusion  proposes  to  enter  negotiations  with 
Addaction upon contract award to take over responsibility for the current premises portfolio.  
We  have  experience  of  successfully  adopting  this  approach  and  are  supported  by  a  well-
resourced  Facilities  &  Estates  function  within  SSSFT.    By  retaining  and  improving  existing 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
premises  disruption  to  service  users  will  be  minimised  and  scare  resources  will  not  be 
wasted by unnecessary premises procurement.  Retaining the current spread of sites will; 
 

Maximise available financial resources and optimise staff coverage. 

Provide a wide geographical spread with multiple service access points. 

Ensure  that  service  users  can  access  services  within  reasonable  distance  of  their 
homes and communities. 

Reduce  barriers  to  service  engagement  such  as  travel  time,  travel  costs  and  anxiety 
associated with the unfamiliarity of travelling to a distant service. 
  
Inclusion intend to secure the use of 3 service hubs and 2 satellite locations namely: 
 
• 
Service Hubs 
1. 
Mill House, Brookfields Hospital Site, 351 Mill Road, Cambridge, CB1 3DF 
2. 
7-8 Market Hill, Huntingdon, PE29 3NR 
3. 
The Former Council Offices, Church Terrace, Wisbech, PE13 1BW 
• 
Satellite Service Locations 
1. 
Central Hall, 52-54 Market Street, Ely, CB7 4LS 
2. 
1st Floor offices, Cross Keys Mews, Market Square, St. Neot’s, PE19 2AR 
 
Inclusion intends to fully support and continue the delivery of services at: 
1. 
Cambridge Access Surgery, 125 Newmarket Road, Cambridge, CB5 8HB 
 
 
Outreach Provision 
Our provision of outreach will of course include domiciliary visits when indicated.  Along side 
this, Inclusion will look to secure access to space at a range of community venues across the 
county  in  St.Ives,  Chatteris,  March,  Eemaus,  Yaxley  and  Stanground.   We understand  that 
the current service delivers outreach at venues in these locations and as part of our contract 
implementation  we  will  seek  to  continue  these  arrangements.    We  anticipate  being  able  to 
secure  access  to  clinic  space  at  existing  LES  practices  and  to  negotiate  space  at  new 
practices  willing  to  work  with  the  service  as  Shared  Care  develops.    During  contract 
implementation, Inclusion will consult with commissioners, the existing staff team and service 
users  to  develop  an  accurate  understanding  of  where  best  to  target  additional  outreach 
venues. 
Delivery Of Structured Day Programme  
We intend to delivery our full modular Structured Day Programme in Cambridge, Huntingdon 
and  Wisbech.    The  configuration  of  the  programme  comprises  Induction,  Aiming  for 
Abstinence and Re-integration & Recovery phases.  It is our proposal to deliver the Induction 
phase  of  each  programme  from  within  the  service  hubs:  this  is  because  by  definition,  the 
Induction phase involves engaging and stabilising service users in a group work programme 
and  by  delivering  on-site,  we  aim  to  minimise  barriers  to  involvement  and  maximise 
progression  to  the  Aiming  for  Abstinence  phase.    The  Aiming  for  Abstinence  and  Re-
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
integration  &  Recovery  phases  will  be  delivered  away  from  the  service  hubs  at  community 
venues.  During the implementation of services Inclusion will move to ‘rent’ space in suitable 
community venues from which to deliver the programme. 
 
Opening Times 
To  facilitate  timely  access  for  service  users,  outside  of  the  ‘by-appointment’  system 
described  below,  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug  Treatment  service  will  operate  a  duty  worker 
system as part of the Single Point Of Contact (SPOC) arrangements.  At each service site, a 
formal duty worker rota will be established, with all practitioners fulfilling regular sessions.  If 
a new or re-engaging service user presents at a service hub, they will be seen by the duty 
worker during that day at the latest, with immediate access highly likely as the duty worker 
will not book prior appointments during their duty session.  
 
For  service  users  who  have  already  been  assessed  and  are  currently  engaging  with  the 
service  a  ‘by-appointment’  system  will  operate.    Appointments  at  all  service  hubs  will  be 
offered  across  all  opening  hours  and  these  times  are  detailed  below.    In  the  event  of  a 
named worker being unavailable for unforeseen reasons, the duty  worker system will allow 
for cover to be maintained for all scheduled appointments. For service users accessing the 
service via satellites, the appointment system will also operate.  Appointment availability will 
take account of the opening times and requirements of satellite sites.  Workers will operate 
on  a  patch-based  system  to  promote  effective  inter-agency  working,  service  continuity  and 
efficient use of time and resources.   
 
Inclusion will seek to maximise access for service users in the following ways; 

Each  service  site  will  open  52  weeks  a  year  with  the  exception  of  Bank  and  Public 
holidays 

Each  service  site  will  open  between  9.00am  and  5pm  each  weekday  and  will  not  close 
over lunch time. 

The service hubs will open on at least one extended evening up to 7.30pm 

Service hubs will open for 4 hours between 9am and 1pm on Saturday mornings to offer 
open  access and  prescribing  appointments  to  service  users.    Inclusion  will  also  seek  to 
deliver family-targeted interventions during this period. 

Appointments  will  be  available  at  outreach  sites  depending  on  host  agency  opening 
times.    However,  the  service  will  look  to  establish  appointment  coverage  that  at  least 
spans the hours of 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday.  Where an outreach service operates 
outside of normal office hours, the service will seek to match this commitment. 

Inclusion  is  committed  to  on-going  consultation  with  service  users,  commissioners  and 
partners with regard to the suitability of opening hours.  We will regularly ask our service 
users  about  their  experience  of  accessing  the  service  and  what  improvements  can  be 
made. 

In  addition  to  the  core  opening  hours  described  above,  we  will  seek  to  make  premises 
available to Mutual Aid and SMART Recovery groups wherever practicable. 

Outreach  in  terms  of  engagement  with  the  Criminal  Justice  System  via  Police  Stations 
and Courts is described in method statements 3B3i.  
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
9. Section 5.0 
Provision of the Service 
How will the service provide gender specific support 
Sub headings 
across the service?  
a – k 
 
Weighting 4  
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion recognises that many treatment services have historically been dominated by male 
service  users.    Furthermore,  men  and  women  can  experience  drug  dependence  differently 
including how the body processes drugs and why drugs are being used in the first place. To 
move away from this position and encourage more women to take up treatment services, we 
have developed a number of initiatives: 
• 
Mother & Baby Services 
 
Inclusion  believes  that  providing  support  to  pregnant  drug  users  is  crucial  on  a  number  of 
counts: 
 
o  It can be a daunting and worrying time for a drug user who is pregnant. 
o  During pregnancy may be a time when a drug user wants to do something about her 
drug use. 
o  We  know  from  research  that  pregnant  drug  users  are  often  late  bookers  for 
antenatal  care,  poor  attenders  at  antenatal  care,  have  smaller  babies  and  deliver 
early,  suffer  increased  levels  of  domestic  violence  and  sexual  abuse,  suffer 
increased levels of physical, mental and psychological health problems and have a 
higher incidence of involvement with Safeguarding systems 
We  have  found  that  operating  a  mother  and  baby  service  increases  the  overall  number  of 
women  accessing  the  drug  service:  last  year  over  42%  of  service  users  at  our  South 
Birmingham  CDT  were  women.    The  approach  of  our  Mother  &  Baby  services  are  to  be 
woman  and  family  centred,  non-judgmental,  pragmatic  and  with  an  emphasis  upon  harm 
minimization.  
The South Birmingham service demonstrates what we can offer to pregnant users: 
-  Lead by a Specialist Midwife who is a member of the Safeguarding team 
-  Referrals can be made from any source including other midwives and GP’s 
-  Interventions to reduce the incidence/impact of drug use in pregnancy 
-  Early identification of drug use in pregnancy 
-  Treatment staff awareness raising 
-  Development of care pathways between hospital and drug services 
-  An open environment that encourages honesty about drug use during pregnancy 
-  Interventions  aimed  at  reducing  maternal  and  Perinatal  mortality  and  morbidity  due  to 
drug use 
-  Safeguarding work around existing children and the unborn child 
-  Access to maternity, neonatal and gynecological services 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
-  Formal treatment protocols for community and hospital settings 
• 
Other Services 
Inclusion  services  also  have  a  track  record of providing  wider  gender  specific  support  as a 
component of drug treatment.  These include: 
 
-  Separate  Male  and  Female  peer  support  groups  run  weekly  as  part  of  residential  and 
community rehabilitation programmes 
-  Clinics targeting particular aspects of both female health concerns including sexual health 
and birth control 
-  Gender specific workshops on health, relationships, confidence and self esteem 
-  Staff and female peer support group members in our Birmingham service ran the 5km 
‘Race for Life’ alongside local commissioners raising money for Cancer UK. 
 
• 
Substance Misusing Parents 
Inclusion services all place a strong emphasis upon developing close partnerships with local 
Young People & Families teams so as to help reduce harm to those children with a parent 
misusing  substances.   Our  approach  here  is  to  ensure  that  parents  accessing  our  services 
are assessed quickly and enter treatment as soon as possible.  Inclusion recovery planning 
will  prioritise  the  areas  of  parental  responsibility  and  support  to  ensure  Young  People  are 
safeguarded.  
 
10. Section 
Provision of the Service 
Please demonstrate and detail how complimentary 
5.0 
therapies will be delivered across the service and how 
Sub headings 
will these be accessed? 
a – k 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
  
Inclusion recognises the utility of a limited range of complimentary therapies in the treatment 
of  substance  misuse.    Whilst  there  is  a  modest  evidence  base  supporting  the  use  of 
complimentary therapies in treatment services, our experience is that they can be a valuable 
engagement tool and the start of a service user’s consideration of more structured treatment 
interventions.  Inclusion will offer complimentary therapies across services in Cambridgeshire 
based on the following principles: 
 
• 
Complimentary  therapies  will  be  delivered  in  conjunction  with  relevant  policy  and 
procedures  including  Clinical  Governance,  Control  of  Substances  Hazardous  to  Health 
Policy,  Blood  Borne  Virus  and  Infection  Control  Policy,  Needle  Stick  Injury  and  Disposal  of 
Sharps and Incident and Accident Reporting. 
• 
Inclusion  will  support  the  provision  of  complimentary  therapies  limited  to 
Aromatherapy,  massage,  Reflexology  and  Auricular  Acupuncture.    The  use  of  detox  and 
sleep teas will also be considered. 
• 
All  delivery  of  complimentary  therapies  in  Cambridgeshire  will  be  agreed  by  the 
relevant on-site manager. 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
• 
Inclusion will consult with service users and commissioners around the effectiveness 
and uptake of complimentary therapies to improve or discontinue there use as indicated. 
• 
The use of complimentary therapies will be evaluated over time  
• 
All  complimentary  therapy  practitioners,  whether  drawn  from  the  paid  workforce, 
volunteers  or  external  agencies,  must  have  the  appropriate  training  and  qualifications 
required  including  details  of  the  professional  body  responsible  for  certification  and 
appropriate  indemnity  insurance.    Inclusion  will,  where  possible,  support  such  training  and 
associated costs, from the service budget. 
• 
Inclusion  are  clear  that  complimentary  therapies  should  be  seen  as  just  that  – 
adjuncts  to  evidence-based,  structured  interventions.    We  will  ensure  that  complimentary 
therapies do not become alternative therapies. 
• 
All  complimentary  therapy  delivery  will  take  place  with  the  context  of  meaningful 
practitioner supervision and appraisal. 
• 
All  service  users  taking  part  in  complimentary  therapies  must  be  subject  to  an 
appropriate level of risk assessment 
• 
Complimentary therapies will be available at all service sites, as far as is practicable, 
on a planned basis and be clearly marketed in service literature 
• 
Complimentary  therapies  will  be  available  to  service  users  accessing  the  service 
through the Single Point of Contact to promote engagement 
• 
Complimentary  therapies  will  be  offered  as  a  small,  additional  element  of  the 
Structured Day Programme 
 
11. Section 
Provision of the Service 
Please demonstrate how the service will ensure that 
5.0 
service users will remain positively engaged throughout 
Sub headings 
their recovery journey. 
a – k 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 2000 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion understands and supports the reality that for treatment services to be effective and 
deliver excellent recovery outcomes, service users must be fully engaged at all steps along 
their recovery journeys.  Inclusion’s experience, and our consequent commitment to service 
users  in  Cambridgeshire,  revolves  around  three  key  components;  firstly  our  organisational 
attitude  to  service  user  involvement,  secondly,  the  quality  of  the  relationship  between 
practitioners  and  service  users  and  thirdly,  the  way  in  which  service  user  engagement  is 
incentivised and recognised. 
 
Inclusion’s Approach to Engaging Service User’s In Recovery 
The  involvement  of  service  users  at  all  levels  in  the  delivery  and  design  of  treatment  and 
care  is  key  to  Inclusions  vision  of  delivering  respectful  and  high  quality  recovery  services.  
This vision is under pinned by a number of written documents including Inclusion’s Service 
User  Strategy  and  SSSFT’s  ‘Use  your  voice  make  a  choice’  policy  and  ‘Involvement  our 
commitment’ guidance to services. 
Our aim is to ensure the organisation is accountable to its 
consumers  from  top  to  bottom  and  actively  works  with  them  to  create  better  services, 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
involves them in their treatment and gives opportunities for them to help their peers towards 
the goal of recovery.     
Involving service users at all levels within the organisation has a number of objectives: 
•  Giving service user feedback to facilitate quality control of services and their improvement 
through creating ideas for innovation 
•  Ensuring strategies, plans and recruitment decisions have greater validity and ownership 
by consumers of the service 
•  Utilising  skills  and  experience  of  service  users  to  benefit  their  peers  through  initiatives 
such as Recovery Mentoring and volunteering 
•  Providing  routes  into  employment  with  Inclusion  for  service  users  helping  to  create  a 
more varied, rich, dynamic and representative workforce  
•  Promoting transparency to organisational development and decision making 
•  Enhancing Inclusions ability to deliver non-discriminatory services 
•  Highlighting the positive nature of recovery within our treatment population    
The  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  will  develop  its  own  service  user 
involvement  plan  in  line  with  this  overarching  strategy.    At  the  most  fundamental  level  all 
service users should be empowered to lead in the development of their recovery plans and 
to  make  fully  informed  choices  regarding  they  types  of  interventions  they  will  receive  in 
treatment.  The Cambridgeshire service will also designate a Service User Involvement lead 
and establish a Service User Group.   
It  is  clear  that  implementing  this  strategy  across  Cambridgeshire  will  have  training 
implications.    All  staff need  to  understand  the  concepts  involved  and  be  enthusiastic  about 
delivering on them.  Inclusion will ensure that a full training needs analysis takes place during 
implementation  and  post-contract  start  that  includes  Service  User  Involvement.    We  will 
formulate  an  associated  training  plan  that  encompass  staff  learning  &  development  in  its 
widest sense including shadowing, role coaching and formal courses. 
Inclusion’s  Senior  Management  Team  will  be  responsible  for  driving  this  strategy  and  will 
place clear expectations on the Cambridgeshire management team to deliver.  Inclusion will 
ensure that an audit of service user involvement takes place bi-annually with an associated 
action plan put in place.  We will recruit local service users to carry out this audit along side 
staff from other Inclusion services.  
Across Cambridgeshire services, Inclusion will purse a three tiered service user model: 
 
• 
Individual Service Users – all service users should be involved in key aspects of their 
treatment. This should include; 
o  Active involvement in assessment  
o  Active involvement in the preparation and review of recovery plans 
o  Access to their treatment file 
o  Clear  understanding  of  the  service,  treatment  goals,  rights  &  responsibilities,  service 
rules and  complaints procedures 
o  Having a named key worker. 
 
• 
Service  Level  Feedback  and  Consultation  -  building  on  the  individual  service  user 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
having  active  participation  in  their  own  treatment  and  recovery,  we  will  ensure  that  service 
user’s  views  are  sought.    There  are  numerous  ways  of  consulting  service  users  and  these 
include; 
 
o  Service wide consultation meetings 
o  Use of questionnaires 
o  Informal feedback sessions 
o  Suggestion boxes 
o  Service specific user groups 
 
• 
External  Bodies  –  at  an  area  and  regional  level  there  are  opportunities  for  service 
users  to  feed  into  system  planning  and  commissioning  processes.    Wherever  practicable, 
Inclusion will facilitate the involvement of service users in such opportunities through training, 
support and reimbursement of expenses. 
 
Therapeutic Alliance 
 
Inclusion  sees  the  therapeutic  alliance  as  of  critical  importance  in  drug  treatment  services.  
Research  shows,  and  we  know  from  our  own  experience  of  delivering  services,  that  the 
quality  of the  relationship  between practitioner  and  service  user  is  a  strong  predictor  of  the 
quality of recovery outcomes. It is clear that effective treatment designed to engage service 
users  will  take  into  account  client  preferences  and  establish  realistic  yet  challenging  goals.  
The  basis  of  the  relationship  is  the  practitioner’s  ability  to  listen,  challenge  and  motivate 
without  being  judgmental  or  too  directive.    Consequently  we  are  very  clear  about  the  key 
behaviours, skills and experience that all staff and volunteers are expected to demonstrate in 
support of our recovery and re-integration outcomes.   
• 
Key Behaviours 
All  staff  will  be  expected  to  demonstrate  positive  behaviours  that  include honesty,  integrity, 
commitment and perseverance. We acknowledge that our field of work can often be difficult 
and challenging and that staff will need considerable personal capital to become and remain 
effective  in  their  roles.    We  expect  staff  to  consider  their  own  practice  through  supervision 
and  appraisal  and  to  meet  their  development  needs  through  an  on-going  commitment  to 
training and staying abreast of industry initiatives.   
• 
Key Skills 
Given the often complex range of needs and changing patterns of substance use, our staff 
need to possess a comprehensive array of specific skills to operate as effective workers who 
are able to sensitively and appropriately challenge service users to change their lives.   We 
will ensure staff possess the ability to accurately assess service users and build challenging, 
service-user led recovery plans.  We will provide training and on-going supervision to enable 
staff to deliver services from a menu that includes an agreed range of pharmacological and 
psycho-social interventions.  We will also ensure that staff are able to deal competently with 
issues  arising  relating  to  the  Safeguarding  of  Young  People  and  Vulnerable  Adults  and  to 
share information appropriately with other health and social care agencies as required. 
• 
Key Experience 
Inclusion recognises the diverse personal and professional backgrounds of all staff and will 
seek to build on those experiences to ensure the deliver of an integrated service model that 
incorporates  multi-disciplinary  staff  teams.    We  will  support  staff  from  recognised 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
professional groups to maintain registration and umbrella-body links wherever possible at the 
same  time  as  seeking  to  recruit  staff  with  personal  experience  of  substance  misuse 
treatment.   To this end, we recognise the breadth of treatment philosophies permeating the 
substance  misuse  field  whilst  ensuring  that  all  staff  operate  to  defined  competencies  and 
deliver evidenced based interventions.   
 
Incentivising Treatment Engagement & Recognising Recovery 
 
Throughout  all  aspect  of  service  delivery  in  Cambridgeshire  Inclusion  would  establish  a 
number  of  initiatives  aimed  at  incentivising  engagement  and  recognising  progress  in 
recovery: 
 
• 
Service user responsibilities in terms of acceptable behaviour will be made clear.  This 
is important so as to offer service users structure and clarity and to provide assurance to all 
service  users  what  they  can  expect  from  their  peers.  In  essence  unacceptable  behaviour 
needs  to  have  consequences.    Substance  misuse  treatment  provides  an  opportunity  for 
users to develop the ability to recognise and live within appropriate boundaries.  Mistakes will 
be  made  by  those  in  treatment  and  when  this  happens  every  effort  will  be  made  to 
encourage service users to take the learning from them. The object is not to punish service 
users, but to help them recognise that behaviour change is often closely associated with not 
using drugs and recovery.   
 
Service users are expected to behave towards each other, staff and volunteers in a manner 
that is respectful and consistent with this therapeutic approach.  This will include: 
o  Co-operating with staff 
o  Participating in and applying oneself all treatment activities  
o  Respecting and maintaining the confidentiality of peer’s 
o  No violence or threatening behaviour towards people or property 
o  No bullying or harassment of peers, staff, volunteers or visitors. 
 
• 
Recovery Mentoring & Volunteering 
Inclusions approach to Recovery Mentoring and volunteering opportunities are described in 
detail  in  method  statements  28  and  29  respectively.    We  would  wish  to  stress  that  these 
opportunities should be seen as something service users have the right to access but only as 
a mark of progression in treatment.  We wish to create a culture amongst service users that 
engagement in treatment, achieving recovery goals and moving away from problematic drug 
use are laudable aims and that success will be duly recognised and rewarded.  To that end 
we  will  only  make  Recovery  Mentor  placements  available  to  those  service  users  achieving 
stability  in  their  drug  and  who  are  apply  to  comply  with  reasonable  treatment  expectations.  
Potential Recovery Mentors will need to demonstrate the ability to participate in a significant 
training  programme  before  taking  up  their  placements.    Similarly,  the  move  into  wider 
volunteering  roles  for  service  users  successfully  completing  Recovery  Mentor  placements, 
will  be  marked  by  the need  to  demonstrate acquired  learning  and the  completion of further 
training.  By incentivising mentoring and volunteering opportunities, we aim to model positive 
behaviours and demonstrate the benefits accruing to those who take part. 
 
• 
Accredited Learning Programmes 
As  part  and  parcel  of  mentoring  and  volunteering  placements  Inclusion  will  seek  to  offer 
accredited  learning  programmes  to  Cambridgeshire  service  users.    Again,  we  will  offer  the 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
opportunity  of  taking  part  in  learning  programmes  with  recognised  qualifications  as  an 
incentive to all service users.  We know from our experience in other Inclusion services that 
many service users who become mentors and volunteers wish to consolidate their learning 
and  go  onto  paid  employment  in  the  health  and  social  care  sector.    By  offering  accredited 
learning  programmes  as  another  incentive  to  recovery,  we  will  help  a  number  of  service 
users  gain  qualifications,  contribute  meaningfully  to  service  delivery  and  take  up  paid 
employment as a consequence.  
 
• 
Recognition and Awards 
Inclusion  sees  recognising  success  in  treatment  as  important  and  will  do  this  on  a  regular 
basis through ‘graduation ceremonies’.  Awards will be made available to Recovery Mentors 
successfully  completing  their  placements  and  to  volunteers  who  have  made  significant 
contributions  to  service  delivery  and  development.    We  will  ensure  that  graduation 
ceremonies  are  open  to  family  members  and  other  carers,  staff,  partner  agencies  and 
commissioners.    Inclusion  will  also  put  forward  people  succeeding  in  the  Cambridgeshire 
service for Trust awards. 
 
• 
Service Marketing 
As  detailed  in  other  method  statements,  the  need  to  market  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug 
Treatment  service  will  be  key.    This  is  another  way  that  service  user’s  can  be  incentivised 
and  rewarded  for  progress;  we  will  make  opportunities  available  for  service  users 
progressing  in  their  recovery  to  work  along  side  staff  at  service  open  days,  in  media 
interviews, through contributing recovery stories to service and DAAT level publicity and by 
engaging  with  members  of  the  public  to  positively  promote  the  service  and  the  benefits  of 
treatment. 
 
• 
Contingency Management 
Providing service users with material incentives to encourage engagement and completion of 
treatment can play an important role in improving recovery outcomes.  Inclusion will consult 
with  commissioners  and  service  users  across  Cambridgeshire  as  to  the  desirability  of 
utilising specific incentives but these could include: 
o  Needle Exchange take up 
o  Completion of BBV vaccination programmes 
o  Groupwork attendance vouchers 
 
12. Section 
Provision of the Service 
Please detail who the “Lead” roles for specific areas will 
5.0 
Partnership working 
be and how these roles will gain, and maintain the 
Sub heading 
specialist knowledge and links necessary for these 

roles. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 2000 
words 
Introduction 
 
To  be  effective  Inclusion  recognises  the  need  to  ensure  close  working  partnerships  and 
positive relationships with a range of services within Cambridgeshire and this will include: 
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
• 
Safeguarding vulnerable children 
• 
Safeguarding vulnerable adults 
• 
Child and adolescent/ young people’s services. 
• 
Mental health services 
• 
Alcohol treatment services (including liaison regarding inpatient detoxification 
• 
bed management). 
• 
Maternity services 
• 
General medical services 
• 
Accident and emergency / Hospital liaison in all relevant hospitals 
• 
Sexual health / communicable diseases services 
• 
Housing agencies 
• 
Homeless hostels 
• 
Disability services 
• 
Employment, training and education services 
• 
Domestic violence / sexual violence/ prostitution services 
• 
Integrated Offender Management 
• 
Prisons 
• 
Cambridge Access Surgery providing health Services to the homeless population 
 
Inclusion will build partnerships in Cambridgeshire through a commitment to: 
 

Agreeing working protocols defining areas of activity and responsibility. 

Resource contribution to joint working arrangements including some staff time. 

Negotiation & creation of satellite specialist drug services in other settings. 

Contribution to joint policies on key inter-agency issues e.g. pregnant drug users, drug 
using parents. 

Promote service user choice without duplicating services. 

Systems that seek services user’s views on the whole spectre of service provision. 

Potential to develop/increase work that may not be possible for a single agency. 
 
Safeguarding Vulnerable Children and Vulnerable Adults 
The lead within the service will be the Service Manager. The manager will operate within the 
guidelines  set  out  in  Cambridgeshire  DAAT’s  Practice  Guidance  for  Agencies  in  relation  to 
safeguarding  children  with  drug  and  alcohol  misusing  parents.    The  manager  will  receive 
training  from  the  Trust  in  relation  to  safeguarding  vulnerable  children  and  adults  and  will 
contribute  to  meetings  as  requested  by  Cambridgeshire  DAAT  and  Cambridgeshire  Local 
Safeguarding  Board.    The  manager  will  attend  appropriate  conferences,  keep  abreast  of 
research findings and will have his\her work in this area scrutinised by the appraisal process, 
which is standard for all staff.   
 
General Medical Services  
The lead doctor will have strategic oversight of all prescribing policies. The lead nurse, with 
responsibility for nurse prescribing will ensure all policies in relation to nurse prescribing are 
consistent with best practice. This person will have the support of Inclusion’s lead for nurse 
prescribing  –  Catherine  Larkin.  At  a  recent  conference  of  the  Royal  College  of  G.P.s, 
Catherine’s  presentation,  on  nurse  prescribing,  was  voted  the  best  presentation  of  the 
conference. 
 
Both the lead doctor and nurse will be accessible to local primary care teams by telephone, 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
text, E mail and through the website, which will be designed specifically for the service. This 
will allow the service to keep in touch with all local practices and allow the service leads to 
constantly develop their local network.  Both the Lead Doctor and Lead Nurse prescriber will 
have the support of our Community Services lead Jim Barnard who is the Chair of SMMGP 
the  national  organisation  for  G.P.s  and  others  working  in  primary  care  services  for  drug 
users. 
 
Sexual Health 
The lead nurse for blood borne viruses and sexual health will have responsibility for ensuring 
that  liaison  with  key  agencies  is  developed:  these  include  GUM  clinics,  Relate,  Rape  and 
Sexual  Violence  programmes,  Women’s  Aid,  Victim  Support  services,  Healthy  Gay  Life, 
Samaritans  and  Cruse:  Bereavement  Support.    The  lead  nurse  will  attend  appropriate 
conferences,  keep  abreast  of  research  findings  and  will  have  his\her  work  in  this  area 
scrutinised by the appraisal process, which is standard for all staff.   
 
Domestic Violence\Sexual Violence\ Sex Worker Services 
Working closely with the sexual health elements of the service a lead Recovery Worker will 
ensure  that  links  are  made  with  the  sex  industry  and  with  agencies  dealing  with  domestic 
violence:  these  agencies  include  Women’s  Aid,  the  Police  and  Probation  Services.    Sex 
workers  include  both  men  and  women  and  their  work  is  often  hidden.  A  high  proportion  of 
sex workers do not voluntarily disclose their work to service providers due to stigmatisation 
and the partly criminalised nature of their work. To reach out and encourage sex workers into 
our services where they feel safe enough to disclose their real issues Inclusion will work with 
other  projects  for  sex  workers  locally  and  nationally.  We  will  seek  to  engage  other  sex 
workers to publicise our services and provide peer support and education. This means that 
the lead worker in this area must be skilful at constructing a network of contacts and building 
trust. Training and support for this worker will focus on this area of professional development. 
 
Employment, Training and Education Services 
Employment is a crucial issue for drug users in terms of sustaining recovery: as such it is the 
responsibility of all staff members to be aware of local employment services and build links 
whenever possible. This endeavour will be overseen by the service manager. As part of our 
approach Inclusion will run a volunteer training programme. In other parts of the country e.g. 
in Swindon, volunteers come from both ex service users and local citizens: In Swindon 60% 
are  ex-service  users.  A  significant  number  of  volunteers  have  gone  on  to  gain  paid 
employment in either local or regional drug treatment services.  The Volunteer Co-ordinator 
will have the task of building links with local service user groups: in Swindon the service user 
group  provided  excellent  support  for  the  volunteer  programme.  This  benefitted  the  service 
users,  volunteers  and  staff  in  terms  of  increased  understanding  of  the  perspective  of  local 
drug users and their families. 
 
Housing Agencies\Homeless Hostels 
Having a decent place to live is a basic human right or it should be in a developed European 
country.  To  ensure  that  this  right  is  made  real  is  an  important  task  for  all  team  members. 
Without this basic right being fulfilled sustained recovery is unlikely. The leadership function 
in  this  area  will  fall  to  the  Homelessness  Co-ordinator  who  will  support  staff  to  provide 
information  on  local  housing  opportunities  and  services  to  service  users  and  that  advice  is 
delivered  regularly  from  local  specialist  agencies  on  drug  service  premises.  Of  course 
housing  is  a  key  issue  for  those  leaving  prison:  close  liaison  will  be  required  between  the 
DIP, treatment services and housing agencies. 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
Child and Adolescent Services 
A  key  point  of  vulnerability  is  when  a  young  person  transfers  into  an  adult  service.  It  is 
necessary  for  the  key  worker  from  the  adult  service  to  work  very  closely  with  CASUS  to 
ensure a smooth handover. A manager from the service will be tasked with overseeing the 
transfer  process  in  terms  of  monitoring  the  process  and  identifying  possible  improvements. 
This  person  will  be  encouraged  to  think  from  a  young  person’s  perspective  and  will  be 
offered  training  to  encourage  such  a  perspective.  Without  this  perspective  it  will  be 
impossible to sustain such a role.    
 
Disability Services 
The  service  will  be  required  to  address  the  needs  of  drug  users  who  experience  disability 
issues.  We  recognise  our  responsibility  to  provide  a  user  friendly  service  by  providing 
training  for  staff  around  attitudes  to  disability  such  as  disability  awareness  and  disability 
equality,  which  has  a  focus  on  the  social,  attitudinal  and  environmental  factors  that 
disadvantage  people  accessing  our  services.    The  tasks  for  the  lead  Recovery  Worker  in 
terms of disability services are varied e.g. ensuring that there is understanding and respect 
for those with communication difficulties such as visual, hearing and\or speech impairments 
and where possible provide aids to support them: lobbying commissioners to provide funding 
for  disabled  access,  grab  rails,  door  widths,  parking  and  toilet  facilities:  building  links  with 
specialist agencies.  This role requires a therapeutic and advocacy function and supervision 
will  be  delivered,  which  takes  account  of  the  diversity  of  tasks  involved.  It  is  unusual  for  a 
staff member to be equally skilled in all these functions. 
 
Maternity Services 
The  lead  for  maternity  services  will  be  the  service’s  Specialist  Mother  and  Baby  Drugs 
Worker  who  will  take  the  lead  in  liaising  with  local  midwifery  services  and  maternity  units 
including the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Also key are local G.P.s and linked health 
visitors.    The  Inclusion  service  in  South  Birmingham  has  won  awards  for  its  work  around 
mother  and  baby  services.  Staff  in  Cambridge  will  have  the  opportunity  to  learn  from  the 
experience  gained  by  members  of  the  South  Birmingham  team.    This  service  has  been  an 
important  element  in  the  team’s  caseload  being  made  up  of  41%  women  –  a  figure  well 
ahead of other services in the West Midlands.  
 
Hospital Liaison  
The service will include a lead recovery worker for hospital liaison. A key task for this person 
will be developing sound working relationships with both Addenbrookes and Hitchingbrooke 
hospitals.  To  build  links  and  maintain  detailed  knowledge  of  working  practices  in  these 
hospitals the lead worker will ensure that regular meetings are held with both hospitals.  The 
lead  worker  will  also  ensure  that  clear  information  sharing  protocols  are  developed  to 
improve the care of service users. The process of the discussions around constructing such 
protocols  is  often  very  useful  in  cementing  relations  and  results  in  considerable  learning 
about participants working practices. 
 
Alcohol Treatment Services 
Many heavy end drug users also use alcohol to excess, especially when attempting to come 
off  drugs.  It  is  important  that  protocols  exist  describing  care  pathways  between  drug  and 
Addaction’s  alcohol  treatment  services.  At  a  strategic  level  the  lead  doctor  and  Service 
Manager  will  have  oversight  of  relations  with  local  general  hospitals  and  inpatient 
detoxification  services.  At  an  operational  level  a  Recovery  Worker  will  take  the  lead  in 
developing  links  with  alcohol  services  and  user  groups  including  AA.    This  worker  will  be 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
supported through supervision, training and access to relevant conferences to sustain his\her 
commitment to this task. 
 
Mental Health Services 
Mental health and drug services share many clients: sometimes service users are bounced 
between services. To prevent this happening, excellent liaison is required between services. 
Inclusion  will  include  within  the  service  dual  diagnosis  workers  who  will  have  the  key 
responsibility  to  ensure  that  protocols  delineating  the  responsibilities  of  each  agency  are 
adhered  to.  This  task  requires  resilience  and  stamina:  it  therefore  behoves  the  service  to 
deliver  supervision  and  training,  which  bolsters  energy.  Inclusion’s  team  in  South 
Birmingham have won awards from Birmingham DAAT for their in dual diagnosis.  We aspire 
to replicating this quality of work in Cambridgeshire. 
 
Integrated Offender Management and Prisons 
Inclusion staff have extensive experience of work within the criminal justice system, both in 
custodial settings and in community programmes such as DRR and prison in-reach as part of 
DIP  services.  Inclusion  operates  CARAT  and  rehabilitation  services  in  seventeen  prisons. 
The  Inclusion  Area  Manager  South  for  Criminal  Justice  services  will  have  a  strategic 
overview  for  partnership  work  with  criminal  justice  agencies  such  as  HMP  Whitemoor,  the 
Police  and  Probation  Services.  The  CDIP  Manager  will  be  mentored  by  the  Area  Manager 
who will, alongside the Service Manager oversee the work with DIP partners and the Prison 
Service.  The CDIP Manager will attend prison and DIP strategy meetings. 
 

13. Section 
Provision of the Service 
Please demonstrate how the service will work with CAF 
5.0 
Partnership working 
processes to increase life chances for children who are 
Sub heading 
not considered a safeguarding risk 

 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  recognises  the  Common  Assessment  Framework  (CAF)  as  a  crucial  tool  in  early 
and  on-going  intervention  allowing  for  the  assessment  of  needs  and  a  multi-agency 
approach  to  working  with  families  living  with  substance  misuse.    We  see  CAF  as  a  way  of 
empowering  families  to  address  substance misuse,  building  trust and a  way  of  overcoming 
possible  previous  unsatisfactory  experiences  of  services.  CAF  essentially  creates  the 
circumstances to engage with a family through constructive dialogue. 
 
To ensure that staff in Cambridgeshire Adult Treatment Service become aware that there is 
a Young Person in the family of a service user, we will: 
• 
Ensure  all  screening  and  assessment  tools  used  in  the  service  reflect  the  priority  to 
gather  information  relating  to  safeguarding  &  child  protection  issues.    In  other  Inclusion 
services we use CAF pre-assessment check lists that are completed with service user’s who 
have children under 18.  These are reviewed every 3 months or before if required.  Inclusion 
will  also  consider  home  visits  for  some  service  users  with  parental  responsibility  that  can 
help highlight issues that may be addressed via the CAF process 
• 
Ensure  all  staff  has  access  to  appropriate  training  around  safeguarding  &  child 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
protection  issues.   This  will  include  agreement  to provide  training all  practitioners  delivered 
by the Cambridgeshire CAF co-ordinator 
• 
Ensure  all  staff  have  access  to  robust  supervision  that  includes  discussion  of 
safeguarding & child protection issues 
• 
Ensure  that  all  staff  are  fully  aware  and  have  access  to  both  agency  policy  and 
procedures  in  relation  to  safeguarding  &  child  protection  issues,  as  well  as  knowledge  of 
Cambridgeshire locality agreements. 
 
In respect of those children not considered a safeguarding risk the following measures will be 
taken: 
• 
All service users will be routinely approached and have the concepts of confidentiality 
and informed consent fully explained.  This will include matters relating to the safeguarding 
of young people and the extent to which information may be shared under the confidentiality 
agreement.    Inclusion  staff  will  be  very  clear  and  open  with  service  users  when  discussing 
issues  relating  to  the  safeguarding  of  young  people  and  include  service  users  in  decision 
making about next steps. 
• 
The service will check with the Locality Co-ordinator whether a CAF is already open in 
relation to the family concerned.  Inclusion view regular liaison with CAF Area Coordinators 
as important in developing staff decision making around CAF. 
• 
Where  a  CAF  is  in  existence,  the  service  will  seek  to  contribute  to  the  on-going 
assessment and action planning.  
• 
In the absence of a CAF, staff will be encouraged to consider whether a CAF ought to 
be initiated.  In doing this, Inclusion will promote the use of recognised social care thresholds 
Level 4: complex needs, children at risk of serious harm, Level 3: complex needs, children at 
risk of social or education exclusion, Level 2: children with additional needs and Level 1: 
children with good development progress. 
• 
In considering the appropriateness of a CAF Inclusion staff will: 
o  Raise  the  issue  with  the  service  user  and  Young  Person  if  possible  and  always 
obtained agreement to initiate a CAF and consent to share information 
o  Raise  the  issue  in  practice  supervision  and  team  discussions  to  develop  a  consider 
view of the case 
o  Consult with CASUS to garner advice and information relating to CAF best practice 
• 
When  the  decision  to  initiate  a  CAF  is  taken  the  assessment  will  attempt  to  build  a 
picture of the young person’s needs, resources and how useful help can be identified. 
• 
Once  the  assessment  has  been  completed,  Inclusion  staff  will  follow  the  next  steps 
identified in Cambridgeshire Children’s Trust’s CAF guidelines.  In essence we will either: 
o  Look to manage the CAF as the sole agency involved 
o  Use the CAF to involve another single agency better placed to meet the child’s needs 
including where the outstanding need is considered specialist 
o  Request  that  the assessment  is  reviewed  by  the multi-agency  Locality  Allocation  and 
Review Meetings (LARM) 
o  Following  discussion  and  agreement  with  the  LARM,  request  a  specialist  meeting 
takes  place  where  unmet  needs  may  be  considered  by  a  Team  Around  the  Child 
which can include the family themselves 
• 
To ensure that the service plays an appropriate part in the on-going management of a 
CAF, Inclusion will ensure that all workers have the capacity to attend CAF meetings 
• 
The role of the service in all CAF processes will be to ensure the service user (parent) 
receives the best possible treatment in respect of their substance misuse and recovery.  As 
the  parent’s  treatment  progresses  and  their  social  functioning  and  parenting  skills  develop, 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
the outstanding needs of the young person are more likely to be successfully met from within 
the family. 
 
14. Section 
Provision of the Service 
Please demonstrate how the service will support the 
5.0 
Partnership working 
needs of young carers where they are aware of a child 
Sub heading 
aged over 7 is living with a service user, or other family 

members. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 500 words  
Contractors response: 
Inclusion recognises that across Cambridgeshire there are likely to be a number of children 
who  are  actually  Young  Carers  faced  with  a  parent  or  even  older  sibling  who  is  currently 
misusing drugs.  Individual circumstances will of course differ family by family but the range 
of  responsibilities  a  Young  Carer  can  face  can  include  food  preparation,  shopping, 
household  cleaning  and  providing  nursing,  personal  care  and  emotional  support.    We 
Recognise  that  this  can  mean  Young  Carers  missing  out  on  opportunities  open  to  other 
children,  creating  difficulties  at  school  and  amongst  peer  groups.    Asking  for  help  may  be 
very  difficult  for  many  Young  Carers  and  they  can  become  isolated  and  suffer  unduly.  
Research also shows that Young Carer’s are vulnerable to developing behavioural problems 
and may misuse substances themselves. 
Once the Cambridgeshire Adult Drug Treatment Service becomes aware of the presence of 
a Young Carer in the family of a service user via the screening and assessment processes 
outlined in method statement 13 above, we will: 
• 
Consider  initiating  a  CAF  and  following  the  post  assessment  procedures  outlined  in 
the Cambridgeshire Children’s Trust’s CAF guidelines 
• 
Work with the Young Care, the service user and any other agencies identified in the 
CAF process to build an action plan that will address the Young Carer’s outstanding needs 
• 
Ensure  that  the  service  nominates  and  support  a  lead  practitioner  who  will  act  as  a 
Single Point Of Contact for communications from Children’s Services and other agencies 
• 
Endeavour to share all appropriate information with other relevant agencies involved 
with the Young Carer and the CAF 
• 
Ensure  that  all  cases  where  a  Young  Carer  is  involved  with  a  service  user  are 
priortised in supervision discussions. 
• 
Ensure  all  staff  involved  in  CAF  processes  are  able  to  attend  relevant  multi-
disciplinary meetings and provide up to date information 
• 
As far as practicable, the service will ensure that treatment interventions aimed at the 
service  user  do  not  unduly  impact  upon  the  Young  Carer;  this  will  include  flexibility  around 
appointment times and the location of treatment. 
• 
 The service will identify a range of support services that the service user and Young 
Carer may access including community centres, voluntary agencies, Family Support centres 
and parenting groups 
• 
The  service  will  provide  informal  training  and  consultancy  to  all  Children,  Parenting 
and  Family  Services  across  Cambridgeshire  as  far  as  practicable  in  issues  relating  to 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
substance misuse and treatment interventions. 
 
15. Section 
Provision of the Service 
Please detail how the service will follow guidelines and 
5.0 
Partnership working 
set up procedures relating to Adult Safeguarding. 
Sub heading 

 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words  
Contractors response: 
As  a  provider  of  health  &  social  care  services,  Inclusion  understands  its  responsibilities  in 
respect of the Safeguarding of Vulnerable Adults.  Cognisant of relevant legislation including 
the Human Rights Act 1998 and the Health & Social Care Act 2008, Inclusion services and 
staff are also expected to adhere to the Adult Protection guidelines detailed in ‘No Secrets: 
guidance  on  developing  and  implementing  multi-agency  policies  and  procedures  to  protect 
vulnerable adults from abuse’ 2000.  Agencies should: 
• 
Actively work together within an inter-agency framework  
• 
Actively  promote  the  empowerment  and  well-being  of  vulnerable  adults  through  the 
services they provide 
• 
Act  in  a  way  which  supports  the  rights  of  the  individual  to  lead  an  independent  life 
based on self determination and personal choice 
• 
Recognise  people  who  are  unable  to  take  their  own  decisions  and/or  to  protect 
themselves, their assets and bodily integrity 
• 
Recognise  that  the  right  to  self-determination  can  involve  risk  and  ensure  that  such 
risk is recognised and understood by all concerned and minimised whenever possible. There 
should be open discussion between the individual and the agencies about the risks involved. 
• 
Ensure the safety of vulnerable adults by integrating strategies, policies and services 
relevant to abuse within the framework of relevant legislation. 
• 
Ensure  that  when  the  right  to  an  independent  lifestyle  and  choice  is  at  risk  the 
individual concerned receives appropriate help, including advice, protection and support from 
relevant agencies 
• 
Ensure that the law and statutory requirements are known and used appropriately so 
that vulnerable adults receive the protection of the law and access to the judicial process.  
 
With  these  guidelines  in  mind,  Inclusion’s  approach  to  the  protection  of  Vulnerable  Adults 
who  are  engaged  with  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug  Service  will  include  all  staff  having  the 
following responsibilities: 
• 
To  work  in  compliance  with  policies  and  procedures  that  promotes  the  safety  of  the 
vulnerable  adult  (e.g.  medication,  moving  and  handling,  management  of  violence  and 
aggression etc.).  
• 
To be aware of how to recognise and report possible abuse.  
• 
To  report  all  instances  of  possible  abuse  immediately  in  accordance  with  these 
procedures.  
• 
To contribute to and co-operate with adult protection investigations where necessary 
or when requested to do so.  
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
• 
To contribute to Protection and Support Plans and Safeguarding Plans.  
• 
To be aware of agency whistle-blowing procedures and use them where appropriate. 
• 
To  produce  reports  as  requested  by  the  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Safeguarding 
Partnership to contribute towards Serious Case Reviews.  
 
In  addition,  as  an  NHS  provider,  South  Staffordshire  &  Shropshire  NHS  Foundation  Trust 
and Inclusion will: 
 
• 
Work in accordance with the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) 
Regulations  2009,  and  the  Care  Quality  Commission  (Registration)  Regulations  2009  and 
report all instances of possible abuse in line with these procedures.  
• 
Report significant incidents to CQC as required by regulations.  
• 
Contribute  information  and  specialist  skills,  knowledge  and  resources  to  an 
investigation. 
• 
Contribute to the assessment of mental capacity or mental health of vulnerable adults 
and of alleged abusers where they too are vulnerable.  
• 
Attend  and  contribute to  Strategy  Discussions,  Investigation  Reviews  and  Outcomes 
Conferences and produce reports as requested.  
• 
Contribute to clinical assessments and provide specialist advice regarding standards 
of clinical care.  
• 
Ensure  that  where  complaints,  disciplinary  or  serious  untoward  incident  (SUI) 
investigations relate to possible abuse, these investigations take place within the framework 
of these procedures.   
• 
Make referrals to professional bodies where necessary.  
 
To ensure that we deliver on these responsibilities, Inclusion will: 
• 
Take  all  possible  measures  to  instil  in  all  members  of  staff  the  absolute  priority  of 
considering the implications of the behaviour of service users for the safety and well being of 
vulnerable adults. 
• 
 Ensure that staff are confident and competent in reporting any concerns as a priority 
to their line manager or next senior manager without delay. That manager must then pass on 
the information to the appropriate authority.   
• 
Ensure  robust  staff  supervision  takes  place and  that  a  culture  of  information  sharing 
within  and  across  teams  exists.    We  will  provide  all  staff  in  supervisory  roles  in  the 
Cambridgeshire Adult Drug Service with excellent training in staff supervision and awareness 
of  safeguarding  procedures.    We  will  promote  a  culture  that  will  encourage  the  proactive 
discussion  of  safeguarding  concerns  that  will  facilitate  experiential  learning  for  staff 
unfamiliar with such matters.   
• 
Whilst we will seek to empower Safeguarding champions within our services, we are 
very clear that safeguarding matters are the responsibility of all staff.   
• 
Utilise  patient  experience  questionnaires,  complaints  procedures  and  incident 
reporting to  monitor  practice  and  raise  awareness  of  any  potential  issues  around 
safeguarding.  
• 
Individual  risk  assessments  will  be  undertaken  that  include  the  domains  of  physical, 
sexual, emotional and financial abuse and neglect. 
• 
Ensure the provision of mandatory Protection of Vulnerable Adults training which aims 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
to  provide  an  introduction  to  issues  related  to  protecting  Vulnerable  Adults  and  to  give  an 
overview  of  the multi-agency  adult  protection  policies and  referral  into  the  Vulnerable  Adult 
systems and procedures.   
• 
Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug  Service  will  maintain  a  central  register  of  known 
safeguarding concerns that will include; 
-  Date of entry 
-  Name 
-  Dates of birth 
-  Address 
-  Details of siblings 
-  Contact numbers 
-  A summary of concerns 
-  An action log 
• 
Ensure  that  all  staff  recruitment  processes  are  informed  by  appropriate  vetting 
procedures in relation to Vulnerable Adults along  with regular  reviews of our organisational 
policy and good practice guidelines. 
  
16. Section 
Provision of the Service 
Please demonstrate how the service will meet the needs 
5.0 
Partnership working 
of service users either suffering or perpetrating domestic 
Sub heading 
violence and ensuring that drug treatment provision 

does not increase this risk. 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1500 
words  
Contractors response: 
Inclusion recognises Women’s Aid’s definition of Domestic Violence as “as physical, sexual, 
psychological  or  financial  violence  that  takes  place  within  an  intimate  or  family-type 
relationship  and  that  forms  a  pattern  of  coercive  and  controlling  behaviour”.    Inclusion 
commits to fully engaging with Cambridgeshire’s Domestic Violence strategy and to working 
in  partnership  with  all  local  agencies  involved  in  challenging  and  working  with  Domestic 
Violence.    We  share  the  locality’s  vision  of  “achieving  coordinated  multi-agency  good 
practice  in  supporting  victims  of  domestic  violence,  including  children,  young  people  and 
vulnerable  adults  who  experience  or  witness  domestic  violence,  by  taking  protective  and 
preventative measures, dealing appropriately with perpetrators, and raising public awareness 
about domestic violence”. 
 
Inclusion’s aim when working with victims of Domestic Violence is always to improve social 
functioning  and  self-efficacy,  empower  the  service  user  and  increase  their  life  chances 
through addressing their drug treatment needs.  We recognise that there are circumstances 
when progress in treatment for a person suffering from Domestic Violence could potentially 
make  things  worse.    For  example,  where  a  service  user  is  involved  with  another  user  in  a 
relationship  centred  around  mutual  drug  use,  that  person’s  move  away  from  drug  use may 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
further  destabilise  the  relationship  and  increase  the  risk  of  more  violence  taking  place.    In 
such circumstances we will work closely with the service user and other agencies to ensure 
that future safety and alternative accommodation is secured. 
 
The  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  will  contribute  to  realising  the  local 
Domestic Violence vision in the following ways: 
 
• 
Raising Awareness Of Domestic Violence 
The  service  will  display  relevant  posters  in  each  service  site  reception  area  and  all 
counselling rooms aimed at both the survivors and perpetrators of Domestic Violence.  We 
will also make Domestic Violence information leaflets available as well as the contract details 
of local support services.  We will add information about Domestic Violence to the Adult Drug 
Treatment Website as it develops. 
• 
Ensuring Staff Can Recognise Domestic Violence  
Inclusion will ensure that all staff access local Domestic Violence training courses.  Through 
this our staff will develop knowledge of; 
o The dynamics of domestic violence 
o The barriers to seeking help 
o Coping strategies used  
o How domestic violence can impact on children and young people  
o Working in a survivor-centred way and engagement techniques 
• 
Screening & Assessment 
The  service  will  ensure  that  all  screening  and  assessment  tools  that  are  used  will  include 
specific  questions  relation  to  Domestic  Violence.    We  will  equip  the  staff  team  with  the 
confidence to raise and address issues of Domestic Violence with service users. To ensure 
that  our  screening  and  assessment  tools  are  fit  for  purpose  in  this  respect,  Inclusion  will 
consult  with  Cambridgeshire’s  Independent  Domestic  Violence  Advocacy  Service  (IDVAS) 
during contract implementation.   
• 
When  staff  become  aware  that  a  service  user  is  suffering  from  Domestic  Violence, 
access to local support services will offered including: 
o  Referral to IDVAS 
o  Referral  to  the  Freedom  group  therapy  programme  for  women  who  have 
experienced Domestic Violence 
o  Raising awareness of the Sanctuary Scheme 
o  Referral to support agencies such as Women’s Aid and SNAP 
• 
Flexible Services 
When  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  is  actively  engaged  with  a  service  user  suffering 
from Domestic Violence, we will ensure a flexible service is offered.  This will include offering 
appointments at times and locations that are most helpful to the service user.  We will also 
ensure that requests for same-gender keyworking are met. 
• 
Information Sharing 
As  part  of  its  responsibilities  in  respect  of  Domestic  Violence  and  in  support  of 
Cambridgeshire’s  Domestic  Violence  strategy,  Inclusion  will  ensure  that  all  information 
sharing protocols operated by the Adult Drug Treatment service are informed by the need to 
reduce  the  risk  to  victims.    Inclusion  will  also  ensure  the  service  contributes  relevant 
monitoring data for Domestic Violence partnership monitoring & reporting purposes 
• 
Multi-Agency Risk Assessment (MARAC)  
In the most high risk cases of Domestic Violence, the service will contribute to Multi-Agency 
Risk Assessment (MARAC) processes where drug use is a contributory factor.  This will take 
the form of attendance at MARAC review meetings and the provision of appropriate reports 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
in relation to drug treatment linked to the case.  Staff will be encouraged to weigh carefully 
the need  to  respect a service  user’s  confidentiality  with  the  need to  override  this  when  risk 
assessment dictates that a MARAC referral should be made. 
• 
Domestic Violence Lead & Agency Policy 
The  service  will  identify  a  lead  for  Domestic  Violence  from  amongst  the  staff  team.    The 
Domestic  Violence  lead  will  co-ordinate  links  to  multi-agency  training  programmes  for  all 
staff,  promote  staff  understanding  of  the  local  Domestic  Violence  strategy,  ensure  that  the 
service is linked into MARAC processes effectively and that excellent relationships exist will 
all  Domestic  Violence  support  agencies  across  Cambridgeshire.    The  service  will  also 
develop a specific policy in relation to Domestic Violence and ensure all staff are aware of its 
content and their responsibilities. 
• 
Perpetrators of Domestic Violence 
When the service becomes aware that one of its service users is a perpetrator of Domestic 
Violence we will  work  with the individual to consider the role of their drug use in relation to 
their perpetrator status.  This will include referral to accredited perpetrator programmes and 
contributions to multi-agency working.  Inclusion staff will work with perpetrators to consider 
issues including that substance misuse does not excuse or justify domestic violence and that 
all have control and choice about their abusive behaviour.  The service will seek to explore 
links between drug use and instances of Domestic Violence and encourage the service user 
to actively address the problem. 
 
17. Section 
Provision of the Service 
Please demonstrate how the service will increase the 
5.0 
Sexual health 
effectiveness of interventions to improve sexual health. 
Sub heading 

 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
Introduction 
The approach taken by Inclusion is driven by the WHO definitions of sexual health, sexuality 
and the impact of sexual health problems. 
 
Sexual Health 
Sexual  health  is  a  state  of  physical,  mental  and  social  well-being  in  relation  to  sexuality.  It 
requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as 
the  possibility  of  having  pleasurable  and  safe  sexual  experiences,  free  of  coercion, 
discrimination and violence.” 
World Health Organisation (2011)  
 
Sexuality 
 Sexual  health  cannot  be  defined,  understood  or  made  operational  without  a  broad 
consideration  of  sexuality,  which  underlies  important  behaviours  and  outcomes  related  to 
sexual health. The working definition of sexuality is: 
 
“…a central aspect of being human throughout life encompasses sex, gender identities and 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
roles,  sexual  orientation,  eroticism,  pleasure,  intimacy  and  reproduction.  Sexuality  is 
experienced  and  expressed  in  thoughts,  fantasies,  desires,  beliefs,  attitudes,  values, 
behaviours,  practices,  roles  and  relationships.  While  sexuality  can  include  all  of  these 
dimensions, not all of them are always experienced or expressed. Sexuality is influenced by 
the  interaction  of  biological,  psychological,  social,  economic,  political,  cultural,  legal, 
historical, religious and spiritual factors.”  
World Health Organisation, 2006 
 
Impact of Sexual Health Problems   
“Sexual  health  problems  also  include  sexual  dysfunction,  gender  identity  disorders  and  a 
variety  of  other  concerns  and  anxieties.  Sexual  dysfunctions  such  as  low  sexual  desire, 
erectile  dysfunction,  inability  to  achieve  orgasm,  premature  ejaculation,  pain  during  sexual 
activity  (dyspareunia  and  vaginismus)  are  relatively  common  but  seldom  diagnosed  or 
treated.  Sexual dysfunctions are often associated with other physical and mental disorders, 
such  as  diabetes,  cardiovascular  problems,  blood  pressure  abnormalities,  depression  and 
anxiety. 
 
Sexual  violence  is  common  and  occurs  throughout  the  world.    There  are  many  forms  of 
sexual violence: forced intercourse/rape, sexual coercion, trafficking, forced prostitution, and 
sexual  harassment.  It  takes  place  in  all  settings,  but  particularly  in  the  home.  It  has  a 
profound impact on the physical and mental health of those who experience it, often lasting 
well  beyond  the  assault.  It  is  associated  with  an  increased  risk  of  sexual  and  reproductive 
health  problems,  including  unwanted  pregnancy,  STI  and  HIV  infection,  and  mental  health 
problems  such  as  depression,  anxiety  and  post-traumatic  stress  disorder.  Sexual  abuse  of 
children  is  associated  with  low  self-esteem,  high-risk  sexual  behaviours  and  drug  abuse  in 
later life.” 
World Health Organisation, 2006 
 
Service Delivery 
A core element of the approach proposed for Cambridgeshire is a blood borne virus, sexual 
health and general health check service operated by specialist nurses: the model proposed 
was developed by our community drug service in South Birmingham.  Core elements of the 
service  are  well  man\woman  clinics,  one  to  one  advice  on  sexual  health,  testing  and 
vaccination  for  blood  borne  viruses  and  a  structured  four  session  programme  on  sexual 
health. 
 
1.  Sexual Health – Structured Programme(Heart String sand Fun Things) 
 
Usually  the  programme  is  run  weekly  over  one  month.  Session  one  focuses  on  two  key 
issues: 
•  What things can be harmful to our sexual health? 
•  Tips for protecting sexual health. 
 
The aims for session two are to gain a better understanding of: 
•  sexually transmitted infections (STI’s) 
•  the different risks associated to different sexual practices 
•  different forms of protection 
•  effective communication with your partner regarding sexual health 
•  support and treatment services available 
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
Session aims for session three are to explore and understand: 
•  why relationships are important to us 
•  The difference between healthy and destructive relationships 
•  your expectations of a relationship 
•  how to recognise the signs of a potentially abusive relationship 
•  setting and maintaining personal boundaries 
•  support  services  available  including  Relate,  Rape  and  Sexual  Violence  programmes, 
Women’s  Aid,  Victim  Support  services,  Healthy  Gay  Life,  Samaritans  and  Cruse: 
Bereavement Support. 
 
Aims for session four are to discuss and explore: 
•  when you feel it is an appropriate time for you to enter into a new relationship 
•  things you can do to strengthen the relationship you are already in 
•  healthy and safe ways of meeting new people 
•  recap of topic and the things we have learnt 
 
2.  Testing 
 
Service users will be offered urine testing for Chlamydia and gonorrhoea and blood testing 
for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV. Leaflets have already been developed to promote the 
service. A section of one leaflet is: 
 
“Testing is Quick and Easy 
 
Testing for Chlamydia and gonorrhoea involves a urine test just like for a  
pregnancy test.                                                                                                    
 
Testing for hepatitis and HIV requires a blood test. However if you have  
poor access to your veins or are anxious about having blood taken we can  
use very small needles to draw blood, you can find veins yourself and we  
will take as much time as you need to get the sample. 
 
There is also a dried blood spot test for HIV where a small needle prick on    
the finger is used to get a couple of drops of blood.” 
 

3.  One to One Sexual Health Advice Sessions 
Specialist  nurses  will  offer  advice  on  sexual  health,  including  in  relation  to  contraception, 
pregnancy testing, testing for sexually transmitted infections. Service users will be referred to 
STI  testing  if  appropriate.  A  selection  of  condoms  and  other  sex  aids  will  be  given  by  the 
specialist staff or generic drug workers free of charge.  
 
4.  Well Man\Woman Clinics 
Clinics will be operated by specialist staff: they will be run on a drop-in basis. Their function 
will be to give service users the opportunity to discuss any concerns, monitor ongoing health 
issues  and  arrange  for  appropriate  support  including  referrals  to  specialist  or  other 
community service 
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
18. Section 
Provision of the Service 
Please demonstrate how the service will adhere to 
5.0 
Pregnancy liaison 
Safeguarding Practice for Pregnant substance misuser’s 
Sub heading 
and drug misusing parents. 

 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
Safeguarding Practice for Pregnant Users 
 
Inclusion recognise that pregnant drug users often do not readily access treatment services 
for a number of reasons including perceptions that services cannot meet their needs, lack of 
awareness of pregnancy and pre-occupation with drug use itself.  To ensure that the needs 
of pregnant women are met and to safeguard the unborn child, Inclusion services will adopt 
the following approaches: 
• 
All female service users of child bearing age will be offered pregnancy testing at all of 
the  service  sites.    Staff  will  advise  the  service  user  on  how  to  carry  out  the  test  and  will 
discuss  the  results  immediately  post-test.    When  the  pregnancy  test  is  positive  the  service 
user will be encouraged to visit their GP immediately and link into antenatal services 
• 
For those service users returning a negative test contraception advice will be offered 
• 
A positive pregnancy test will result in a full re-assessment of the service user that will 
consider: 
o  Current drug, alcohol and tobacco use including routes of use 
o  Safer sexual practices 
o  Other potential health risk considerations 
o  Support networks 
o  Current accommodation 

Other children affected 
• 
In  the  light  of  the  re-assessment  the  service  user’s  care  plan  will  be  reviewed.    A 
major  feature  of  the  reviewed  care  plan  will  be  the  need  for  multi-agency  co-operation  to 
support  the  pregnant  service  user  involving  her  GP,  Maternity  services  and  the  Adult 
Treatment Service. 
• 
The  care  plan  is  likely  to  prioritise  access  to  rapid  prescribing  if  the  illicit  drugs  are 
being used and continuity of prescribing where the pregnant woman is prescribed substitute 
medication. 
• 
Inclusion  will  establish  a  lead  for  Mother  &  Baby  interventions  from  within  the  staff 
team to provide care planning, information and guidance to pregnant service users.  This will 
include leading antenatal clinics with a designated midwife. 
• 
 The  Mother  &  Baby  lead  will  have  capacity  to  carry  out  home  visits  therefore 
increasing retention in service and the ability to monitor the home situation and update risk 
assessments. 
• 
The service will consider opening a CAF depending on a pre-CAF assessment taking 
place and discussion amongst the team.   
 
Other  developmental  work  that  the  service  will  contribute  to  in  support  of  improving 
interventions for pregnant users and to safeguard unborn children include: 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
•  Providing  training  to  Midwives  and  Health  Visitors  across  Cambridgeshire  around  drug 
use 
•  Leading  on  the  development  of  care  pathways  between  drug  services  and  Maternity 
Services to improve joint working and information sharing 
•  Specialist advice and consultation for colleagues amongst the Adult Drug Treatment staff 
team from the Mother & Baby lead. 
 
Safeguarding Practice for the Children of Drug Misusing Parents 
 
Inclusion’s approach to working with service users who have parental responsibility is based 
on the conviction that problematic drug use does not automatically imply poor parenting and 
subsequent  safeguarding  concerns.    However,  Inclusion  services  all  place  a  strong 
emphasis upon developing close partnerships with local Children & Families teams so as to 
help reduce harm to those children with a parent misusing substances.  Our approach here 
is to ensure that parents accessing our services are assessed quickly and enter treatment as 
soon  as  possible.    Inclusion  recovery  planning  will  prioritise  the  areas  of  parental 
responsibility and support to ensure Young People are safeguarded.   
 
The  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug  Treatment  service  will  put  in  place  the  following  measures 
around Drug Misusing Parents: 
• 
Ensure  all  staff  are  aware  of  their  and  the  services  responsibilities  in  respect  of 
Safeguarding  Children  and  that  the  agency  plays  a  full  part  in  the  Cambridgeshire  Local 
Safeguarding Children Board (LCSB) 
• 
Ensure  all  staff  access  relevant  Safeguarding  training  provided  by  Cambridgeshire 
LCSB 
• 
All staff will be trained in assessing risk factors for children of drug misusing parents 
• 
All assessments carried out by the service will address the issue of children living with 
the service user or of any children the service user has contact with. 
• 
Where there is concern for a child all staff will need to ascertain whether a CAF has 
been undertaken.  
• 
All staff that identifies a child who is suffering or is likely to suffer significant harm has 
a duty to contact the Social Care Contact Centre of the Emergency Contact Team.  In normal 
circumstances Inclusion staff would be expected to discuss concerns immediately with their 
line manager prior to a referral being made.   
• 
Staff should inform the service user parent/carer and if possible seek their agreement 
that a referral will be made unless so doing would place the child at further risk.  
• 
Staff  will  need  to  share  the  relevant  information  to  enable  the  Social  Care  team  to 
make an informed decision if the child is in need of protection. 
• 
If  a  Child  Protection  Plan  is  put  in  place  following  referral  the  service  will  ensure 
representation at Core Group meetings. 
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
19. Section 
Groups served 
Please detail how the service will ensure that 
6.0 
information and services are available to all, including 
Sub 
those for whom literacy is a problem or English is not 
heading a-c 
their first language. 
 
Weighting 

 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1500 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
Introduction – Social Marketing 
 
Social marketing places the primary focus on the service user - on learning what people want 
and  need  rather  than  trying  to  persuade  them  to  take  what  the  service  happens  to  be 
offering.  Two  key  principles  of  the  approach,  which  Inclusion  will  deploy  to  target  priority 
groups are: 
 

Marketing talks directly to the service user: not just delivering information about what 
is on offer. 

Ensuring the planning process takes the service user into account by examining ways 
to improve access and construct partnerships with other agencies and stakeholders. 
 
Underpinning  our  marketing  strategy  is  recognition  of  the  crucial  role  of  action  research: 
Inclusion proposes three research foci: 
 
1.  To discover the perceptions of service users on the nature of their difficulties. 
2.  To  determine  the  activities  and  habits  of  potential  service  users.  This  will  allow  the 
service to pinpoint effective locations, opening hours and potential partner agencies:  
3.  To determine the best ways of reaching potential service users: for example building links 
with  maternity  services,  including  midwives  and  health  visitors  –  with  the  aim  of 
increasing  engagement  with  women.  In  Inclusion’s  community  service,  in  South 
Birmingham, 41% of service users are women: this figure is significantly higher than any 
other alcohol or drug service in Birmingham.  
 
Putting Social Marketing into Practice 
Opening  hours,  eligibility  criteria,  the  range  of  services  available  and  contact/referral 
information  will  be  advertised  through  our  marketing  literature,  information  posters  and  via 
inter-agency presentations. We will target client groups by ensuring that project literature is 
printed  in  a  range  of  appropriate  languages.  The  service  will  work  closely  with  other 
treatment providers, commissioners and partner agencies to disseminate written information 
outlining the scope of services to be offered.  
 
Information posters and programme literature will be strategically placed in public reception 
areas  such  as  GP  waiting  rooms,  Police  custody  cells,  Accident  &  Emergency  suites  and 
local drug & alcohol agencies to ensure that as many service users as possible learn about 
the service and how to access it.  
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
Inclusion will use information technology to market the service including using text reminders 
prior to service user appointments. 
 
Women 
Women  are  underrepresented  in  substance  misuse  services.  This  is  attributed  to  factors 
such  as  stigmatisation,  child  care  responsibilities  and  concerns  that  they  will  come  to  the 
attention of Social Services plus the perception that services are heavily orientated towards 
the  needs  of  men.    Inclusion  services  for  women  are  aimed,  through  social  marketing,  at, 
understanding  the  different  experiences  of  women  and  putting  in  place  staffing  structures, 
materials and interventions, which have a clear focus on female issues.  
In  our  experience  women  users  are  not  a  homogenous  group,  who  have  identical  needs 
simply  because  of  their  gender.  Nor  should women’s  needs  be  defined  solely  in  relation  to 
pregnancy,  childcare  or  ethnic  background.  Key  elements  of  ensuring  that  we  deliver  a 
respectful service to women include: 
 
•  Taking into account the varying needs of women in terms of race, culture, age, sexuality 
and pattern of drug/alcohol use. 
•  Offering  the  choice  of  worker’s  gender,  wherever  possible  and  ensure  that  the  client 
knows when that worker will be available. 
•  Service  provision  will  pay  particular  attention  to  issues  of  low  self-esteem,  domestic 
violence, self injury, eating disorders, sexual abuse and sexual health. 
•  Developing  attractive  written  material  giving  information  specifically  targeted  at  women 
alcohol users. 
•  Training  staff  in  women  specific  issues  including  self  harm  and  benzodiazepine 
dependency.  
•  Offering single sex provision that will include supports groups and counselling.  
•  Developing  working  relationships;  joint  care  arrangements,  joint  training  and  referral 
pathways with mental health services and women’s counselling agencies. 
•  Designing and plan treatment intervention with female service users.  
 
Inclusion  will  provide  an  open  ended  woman’s  support  group  one  day  a  week  at  school 
friendly times supported by crèche facilities: visiting speakers will be invited. 
It is Inclusion’s view that we need to strive not to replicate the dynamics of stigmatisation or 
lack of options experienced by many women who have drug related problems. The provision 
of  staff  who  understand  the  specific  requirements  of  women  with  drug  problems  need  to 
include those from BME groups. 
 
Attention  will  be  paid  to  promoting  access  for  women  from  BME  groups.  Inclusion 
understands  that  some  will  face  additional  barriers  to  seeking  treatment  due  to  a  sense  of 
shame  and  going  against  women’s  perceived  position  and  expected  role  in  their  own  and 
wider society. 
  
Monitoring  performance  will  include  female  health  issues  such  as  the  presence  of 
depression, eating disorders and self injury. General health issues will include antenatal care 
co-ordination and sexual health linking up with GUM clinics and maternity units. 
Inclusion  acknowledges  that  drug  services  have  vital  roles  in  assessing  and  responding  to 
drug  using  parents  and  their  children;  acting  as  advocates  for  service  users  who  have 
responsibility for the care of children and in promoting the welfare of children.  
 
It is essential that our staff are competent and sensitive to the needs of drug using mothers, 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
whilst  vigilant  and  uncompromisingly  aware  that  the  needs  of  the  child  is  paramount  and 
must take precedence over any other consideration. We will ensure training and liaison with 
social services to ensure competency to deliver safe practice consistent with ‘Safe Guarding 
Children’ and Local Safeguarding Children’s Board guidelines. 
 
BME Service Users 
 
A strategy for working with black and minority ethnic communities must take account of the 
impact  of  drug  and  alcohol  use  within  local  communities.  Cambridgeshire  has  a  diverse 
community, which includes students from all over the world, a significant traveller population 
and immigrants from Eastern Europe. 
To reach, attract and retain drug users Inclusion will market the service as follows: 

Provide a welcoming environment, which offers clear information to service users on 
what  is  being  offered,  both  verbally  and  in  writing,  including  provision  of  locally  spoken 
languages. 

Provide access to appropriate interpreting and translation services in order to ensure 
culturally competent and sensitive services. 

Develop  networks  with  other  services  and  any  specific  black  and  minority  ethnic 
groups, carers and advocates in order to inform culturally appropriate service delivery. 

Promote  services  and  advertise  staff  vacancies  in  black  and  minority  ethnic  specific 
newspapers, radio stations and community forums. 

Promote  black  and  minority  ethnic  communities  at  all  levels  of  policy,  planning, 
staffing and provision. 

Provide  evidence  of  involving  and  consulting  black  and  minority  ethnic  community 
groups and service users in the review and planning of services. 
Inclusion aspires to: 

Develop partnerships with community groups 

Establish satellite services in popular BME venues  

Foster BME volunteer schemes to provide peer support and mentoring 

Secondments into our service from BME community agencies 

Second Inclusion workers to BME community agencies. 
 
Needs of Service Users with Physical or Sensory Impairments 
Since  December  2006  all  public  bodies  and voluntary  and  private sector  organisations  that 
provide  services  for  public  sector  organisations,  have  a  legal  duty  to  promote  equality  of 
opportunity for disabled people in all aspects of their work.  
 
To  ensure  respectful  services  are  delivered  to  disabled  groups  Inclusion  will  apply  social 
marketing principles as follows: 
 
•  Emphasis on specific advice and information to support choice in decision making. 
•  To support service user decisions about treatment options, advocacy will be required. 
•  Support and assist disabled service users to become advocates. 
•  Where there are mobility issues home visits built into care planning. 
•  Assistance with phone calls and other communication tools. 
 
Working  closely  with  carers  may  be  important  if  an  impaired  service  user  feels  this  is 
desirable. More time may need to be spent with young disabled drug users in the transition 
from young person’s to adult services. Flexibility with rules is vital e.g. waiving ‘no dog’ policy 
for service users to be accompanied into clinics by a guide dog or a hearing dog.  
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
Whilst  additional  support  might  be  required  to  facilitate  access  of  disabled  people  to 
treatment,  it  is  important  to  remember  that  this  needs  to  be  balanced.  Understanding 
ordinary independence is not about being entirely self-sufficient, none of us are, but simply 
about being in control of what happens to you. 
 
Learning Disabilities 
1.5 million  people  in  the  U.K.  have  a  learning  disability,  which  is  defined  as  a  neurological 
disorder that affects the way a person learns, communicates and does every day tasks. A 
person  has  a  learning  difficulty,  for  all  of  their  life,  which  can  be  categorised  as  mild, 
moderate  or  severe.  There  are  many  types  of  learning  difficulty  and  some  conditions 
whilst  not  diagnosed  as  ‘learning  disabilities’  affect  many  drug  users  particularly  young 
service users. These include:  
 
Asperger’s Syndrome, Autism, Epilepsy, Dyspraxia, Severe Dyslexia 
 
Some  of  these  conditions  can  affect  all  areas  of  development  including  intellectual, 
emotional,  physical,  language,  social  and  sensory.  Sufferers  appear  to  have  poor 
understanding, difficulty relating to others and present as hesitant. It is no wonder that some 
from this group are rejected by their peers and seek comfort in drug use. 
Vigorous  marketing  of  the  service  to  those  experiencing  learning  disabilities  is  especially 
important because of the communication difficulties outlined above. 
 
20. Section 
Groups served 
Please detail how exclusions from the service are 
6.0 
(Priority Groups/Target 
reduced to a minimum, whilst ensuring that boundaries 
Sub 
Groups and Exceptions) 
are adhered to throughout the service. 
heading 6.1 
- 6.2 
 
Weighting 

 
Maximum 
word count 
of 2000 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
Introduction 
 
Some  client  groups  tend  to  be  excluded  from  services:  the  reasons  for  this  include  lack  of 
understanding of service user needs, unclear interagency working and lack of knowledge or 
training. 
 
Consideration is given here to Inclusion’s responses to some key socially excluded groups. 
These  are,  children  of  parents  who  use  drugs,  unborn  children,  pregnant  women,  those 
experiencing significant physical or mental health difficulties, lesbian, gay and transgendered 
people and sex workers. 
 
 
Children of Parents who are Drug Users 
In our efforts to support the children of drug users who are parents we concentrate on doing 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
the core work well and liaise closely with other key agencies.  
 
Crucially  we aim to stabilise the parent’s drug use as far as possible e.g. if abstinence is a 
realistic objective, arranging detoxification and providing effective support post detoxification.  
 
If longer term methadone prescribing is appropriate, ensuring the methadone is dispensed in 
adequate  doses  with  supervised  consumption  until  home  consumption  can  be  safely 
assured.  
 
Other key tasks include: 
 
•  Reports  about,  or  allegations  of  abuse,  or  neglect  made  by  children  and  others  are 
always be taken seriously.  
•  Aspiring to build trust whilst conforming to local confidentiality agreements consistent with 
Cambridgeshire LSCD guidelines. 
•  Liaise  immediately  with  the  local  child  protection  teams  if  there  is  concern  that  a 
child/children are at risk of harm. 
•  Staff  to  fully  co-operate  with  all  LSCD  Child  Protection  procedures  which  includes 
attending and providing reports for case conferences. 
•  Involving  mental  health  services  where  a  parent/client  presents  with  significant  mental 
health problems 
•  If the service user is pregnant, ensure and/or enable her to attend antenatal services.  
•  Emphasis  on  home  visits  to  assess  parents,  children’s  and  general  family  issues 
together. 
•  Discuss with the parents safety at home including safe storage of drugs and needles. 
•  Develop  close  liaison  with  social  services,  maternity  services,  domestic  violence 
agencies, family centres and any other relevant local service. 
•  It  is  mandatory  that  as  NHS  workers,  Inclusion  staff  attend  child  protection  training  and 
refresher training on a regular basis 
 
Analysis  shows  that,  whilst  not  exclusively,  it  is  much  more  likely  that  drug    using  mothers 
will  continue  to  have  direct  responsibility  for  their  children  rather  than  drug  alcohol  using 
fathers, it is essential that we meet the needs of women. 
 
 
Unborn Children  
It  is  well  documented that  pregnant drug  alcohol users  tend  to  put  off  accessing  ante-natal 
care  for  fear  of  losing  their  unborn  child  and  existing  children  into  care.  Nationally  despite 
90%  of  female  service  users  being  of  child  bearing  age,  few  are  known  to  drug  treatment 
services as pregnant.  
 
It is likely that in Cambridgeshire, pregnant clients, known to services, are not accessing help 
in  the  early  stages  of  pregnancy.  What  is  needed  is  a  service  emphasis  that  looks  after  a 
pregnant woman’s social, psychological and physical well-being. 
 
A  shared  care  approach  with  antenatal  services  and  specialist  drug  alcohol  services  will 
ensure  that  services,  in  consultation  with  pregnant  drug  users,  develop  a  package  of  care 
based on individual need and those of the unborn child.  
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
Inclusion  envisages  a  bridging  role  between  maternity  services,  drug  services  and  social 
services to support both mother and infant. 
 
Within  our  Birmingham  Community  Drug  Team  we  have  developed  a  role  titled  ‘Hidden 
Harm  Worker’  which  combines  safe  guarding  unborn  children  by  supporting  pregnant  drug 
user’s pre and post birth. We aspire to replicating this role across Cambridgeshire. 
 
A  mother  taking  illegal  drugs  such  as  cocaine  during  her  pregnancy  increases  her  risk  of 
anaemia, blood and heart infections, skin infections, hepatitis and other infectious diseases. 
Cocaine  use  can  lead  to  premature  detachment  of  the  placenta,  high  blood  pressure,  still 
birth.  Infants  born  to  cocaine  using  mothers  may  have  an  increased  risk  of  sudden  infant 
death syndrome. 
 
Heroin  and  other  opiates  can  cause  significant  withdrawal  in  a  baby,  with  some  symptoms 
lasting as long as four to six months. 
 
Uncomplicated drug use in pregnancy can often be managed by GPs, especially when they 
are involved in obstetric shared care for the woman or provided by midwives within primary 
care settings.  
 
Substitute  prescribing  should  be  offered  as  quickly  as  possible  after  an  assessment 
highlights  the  need.  The  wishes  of  the  mother  should  be  respected  if  she  wishes  to 
detoxification.  
 
During pregnancy it is often observed that motivation is high and progress in addressing drug 
use is good. Following birth these gains are sometimes maintained but sometimes lost and 
extra support is appropriate. 
 
Staff will meet with the service user at regular intervals to discuss and monitor progress. A 
liaison  meeting  will  be  held  ideally  two  to  three  months  before  earliest  due  date,  involving 
parents and all involved agencies at the local hospital. The service key worker will organise 
this meeting. 
 
Though pregnancy may act as a catalyst for change, drug users may not seek general health 
services  until  late  into  pregnancy:  this  increases  the  health  risk  to  mother  and  child.  We 
support pregnant drug/alcohol users in making informed choices about their pregnancy, drug 
use and birth plans. 
 
Childcare Issues 
Inclusion  fully  acknowledges  that  drug  services  have  vital  roles  in  assessing  and/or 
responding  to  drug  using  parents  and  their  children;  acting  as  advocates  for  service  users 
who have responsibility for the care of children and in promoting the welfare of children.  
 
We do not  believe  that  all  drug  users  who  are  women,  necessarily  make  poor parents  and 
drug  use  in  itself  should  not  be  automatically  be  taken  to  imply  poor  parenting  or  abuse. 
However lack of attention to the possible effects of drug use on parenting and therefore the 
lives  of  children  may  lead  to  them  suffering  neglect  and/or  abuse.  Inclusion  believes  that 
assessment  of  adult  drug  use  is  incomplete  and  interventions  applied  unsatisfactory  if  the 
parenting role has not been taken into account.  
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
Assessment relies upon clear professional judgements about what actions and services best 
meet  the  needs  of  a  particular  child  and  family  and  whether  a  child  is  suffering  or  likely  to 
suffer significant harm. Early intervention is essential to support children and families before 
parenting capacity and family life escalate into crisis.  
 
It is essential that our staff are competent and sensitive to the needs of drug using mothers, 
whilst  vigilant  and  uncompromisingly  aware  that  the  needs  of  the  child  is  paramount  and 
must take precedence over any other consideration. We will ensure training and liaison with 
social services to ensure competency to deliver safe practice consistent with ‘Safe Guarding 
Children’ and Local Safeguarding Children’s Board guidelines. 
 
Benzodiazepine Use 
A particular issue for women (although not exclusively so) is the misuse of benzodiazepines: 
mixing benzodiazepines with other depressant drugs such as alcohol and opiates can lead to 
a fatal overdose. As benzodiazepines are prescribed drugs as well as street drugs there is a 
tendency  for  drug  workers  not  to  give  them  due  attention.  Inclusion  has  a  track  record  of 
recognising  the  needs  of  benzodiazepine  users  both  in  prisons  and  the  community  and 
ensure our staff receive specific training to meet the needs of this group.  
 
Mental and Physical Health - Care Co-ordination 
To  prevent  those  experiencing  significant  mental  and  physical  health  being  excluded  from 
effective  treatment,  excellent  care  co-ordination  is  crucial.    It  should  facilitate  access  to, 
assessment  and  care  planning  of  integrated  health  and  social  care.    A  named  care  co-
ordinator should organise care across health and social agencies.  The criteria for care co-
ordination are identical to the criteria for comprehensive assessment. 
 
•  Significant drug use. 
•  Mental/physical health. 
•  Need for intense support. 
•  Child/pregnancy issues, 
•  Risk of harm to self or others. 
•  Multiple service providers. 
•  History of disengagement from services 
 
Standard care co-ordination applies to all the service users who meet the criteria above but 
not the criteria for enhanced care co-ordination.  
 
Models of Care suggests that the level and intensity of care co-ordination will depend on the 
complexity of the individual. 
•  Standard care co-ordination (Standard Care Programme Approach – SCPA). 
•  Enhanced care co-ordination (Enhanced Care Programme Approach – ECPA). 
 
Enhanced care co-ordination should apply to all service users with severe mental health dual 
diagnosis problems, who in most cases will be under the care of a community mental health 
team (CMHT).   
 
The CMHT have responsibility for appointing a key worker and for the care co-ordination of 
the  service  user.  The  drug  treatment  service  being  responsible  for  specific  drug  related 
elements of the care plan. 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
 
Offenders – Care Co-ordination 
Service  users  subject  to  a  criminal  justice  order  and  care  co-ordination  will  require  the 
integration of care planning and sentence planning process. The care co-ordinator needs to 
balance  encouraging  a  service  user  to  engage  in  treatment  with  the  requirements  of 
enforcing an order of the Court and National Standards constraints of the probation service.   
 
Inclusion  believes  that  the  need  for  joint  working  protocols  and  effective  partnership  are 
essential to balance the different objectives. 
 
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender 
A  key  objective  is  to  deliver  drug  services  which  attract  and  are  sensitive  to  lesbian,  gay, 
bisexual and transgendered people: it is necessary for staff to have a clear understanding of 
the target group and the issues involved. We need to appreciate that diversity is inherent in 
each  of  these  groups.  Lesbian,  gay  men,  bisexuals  and  heterosexuals  are  defined  by  their 
sexuality.  
 Transgendered  individuals  are  defined  by  their  gender  and  may  choose  any  of  the 
sexualities above. While sexuality and gender are different issues, common themes can be 
identified to help ensure our drug services maximise their accessibility. In order to do so we 
will: 
 
•  Train  staff  about  attitudes  and  assumptions  for  example  drug  prevalence  within  each 
grouping. 
•  Have policies and procedures that include recognition of sexuality and gender issues. 
•  Train  staff  to  appropriately  and  sensitively  ask  questions  about  sexuality:  such 
information is best elicited as part of a discussion. 
•  Develop  anonymous  self-completed  monitoring  sheets  at  initial/comprehensive 
assessment. 
•  Include sexual behaviour in risk assessment. 
•  Develop  effective  links  and  networking  with  lesbian,  gay,  bisexual  and  transgendered 
(LGBT) local support groups including possible joint working. 
•  Provide  material  to  promote  our  services  in  venues  used  by  LGBT  groups  and 
individuals. 
 
The training of our staff and performance monitoring is vital to ensure that homophobia, bi-
phobia and trans-phobia are appropriately challenged. In addition it is only by engaging and 
monitoring LGBT work that we can appropriately support and advise individuals about their 
sexual and drug risk behaviour 
 
Sex Workers 
We define sex work as the exchange of sexual services for money, goods, drugs or perhaps 
even  a  place  to  stay.  Sex  workers  include  both  men  and  women  and  their  work  is  often 
hidden.  A  high  proportion  of  sex  workers  do  not  voluntarily  disclose  their  work  to  service 
providers due to stigmatisation and the partly criminalised nature of their work. To reach out 
and encourage sex workers into our services where they feel safe enough to disclose their 
real issues we will: 
 
•  Offer a widely published service with some evenings dedicated to flexible opening hours. 
This  will  be  advertised  in  sexual  health  clinics,  pubs,  clubs,  saunas,  massage  parlours 
etc. 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
•  Provide a holistic service that takes account of the wider health and welfare needs of sex 
workers  to  attract  them  into  our  services.  This  may  include  providing  condoms, 
pregnancy testing and information about safe drug use including safer injecting. 
•  Advice  and  information  will  be  given  about  sexual  health,  safer  sex  and  blood  borne 
viruses  that  will  include  testing  and  vaccination.  Information  will  be  gathered  and  given 
about people who have attacked &/or robbed sex workers. Where possible we will work 
with organisations that provide self defence classes. 
•  Develop  protocols  for  referral,  sharing  information  and  joint  working  other  agencies 
including genitor-urinary medicine clinics (GUM)  
•  Work with other projects for sex workers locally and nationally: use other sex workers to 
publicise  our  services  and  provide  peer  support  and  education.    Local  interagency 
working is essential to keep sex workers healthy and safe this includes both female and 
male sex workers. 
 
21. Section 
Referral and Assessment 
Please demonstrate how your service will harness 
7.0 
family support to aid recovery. 
Sub 
heading c 
 
Weighting 

Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words  
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion regards the input of families and carers as often crucial in helping the service user 
engage with treatment and make sustained progress towards recovery.   Whilst the support 
needs  of  families  and  carers  are  important  in  their  own  right  (these  are  covered  in  the 
method  statements  at  3B3h),  Inclusion  will  seek  to  involve  a  service  user’s  loved  ones  in 
their recovery in the following ways: 
 
• 
All service users will be encouraged to involve their families and significant others in 
their treatment in order to achieve successful outcomes, except in cases where this is not in 
the interest of the service user and may hinder their treatment.  
• 
Service  users  will  be  asked  during  assessment  for  written  consent  that  family 
members  or  partners can be  involved  in  treatment  and  the family  members  in  question will 
be named on the confidentiality consent agreement. 
• 
The  service  will  provide  a  welcoming  environment  for  families  with  information  on 
family support and carers’ rights being accessible and visible in reception. Telephone calls to 
the SPOC by family and carer’s will be welcomed and helpful information made available. 
• 
Recovery Mentors will be available at all sites to meet and greet family members and 
to  help  build  confidence  in  the  family  that  their  involvement  is  beneficial.    Indeed,  some 
family members may wish to volunteer with services following their initial involvement 
• 
The service will provide excellent information around drugs, their use and associated 
treatment  interventions  to  all  families  that  become  involved  in  their  loved  one’s  care.    This 
will take the form of posters, leaflets and pamphlets as well as verbal communication.  Our 
aim is to help families further understand the issues relating to problematic drug use and how 
treatment interventions will help to facilitate change.   
• 
Inclusion  services  aim  to  offer  specific  family  therapies  to  support  families,  partners 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
and carer’s to develop strategies for dealing with a loved one’s substance misuse.  We will 
train  a  lead  member  of  staff  to  facilitate  family  focussed  therapy  sessions  in  a  safe, 
confidential  and  supportive  space.    Our  aim  here  is  to  facilitate  better  interfamilial 
communication,  improve  the  participant’s  knowledge  of  substance  misuse,  treatment 
interventions & associated issues and involve family members in recovery planning. 
• 
The  service  will  also  aim  to  train a  member of  staff  in  Behavioural  Couples Therapy 
(BCT).    This  is  one  of  the  psycho-social  interventions  recognised  by  NICE.    BCT  aims  to 
build  support  for  abstinence  and  to  improve  relationship  functioning  among  married  or 
cohabiting individuals  
• 
Inclusion will seek to engage family support for service users under going community 
detoxification,  and  in  the  case  of  Lofexidine  home  detox,  all  service  users  must  have  a 
designated  carer  on  hand  to  help  maintain  safety.    A  supportive  family  environment  in  the 
home can greatly increase the chances of a successful detox being completed. 
• 
In consultation and agreement with local commissioners, Inclusion are able to provide 
Naloxone  training  for  families  and  carer’s  who  are  in  contact  with  someone  potentially 
vulnerable  to  an  opiate  overdose.  The  training  will  cover  the  context  for  Naloxone  use, 
administration and basic first aid principles.  
 
22. Section 
Referral and Assessment 
Please provide the assessment documentation that the 
7.0 
service will use as detailed in Section 7c and describe 
Sub 
its application. 
heading c 
 
Weighting 

 
Maximum 
word count 
of 1000 
words  
Contractors response: 
Inclusion’s standard approach to the use of assessment and care planning arrangements in 
any  particular  locality  is  to  adopt  the  partnership’s  preferred  tools  and  utilise  them  across 
service  delivery.    We  have  a  strong  track  record  in  this  respect  and  of  driving  the 
development of improved assessment and care planning tools following contract transfers. 
 
We  will  consult  with  Cambridgeshire  commissioners,  service  users  and  partner  agencies 
during  the  implementation  phase  and  are  likely  to  recommend  adoption  of  the  pan-
Birmingham  assessment  tool  appended  to  this  bid.    This  assessment  tool  has  evolved 
through  continuous  use  and  improvement  in  Birmingham  services  and  could  be  easily 
adapted  for  use  across  Cambridgeshire,  although  we  are  happy  to  adopt  a  preferred  local 
tool. 
 
Whichever  assessment  tool  is  agreed  upon,  Inclusion’s  aim  will  be  to  establish  a  service 
user’s current and previous substance misuse and move them into the appropriate recovery 
pathway.  At  this  stage  the  assessment  process  will  also  seek  to  identify  any  further  needs 
requiring onward referral, for example to mental health services. Assessment processes will 
include  initial  screening,  triage  and  a  comprehensive  needs  assessment.    We  will  gather 
information on:   

Why the person has presented at the service and current motivational level 

Current and previous substance misuse including injecting and overdose 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 

Any previous treatment history including what worked well 

Family, dependents and social circumstances 

Current physical and mental health including  

Psychiatric history  

Risk assessment 

Any special needs 

Accommodation status 

Education, training and employment history 

Treatment Outcome Profile 

Mapping of recovery capital 

Understanding recovery goals and next steps 

Client confidentiality and consent to share information 
 
Inclusion regards information gathering, its sensible interpretation and the identification and 
prioritisation  of  need  as  a  key  function  of  the  service.  We  see  assessment  as  a  process 
rather than a one off event.  Where joint assessment is required – for example with service 
users with significant mental health issues – we will work with other agencies to facilitate this.  
Completing  thorough assessments  with  service  users  are  the  basis  for  developing  relevant 
and  challenging  recovery  plans.    All  referrals  to  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  will  be 
initially assessed within 5 working days. 
 
Risk Assessment 
All service users will undergo a risk assessment as part of their intake into the service.  The 
risk assessment will consider areas of potential risk that include: 
• 
Self-harm and suicide 
• 
Self-neglect 
• 
Violence and aggression 
• 
Fire setting 
• 
Harm or exploitation of others 
• 
Safeguarding of Children 
• 
Mental health issues 
• 
Poly-drug use including alcohol 
• 
Risk taking behaviours 
 
Each service user will have an associated risk management plan in place based on the risk 
factors  indentified.    The  risk  management  plan  will  be  reviewed  regularly  and  information 
shared with other agencies where appropriate. 
 
23. Section 
Care Planning 
Please evidence what processes will be adopted with 
8.0 
regards to care planning and care co-ordination as set 
Sub 
out in 8.1 
heading 8.1 
 
Weighting 

Maximum 
word count 
of 1500 
words 
Contractors response: 
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
Recovery (Care) Planning 
Following assessment, we will build, in full consultation with each service user, individualised 
recovery plans.  Recovery plans will be based on: 

Each service user working with a named Recovery Worker 

Utilising Recovery Mentors to support elements of the plan 

The principles of SMART objective setting 

Excellent record keeping  

Regular reviews 

A proactive approach to agreeing the benefits of information sharing 

Personal ownership of the plan by the service user 

Clear, realistic and challenging goals  

The use of mapping techniques to identify recovery goals, blockages and strategies 

On-going  emphasis  of  indentify  existing  recovery  capital  and  ways  in  which  new 
recovery capital can be acquired 

Prioritisation of needs across four main domains: 
o  Drug & Alcohol Use 
o  Physical & Psychological Health 
o  Criminal Involvement & Offending 
o  Social Functioning 
 
The input of Recovery Workers will be enhanced by our use of Recovery Mentors who will be 
drawn from those progressing on their own recovery journeys and other volunteers that are 
identified. Recovery Mentors will be carefully selected, offered training in recovery  working, 
be supervised and co-ordinated by Recovery Workers and support various elements of the 
recovery  plan.    It  is  our  intention  to  have  Recovery  Mentors  available  at  the  start  of  each 
service  user’s  entry  to  treatment  and  to  help  engagement  through  a  presence  in  reception 
areas and at satellite services. 
 
Recovery Planning Methodology 
Inclusion  will  consult  with  Cambridgeshire  commissioners  and  service  users  regarding 
adopting  the  approach  to  care  planning  currently  used  in  our  Birmingham  services.  
Inclusion’s  Birmingham  service  has  rolled  out  the  use  of  Birmingham  Treatment 
Effectiveness  Initiative  (BTEI)  node  link  mapping  in  its  assessment  and  care  planning 
processes.  The use of maps is built on the following: 
• 
Care  planning  is  the  process  of  setting  goals  and  interventions  based  on  the  needs 
identified by an assessment and then planning how to meet those goals with the client. Care 
planning is a core requirement of structured treatment. 
• 
The ideas and material are the products of extensive research in treatment evaluation 
and cognitive psychology and were developed as part of the Drug Abuse Treatment of AIDS-
Risk  Reduction  (DATAR)  project  and  other work  undertaken  by  the  Institute of  Behavioural 
Research at Texas Christian University (TCU). 
• 
Node-link  mapping  is  a  visual  representation  system  developed  at  TCU  for  helping 
drug  workers  and  their  clients  work  on  issues  that  arise  during  treatment.  Mapping  is  an 
easily  learned  method  of  eliciting,  representing,  and  organising  information  so  that 
relationships between ideas, feelings, and actions can be readily observed and understood. 
• 
Mapping  serves  two  major functions  in  the  keyworking  process.  Firstly,  it  provides  a 
visual  communication tool for  clarifying  information  shared between  client and  their  worker. 
Mapping  can  enhance  communication  with  a  client  whose  cognitive  awareness  is  blunted 
(due  to  acute  or  chronic  effects  of  drugs)  and  can  be  used  in  tandem  with  whatever 
therapeutic  orientation  or  style  a  key  worker  may  follow.  Secondly,  the  regular  use  of 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
mapping  during  keyworking  sessions  provides  a  model  for  systematic  and  “cause-effect” 
thinking  and  problem-solving,  which  clients  begin  to  adopt  (Dansereau,  Joe  and  Simpson, 
1993, 1995; Dansereau and Dees, 2002; Czuchry and Dansereau, 2003).  
• 
Mapping  skills  are  best  developed  through  repeated  practice.  Just  as  key  workers 
develop their own personal style, those who become comfortable and experienced with the 
mapping techniques will develop their own unique ways of using this tool. Although mapping 
may  seem  complicated  at  first  glance,  the  system  quickly  begins  to  feel  familiar  and 
straightforward.  
• 
Novice  mappers  are  encouraged  to  practice  by  mapping  their  own  experiences, 
feelings and thoughts and develop maps for any presentations they may make.  In the short 
term, key workers using mapping with clients can expect at least two measures of success. 
Firstly, maps should help with problem definition. Maps should systematically highlight issues 
for the client in terms of causes, consequences and solution options. In this regard, it shares 
something  with  solution-focused  approaches  to  working  with  a  client.    Secondly,  maps 
should provide easy-to-read summaries of a keyworking session that can be useful both for 
quick recall of session issues and reviewing a case in clinical supervision. 
 
 
‘Client Compacts’ 
Examples  of  client  compacts  can  be  found  in  the  assessment  and  care  planning  tools  we 
have included with our tender 
 
Transitional Care Plans for Young People 
Inclusion  will  work  with  CASUS  to  develop a  transitional protocol covering  the  transfer of  a 
young person’s ongoing substance misuse needs from one agency to the other ensuring a 
seamless  service.   The  protocol  is  likely  to address the  timing  of referrals,  at  what age the 
young person will transfer, individual agency responsibilities, joint working arrangements and 
how the young person’s will be involved in decision making. 
 
Inclusion’s suggested protocol outline is: 
• 
In  the  6  months  before  a  young  person’s  19th  birthday,  CASUS  will  consider  their 
future  care  needs  including  whether  transfer  to  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug  Treatment 
service is appropriate. Are the Young Person’s needs best met by other agencies?  
• 
If transfer is appropriate which services will the Young Person require?   
• 
As part of the transition a degree  of joint working will be established   
• 
CASUS  will  make  referrals  to  the  Adult  Drug  Treatment  Service  accompanied  by 
assessment,  care  planning  and  care  co-ordination  documents.    Where  referrals  are 
accepted, the adult service will allocate a named Key Worker. 
• 
A  three  way  meeting  between  CASUS,  the  adult  service  and  the  Young  Person  will 
take place to discuss aspects of the transition.  During this meeting a formal transfer date 
will  be  agreed  by  all  parties.  Further  three-way  meetings  will  be  agreed  if  particular 
concerns still exist. 
 
Adult Service Care Co-ordination Arrangements 
 
Inclusion will co-ordinate all service user packages of care in Cambridgeshire to ensure they 
receive the correct interventions from the correct agency to facilitate effective recovery and 
re-integration.  Care co-ordination will either be: 
Standard where: 
-  Support requirements are modest. 
-  Any mental health problems are self-managed. 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
-  The individual has a social support network. 
-  The service user poses little or no danger to themselves or others. 
-  We have confidence that contact with services will be maintained. 
Enhanced where: 
-  Multiple needs exist dictating inter-agency working.  
-  A service user engages with one agency in particular but has multiple needs. 
-  Medication management and compliance is an issue 
-  Mental health problems are significant. 
-  Harm to self or others is a possibility 
-  Disengagement with services is likely. 
 
24. Section 
Aftercare 
Please provide a model for Aftercare and ongoing 
10.0 
support once a client has completed treatment with 
Sub heading 
service. 
10.2 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1500 words  
Contractors response: 
Effective  aftercare  and  on-going  support  are  essential  if  service  users  are  to  maintain  their 
recovery  and  consolidate  gains  in  health,  social  functioning  and  offending  behaviour 
following  a  structured  treatment  programme.  We  see  the  transition  out  of  structured 
treatment  as  a  potential  risk  to  many  services  users;  aftercare  will  therefore  offer  both  the 
opportunity  to  address  any  lapse  or  relapse  issues  and  provide  pathways  to  independent 
living  and  improved  social  functioning.    Our  Structured  Day  Programme  has  a  formal  Re-
integration & Recovery phase described in detail in method statements 3B3g.  However, our 
generic approach to aftercare accessible to all service users includes: 
 
Relapse Management 
To manage aspects of relapse, service users will be able to access ad hoc Interventions that 
will address:  
• 
Health - education around the health risks of drug and alcohol use. 
• 
Triggers  and  cycles  of  use  -  understand  how  triggers  work  and  what  an  individual’s 
triggers. 
• 
Cravings  and  euphoric  recall  –  we  know  that  triggers  usually  lead  on  to  cravings  and 
therefore an understanding of cravings and how to manage them is important. 
• 
Learning coping and prevention strategies. 
• 
Anxiety Management  
 
• 
Self Esteem and confidence building 
 
 
• 
Assertiveness   
 
• 
Positive Thinking 
 
 
 
Inclusion  will  support  the  provision  of  complimentary  therapies  limited  to  Aromatherapy, 
massage, Reflexology and Auricular Acupuncture as part and parcel of aftercare services. 
 
Aftercare Pathways 
• 
Mutual Aid & SMART Recovery 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
Some service users will find long-term benefit by participation in 12 step fellowship groups.  
We will therefore encourage and host AA / NA meetings at the service or support clients to 
access 12 step meetings in the community.  For those service users unable to engage with 
the  12  step  approach  Smart  Recovery  will  be  developed.    Smart  Recovery  is  a  mutual  aid 
movement  based  on  a  form  of  CBT,  which  developed  as  an  alternative  to  12  step  based 
fellowships such as AA / NA. Smart Recovery groups are facilitated by a service user familiar 
with  the  approach,  initially  with  the  support  of  a  professional  but  aiming  to  be  freestanding 
over  time.    We  will  support  the  integration  of  Smart  Recovery  groups  into  the  aftercare 
programme.   
 
The Cambridgeshire service will pro-actively promote pathways into mutual aid opportunities 
for as many service users as possible.  We will do this in a number of ways: 
-  By ensuring that up to date information about mutual aid groups is readily available in all 
service locations 
-  By ensuring that all staff are fully cognisant of the remit of mutual aid groups and actively 
sell the benefits of such groups to service users during key working sessions 
-  By encouraging all staff to deepen their own understanding of mutual aid groups through 
reading, discussion and attendance at local ‘open’ meetings. 
-  Wherever  practical,  to  work  jointly  with  mutual  aid  groups:  for  example  to make  service 
premises available for meetings, to facilitate attendance at team meetings and the share 
information  appropriately  in  support  of  recovery  and  re-integration  recovery  plan 
objectives. 
• 
Volunteering 
For  those  successfully  completing  treatment  and  who  wish  to  become  involved  in  service 
delivery  there  wil  be  opportunities  to  volunteer  in  Inclusion  services.    Volunteering  in  the 
service  can  be  an  excellent  opportunity  to  cement  the  gains  made  in  treatment  and 
contribute to the local community.  For many service users, volunteering as part of aftercare 
can be a major step forward in finding work.  Volunteering posts will cover; 
o  Needle Exchange 
o  ‘Front of house’ duties in reception areas 
o  Social Support & Advocacy 
o  Outreach duties 
o  Administrative duties 
o  Delivery of complimentary therapies (where specifically trained & insured) 
o  Involvement in service marketing, open days and partner agency visits 
• 
Education, Training & Employment (ETE) 
o  Inclusion  will  seek  to  broker  in  a  range  of  ETE  services  from  providers  across 
Cambridgeshire in support of the aftercare service. This will include 
o  learning and support plans with service users 
o  provision of on-going individual support 
o  access to further appropriate learning  
o  identification of employment opportunities 
o  Information Advice and Guidance  
o  Psychometric testing 
o  Labour market information  
o  Personal and social development 
o  Preparation for work 
o  confidence and motivation building 
o  CV and interview preparation,  
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
o  identifying and negotiating work placements 
o  positive disclosure training 
o  Communication and team work skills 
 
• 
Housing 
Secure  and  comfortable  accommodation  remains  a  central  issue  for  those  recovering  from 
substance  misuse.    To  this  end,  the  aftercare  service  will  offer  general  advice  and 
information  relating  to  local  accommodation  opportunities  but  will  also  seek  to  broker  in 
support  from  housing  agencies  including  Cambridgeshire  County  Council’s  Home  Link, 
Registered  Social  Landlords  and  Housing Associations.   Our aim will  be  to  support  service 
into decent accommodation where they are in housing need or to help them maintain current 
tenancies or ownership of property where that has been under threat du to problematic drug 
use. 
• 
Benefits 
We  wil  ensure  that  all  service  users  have  access  to  a  comprehensive  range  of  advice  and 
information relating to welfare benefits.  This will be available from the staff team in general 
but  will  be  supplemented  by  specific  benefits  clinics  held  in  the  service  by  the  Citizen’s 
Advice  Bureaux.    The  service  will  ensure  it  has  excellent  relationships  with  The  Benefits 
Agency to facilitate access and support for our service users. 
• 
Independent Living Skills 
The service will offer service users support in a range of independent living skills including; 
personal budgeting and managing bills, nutritional advice, cooking, accessing leisure and 
cultural facilities and managing relationships. 
  
 
25. Section 
Competencies and 
Please demonstrate how you will ensure the delivery of 
11.0 
Training of staff 
a safe, effective and accessible service for staff and 
Sub heading 
(Provider workforce)  
service users.  
11.1 a – k 
 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
2000 words  
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion  will  ensure  that    the  service  is  a  safe,  effective  and  accessible  through  the 
following: 
• 
Employee & Volunteer Compliance with Training and Competency Requirements 
All employees and volunteers will be issued with and expected to sign clear job descriptions 
which will include training and competency requirements.  All employees and volunteers will 
be expected to comply with organisational code of conduct. 
 
• 
Meeting Occupational Standards. 
Registration with a respective professional regulatory body is a prerequisite for many posts.  
All relevant offers of a contract for employment are dependent upon this.  This is supported 
by  a  face  to  face  check  undertaken  by  the  Recruitment  Team  where  PIN  numbers  and 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
qualification  checks  are  undertaken.    These  are  subsequently  checked  online  with  the 
regulatory  body  for  any  fitness  to  practice  issues,  investigations  or  warnings.      During 
employment  SSSFT  has  a  process  in  place  to  check  registration  in  accordance  with  the 
professional  body  requirements.    Where  an  individual’s  registration  is  not  renewed  before 
expiry then they are removed from practice.   
 
As  NHS  employees,  all  Inclusion  staff  work  in  roles  that  are  linked  to  the  KSF.    The  KSF 
structure  allows  for  an  annual  cycle  or  performance  appraisal  and  personal  development 
planning.  There are 4 key stages: 
 
Stage 1 - Reviews how the individual is applying their knowledge and skills 
to meet the demands of their current post against the KSF Outline for that post and any other 
objectives  required  in  respect  of  the  post  that  support  team,  departmental  or  directorate 
priorities. 
 
Stage  2  -  Identifies  future  objectives  and  learning  needs  to  formulate  a  Personal 
Development  Plan  (PDP)  for  the  next  12 months  that  will  support  the  individual  to  gain the 
relevant  knowledge  and  skills  required  and  clarify  priorities  and  expectations  to  meet  the 
demands of the role.   
 
Stage 3 - Any learning and development agreed as part of an individual’s PDP needs to be 
supported  by  the  line  manager.  Where  such  needs  have  been  identified  these  need  to  be 
reflected  and  prioritised  accordingly  in  the  Department/Directorate  training  plans  to  ensure 
appropriate support is given. 
 
Stage  4  -  Evaluate  progress  towards  achievement  of  objectives,  and  how  the  learning  that 
has taken place has been demonstrated in practice. 
 
• 
Staffing the service with a wide range of professional backgrounds. 
Inclusion would inherit an existing staff team from Addaction and Phoenix Futures and in that 
sense the mix of professional backgrounds in the service will be fixed at the point of transfer.  
However,  over  the  life  of  the  contract,  we  will  regularly  carry  out  the  skill  and  professional 
background mix across the service and make adjustments when conditions allow.  The most 
obvious example of this will be to review recruitment requirements as posts within the service 
fall vacant. 
 
• 
Ensure that all staff have appropriate knowledge, skills and training appropriate  
Inclusion  recognises  that  investment  in  staff  education  and  training  is  crucial  to  providing 
quality services within a framework of good governance. Inclusion’s training strategy is three 
fold: 
1. Mandatory training delivered during induction for new employees and periodic refreshers 
for existing staff including: 

Fire Safety, Health and Safety 

Workplace Risk Awareness, Manual Handling 

Personal Safety in the Community 

Breakaway, MAPPA Restraint 

Infection Control, Anaphylaxis & Life Support 

Clinical Risk, Adverse Events, Child Protection 

Domestic Violence, Equality and Diversity 

Confidentiality, Data Protection 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
 
2.  Substance Misuse skills training delivered to all staff including: 

Technical substance misuse training, group-work theory & practice 

Mental Health/Dual Diagnosis, Blood Borne Viruses 

Motivational Therapy , Brief Solution Focused Therapy 
 
3. Professional and role specific training including: 

NVQ Level 4 in Health and Social Care (all recovery workers under go this training) 

RCGP parts 1 & 2, Nurse Prescribing Training, First Line Management Training 

Post Graduate Management Award, BSC & BS Nursing 
 
Inclusion also provides its staff with: 

Coaching 

Mentoring 

E-learning 

Conference & seminar attendance 

Distance Learning 
Given the often complex range of needs and changing substance misuse profiles of service 
users,  our  staff  need  to  possess  a  comprehensive  array  of  specific  skills  to  operate  as 
effective  workers  who  are  able  to  sensitively  and  appropriately  challenge  service  users  to 
change  their  lives.    We  will  ensure  staff  possess  the  ability  to  accurately  assess  service 
users  and  deliver  challenging,  service-user  led  and  goal  orientated  interventions.    We  will 
provide  on-going  training  to  enable  staff  to  deliver  services  from  a  menu  that  includes  an 
agreed  range  of  psycho-social  interventions.    We  will  ensure  that  staff  are  able  to  deal 
competently  with  issues  relating  to  the  Safeguarding  of  Young  People  &  Vulnerable  Adults 
and to share information appropriately with other health & social care agencies as required. 
Inclusion recognises the diverse personal and professional backgrounds of all staff and will 
seek to build on those experiences to ensure the deliver of an integrated service model that 
incorporates  a  multi-disciplinary  staff  team.    We  will  support  staff  from  recognised 
professional groups to maintain registration and umbrella-body links wherever possible at the 
same  time  as  seeking  to  recruit  staff  with  personal  experience  of  substance  misuse 
treatment.   To this end, we recognise the breadth of treatment philosophies permeating the 
substance  misuse  field  whilst  ensuring  that  all  staff  operate  to  defined  competencies  and 
deliver evidenced based interventions.   
• 
Resources for ongoing training needs and professional development. 
The  budget  we  have  submitted  for  the  delivery  of  Cambridgeshire  Adult  Drug  Treatment 
Service  includes  designated  resources  for  the  provision  of  staff  training  and  development 
needs.  Inclusion services are also supported by SSSFT’s Learning & Development team. 
• 
Ensure that there is at all times a sufficient level of staff  
We  manage  sickness  absence  consistent  with  employment  legislation  whilst  fostering  a 
culture  emphasising  a  positive  attitude  towards  attendance  at  work  regularly  when  fit  for 
duty. It is our duty of care to provide a safe and healthy work environment. It is the duty of 
staff to ensure regular attendance in accordance with their contract of employment. 
 
Supported by Human Resource Advisors, line managers monitor sickness and initiate action 
on  an  individual  basis  when  appropriate.  They  conduct  return  to  work  interviews  for  every 
episode  of  sickness  absence  and  return  the  paperwork  to  the  HR  Advisors  who  monitor 
individual and team attendance.  Employees must keep in regular contact with their manager 
during periods of sickness absence and must also attend sickness absence review meetings 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
when requested. Failure to do so without acceptable reason may lead to disciplinary action. 
 
It  remains  the  responsibility  of  managers  to  monitor  and  review  employee’s  sickness 
absence  records  for  all  staff  they  are  responsible  for  and  to  initiate  action  on  an  individual 
basis when considered appropriate, with the support of HR Team. Since the introduction of a 
drive  to  proactively  manage  sickness  absence,  absenteeism  has  reduced  by  5%  with  a 
continuing annual downward trend. 
 
To ensure constant service availability Inclusion employs a flexible approach, which includes 
the following elements that will ensure cover in all normal eventualities: 
 
-  Overtime payments to cover sudden short-term absences in exceptional circumstances 
-  Flexible employment contracts with regard to part-time work and job share arrangements.  
-  Our  own  Bank Workers  who  are  offered  training  and  support  consistent  with  permanent 
staff. 
-  Agency  staff  from  the  Trust’s  approved  list  thus  ensuring  good  standards  and  safe 
practice. 
-  Trained volunteers, to take on tasks that can free up workers to provide core service, for 
example a volunteer performing reception and administration tasks. 
-  A network of peer Recovery Coaches to support service users at all times including when 
the service is under pressure. 
 
• 
Appropriate Supervision Arrangements 
Supervision  is  a  tool  routinely  used  across  Inclusion  services  and  this  ensures  that  staff 
performance  is  managed  effectively  on  a  day  to  day  basis.    Supervision  also  ensures  that 
our investment in staff training results in consistent best practice through embedding learning 
during  supervision  sessions.  Inclusion  provides  line  management  supervision,  clinical 
supervision  in  groups  or  individually,  and  professional  supervision,  where  doctors  are 
employed. 
 
Line  Management  Supervision  -  During  the  probationary  period  for  new  employees 
supervision  is  offered  weekly  based  on  need.    Following  a  successful  probationary  period, 
line  management  supervision  is  mandatory  and  on  a  monthly  basis.  Line  management 
supervision notes are kept, agreed and signed by both the manager and staff member.  Line 
management  supervision  is  linked  to  the  NHS  Knowledge  and  Skills  Framework  annual 
performance appraisal and review. Performance appraisal reviews previous activity, provides 
an  opportunity  to  reflect  on  performance,  identify  areas  for  improvement,  develop  the  next 
work  plan  and  agree  training  needs  for  the  following  year.  Completion  of  training 
requirements must be evidenced and monitored within supervision sessions. 
 
Clinical Supervision - Inclusion sees clinical supervision as a critical element in the provision 
of  safe  and  accountable  practice  and  fundamental  to  safeguarding  standards.    Clinical 
supervision  is  a  confidential  process  between  supervisor  and  supervisee  which  adheres  to 
the  principles  of  professional  codes  of  conduct.  When  embarking  upon  a  supervisory 
relationship,  a  contract  is  agreed  between  the  supervisee  and  supervisor.  Clinical 
supervision is a minimum of one hour a month with flexibility built in consistent with need
Inclusion’s approach to staff supervision is one of accountability, development and support.  
When  provided  in  effective  supervisory  relationships  these  elements  can  contribute 
significantly to improved performance, job satisfaction and staff health & wellbeing. 
 -  Accountability  –  all  staff  work  towards  activity  and  outcome  targets.    Our  approach  is  to 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
make clear and agree such targets so that all staff has confidence in what they are doing and 
why.  Inclusion’s experience is that a lack of clarity over work expectations is unhelpful and 
undermining for staff. 
-  Development  –  when  staff  learn  new  skills  or  enhance  existing  ones,  the  sense  of 
achievement can add greatly to job satisfaction which ultimately results in a better service for 
clients.    Consequently,  all  Inclusion  staff  agree  areas  for  professional  development  in 
supervision that dovetail with service and contractual requirements. 
- Support – Inclusion recognises that working in health and social care environments is both 
rewarding  and  often  very  challenging.   With  this  in  mind,  supervision  sessions  allow  space 
for  staff  to  check  out  the  emotional  and  physical  stress  they  may  be  experiencing  and find 
strategies for dealing with these. 
• 
Safeguard Children Training 
All Inclusion staff will be expected to attend Level 1 Safeguarding Children training provided 
by Cambridgeshire LCSB.  Some staff will also attend Level 2 training as necessary. 
 
• 
Opportunities for Volunteers, Overseen by a Volunteer Coordinator. 
Inclusion’s  proposal  for  providing  opportunities  for  volunteer  and  Recovery  mentor 
involvement are described in details in method Statements 28 and 29 below. 
 
• 
Criminal Records Bureaux (CRB) Checks 
Throughout the duration of employment, all employees are contractually obliged to declare to 
the  Trust  any  criminal  convictions,  cautions,  reprimands  or  final  warnings  received  whilst 
they  are  employed.    Employees  are  also  required  to  declare  if  they  are  the  subject  of  a 
Police investigation, in the UK or abroad. 
 
SSSFT  has  a  centralised  recruitment  system  and  is  compliant  with  the  NHS  Employment 
Check Standards which ensures compliance with UK employment legislation. The NHS has 
developed  these  checks  with  the  Department  of  Health  and  NHS  Employers  and  they  are 
mandatory for all types of employment within the NHS including those directly employed and 
those  engaged  via  an  Agency  or  through  Contract  arrangements.  There  are  6  standards 
which  cover,  verification  of  employment  history  and  references,  qualifications  and 
professional  registration,  criminal  records  checks,  right  to  work  in  the  UK,  occupational 
health  and  verification  of  identity.  Compliance  with  these  standards  is  monitored  via 
assessment  and  inspections  by  the  Care  Quality  Commission  and  the  NHS  Litigation 
Authority. 
 
During the implementation phase Inclusion will consult with all staff transferring under TUPE.  
One of the likely ‘measures’ applied will be the requirement for members of staff to under go 
new  CRB  checks  as  legislation  existing  disclosures  to  be  transferred  to  a  new  employer.  
Pending completion of the new CRB checks, Inclusion will conduct CRB risk assessments on 
all transferring staff to provide additional assurance. 
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
26. Section 
Competencies and 
Please demonstrate and detail to what extent this 
11.0 
Training of staff 
service will be provided by your own staff and facilities. 
Sub heading 
(Provider workforce)  
 
11.1 a – k 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion intends to provide the vast majority of services delivered by Cambridgeshire Adult 
Treatment Service through its own employees and volunteers.  Exceptions to this include: 
• 
Seconded Social Workers 
• 
Clinical waste collection services 
• 
Sessional doctors providing discrete clinical sessions 
• 
Mainstream agencies providing advice and information ‘clinic’ with the service such as 
welfare benefits, housing advice, Education, Training & Employment (ETE) opportunities 
• 
NA, AA and SMART Recovery volunteers 
As per our accommodation strategy we intend to operate 3 Service Hubs 
- Mill House, Brookfields Hospital Site, 351 Mill Road, Cambridge, CB1 3DF 
- 7-8 Market Hill, Huntingdon, PE29 3NR 
- The Former Council Offices, Church Terrace, Wisbech, PE13 1BW 
 
And 2 Satellite Service Locations 
- Central Hall, 52-54 Market Street, Ely, CB7 4LS 
- 1st Floor offices, Cross Keys Mews, Market Square, St. Neot’s, PE19 2AR 
 
Inclusion intends to fully support and continue the delivery of services at: 
- Cambridge Access Surgery, 125 Newmarket Road, Cambridge, CB5 8HB 
Inclusion  will  look  to  secure  access  to  space  at  a  range  of  community  venues  across  the 
county  in  St.Ives,  Chatteris,  March,  Eemaus,  Yaxley  and  Stanground.    Elements  of  the 
Structured  Day  Programme  will  be  operating  at  community  venues  away  fro  treatment 
service  sites.  We  anticipate  being  able  to  secure  access  to  clinic  space  at  existing  LES 
practices and to negotiate space at new practices willing to work with the service as Shared 
Care develops.  
27. Section 
Competencies and 
Please demonstrate how the service will ensure that 
11.0 
Training of staff 
staff will be recovery focussed, for both new staff and 
Sub heading 
(Provider workforce)  
volunteers, as well as existing staff who may be more 
11.1 a – k 
‘maintenance’ focussed.  
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
2000 words 
Contractors response: 
 
Inclusion is an organisation committed to the ongoing learning and development of its staff 
and  volunteers.    We  believe  that  to  ensure  all  our  recovery  interventions  are  delivered  by 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
well trained staff and volunteers who are able to be creative and innovate, the organisation 
must provided the appropriate training, supervision and appraisal in a learning culture.   This 
means that staff and volunteers must feel that they are supported by Inclusion managers and 
the wider Trust and have confidence that they are able to acknowledge when mistakes are 
made  so  as  to  ensure  individual  and  organisational  learning  opportunities  are  maximised.  
Inclusion  is  clear  that  when  a  culture  of  blame  pervades,  staff  can  become  quickly 
demotivated and unwilling to innovate in their roles.   
 
Inclusion’s approach to recovery is built upon some other key beliefs: 
-  We believe that drug \ alcohol users have rights and responsibilities: it is our task to be an 
advocate  for  the  rights  of  alcohol  users  and  to  empower  them  to  take  responsibility  for 
their recovery.  Everyone is capable of change. 
-  We  believe  we  should  offer  a  non-judgmental  service,  which  is  accessible  to  all 
irrespective of age, gender, religion, ethnic origin, social class, disability or sexuality. 
-  We believe that the most effective means of delivering services to drug users is through 
the  collaborative  working  of  all  relevant  agencies.  To  this  end  we  see  it  as  crucial  to 
understand how all agencies see their function and work towards creating effective multi-
disciplinary partnerships. 
-  We  believe  in  the  need  to  consult  with  service  users  at  every  level  of  service 
development and provision.  All our services incorporate various involvement initiatives. 
-  We believe that working  with drug users in  the community and in custodial settings can 
be challenging for staff. To maintain motivation it is the duty of the organisation to provide 
effective support, supervision and training. 
 
Inclusion  will  ensure  that  a  recovery-focussed  staff  team  is  developed  across 
Cambridgeshire through a range of initiatives: 

Strong  leadership  starting  at  the  point  of  consultation  and  transfer  with  staff  subject  to 
TUPE or for those recruited to any vacancies.  Our aim is to win the hearts and minds of 
new staff and have them buy into our reintegration and recovery vision. 

Excellent supervision and objective setting in support of reintegration and recovery 

Tailored  learning  and  development  for  all  members  of  staff  particularly  around  the 
delivery of psycho-social interventions. 

Individual  performance  management  and  additional  support  for  those  members  of  staff 
struggling to make the transition to a recovery orientated culture. 

Inclusion also intends to establish a Recovery Practice and Quality Assurance post within 
our  staffing  structure.  We  see  this  role  as  crucial  in  supporting  the  Cambridgeshire 
Service  Manager  in  developing  a  recovery  culture.    The  role  will  be  responsible  for  an 
initial  ‘recovery  audit’  of  the  inherited  service,  followed  by  a  programme  of  practice 
observation that feeds into staff supervision.  Findings from the recovery audit and staff 
observations will contribute to an overall training needs analysis and subsequent delivery 
of  a  comprehensive  training  programme  that  will  enhance  reintegration  and  recovery 
outcomes. 
 
Peer-led Reintegration & Recovery 
Alongside  our  workforce  learning  and  development  initiatives  designed  to  establish  a 
recovery  focussed  service  Inclusion  are  committed  to  developing  a  peer-led  approach  to 
service  delivery  and  development  in  Cambridgeshire.    We  are  convinced  that  recovery  in 
local communities is more likely to succeed when those prospering and graduating from drug 
treatment are visible to people coming to terms with addiction and dependency. 
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
To this end we will seek to establish a network of Recovery Mentors with an active interest in 
supporting  local  recovery.    Training  in  supporting  people  through  drug  treatment  and  on 
recovery  journeys  will  be  given  to  Recovery  Mentors  along  with  opportunities  to  have 
learning  recognised  with  formal  qualifications  where  possible.    Recovery  Mentors  will  be 
offered  support  and  supervision  with  clear  links  to  the  objectives  contained  in  individual 
recovery plans. 
 
Recovery Orientated Prescribing 
In Inclusion’s experience, the key to ensuring that prescribing modalities facilitate recovery is 
for  pharmacological  treatments  to  be  delivered  alongside  psycho-social  interventions.    The 
days  when  community  drug  teams  operated  solely  as  prescription  management  services 
should  now  be  long  gone.    Our  own,  and  our  service  user’s  expectations  are  now  much 
higher  and  consequently,  our  services  have  adapted  their  approach  to facilitating  recovery.  
In essence, it is not so much what is prescribed rather that prescribing is only one part of a 
service user’s recovery plan. 
Facilitating  recovery,  including  prescribing  interventions,  starts  when  a  service  user  first 
makes contact.  In Cambridgeshire, Inclusion will recruit and train Recovery Mentors to help 
engage service users from the moment they first walk through the door.  We know this works 
well via feedback from service users elsewhere.  Recovery Mentors will help to make service 
users feel at ease and understand what the service can offer, what rights and responsibilities 
each service user has and what happens next. 
Facilitating  recovery  will  then  form  the  basis  of  our  approach  to  assessment  and  recovery 
planning.  As well as gathering all the necessary conventional information from service users 
at  assessment  stage,  we  will  also  begin  the  process  of  understanding  the  recovery  capital 
that each service user already possesses and use this to prioritise need and build a recovery 
plan that is goal orientated and challenging.  We will utilise BTEI mapping tools throughout 
assessment, recovery planning and on-going interventions. 
For  many  service  users,  prescribing  is  still  likely  to  feature  as  an  important  component  of 
their recovery plan.  However, our commitment is to ensure that prescribing is never the only 
intervention
 of any service user’s package of care.  We will ensure that all staff are equipped 
with  a  practitioner’s  tool  box  that  includes  a  broad  range  of  interventions  including  harm 
minimisation, Motivational Interviewing, Brief Interventions, BTEI mapping tools, group work 
facilitation skills and the ability & commitment to facilitate links to mutual aid.  In this way, we 
will seek to identify and harness the recovery capital that each service user brings and build 
pathways that support re-integration. 
Community Detoxification 
Inclusion  is  committed  to  develop  and  expand  the  use  of  community  opiate  detoxification 
across  Cambridgeshire.  Our  local  research  suggests  that  this  as  an  underdeveloped 
pathway that is restricting opportunity for service users in their recovery. Our intention will be 
to offer Methadone, Subutex and Lofexidine detoxification options.  Each service user would 
be offered an individually tailored detox medication plan. 
Action Research at a Service Level 
Service providers across the substance misuse field quite rightly seek to develop a culture of 
continuous  improvement,  manage  service  performance  and  wherever  possible  involve 
service  users  in  development  and  innovation.  However,  action  plans  and  aspirations  to 
include service users can often be nebulous.  To address this issue and to ensure ideas are 
really applied, Inclusion has developed an Action Research approach.  Action Research is a 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
term  used  to  describe  the  process  whereby  research  techniques  such  as  survey  design, 
analysis  of  qualitative  data  and  statistical  techniques  are  used  to  provide  answers  to  the 
practical questions that arise in service delivery. 
 
The  primary  purpose  of  Action  Research  is  to  solve  an  immediate  issue  rather  than 
contribute to theoretical knowledge, although the latter is often a useful further consequence 
of  the  approach.    Inclusion  will  seek  to  utilise  Action  Research  to  improve  the  quality  of 
service delivery of the Cambridgeshire service.     
 
The Action Research process involves: 
 
•  Identifying the issue at hand 
•  Brainstorming potential solutions involving both staff and service users 
•  Gathering base line data before any ideas are deployed 
•  Prioritising the best suggestions 
•  Collecting data in the light of the changes made 
•  Reviewing the impact of changes made 
 
In this way, Action Research provides: 
 
•  A way of embedding continuous improvement in services 
•  Collaboration between staff and service users in the process: success is more likely than 
a top down process of performance improvement. 
•  Staff and service users learn new skills 
•  Improvements to service delivery. 
 
During  the  contract  implementation  phase,  Inclusion  will  audit  the  transferring  service, 
identify  areas  for  improvement  and  apply  an  Action  Research  approach.    Service 
improvements will be measured and made available to commissioners. 
 
28. Section 
Competencies and 
Please detail the programme that the service will use for 
11.0 
Training of staff 
the training, recruitment and development of a volunteer 
Sub heading 
(Provider workforce)  
workforce. 
11.1 j 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  is  fully  committed  to  recruiting,  training  and  developing  volunteers  as  an  integral 
part of services in Cambridgeshire.  Our parent Trust has a long history of encouraging and 
facilitating  volunteer  involvement  and  Inclusion  itself,  as  a  provider  of  substance  misuse 
services,  has  a  strong  believe  in  the  ability  of  volunteers  to  improve  service  delivery  and 
contribute  to  service  development.    We  also  understand  that  building  volunteering 
opportunities into our service design helps to increase the degree of localism and contributes 
to  ensuring  that  what  we  offer  will  meet  local  needs.    In  terms  of  recovery,  utilising 
volunteers, some of who may have graduated through our Mentor programmes, provides an 
excellent  and  visible  incentive  for  service  users  to  make  their  own  positive  changes  and 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
move away from substance misuse. 
 
For  those  successfully  completing  Recovery  Mentor  placements  and  for  the  general  public 
there will be opportunities to volunteer in the Cambridgeshire services.  Inclusion’s approach 
to volunteering includes: 
• 
Pre-recruitment screening interview to assess suitability and outline roles 
All potential volunteers will take part in an initial screening session with the Cambridgeshire 
Volunteer  Co-ordinator.    This  will  allow  Inclusion  to  screen  out  any  people  who  are  clearly 
unsuitable  and  for  potential  volunteers  to  understand  what  the  role  entails  and  their 
commitment  as  a  volunteer.    Pre-screening  sessions  are  likely  to  be  held  at  regular  points 
during  the  year  and  will  be  held  at  Adult  Drug  Treatment  sites  across  the  county.   We  will 
ensure that active volunteers are on-hand to relay their experiences to potential recruits.  We 
will advertise widely for volunteers in public places, other agencies and the local press. 
 
• 
Structured interview and CRB checking 
For  those  potential  volunteers  who  complete  pre-screening  successfully,  a  formal  interview 
and Criminal Records Bureaux checks will be carried out.  The applicant will also be asked to 
provide  two  character  references  as  part  of  the  process.    The  structured  interview  will  be 
carried  out  by  the  Volunteer  Co-ordinator  and  a  member  of  the  wider  service  to  increase 
awareness  of  volunteering  matters  across  the  staff  team.    The  interview  will  include 
questions  relating  to  personal  conduct and  ‘what-if’  scenarios  that  scrutinise  an  individual’s 
judgement when faced with challenging scenarios. 
 
• 
Completion of Inclusion Volunteer training course & on-going training 
Once  interviews  have  been  successfully  completed  each  new  recruit  will  take  part  in 
Inclusion’s  initial  3  day  volunteer  training  programme.    Inclusion  will  aim  to  deliver  this 
programme  on  six  occasions  annually  across  Cambridgeshire.    The  training  course  will 
include session on: 

Role of the Volunteer & Volunteer Contract 

Basic Drug & Alcohol Awareness/ Harm Minimisation 

Supervision & Support 

Communication Skills 

Group Work Skills. 

Motivational Interviewing 

Assertiveness  

Volunteering in Support of Recovery Goals  

Safeguarding 

Managing Challenging Situations. 

Equality & Diversity 

OCN/NVQ Orientation 
 
• 
Placement in an Inclusion service 
Once the Volunteer has completed the initial training programme, a placement will be agreed 
within one of Inclusion’s Cambridgeshire services.  Our expectation of all volunteers is that 
they will be available in their placement for a minimum of 4 hours per week, for a minimum 
time  span  of  6  months  Inclusion  services  offer  a  range  of  volunteering  opportunities 
including: 

Needle Exchange 

‘Front of house’ duties in reception areas 

Social Support & Advocacy 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 

Outreach duties 

Administrative duties 

Delivery of complimentary therapies (where specifically trained & insured) 

Involvement in service marketing, open days and partner agency visits 
 
On-going learning and development will be important for all volunteers.  Inclusion volunteers 
will  all  agree  an  individualised  training  programme  in  support  of  their  development.  
Volunteers will have access to the same internal training programmes available to Inclusion 
staff and where resources allow, bespoke external training course will be provided. 
 
• 
Regular supervision and support from the Volunteer Co-ordinator 
Once  the  Volunteer  has  taken  up  their  placement  in  a  Cambridgeshire  service  they  will 
receive  on-going  supervision  and  support  form  the  Volunteer  Co-ordinator.    Inclusion’s 
approach to the supervision of volunteers will include: 

Accountability – is the volunteer carry out their tasks competently, safely and on time?  
Is  relevant  documentation  being  completely  properly?    Are  local  health  and  safety 
procedures  being  followed?    Is  the  volunteer  building  effective  relationships  with  service 
users, colleagues and partner agencies? 

Development  –  supervision  will  consider  how  current  skills,  knowledge  and 
performance can be improved through further training, e-learning, shadowing and mentoring 
from colleagues. 

Support  –  Inclusion  will  ensure  that  all  volunteers  feel  supported  in  their  roles.  
Supervision is an important opportunity for all volunteers to discuss how they feel in relation 
to their roles and feedback on how the volunteering programme can be improved. 
 
• 
Opportunities to enrol on Open College Network and NVQ qualifications. 
Volunteers  will  be  encouraged  to  enrol  on  an  Open  College  Network  (OCN)  accredited 
learning package at Level 2/3 in Volunteering with support from an in-house Assessor, who 
will assess a volunteer’s OCN evidence against unit criteria & learning outcomes.  For most 
volunteers, a placement in one of our service locations will be viewed as a stepping stone to 
paid  work  either  in the  health  and  social  care field or  the  wider  labour market  and  as  such 
formal evidence of learning is important. 
 
• 
Sessional Work within Cambridgeshire Services 
Inclusion will from time to time recruit sessional workers to meet temporary workforce gaps 
brought about through long term sickness absence or other unforeseen circumstances.  An 
excellent  way  to  fill  such  gaps  is  through  the  recruitment of  sessional  workers.    Volunteers 
working  in  Cambridgeshire  services  will  be  well  placed  to  apply  for  such  roles  having 
developed local knowledge and familiarity with working practices through their placements.  
 
 
29. Section 
Competencies and 
Please demonstrate how the service will develop a 
11.0 
Training of staff 
programme of Recovery Mentors to ensure support and 
Sub heading 
(Recovery Mentors) 
safeguarding mechanisms for both mentor and mentee. 
11.1.1 a – h 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion’s  approach  to  Recovery  Mentoring  is  to  provide  a  supported  learning  opportunity 
for  current,  stable  service  users  to  access  an  accredited  mentor  training  programme 
combined  with  practical  experience  through  a  specific  placement  in  an  Inclusion  service.  
Recovery  Mentors  are  a  valuable  asset  in  Inclusion  services  as  they  bring  by  definition, 
similar experiences to others in substance misuse, offending behaviour, and homelessness.  
Recovery  Mentors  can  offer  experience  of  ppersonal  change,  achieving  success  from 
treatment programmes and sustaining changes.   
 
Clearly, it is crucial that prospective Recovery Mentors can demonstrate a level of stability to 
ensure  their  readiness  to  participate.    Inclusion  understands  that  many  people  with 
experience  of  treatment  services  will  want  to  ‘give  something  back’  and  for  some  this  will 
include  going  onto  employment  in  the  health  and  social  care  fields.    For  the  majority  of 
Recovery  Mentors  however,  a  move  into  education,  training  and  employment  opportunities 
will arise outside of the substance misuse treatment arena.   
 
Inclusion will develop a Recovery Mentor programme across Cambridgeshire during the first 
6 months of service delivery.  The Recovery Mentor programme will be comprised of the 
following key features: 
 
• 
A clearly articulated Recovery Mentor pathway 
Inclusion will develop and publicise a Recovery Mentor pathway for Cambridgeshire so that 
service users can understand; 
o  A degree of stability in treatment is required to become a Mentor 
o  That all potential Mentors must complete a thorough training programme and 
engage with all aspects of it 
o  Robust risk-assessment of all potential Mentors will take place 
o  That following the training, each Mentor will take part in a structured placement in 
one of the Cambridgeshire services 
o  That each mentor will receive on-going supervision and support from a named 
member of staff 
o  That all Mentors will be encouraged to undertake an OCN accredited learning 
package at Level 2/3 in Mentoring/Drug Treatment 
o  That all Mentors are expected to take part in group support meetings on a regular 
basis 
o  Successful completion of a Mentor placement and further progress in treatment can 
lead to full volunteering and other Education, Training & Employment (ETE) 
opportunities 
 
• 
Risk Assessment of all potential Mentors 
To  safeguard  potential  Mentors,  their  future  Mentees  and  the  wider  organisation,  a  risk 
assessment will be carried out.  This will include: 

Offending history and current status in the CJS if applicable 

Previous drug use and current treatment status 

Any relevant health concerns 

Accommodation status 

Existing relationships with other service users 

On-going support needs 
 
• 
12 week Recovery Mentor training package 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
Inclusion will develop and deliver its 12 week Mentor training programme at least 3 times 
annually across Cambridgeshire.  The programme will be delivered by the Volunteer Co-
ordinator and include modules covering; 

Role of the Mentor & Mentor Contract 

Basic Drug & Alcohol Awareness/ Harm Minimisation

Supervision & Support 

Communication Skills 

Group Work Skills. 

Motivational Interviewing 

Assertiveness  

Mentoring in Support of Recovery Goals  

Safeguarding 

Managing Challenging Situations. 

Equality & Diversity.  

OCN/NVQ Orientation  
 
• 
Mentor Role Descriptions 
All Mentors will have a written role description covering role purpose, specific tasks and 
duties, expectations, placement details and Mentor Contract.   
 
• 
3/4 month Recovery Mentor placements 
After the training programme has been successfully completed, each Mentor will be placed in 
one  the  Cambridgeshire  services.    The  range  of  tasks  will  include  1:1  support  for  service 
users  new  to  treatment,  those  having  lapsed  or  in  support  of  specific  recovery  goals,  joint 
groupwork facilitation, outreach along side paid staff to ‘hard to reach’ groups, and advocacy 
support.    Mentors  will  also  be  able  to  lend  support  to  Service  User  Involvement  initiatives 
such as leading user forums or user feedback. 
 
• 
Supervision and involvement in group support meetings 
Each  Mentor  will  be  assigned  to  a  named  member  of  staff  based  where  the  placement  is 
taking place.  The named supervisor will be on hand to offer day-to-day advice and support.  
Each  Mentor  will  also  receive  regular  structured  supervision  and  meaningful  feedback  on 
their  placement  progress.    Any  concerns  with  a  Mentor’s  performance  will  be  discussed 
during  supervision  with  the  Volunteer  Co-ordinator  informed  of  any  substantive  matters.  
There  will  be  regular  group  Mentor  meetings  that  all  Mentors  will  be  required  to  attend 
covering good practice issues, on-going peer support and information giving.  
 
Mentors  have,  by  definition,  experienced  problems  with  drugs.    Inclusion  recognises  that 
there  is  always  the  possibility  of  relapse  for  Mentors  during  their  placements.    Risks  that 
were  identified  during  the  initial  Mentor  recruitment  phase  will  be  monitored  regularly  in 
supervision.   Our main objective is to enable Mentors to remain engaged in their placement.  
However,  should  risk  levels  increase to a  point  where  it  is deemed  inappropriate  or unsafe 
for a placement to continue, the Mentor will be withdrawn and their own treatment package 
re-assessed.  Once stability returns the Mentor will be able to re-join the programme. 
 
• 
Enrolment on accredited learning package 
Mentors will be encouraged to enrol on an Open College Network (OCN) accredited learning 
package at Level 2/3 in Mentoring/Drug Treatment with support from an in-house Assessor.  
Inclusion’s experience is that Mentoring placements are all the more effective in the long 
term if learning is embedded through study, formally recognised and appropriately rewarded.   
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
 
• 
Successful completion of Recovery Mentor placement  
Once the Mentor placement has been completed the Mentor’s performance will be assessed 
by  the  named  Supervisor  and  the  Volunteer  Co-ordinator.    Successful  completion  of  the 
Mentor  placement  will  allow  the  Mentor  to  progress  to  wider  volunteering  roles  with  the 
Cambridgeshire service and lend weight to the individuals access to other ETE opportunities 
 
• 
Graduation Ceremonies & Trust Awards 
As  valued  members  of  services,  Inclusion  Recovery  Mentors  will  have  their  success 
recognised.  All Recovery Mentors successfully completing their placements will be invited to 
regular  graduation  ceremonies  held  at  locations  across  Cambridgeshire  to  receive  award 
certificates.  Staff, partner agencies and commissioners will all be able to attend graduations.  
Recovery  Mentors  will  also  be  considered  for  Trust  awards  along  side  paid  staff  and 
volunteers. 
 
30. Section 
Competencies and 
Please evidence what mechanisms are in place to 
11.0 
Training of staff (Social 
support the integration of social workers within the 
Sub heading 
Workers) 
service. 
11.1.2 a – i 
 
Weighting 3 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
500 words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  and  SSSFT  fully  support  the  secondment  of  Social  Work  staff  to  the  Adult  Drug 
Treatment  Service  from  Cambridgeshire  County  Council  (CCC’s)  Adult  Social  Care  Team.  
We support  the  concept  of  a  multi-disciplinary  approach  to  substance  misuse  services  and 
will  ensure  integration  mechanisms  for  Social Work  staff  are  agreed  and  actioned.    During 
implementation following contract award, Inclusions Implementation Manager will negotiate a 
secondment agreement with CCC and move to secure the secondment of 3 full-time Social 
Workers to be in place by contract start. 
 
SSSFT  has  previously  successfully  integrated  Social  Work  staff  into  mental  health  service 
provision  through  a  partnership  agreement  under  Section  75  of  the  NHS  Act 2006. This 
involved  the  TUPE  transfer  of  70  staff  and  the  subsequent  re-organisation  of  management 
structures  to  support  Social  Workers  and  social  care  staff  as  per  the  code  of  conduct  for 
employers  of  Social Workers  as  published by  the  General  Social  Care  Council.    As  part  of 
the management re-structuring SSSFT appointed a social care professional lead who sits on 
the  Foundation  Management  Team  (FMT)  and  who  plays  an  important  role  in  SSSFT’s 
governance  structures.    SSSFT  is  also  sponsoring  eligible  staff  on  the  Open  University 
Graduate  Social  Work  course,  and  with  the  appointment  of  a  Social  Work  Advanced 
Practitioner at Band 8a has established a clear career progression for social care and social 
work staff. 
 
To  ensure  that  seconded  Social  Workers  (SSW’s)  are  fully  integrated  in  Cambridgeshire 
Adult Drug Treatment Service Inclusion will: 
• 
Ensure  that  all  SSW’s  have  access  to  work  place  resources  including  keys, 
Information Technology, telecommunications, stationary and all other reasonable facilities to 
carry out their duties 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
• 
Ensure  that  all  SSW’s  are  given  adequate  inductions  in  respect  of  use  of  premises, 
on-site Health & Safety and operational policies & procedures.  Inclusion will ensure that all 
service related information sharing protocols include the role of all SSW’s. 
• 
Ensure  that  adequate  time  is  allowed  for  SSW’s  to  take  part  in  CCC’s  professional 
development,  supervision  processes  and  to  access  necessary  training  courses.    Inclusion 
will make SSSFT and other training course accessible by Cambridgeshire staff available to 
all SSW’s. 
• 
Ensure that all SSW’s are supported on a day to day basis by providing a named on-
site proxy Supervisor available for case discussions, advice and information.   
• 
Ensure  that  SSW’s  play  a  full  role  in  the  delivery  of  services  by  comprehensive 
provision of relevant information including role clarity and responsibilities, attendance at team 
meetings and involvement in service planning & development initiatives 
• 
Ensure that all staff working within Cambridgeshire Adult Drug Treatment Service are 
briefed by SSW’s regarding relevant legislation particularly in relation to the Community Care 
Act, Child & Adult Safeguarding and Human Rights.  We will provide opportunities for this at 
team meetings, through staff bulletins and through co-working of service users. 
• 
 
31. Section 
Policies, Protocols and 
Please provide copies of all policies, protocols and 
13.0 
Written Strategies 
strategies as set out in Section 13.0 a – c 
Sub heading a 
 
– c 
 
 
 
Weighting 5 
 
 
Contractors response: 
 
The following Policies and Procedures have been provided: 

Child protection 

Safeguarding 

CAF 

Complaints 

User involvement 

Information sharing 

Confidentiality 

Drugs and alcohol in the workplace 

Lone working 

Exclusions from the service 

Maximising access to underserved / socially excluded groups 

Social care 

LSCB 

Domestic Violence 

Dual Diagnosis 

Adult Safeguarding 
 
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
32. Section 
Policies, Protocols and 
Please describe what the Clinical Governance 
13.0 
Written Strategies 
arrangements will be for the service. 
Sub heading 
(Clinical Governance) 
13.1 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
2000 words 
Contractors response: 
Clinical  governance  is the  system  through  which  Inclusion  and  our  parent  body,  South 
Staffordshire  &  Shropshire  NHS  Foundation  Trust  (SSSFT)  is  accountable  for  continuously 
improving the quality of its services and safeguarding high standards of care, by creating an 
environment  in  which  clinical  excellence  will  flourish.  Inclusion  have  built  our  approach  to 
Clinical  Governance  on  the  Seven  Pillars  incorporated  in  Standards  for  Better  Health 
(Department of Health 2004 – Update 2006) 
1. 
Service user focus. 
2. 
Risk management/safety 
3. 
Clinical audit 
4. 
Staffing and management 
5. 
Education and training 
6. 
Clinical effectiveness 
7. 
Use of information 
 
Whilst  the  framework  for  clinical  governance  remains  in  place,  Standards  for  Better  Health 
has now been replaced by the essential standards of quality and safety set out by the Care 
Quality Commission (CQC).  These consist of 28 regulations (and associated outcomes) that 
are  set  out  in  two  pieces  of  legislation:  the  Health  and  Social  Care  Act  2008  (Regulated 
Activities)  Regulations  2010  and  the  Care  Quality  Commission  (Registration)  Regulations 
2009. 
 
As NHS providers we comply with the essential standards, which focus on the 16 regulations 
(out  of  the  28)  that  come  within  Part  4  of  the  Health  and  Social  Care  Act  2008  (Regulated 
Activities) Regulations 2010 – these are the ones that most directly relate to the quality and 
safety of care. We produce documented evidence that these outcomes are met.  This is co-
ordinated centrally at SSSFT and all Inclusion services must provide the required evidence 
of  compliance.    All  new  services  are  separately  registered  and  must  satisfy  the  CQC 
requirements for NHS trusts. 
 
Inclusion  recognises  that  clinical  governance  can  be  complex  in  drug  &  alcohol  treatment, 
crossing  over  as  it  does  the  fields  of  social  care  and  criminal  justice.  This  requires  a  clear 
understanding of partner agency roles and working arrangements based on mutually agreed 
protocols  that  are  bench  marked  against  national  standards  e.g.  CQC  standards,  NICE 
Guidelines. 
 
Good governance is based on a number of factors; the expertise of our staff, learning from 
past experience and new thinking, evidenced based practice; focus on service user’s needs, 
including  service  user’s  perspectives  and  robust  clinical  audit  to  constantly  monitor 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
effectiveness. 
 
Strong Service User Involvement Ethos 
A general overarching principle, enshrined in the Clinical Governance Pillars and guidance is 
that service users are involved and participate in services, which are provided for them. Our 
approach includes: 
 
•  Providing service information in an appropriate manner/format. 
•  Access  to  complaints  procedures  whilst  also  providing  full  support  throughout  the 
complaint process. 
•  Displaying a charter of service user rights and responsibilities. 
•  Full  involvement  with  recovery  planning,  ensuring  that  their  needs  are  represented, 
documented and that treatment outcome goals are mutually agreed. 
•  Periodical satisfaction surveys, with full feedback given of the results. 
•  Comments book, suggestion box and ‘your shout our shout board’, availability. 
•  Closely  working  with  service  user  groups  and  representatives,  including  BME/diverse 
groups. 
•  Regular service user meetings and events 
•  Direct involvement in recruiting staff, developing literature 
•  Direct involvement in the meeting cycle, with policy development and at strategic level. 
 
We have found that involving service users directly leads to fresh creative outcomes; we also 
know that it is essential to provide support, training and expenses to promote empowerment. 
We have developed a service user involvement strategy which provides the framework for all 
our services to maximise the engagement, involvement and utilisation of service users in the 
development and delivery of our services.   Feedback is essential even when the feedback is 
contrary  to  suggestions  made.  Involving  service  users  in  promoting  and  developing  good 
clinical governance within our services is about partnership’; to be meaningful and genuine 
the process must include negotiation and compromise.  
 
Inclusion takes sound governance in health promotion extremely seriously. Our client group 
can be high risk and include those living in poor environments, sex workers, poly drug users, 
the  street  homeless  and  recidivist  offenders  with  substance  misuse  problems.  Many  use 
excessive amounts of alcohol/drugs, often of poor quality due to adulteration. They engage 
daily  in  high  risk  behaviour,  which  can  lead  to  serious  infections,  illness  and  premature 
death.    Our  service  model  is  based  on  ‘recovery’  principles:  on  the  pathway  to 
recovery/abstinence we work to reduce the harm caused by problematic substance misuse 
to individuals and to communities. 
 
We  work  consistently  and  collaboratively  with  partners,  from  all  disciplines,  to  promote 
healthy  living  behaviour  to  reduce  the  spread  of  infection.  Through  our  health  promotion 
strategies we seek, not only to raise awareness of the negative consequences of substance 
misuse and how to minimise those consequences, but to also reduce the recruitment of new 
users. 
 
Sound  governance,  given  the  nature  of  our  work,  requires  being  ambitious  about  full 
involvement with local health promotion initiatives within our geographical areas of operation. 
Effective exchange of information is vital to highlight potential areas of concern and emerging 
difficulties.    By  appropriate  information  sharing,  we  will  make  a  valuable  contribution  by 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
bringing  our  specialist  knowledge  and  experience  to  planning  and  action  arrangements  to 
community based health promotion strategies. 
 
Clinical Effectiveness 
We  incorporate  NICE  Interventional  Procedures,  which  seek  to  standardise  good  practice 
and cost effectiveness, into our everyday practice simply as a matter of assuring we provide 
effective and safe evidence based interventions. This is not possible unless we are aware of 
NICE  guidance  and  procedures.  Similarly  medical  assessment,  prescribing  practice  and 
review is based on Drug Misuse and Dependence – Guidelines on Clinical management (DH 
2007) 
 
An  example  of  working  to  NICE  guidelines  is  that  their  research  clearly  shows  that 
Buprenorphine/methadone  treatment  is  best  delivered  when  supported  by  Psycho/social 
interventions  applied  at  the  same  time.  This  also  supports  the  reintegration  and  recovery 
agenda. 
 
NICE Technology Appraisals are based on sound evidence of the benefits of an intervention 
in the broadest sense. This includes the impact of interventions on a service user’s quality of 
life  and  on  specific  recommendations  for  defined  groups.  This  gives  us  confidence  in  the 
treatment we apply and methodology used. It is the basis of good governance. 
Line managers are tasked with keeping staff informed of existing and new national guidance 
by incorporating clinical briefings as a standard team meeting agenda item.  If new training is 
required,  we  incorporate  it  into  individual  staff  annual  appraisal  and  training  review.  We 
monitor  compliance  by  regular  supervision,  file  audit,  observed  practice  and  performance 
improvement plans for staff whose work falls below standards. 
 
We also ensure that our agency is compliant with good practice by regular review of policies 
and procedures, consistent with NTA and CQC guidance and recommendations.  
 
Service  managers  are  responsible  for  performance  improvement,  action  planning, 
implementing  and  monitoring  effectiveness  within  their  area  and  scope  of  responsibility. 
Compliance  is  reviewed  on  a  regular  basis  by  the  Community  Services  Manager  who  is 
Inclusion’s named Clinical Governance Lead who reports to the Director. 
 
Clinical Audit 
Reviewing  and  implementing  clinical  procedures  and  standards  consistent  with  the  Orange 
Book,  NICE  and  Public  Health  guidelines  is  a  vital  element  of  effective  service  delivery. 
Inclusion is required by the Trust to produce a forward programme of clinical audit activity at 
the start of each financial year. This is informed by requirements in relation to the National 
Service  Framework,  national  guidance,  risk  management  issues  and  learning  from 
complaints. 
 
All  clinical  and  non-clinical  staff  including  doctors  are  expected  to actively  participate.  Data 
collected  must  be  accurate  and  of  good  quality  to  inform  the  audit.    An  audit  has  no  real 
value  unless  the  findings  are  followed  through  with  improvements  made  and  sustained.  
Audit  results  are  shared  with  commissioners  and  partner  agencies  where  changes  made 
could impact on their areas of responsibility. 
 
Development of action plans to implement audit recommendations are drafted which states 
the: 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 

Desired action required 

Dates for individual strands to be completed 

Named person charged with responsibility 

Mode of reporting progress 

Evidence that demonstrates that change has been implemented 

Processes that need to be built in to sustain the audit recommendations. 

Overall target date for completion. 
 
The process is overseen by our Clinical Governance lead who reports to Inclusion’s Director 
and the Trust’s Clinical Audit Team. 
 
Changes  to  systems  and  practice  require  full  staff  participation.  Change  can  be  difficult  for 
some; we make every effort to retain motivation and fully share the audit findings. 
 
An  important  part  of  the  clinical  audit  cycle  is  to  ensure  that  the  learning  is  disseminated 
throughout our services and that service user opinion is sought about their perspective of the 
impact on their treatment. 
 
The  Care  Quality  Commission  (CQC)  requests  all  NHS  organisations  assess  their 
performance  against  the  Department  of  Health’s  28  Standards  and  to  declare  this 
information publicly. We are subject to CQC inspection, which is a further powerful measure 
to ensure good standards. 
 
Staff/Management/Education/Training 
Staff  are  the  most  important  resource  we  have:  all  strands  of  clinical  governance  are 
dependent  on  the  standard  of  staff  performance.    Supervision  is  the  tool  we  use  which 
ensures  performance  is  managed  effectively  on  a  day  to  day  basis  and  that  investment  in 
training results in consistent best practice.  We provide line management supervision, clinical 
supervision in groups or individually and professional supervision. 
 
Line  managers  have  responsibility  to  enable  staff  to  undertake  one  form  of  clinical 
supervision, which best suits their clinical development needs, and ensure protected time for 
them  to  attend.    Post  the  induction  period  for  new  employees  when  supervision  is  offered 
weekly  based  on  need,  line management  supervision  is  mandatory  and  on  a  strict monthly 
basis. 
 
Line management supervision is linked to the NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework annual 
performance appraisal and review. Performance appraisal reviews past activity; provides an 
opportunity to reflect on performance, identify areas for improvement, develop the next work 
plan  and  agree  training  needs  for  the  following  year.  Completion  of  training  requirements 
must be evidenced at monthly supervision. 
 
Incidents  of  poor  performance  are  subject  to  performance  management  with  clear  a  clear 
timed  plan  agreed  for  competency  to  be  achieved.  Additional  training  and  supervision  is 
offered. If improvement is not achieved redeployment or dismissal is initiated. 
 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
33. Sections 
Data Collection 
Please demonstrate how data monitoring requirements 
14.0 and 15.0 
Requirements/Monitoring 
will be met with consistent and robust data. 
 
and Review 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
1000 words 
Contractors response: 
As  a  current  provider  of  drug  services,  Inclusion  is  fully  compliant  with  the  monitoring 
requirements  as  laid  out  in  the  National  Drug  Treatment  Monitoring  System  (NDTMS).  Our 
services  are  fully  compliant  with  the  monthly  monitoring  requirements  TOP.    As  an 
organisation  we  fully  understand  the  importance  of  evidence  based  practice  supported  by 
strong performance management systems.  
 
Our community services currently use the HALO system. As well as being compliant with all 
national  monitoring  requirements  the  system  also  acts  as  a  client  casework  record.  The 
system is adaptable enough to provide the detailed reporting required by NDTMS as well as 
providing individual workers with reminders for TOP reviews and completions.  
 
Upon  contract  award  and  during  implementation,  prior  to  the  start  of  service  delivery, 
Inclusion  will  work  with  Cambridgeshire  commissioners,  the  HALO  system  provider  and 
SSSFT’s Health Informatics Service to ensure that the system as deployed locally meets all 
the reporting requirements set in the tender specification. Training would be provided to staff 
that  were  not  familiar  with  the  HALO  system  and  any  client  records  that  need  to  be 
transferred onto the system would be migrated or inputted as necessary. 
 
Inclusion  has  a  range  of  measures  to  ensure  the  accuracy  of  the  data.  Within  the  staffing 
structure we have included an administration staff with a Data Lead included. Their primary 
responsibility  will  be  to  ensure  that  the  client  records  are  up  to  date  and  that  the  data 
produced from these records is accurate. Inclusion has ensured that this type of post forms 
part  of  all  our  community  teams.  In  the  process  we  have  seen  both  the  quality  of  client 
records and the accuracy of performance management information improve. We would see 
this post as key within the proposed staffing structure. 
 
There are a  range  of other  methods that  we  will  have  in  place  to ensure  the  robustness  of 
data monitoring  and  reporting.  All  staff  will  be  provided  with  training  and  regular  refreshers 
on how to use the HALO system. The data output is only as good as the input and all staff 
will  need  to  be  competent  in  their  use  of  the  system.  The  data  lead  will  undertake  regular 
checks  of  client’s  records  to  ensure  that  they  are  up  to  date  and  accurate.  If  individual 
workers are struggling with the inputting; this will be raised with their line manager to discuss 
with them in supervision. If additional training is required then this will be provided. If the data 
inputting  does  not  improve  this  will  be  dealt  with  as  a  performance  issue  through  the 
performance management process. 
 
The  HALO  system  produces  the  data  for  the  monthly  returns  to  NDTMS.  These  will  be 
checked  by  the  data  lead  and  signed  off  by  the  service  manager  before  uploading.  TOP 
returns  will  be  collated  via  the  administration  team,  new  referrals  will  have  a  TOP  form 
completed at the assessment stage and HALO provides a reminder to workers when a TOP 
review  is  required.  HALO  will  not  allow  a  client  record  to  be  closed  unless  a  TOP  form  is 
completed.  
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
 
Data  accuracy  is  everybody’s  responsibility. Within  individual  line  management  supervision 
the quality of the electronic records and data recording will be discussed with each individual 
worker;  data  is  used  as  a  management  tool.  Performance  management  information  is  a 
standing  agenda  item  at  team  meetings  and  at  Inclusion  manager’s  meetings.  As  well  as 
reporting  against  the  targets  in  the  service  specification  and  against  NDTMS,  the 
Cambridgeshire service will also have to report to Inclusion senior managers.  
 
As  well  as  the  areas  laid  out  in  the  service  specification  there  are  a  number  of  additional 
areas that could be reported against. Below are some examples,  
 
•  The  geographical  area  of  referrals  based  on  postcode  –  This  would  help  to  identify 
areas  of  most  need  and  would  help  to  target  services  at  particular  hotspots  and 
diverse groups. 
•  Monitoring  by  GP  –  This  could  help  to  identify  areas  where  greater  GP  involvement 
would be useful. It could also be used to track referrals from individual surgeries 
•  Health  Carer  Reviews  –  One  of  the  outputs  identified  in  the  service  specification  is 
percentage of healthcare assessments completed. This could be expanded to include 
a review so a measure could be seen of general health care improvement 
•  Service  user  feedback  –  Regular,  formalised  service  user  feedback  could  also  be 
undertaken  to  establish  data  on  the  effectiveness  of  the  project  from  a  service  user 
perspective 
•  Number of re-referrals to the service – This data could help to establish the numbers 
that clients that are in a cycle of treatment, exit and referral. This information could be 
used to target specific interventions at this client group. 
 
Inclusion has a range of measures in place to ensure that the data provided is of the highest 
quality and meets national reporting requirements. We would also work closely with the local 
commissioners to develop data the meets the needs of this area. 
 
34. Part A 
Contract Documents 
Please demonstrate and detail how you will provide the 
Section 4 
Duration of this Contract 
service if there was a reduction in funding as stated in 
 
paragraph 3.2 in the Council’s Terms and Conditions. 
Paragraph 3.2 
 
Weighting 5 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
2000 words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion recognise that future levels of income are uncertain and that the service may have 
to  be  delivered  with  lower  levels  of  funding  in  future.    There  are  a  number  of  general 
principles that would define our approach to future funding cuts. 
 
Approach to managing a reduced budget 
• 
Inclusion would work with Cambridgeshire commissioners to identify where necessary 
cost savings could be made with as little impact upon service delivery as possible 
• 
Inclusion  would  seek  the  maximum  possible  notice  period  prior  to  a  budget  cut  to 
allow  for  reductions  in  the  level  of  service  and  any  associated  staff  redundancy  whilst 
maintaining continuity of care for service users 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
• 
Redundancies  proposed  due  to  budget  cuts  will  be  subject  to  statutory  consultation 
processes with all staff affected 
• 
If  significant  budget  cuts  were  likely  then  Inclusion  would,  in  consultation  with 
commissioners and service users, refine its accommodation portfolio.  This may involve the 
closure  of  one  or  more  service  sites  and  the  greater  use  of  available  space  in  community 
venues and primary care settings. 
• 
Wherever  possible,  Inclusion  would  seek  to  develop  the  ways  in  which  Recovery 
Mentors and volunteers are recruited and deployed across the service.  At the same time, we 
do  not  see  the  use  of  volunteers  as  a  straight  replacement for  paid  staff;  rather  volunteers 
augment the role of paid staff. 
• 
Our recovery-orientated approach to prescribing is expected to drive down associated 
costs over the life of the contract. 
• 
In  the  event  of  significant,  long  term  budget  cuts  Inclusion  would  expect  the  entire 
treatment service to be re-configured and we would play a full part in such a process. 
 

35. Section 3.0 
Provision of Service 
Please demonstrate how the service will review all 
Sub heading 
 
current clients at the time of handover. 
a – b 
 
Weighting 4 
 
Maximum 
word count of 
2000 words 
Contractors response: 
Inclusion  recognises  both  the  importance  and  significant  challenge  of  a  thorough-going 
review of all clients at the point of service handover.  As an agency familiar with transferring 
services  and  staff  into  the  organisation  following  a  successful  tender,  we  have  developed 
significant  experience  of  conducting  large-scale  caseload  reviews  over  relatively  short  time 
scales.    Given  the  clear  emphasis  upon  driving  forward  the  recovery  agenda  in  the 
Cambridgeshire  service  specification,  a  service-wide  review  of  clients  is  in  all  likelihood 
entirely necessary. 
 
To undertake and complete a review of all clients Inclusion will adopt the following approach: 
• 
Following  contract  award,  Inclusion  will  agree  an  implementation  communications 
strategy  for  Cambridgeshire.   The  strategy  will  be  aimed at  a broad  range  of  stakeholders, 
not  least  service  users.    We  will  seek  to  provide  service  users  with  accurate  and  timely 
information relating to the impending change of service provider together with details such as 
any changes to service locations or opening times.  Our priority here will be to ensure that 
service users do not suffer any undue anxiety or concerns regarding the change of service 
provider  and  to  make  clear  the  message  that  any  changes  will  be  communicated  in  good 
time. 
• 
Prior  to  contract  start,  through  negotiation  with  Addaction  and  Phoenix  Futures, 
agreement will be reached to transfer all client case files and electronic data records.  This 
will include securing individual consent from all clients to appropriate information sharing.  In 
our experience client consent is best secured by existing service staff in the run up to service 
transfer; as such we will negotiate with the existing service providers to allow this to happen.  
Consent  forms  will  be  produced  detailing  what  information  will  be  shared  and  it  is  our 
expectation  that  each  worker  will  raise  the  issue  in  scheduled  key  working  sessions  in  the 
weeks prior to transfer. 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
• 
Once  consent  is  secured  and  the  date  of  transfer  approaches,  Inclusion’s 
Implementation Manager will negotiate with the existing service providers for case files to be 
physically  moved  as  necessary.    This  should  cause  minimal  disruption  as  Inclusion’s 
accommodation  strategy,  explained  in  method  statement  8,  is  to  assume  responsibility  for 
the  existing  premises  portfolio  across  the  county.    In  the  event  that  one  or  more  service 
locations  do  change,  then  the  Implementation  Manager  will  arrange  for  appropriate  and 
secure transfer of case files immediately prior to handover. 
• 
It  is  of  importance  to  note  that  service  continuity  is  the  absolute  at  the  time  of 
handover.  In the weeks prior to handover, Inclusion will work with Addaction to ensure that 
continuity  of  care  and  prescribing  has  been  thought  through  to  cause  as  little  disruption  to 
service users on the first day of the new service – April 2nd 2012.  (Staff transfers will take 
effect  from  April  1st  for  employment  purposes).    This  in  of  itself  will  require  excellent 
organisation and planning, with the added challenge of Easter Bank Holidays at the end of 
the first week of service delivery. 
• 
Once  the  transfer  to  Inclusion  as  the  new  service  provide  has  taken  place,  we  will 
initiate the process of a full caseload review.  It is our intention, due to the large number of 
clients  transferring,  to  establish  three  small  working  groups  to  drive  the  caseload  review.  
These  will  be  lead  by  Ian  Merrill,  Inclusion’s  Implementation  Manager,  Jim  Barnard, 
Inclusion’s  Community  Services  Lead  and  Catherine  Larkin,  Inclusion’s  lead  Nurse 
Prescriber.    Each  team  will  comprise  two  other  members  of  staff,  drawn  from  those 
transferring  from  Addaction  or  Phoenix  Futures.    Ideally  this  will  be  a  Team  Leader  or 
another  member  of  staff  with  supervisory  responsibility  as  well  as  an  experienced 
practitioner.  With this range of staff skills and experience we can expedite the case review 
as  efficiently  as  possible  whilst  at  the  same  time,  familiarise  newly  transferred  staff  with 
Inclusion’s working practices and culture. 
• 
A full caseload review across all services in Cambridgeshire will be a significant task.  
Inclusion  is  confident  the  review  can  be  completed  in  its  entirety  in  the  first  8  weeks  of 
service delivery.  We will update commissioners weekly as to the progress of the review as 
well as outlining any significant findings or concerns. 
• 
In carrying out a full caseload review of all clients, we will have in mind the following 
principles: 
o Is the service user being seen by the correct service? 
o Is  a  harm  minimisation  approach  balanced  with  interventions  that  are  recovery-
orientated? 
o Are interventions being delivered safely? 
o Are risks understood and appropriately managed? 
o Are organisational policies and procedures being followed? 
o Can the client move to nurse-led prescribing? 
o Are interventions for Criminal Justice System clients aimed at reducing re-offending? 
o Are  the  client’s  mental  health  needs  being  met  and  is  Care  Co-ordination  sitting  with 
the correct agency 
o Is current prescribing in line with clinical guidelines 
o Are  care  plan  goals  co-opting  the  support  of  external  agencies  with  an  interest  in 
recovery and re-integration? 
 
In addition the caseload review will offer insights as to: 
o The size and complexity of practitioner caseloads 
o Necessary changes to case allocation procedures  
o Gaps in practitioner skills and knowledge 
o Subsequent training requirements of the staff team 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
 
• 
Inclusion has developed a caseload review tool that will be utilised in Cambridgeshire.  
The  tool  enables  review  teams  to  examine  each  client’s  treatment  by  focussing  on  the 
following processes and areas of intervention: 
o  Complete and up-to-date demographic and contact details  
o  Details of referring agency and feedback given 
o  Easily identifiable case chronology and significant events log 
o  Harm minimisation checklist is completed 
o  Completed assessment  
o  Completed  risk  assessment  and  associated  risk  management  plan  highlighting 
issues such as polydrug use, BBV’s, chronic alcohol use, IV drug use etc. 
o  Initial care plan with evidence of client receiving copy 
o  Comprehensive care plan with evidence of client receiving copy 
o  SMART care plan goals recorded with evidence of progress 
o  Evidence of confidentiality agreement and sign consent to share form 
o  TOP forms completed in line with case progress 
o  Safeguarding issues highlighted and action as necessary 
o  Case conference meetings minuted if relevant 
o  Evidence of re-engagement strategy in the event that client drops out of treatment 
o  Evidence of any outreach carried out 
o  NDTMS forms in files as appropriate 
o  Evidence of the use of node link maps 
o  Drug testing results available 
o  External agency referrals recorded. 
o  Easily identifiable, legible and succinct case notes. 
 
Inclusion’s maxims in relation to case file recording are simple but effective: 
(1)  ‘If it isn’t recorded in the file, it didn’t happen’.   
(2)  ‘If a member of staff falls sick, they should be confidant that a colleague could pick up 
the case that day and the client be unhindered in their recovery due to the inadequate 
state of the their file’. 
 
By  looking  at  all  of  these  features,  the  review  teams  will  be  able  to  develop  an  excellent 
understanding of each case and any outstanding actions that are necessary.  Given the size 
of  the  caseload  we  will  inherit  and  the  complexity  of  some  service  users,  it  is  also  our 
intention  to  categorise  each  case  where  there  are  significant  risks  using  a  simple 
red:amber:green rating system.  This will enable the review teams to prioritise what happens 
next in each case.  The rating system is based upon: 
 
Red: 
These are likely to be service users who need input at least on a weekly basis.  For example 
service  users  with  unstable  mental  health  needs  that  are  not  being  comprehensively 
managed by Mental Health services or where the involvement of a number of other agencies 
is in place so that significant case management and care co-ordination is required.  This may 
include  pressing  child  protection  issues.  Where  risk  assessment  indicates  that  the  service 
user has a high likelihood of needing such co-ordinated support in the near future. 
 
Amber: 
Service users who require input at least fortnightly.  Needs which are moderate such as an 
ongoing  mental  health  problem  which  is  reasonably  stable  but  without  significant  support 
 

FOI 1719 APP3 – March 2012 
from other agencies.  Ongoing housing needs which require advocacy from drug services or 
child care issues involving liaison with child care agencies.  The risk of these service users 
needing more intensive support in the foreseeable future should be medium or low.   
 
Green: 
Service  users  who  only  require  monthly  input  and  who  have  a  low  risk  of  needing  more 
intensive  support.    They  may  have  mental  health  needs  but  these  will  either  be  stable  or 
adequately  managed  by  another  agency.    However  service  users  in  this  group  will  need 
targeting  with  more  input  to  facilitate  recovery  and  may  need  transferring  to  red  status  to 
support this. 
 
Following  completion  of  the  full  caseload  review  the  findings  will  be  collated  and  made 
available to: 
• 
Staff  teams  in  the  form  of  aggregated  feedback  and  observations  relating  to  current 
practice 
• 
Staff  in  supervisory  positions  to  inform  supervision  agenda  and  objective  setting  for 
individual practitioners 
• 
SSSFT  Learning  &  Development  and  Cambridgeshire  Managers  to  inform  training 
needs analysis and delivery of training plans. 
• 
Commissioners in the form of summary report, findings and recommendations. 
• 
Service  User  representation  in  the  form  of  summary  report,  findings  and 
recommendations