Recently Issued Marriage Certificate-

Syed Faghurudeen made this Rhyddid Gwybodaeth request to Home Office

This request has been closed to new correspondence from the public body. Contact us if you think it ought be re-opened.

Yn disgwyl am adolygiad mewnol gan Home Office o'u triniaeth o'r cais hwn.

Syed Faghurudeen

Dear Home Office,

Could you please let me know that a marriage certificate registered immediately after the marriage in 1950 but the certificate was issued very recently in 2016.is it acceptable for Nationality Purpose? or

if a marriage was not registered.is it compulsory to make to declaration by witnesses to validate marriage?

Yours faithfully,

Syed Faghurudeen

Syed Faghurudeen

Dear Home Office,
I humbly request to please reply to my foi request
sir/madam.

Yours faithfully,

Syed Faghurudeen

Further Nationality Enquiries, Home Office

Dear Syed Faghurudeen,

Thank you for the email and I apologise for the delay in responding.

We can't really answer this query as there is no context to the questions. It would depend on what type of application you were considering making. However, we also really can't provide too much advice and guidance to prospective applicants because the onus is on the applicant to ensure they meet the requirements of the application that they are making.

UKVI decide these applications so we are the neutral party in this so to speak that's why applicants often seek legal advice as a solicitor acts for them and advises them as to the best course of action.

Regards

M Goode
Central Correspondence team
Customer Service Operations
UK Visas and Immigration
www.gov.uk/ukvi

We would like to hear about your experience and invite you to spend a few moments completing this customer satisfaction survey:
www.homeofficesurveys.homeoffice.gov.uk/...

dangos adrannau a ddyfynnir

Syed Faghurudeen

Dear Further Nationality Enquiries,

Thank you for your kind reply.

I herewith submit below the context to the information:

1.Could you please clarify that the parent’s marriage certificate was obtained from the authority concerned recently but registered immediately on the same day of marriage event. whether this marriage is acceptable as per the Said UKVI policy guide instructions in this regards reads as “The applicant who claim they are unable to provide a marriage certificate from overseas must be advised to contact the embassy or High Commission for the country concerned for help In obtaining a certificate copy of the Marriage from the official record in the country concerned.”

2.Could you please clarify as per UKVI guidance stated below:

Evidence of Marriage or Civil Partnerships
26. Marriages, civil partnerships or evidence of divorce or dissolution from outside the UK must be evidenced by a reasonable equivalent to the evidence detailed in paragraphs 22 to 25, valid under the law in force in the relevant country.

3.Full birth certificates policy - marriage certificates
Applicants who claim they are unable to provide a marriage certificate from overseas must be advised to contact the Embassy or High Commission for the country concerned for help in obtaining a certified copy of the marriage from the official record in the country concerned.

Where the authorities in the country concerned have been unable to trace a record of the marriage, or there are doubts about the authenticity of the marriage certificate produced. Please see Statutory Declarations.

Could you please clarify me how the statutory Declaration will be made?is it acceptable for nationality purpose as per the UVKI guidance?

I hope your kind reply sir/Madam.

Yours sincerely,

Syed Faghurudeen

Further Nationality Enquiries, Home Office

Dear Syed Faghurudeen,

Thank you for the email.

One of our case workers would like to see your original request and the attached documents so can you please resubmit them and we will aim to respond ASAP.

Regards

M Goode
Central Correspondence team
Customer Service Operations
UK Visas and Immigration
www.gov.uk/ukvi

We would like to hear about your experience and invite you to spend a few moments completing this customer satisfaction survey:
www.homeofficesurveys.homeoffice.gov.uk/...

From: Syed Faghurudeen [mailto:[FOI #352385 email]]
Sent: 26 September 2016 18:36
To: Further Nationality Enquiries
Subject: Re: FW: Freedom of Information request - Recently Issued Marriage Certificate-

Dear Further Nationality Enquiries,

Thank you for your kind reply.

I herewith submit below the context to the information:

1.Could you please clarify that the parent’s marriage certificate was obtained from the authority concerned recently but registered immediately on the same day of marriage event. whether this marriage is acceptable as per the Said UKVI policy guide instructions in this regards reads as “The applicant who claim they are unable to provide a marriage certificate from overseas must be advised to contact the embassy or High Commission for the country concerned for help In obtaining a certificate copy of the Marriage from the official record in the country concerned.”

The secretary of state requires original and contemporaneous evidence of a claimed event. So, the event needs to be registered no later than one year after the event took place and the certificate should be issued in the same timeframe, or in accordance with the registration requirements in the country in which that event took place. For example, in the UK a birth has to be registered within 42 days.

2.Could you please clarify as per UKVI guidance stated below:

Evidence of Marriage or Civil Partnerships 26. Marriages, civil partnerships or evidence of divorce or dissolution from outside the UK must be evidenced by a reasonable equivalent to the evidence detailed in paragraphs 22 to 25, valid under the law in force in the relevant country.

3.Full birth certificates policy - marriage certificates Applicants who claim they are unable to provide a marriage certificate from overseas must be advised to contact the Embassy or High Commission for the country concerned for help in obtaining a certified copy of the marriage from the official record in the country concerned.

Where the authorities in the country concerned have been unable to trace a record of the marriage, or there are doubts about the authenticity of the marriage certificate produced. Please see Statutory Declarations.

Could you please clarify me how the statutory Declaration will be made?is it acceptable for nationality purpose as per the UVKI guidance?

I hope your kind reply sir/Madam.

Yours sincerely,

Syed Faghurudeen

dangos adrannau a ddyfynnir

Dear Further Nationality Enquiries,

I herewith pasted my original request for your kind information sir/madam:

Syed Faghurudeen 26 September 2016
Delivered
Dear Further Nationality Enquiries,
Thank you for your kind reply.
I herewith submit below the context to the information:
1.Could you please clarify that the parent’s marriage certificate was obtained from the authority concerned recently but registered immediately on the same day of marriage event. whether this marriage is acceptable as per the Said UKVI policy guide instructions in this regards reads as “The applicant who claim they are unable to provide a marriage certificate from overseas must be advised to contact the embassy or High Commission for the country concerned for help In obtaining a certificate copy of the Marriage from the official record in the country concerned.”
2.Could you please clarify as per UKVI guidance stated below:
Evidence of Marriage or Civil Partnerships
26. Marriages, civil partnerships or evidence of divorce or dissolution from outside the UK must be evidenced by a reasonable equivalent to the evidence detailed in paragraphs 22 to 25, valid under the law in force in the relevant country.
3.Full birth certificates policy - marriage certificates
Applicants who claim they are unable to provide a marriage certificate from overseas must be advised to contact the Embassy or High Commission for the country concerned for help in obtaining a certified copy of the marriage from the official record in the country concerned.
Where the authorities in the country concerned have been unable to trace a record of the marriage, or there are doubts about the authenticity of the marriage certificate produced. Please see Statutory Declarations.
Could you please clarify me how the statutory Declaration will be made?is it acceptable for nationality purpose as per the UVKI guidance?
I hope your kind reply sir/Madam.
Yours sincerely,
Syed Faghurudeen

Attached Documents herewith pasted:

Copied From:https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/sy...

1. Birth Certificates(UKVI Policy)

Obtaining copies of birth certificates for persons born overseas

Applicants born overseas who do not submit a birth certificate should be advised to seek to obtain a copy of their birth certificate from either the local Registrar's Office in the country of birth, or through the relevant Embassy or High Commission Office.

Certificate of registry of birth

A certificate of registry of birth is unsuitable for passport purposes if the name of the child to whom it refers is not recorded. In such cases the applicant should be advised to obtain a new birth certificate.

Birth not registered

Where an applicant is unable to provide a birth certificate and there is a plausible explanation, discretion may be used in accepting other documents providing birth details.

This discretion should be exercised carefully and account taken on the overall 'feeling' of the application. Acceptable
documents for this purpose may be:

a baptismal certificate (provided the baptism took place in early childhood)

a letter from the applicant's doctor at the time of birth or the first/primary school attended, which provides confirmation of identity; AND,

a letter from the GRO stating there is no trace of the birth having been registered together with evidence that the birth was likely to be in the United Kingdom.

The principle aim is for the applicant to produce some document as near as possible to the date of birth indicating that birth was likely to have been in the United Kingdom.

If the applicant is unable to produce any of the above (for example the parents were "travellers" during the applicant's childhood) this would not necessarily preclude the issue of a passport. On an exceptional basis, applications may
be considered provided they are accompanied by a Statutory Declaration which has been made by either the applicant or by someone who has personal knowledge of the circumstances surrounding the applicant's birth. In the latter case, it can be expected the person making the declaration should have been old enough at the time of the birth to realise what was happening, have a reasonably reliable memory, and there is no reason to believe they will be untruthful.

It is usual for such declarations to be made by older members of the family and this is acceptable to the Identity and Passport Service (IPS). If the declaration has, however, been made by the applicant, it needs to be supported by other documentation such as a medical card, driving licence, Social Security papers or any educational diplomas/certificates which would help to verify identity.

A letter from the GRO stating there is no trace of the birth having been registered is required in all cases where the applicant claims their birth has not been registered.

Full birth certificates policy - marriage certificates
Applicants who claim they are unable to provide a marriage certificate from overseas must be advised to contact the Embassy or High Commission for the country concerned for help in obtaining a certified copy of the marriage from the official record in the country concerned.

Where the authorities in the country concerned have been unable to trace a record of the marriage, or there are doubts about the authenticity of the marriage certificate produced. Please see Statutory Declarations.

2.UKVI Policy Notes:

[email address] wrote:
A recently issued official copy of a record of registration of an event will be taken into consideration if the event was registered with relevant authorities around the time of the event. However where an applicant is only able to provide recently-obtained copies (rather than those issued at the time of the event), we would expect to be provided with alternative contemporaneous evidence in support of the applicant’s claim. Furthermore, in such cases, full enquiries are made to establish the identity of the person presenting recently-issued documents to ensure that they relate to the applicant when a passport application is made.
Regards
Mr J P Worsley
Home Office A04
UK Visas & Immigration
North West Responder Hub

Nationality status JUNE 2014

The evidence must be original and date from around the time that the events to which it relates took place.For example,birth many years ago should be evidenced using documents that existed around that time.Documents such as certificates of birth registered within a short time after the birth took place will be accepted. So too will baptism or school certificates issued reasonably near the time of birth.

Birth not registered
Where an applicant is unable to provide a birth certificate and there is a plausible explanation, discretion may be used in accepting other documents providing birth details.
This discretion should be exercised carefully and account taken on the overall 'feeling'of the application. Acceptable documents for this purpose may be:
•a letter from the applicant's doctor at the time of birth or the first/primary school attended, which provides confirmation of identity;

3.Birth certificates
Birth certificates from abroad
If you were born abroad, the birth may also have been registered in the UK. If so, a copy of the certificate can be obtained in the usual way - see above.
If the birth has not been registered in the UK, you may be able to get a copy of the birth certificate from the country where you were born. This can be done by contacting the relevant embassy in the UK.
If you are unable to obtain a copy of your birth certificate from abroad, the Local Document Searches of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office may be able to help. A fee is charged. The address is:-
Local Document Searches
Consular Directorate
Rm K4.4.9
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
King Charles Street
London
SW1A 2AH
Website: www.fco.gov.uk
If you were baptised in the Indian sub-continent before 1947 you should check with the India Office Records at:-
Asia, Pacific and Africa Collections enquiries
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London
NW1 2DB
Tel: 020 7412 7873
Fax: 020 7412 7641
E-mail: [email address]
Website: www.bl.uk

UKVI Full Policy:
Birth Certificates
Introduction
Obtaining copies of birth certificates for persons born overseas
Replacing lost birth certificates
Copies of birth certificates held at British Consulates
Adoption certificates
Certificate of registry of birth
Persons born at sea or on aircraft
Birth not registered
Late registration of births
Re-registration of births
Obtaining birth details from the Ministry of Defence
Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages (Scotland) Act 1965
Registration of Overseas Births and Deaths Regulations 1982
Registration of births in Commonwealth Countries
Baptismal certificates issued in Quebec
Certification of birth (baptism) in former British India
United States adoption and birth certificates
Full Birth Certificates Introduction
Summary
Background
Process
Details shown on a full birth certificate
Confirming parental responsibility using a FBC
Confirming national status using a FBC
Full birth certificate policy - marriage certificates
Documents needed to establish a first time claim for those born in the UK
Parent’s passport not on the system
Parent’s names differ to that on birth certificate
Divorce documents
DNA testing
Place of birth
Introduction
A birth certificate is required, for passport purposes, as evidence of a person's name, date and place of birth. A full birth certificate is normally required for applicants:
• Born outside the United Kingdom.
• Born in the United Kingdom after 31 December 1982
Copies of certificates for applicants born in England and Wales can be obtained from the Superintendent Registrar of the district in which the individual was born, or from the Office of National Statistics, Southport. For applicants born in Scotland, Northern Ireland, or the Irish Republic copies of certificates can be obtained from the local Registrar for the district in which the birth was registered or from the office of the relevant Registrar General.
If an applicant requests the return of any of the documents before issue, examiners may do this on a case by case basis, but should consider potential courses of action for the application as a whole before returning such documents. This will ensure that examiners have the chance to refer the case if there are any issues before considering the return of the document. A case note should also be completed when any requests or actions are carried out and a signed statement requesting the return of the document received and scanned.
For births in the UK after 31.12.82 and before 01.07.06 where the claim is through the father, the parents' marriage certificate must also be produced. See Full Birth Certificate Policy.
Obtaining copies of birth certificates for persons born overseas
Applicants born overseas who do not submit a birth certificate should be advised to seek to obtain a copy of their birth certificate from either the local Registrar's Office in the country of birth, or through the relevant Embassy or High Commission Office.
Replacing lost birth certificates
Requests for the replacement of birth certificates lost within the Passport Office or in the post when being returned to the applicant should be made by the Customer Services Team in line with the process set out on the page Documents Lost or Damaged.
Copies of birth certificates held at British Consulates
A certified copy of an entry in a Register of Births held at a British Consulate may be accepted as evidence of British Nationality. No other form or certificate of birth may be accepted as evidence of British Nationality for applicants born outside Her Majesty's Dominions unless it is supported by evidence of British nationality of the parent from whom British nationality was derived and that the applicant was born by legitimate descent if the claim is through the father.
Copies of entries of birth overseas made in the British Army and Air Force registers and in the Foreign Register of Births at Edinburgh should not be accepted as establishing anything other than the place and date of birth and particulars of parentage.
Adoption certificates
Adoption certificates for those who were adopted in England and Wales can be obtained from the Adopted Children Register at the Office of National Statistics.
A certified copy of an entry in the Adopted Children Register for an applicant adopted by an order made before 1 January 1950 may be accepted as evidence of British Subject status at the time of adoption. Adoption Certificates or Adoption Orders issued on or after that date should not be accepted as evidence of British Nationality unless it is clear from the documentation that the applicant was a British Subject or British Citizen before adoption.
A short adoption certificate in respect of an applicant who was the subject of an adoption order before 1 April 1959 will show the country of birth only. After that date an adoption certificate will show the district and sub-district of birth of an adopted child; if not, the application should be referred to a line manager.
Certificate of registry of birth
A certificate of registry of birth is unsuitable for passport purposes if the name of the child to whom it refers is not recorded. In such cases the applicant should be advised to obtain a new birth certificate.
Persons born at sea and on aircraft
Before 1 January 1983, birth aboard a British ship or aircraft registered in the United Kingdom or a Dependent Territory conferred British Nationality. Under the provisions of the British Nationality Act 1981 British Citizenship or British Dependent Territories Citizenship is not automatically acquired simply by birth on a United Kingdom or Dependent Territory registered ship or aircraft. A person can be deemed to have been born in the United Kingdom only if either the mother or father was a British Citizen at the time of the birth, and the aircraft or ship (including hovercraft) was registered in the United Kingdom.
NOTE: This also applies to a person born on an unregistered ship or aircraft belonging to the United Kingdom government.
Any applicant born on a British registered ship or hovercraft should be advised that birth certificates and copies may be obtained from the Marine section of the Department of Transport.
For those born on British registered aircraft, the birth is registered in the normal way at Registry Offices in the United Kingdom.
NOTE: An applicant born after 1 January 1983 on an aircraft, ship, or hovercraft registered overseas would not have a claim to British citizenship unless either of the parents were British citizens at the time of the birth. If this applied the individual would have a claim to British citizenship by descent.
When people gain status in this way, the correct procedure is to show their place of birth as ‘’AT SEA’’ and the Country of birth as ‘’UK’’.
Birth not registered
Where an applicant is unable to provide a birth certificate and there is a plausible explanation, discretion may be used in accepting other documents providing birth details. This discretion should be exercised carefully and account taken on the overall 'feeling' of the application. Acceptable documents for this purpose may be:
• a baptismal certificate (provided the baptism took place in early childhood)
• a letter from the applicant's doctor at the time of birth or the first/primary school attended, which provides confirmation of identity; AND,
• a letter from the GRO stating there is no trace of the birth having been registered together with evidence that the birth was likely to be in the United Kingdom.
The principle aim is for the applicant to produce some document as near as possible to the date of birth indicating that birth was likely to have been in the United Kingdom.
If the applicant is unable to produce any of the above (for example the parents were "travellers" during the applicant's childhood) this would not necessarily preclude the issue of a passport. On an exceptional basis, applications may be considered provided they are accompanied by a Statutory Declaration which has been made by either the applicant or by someone who has personal knowledge of the circumstances surrounding the applicant's birth. In the latter case, it can be expected the person making the declaration should have been old enough at the time of the birth to realise what was happening, have a reasonably reliable memory, and there is no reason to believe they will be untruthful.
It is usual for such declarations to be made by older members of the family and this is acceptable to the Identity and Passport Service (IPS). If the declaration has, however, been made by the applicant, it needs to be supported by other documentation such as a medical card, driving licence, Social Security papers or any educational diplomas/certificates which would help to verify identity.
A letter from the GRO stating there is no trace of the birth having been registered is required in all cases where the applicant claims their birth has not been registered.
Late registration of births
Under the provisions of section 17 of the 1965 Act a birth cannot be registered more than three months from the date of birth of the child without the Registrar General’s authority.
A birth may be registered more than one year after the event if the Registrar General is satisfied by documentary evidence of the precise date and place of birth.
Re-registration of births
In some circumstances a child’s name can be changed by re-registering the birth. No other evidence of change of name is needed in such cases.
The General Register Office (GRO) has confirmed that there are no time limits for re-registration of births and upon re-registration the name can be changed. Re-registration can usually take place under one of the following criteria:
• To include natural father’s details
• Where the natural parents subsequently marry each other
England, Wales and Northern Ireland
Where the parents have not married each other and the mother initially registers the birth without any father’s particulars, both parents can then apply to re-register the birth to include his details at a later date. This would take place under section 10a of the Births and Deaths Registration Act 1953. A change of surname for the child in the new registration is possible if both parents agree. If the child is aged 16 or over, the child’s agreement is also necessary. GRO would also make further enquiries to ascertain whether any court order is in existence to prohibit a change of surname.
If the parents are not married to each other, the birth may initially be registered either by the mother alone or on the joint information of both parents. Upon their marriage the parents should apply to re-register the birth to show the child as a child of their marriage. This would take place under section 14 of the Births and Deaths Registration Act 1953. Re-registration of a birth upon the parents' marriage has been possible in England and Wales since 1927. GRO would also make further enquiries to ascertain whether any court order preventing any change to the child’s surname, otherwise the conditions are as set out in the above paragraph. Examiners should be aware that it is the subsequent marriage of the parents that legitimates the birth and not the re-registration itself.
The legal advisors team for GRO have stated that the child’s surname may only be changed to:
1) The father’s surname
2) The mother’s surname
3) A combination of the two
4) The mother’s maiden surname or,
A relevant surname where the parents follow a different cultural custom
On occasions a re-registration will be offered when the incorrect father has been initially registered as father. If it is then proven to the Registrar General’s satisfaction that that man is not the natural father, a correction is then made to the birth entry to effectively remove his details. Following this, the way is then clear for the mother and the natural father to apply to re-register the birth to include his details as father.
In all cases when a re-registration has been effected the words “On the authority of the Registrar General” are displayed after the date of registration on the full birth certificate.
Scotland
In Scotland re-registration takes place under section 20 of the Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriage (Scotland) Act 1965. When a birth is re-registered in Scotland the GRO will allow the child’s surname to be changed
to that of the father, the mother’s maiden name to be included as a forename, or both parents’ surnames to be given as the new surname. Also where the father’s surname was given as a forename at the time of initial registration it can be omitted if the child is being given the father’s surname at re-registration.
Any birth certificate issued subsequent to the recording of a change of name will show the new and original names.
In these cases the old name will be crossed out and the new name will be shown as either a marginal note or at the bottom of the new certificate. A person may change their name more than once, each time the old name will be crossed out and the new name included as described above.
Obtaining birth details from the Ministry of Defence
Where an applicant's birth was registered on a Forces birth certificate while the father was serving overseas, a copy of the father's birth certificate and the parents' marriage certificate is required to confirm a claim to British citizenship through the father's birth in the United Kingdom.
Where the applicant’s father was in HM Forces at the time of their birth overseas, but the applicant is unable to obtain the necessary birth and/or marriage certificates, consideration may be given to accepting alternative evidence in the form of British Army Records. Each application should be treated on its merits and the reason the documents are unavailable considered.
If the father was serving in the Royal Air Force, at the time of the applicant's birth overseas, the applicant should be advised that confirmation of the father's birth and parents' marriage details can be obtained from Department PMSN 4A2B, RAF Innsworth, Gloucestershire. Where the father was serving in the Army the records at the Ministry of Defence, Government Buildings, Bourne Avenue, Hayes, Middlesex, UB3 1RF may be of assistance in providing evidence of nationality.
NOTE: When making a request to check service records the applicant's full name, father's full name and details of where he enlisted must be provided to the records office. Other details such as service number, regiment, rank on discharge, and final year of discharge is helpful.
Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages (Scotland) Act 1965
This Act applies to those born or adopted in Scotland only, and provides for the correction of clerical errors, and for any name changes (both surnames and forenames) from 05 August 1965. When a birth certificate is issued in a new name it also records the old name (the new name will be shown at the top and the original name at the bottom of the document).
The certificate showing both names is acceptable for passport purposes as evidence of change of name.
Registration of Overseas Births and Deaths Regulations 1982
The 1982 Births and Deaths Regulations which came into effect on 1 January 1983, provides for the registration of births at British Consulates and High Commissions of children who are British Citizens, British Dependent Territories Citizens, and British Overseas Citizens. Birth certificates issued under these regulations are accepted as evidence of a holder's claim to citizenship.
NOTE: Registration under the Regulations is not undertaken in: Ascension Islands, Canada, Bermuda, Australia, Cayman Islands, Christmas Islands, Falkland Islands, Nevis, New Zealand, Zimbabwe, Nauru, St Helena, South Africa, Turks and Caicos, Virgin Islands, and the Republic of Ireland.
Registration of births in Commonwealth Countries
The Registration of Births and Deaths (High Commission) Regulations 1964 provided for the registration of births of persons of the second generation born in a Protected State where there was no jurisdiction over British Subjects at the time. Certificates were issued by High Commission Offices and, while they do not prove British nationality, if a certificate gives details of a valid claim to citizenship, this can be accepted for passport purposes.
An applicant whose parents have not been married to one another will be indicated by the absence of the father's surname on the certificate or by the signature of the two parents. In such cases the applicant should be referred to the Nationality Group for advice on the possibility of obtaining British citizenship.
Baptismal certificates issued in Quebec
A Baptismal certificate issued by the Province of Quebec which give full details of the applicant's birth may be accepted in lieu of a birth certificate.
Certification of birth (baptism) in former British India
Applicants should be advised that copies of the above certificates, or photocopies of original entries, can be obtained from the Oriental and India Office. These are acceptable in lieu of certificates of civil registration.
India Records Office The British Library Asia Pacific& Africa Collections 96 Euston Road
London NW1 2DB
United States adoption and birth certificates
A recent case was highlighted where there was a United States "birth certificate" that did not indicate the child was adopted.
Staff dealing with such certificates should:
• Compare the date the birth certificate was issued to that of the child’s date of birth.
• If there are discrepancies between these dates of 3 months or more discreet enquiries should be made to the person making the application to explain the discrepancy between these dates.
All cases of doubt should be referred to an HEO or above for a decision to be made or for consultation with a member of HQ Policy Team.
Full Birth Certificates Introduction
(Born in the UK)
This document details the Full Birth Certificate policy.
The aim of this policy is to set out the requirements for the documents needed by applicants born in the UK on or after 1 January 1983 who are applying for a passport for the first time. It is not intended to provide guidance on the authenticity of documents submitted.
For the Identity and Passport Service (IPS) purposes, to ensure consistency with Registration Services and General Registrars Office (GRO), and for clarity to the customer, the Long Birth Certificate will be referred to as a Full Birth Certificate (FBC). Letter texts have been updated to reflect the change.
Summary
All applications for a first passport for a person born on or after 1.1.83 must be submitted with a full birth (FBC) or adoption (FAC) certificate together with documentary evidence of their claim to British nationality. Section 4 of the application form must be fully complete. In addition, where the applicant’s parents were also born after 31.12.82, or born overseas, the grandparents’ details should be shown at section 8. (But see below for further information.)
Where a short birth certificate (SBC) or short adoption certificate (SAC) has been submitted with the application, or where no birth or adoption certificate has been submitted, a full version of the certificate providing details of parentage must be requested. An adoption order may be accepted where the order provides full details of the parent from whom national status is derived.
This guidance explains what information can be found on a FBC/FAC and how IPS examiners may interpret the information in conjunction with the details provided on the application form.
It also standardises the way place of birth in the UK is shown in a passport.
Background
First time passport applicants are required to produce documentary evidence of their nationality to show they are entitled to hold a British passport.
British nationality is defined by the British nationality Act 1981 (as amended) which came into force on 1 January 1983. Before commencement of the Act, birth in the UK is sufficient to confer British nationality, except those born to a male, foreign diplomat serving in (accredited to) a diplomatic mission in the UK for an overseas government. Those born in the UK to a foreign male diplomat are not eligible for British nationality under UK law.
After 31.12.82, birth in the UK is not enough to establish British nationality. Those born in the UK on or after 1.1.1983 will only have a claim to British nationality if they have a natural parent who is a British citizen or settled in the UK. Alternatively, a person born in the UK on or after 1.1.83 may have a claim to British citizenship if adopted in the UK and one of the adoptive parents is a British citizen. An amendment to the British Nationality Act 1981 allows for children to also gain British citizenship if adopted by British citizens under the Hague Convention on or after 1 June 2003. Full details of what this means can be found in policy and procedures guide under Adoption.
British citizens born in the UK will be ‘otherwise than by descent’ irrespective of how they gain their citizenship.
Before 1 July 2006, the relationship between father and child shall be taken to exist only between a man and any legitimate child born to him. On or after this date, the father is defined under section 50 of the Act as either
a) the husband of the child’s mother (if they are married at the time of the child’s birth) or
b) the man treated as the father under section 28 of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 (that is the husband of the woman carrying the child) or if neither a) or b) apply
any man who can satisfy certain prescribed requirements as to proof of paternity.
Applicants born after 31.12.82 who do not have a claim to British citizenship through their parents or adoptive parents may have an entitlement to register as a British Citizen.
In order to consider a claim under c) only a birth certificate naming the father can be accepted by IPS staff as proof of paternity without reference to IND Nationality Group. Any application where alternative evidence is provided must be referred to HQ Operational Policy Team to consult Nationality Group.
From 6 April 2009 the definition of parent for nationality purposes under section 50 will be as follows:
the ‘mother’ is the woman who gives birth to the child, and
the ‘father’ is either:
(a) the mother’s husband, if any at the time of the child’s birth,
(b) any person who is treated as the father under section 35 or 36 of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008 or
(ba) a woman who is treated as a parent of the child under section 42 or 43 of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008 (second female parent), or
(c) if none of the above applies, a person who is proved to be the father by production of either
(i) a birth certificate identifying him as such, and issued by the competent registration authority within 12 months of the birth of the child, or
(ii) such other evidence, such as a DNA test report or court order as may satisfy the Secretary of State.
For further information please see Children - Surrogate Parents.
Applicants born after 31.12.82 who do not have a claim to British citizenship through their parents or adoptive parents may have an entitlement to register as a British citizen.
On 21st January 2004 a press notice and Ministerial Statement were issued stating that as of 4th May 2004 the shortened form of birth certificate, which omits the names of parents, will no longer be acceptable evidence of nationality for the purpose of applying for a British passport in the UK. From 3 January 2005, all first time applications for those born on or after 1 January 1983 must be supported by additional documents to establish their nationality as detailed below.
The new policy brings IPS in line with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) passport issuing posts and those in the Islands where the production of an FBC has been a requirement for a number of years.
Since the Ministerial statement and press notice, extensive consultation of all interested parties has been undertaken. Also, Post Office Ltd, General Registrars Offices (GRO) Scotland, Northern Ireland, and England and Wales were consulted about communicating the change of policy to their customers and to assess the probable impact on their operation.
The guidance notes in the passport application form pack have been updated to reflect the change of policy and have been in circulation since 1 April 2004. Regional registrars' offices were provided with flyers and posters to advertise the change in IPS policy and registrars have agreed to encourage parents to obtain a FBC for their children at the time of registration.
Process
First time applications for those born on or after 1.1.83 must be supported by a FBC. There will be no deviation to this policy unless the applicant has acquired British citizenship through registration or naturalisation.
Where the applicant has acquired British Citizenship through registration or naturalisation, their certificate showing the applicant is a British national will be sufficient to establish British nationality. It will be unnecessary for the applicant to provide a birth certificate as well as their nationality certificate as the details must be taken from the nationality certificate. Information on the changes to registration and naturalisation certificates may be found under ‘Registration Certificates’ and ‘Naturalisation Certificates.’
Where the applicant submits a FBC with an application for a first passport, national status and parental responsibility will be determined from the information about parentage contained on the birth certificate and on the passport application form.
Where the applicant submits a SBC no birth certificate with an application for a first passport, a FBC showing details of parentage must be requested.
The call centre and passport website will advise customers that IPS requires a FBC for first time applications for those born on or after 1 January 1983. Where the applicant indicates that s/he does not have a FBC, s/he will be advised that a FBC will be required, and will be told how to obtain one.
Details shown on a full birth certificate
FBCs issued in Northern Ireland show full name, place and date of birth of the person registered, and the names of the parent(s).
FBCs issued in England and Wales have shown the full name, place and date of birth of the registered person, and the names of the parent(s). Since 1 April 1969, FBCs have also shown the places of birth of the parent(s). FBCs issued before that date do not show the parents' places of birth.
FBCs issued in Scotland show the full name, place and date of birth of the registered person, the names of the parent(s) and the date of the parents' marriage.
In all cases, where the birth is illegitimate both parents have to register the birth if the father's details are to be included on the certificate. It will be clear from the FBC if the parents were not married at the time of the birth, as both parents' signature/names will appear on the certificate. This does not necessarily mean that both parents have parental responsibility.
Where a replacement birth certificate has been issued “on the authority of the Registrar General” this usually means there has been an amendment made to the original record.
Confirming parental responsibility using a FBC
Where the FBC shows the names of both parents, the document is signed by one parent only, and the passport application form shows the parents’ date of marriage the examiner may be confident that both parents have parental responsibility.
Where a FBC issued in Northern Ireland shows that the father has jointly registered the child's birth with the mother and the registration took place on or after 15 April 2002, both parents have parental responsibility regardless of whether they are married to each other.
Where a FBC issued in England and Wales shows that the father has jointly registered the child's birth with the mother, and the registration took place on or after 1 December 2003, both parents have parental responsibility regardless of whether they are married to each other, or whether the father is later found not to be the father.
Where a FBC issued in England and Wales shows that the father has jointly registered the child's birth with the mother and the registration took place before 1 December 2003, the father will not automatically have parental responsibility unless he has acquired it by a parental responsibility agreement or order, or has subsequently married the mother.
Where a birth is jointly registered in Scotland before 4 May 2006, parental responsibility is not acquired automatically by an unmarried father. However, from 4 May 2006, an unmarried father will gain parental responsibility and rights for his child born and registered in Scotland if both parents register the child’s birth together and both of their names appear on the birth certificate. It is not necessary for both parents to be at the registration office at the time the birth is registered as long as the parent registering the birth has written authorisation from the other to do so and certain forms are completed. See also Children.
Where the passport application form indicates that the parents have not married and only the mother's details are shown on the FBC it should not be
automatically assumed that the father does not have parental responsibility. In cases where the father has made the application examiners should not request consent to passport facilities from the mother unless satisfied that the father has not acquired parental responsibility in some other way. Where the father has signed the declaration at section 9 he has indicated that he does have parental responsibility for the child named at section 2. If it is not clear from the FBC or the passport application form how parental responsibility was acquired the examiner should investigate and ask for documentary evidence to prove the claim. The evidence will normally take the form of a parental responsibility agreement or order.
See also Children.
Confirming national status using a FBC
Section 1 (1) BNA'81 confirms that a person born in the United Kingdom on or after 1.1.83 will be a British citizen if at the time of the birth his father or mother is -
a. A British Citizen; or
b. Settled in the United Kingdom
For people born on or after 1.1.83 in the UK, a full birth or adoption certificate is required showing parents’ or adoptive parents’ details. In addition to the full birth or adoption certificate, the examiner must establish the parent’s nationality. In most cases it will be easiest to establish the claim through the applicant’s mother. However examiners will need to look at the information provided and the circumstances of each case individually and decide which will be the simplest route. (This will be based on the documents provided, whether both parents have a British passport, the parents’ place of birth, what documents may be easily obtained and so on.)
A full adoption order may also be accepted where it gives full details of the adoptive parent from whom the nationality is derived. When establishing the claim through the adoptive parent it should be remembered that the parent must be a British citizen, but the marital status of the adoptive parents is not relevant.
Where the claim is through the father the persons named on the birth certificate must have been married to each other at the time of the birth or subsequently and the marriage certificate must be provided. For children born on or after 1 July 2006, section 47 of the British Nationality Act (BNA) no longer has any effect; a marriage that takes place after the birth has no effect on the child’s nationality. In such cases proof of paternity as described in paragraph 5 above would be needed to establish a nationality claim depending on the father. However, a child born before 1 July 2006 may still be legitimated if his or her parents later marry (even if the marriage takes place after 1 July).
Where the father was born outside the UK, and the parents married after the birth, the application should be referred to the line manager.
The examiner should compare the details shown on the FBC with the information provided at sections 2 and 4 of the application form.
Where the parent from whom the claim is derived holds a UK passport issued before the child was born, details of the passport at section 4 may be accepted to establish the parent was a British Citizen. The result of all actions must be case noted.
Where the parent from whom the claim is derived is born overseas or after 31.12.82 in the UK, and holds a UK passport issued after the child was born, details of the passport at section 4, together with the grandparents' details are needed in order to clearly see how the parent acquired their nationality. The result of all actions must be case noted.
Where the parent from whom the applicant acquires his nationality is an Irish citizen, it will be necessary for the parent to prove his/her nationality. An Irish passport or birth certificate will be acceptable. Under Irish nationality, those born in Ireland before 1 January 2005 will usually be Irish. A birth certificate showing birth in Southern Ireland before 1 January 2005 will be acceptable as evidence that the parent is an Irish citizen. Unless there is evidence to doubt otherwise, it may be accepted that the parent is normally resident in the United Kingdom.
System checks
The system should not routinely be checked for parents' statuses as too many system checks may slow down the system and the onus is on the applicant to provide the required documentation, however there are exceptions where the system can be checked, the majority of which are in the interest of detecting fraud or resolving errors:
Other cases where the parent’s UK passport issued after the child was born supplied
In these cases the case notes on the passport supplied must be checked for the number of the previous passport. If this is included it can be checked on the system and where the parent can be identified from the photograph and the personal details agree, the status can be taken from that passport and case noted accordingly.
Other cases where the parent’s UK passport number issued after the child was born supplied
In these cases the case notes on the passport supplied must be checked for the number of the previous passport. If this is included it can be checked on the system and where the personal details agree the status can be taken from that passport and case noted accordingly.
Other circumstances
Also in exceptional circumstances some discretion may be used. For example if an error has been made resulting in a number of queries to the applicant which has failed to establish the status of the intended passport holder.
Where the grandparents’ details have been included but do not provide a clear indication on how the parent acquired their nationality, the parents' passport may be checked against the system as these cases should be few.
Full birth certificates policy - marriage certificates
The full birth certificate policy was fully implemented on 3 January 2005. The policy was launched to make sure that all those born in the UK after 31.12.1982 have a valid claim to British citizenship by introducing the need for an individual to provide documents in support of their claim.
A number of cases have come to light where the parents’ marriage date has been added to the application form, but later information has cast doubt on the information and/or documents provided
For applicants born before 1 July 2006, when the claim to British nationality is through the father, the father must be married to the mother at the time of the person’s birth.
When establishing nationality through an applicant’s father the parents’ marriage certificate must be requested when the applicant is born before 1 July 2006 if it is not already sent in. (Our Information Leaflet, web site and our partners already ask for the marriage certificate).
Where the parents were married in the UK, the marriage certificate must be checked to ensure the date of marriage was before the child’s birth and that the marriage certificate is issued by the civil authorities in the UK. (A religious ceremony at a mosque or church is not valid unless the person and premises are authorised to perform marriages according to UK regulations, in which case the marriage certificate will show that it is ‘in pursuant to the Marriage Act’.) A religious marriage certificate, showing marriage in the UK only is not acceptable on its own as evidence of a valid marriage unless accompanied by a marriage certificate that shows it is ‘in pursuant to the Marriage Act’.
Where the applicant is born before 1 July 2006, their claim is through the father, and the parents were married after the applicant’s birth, the application must be referred to a line manager to consider whether or not the applicant was legitimated by the parents' subsequent marriage.
Where the parents were married overseas, the marriage certificate must be produced, together with an official translation if necessary.
Note: The official translation must be affixed to the original document and certified as a true translation of the marriage certificate attached. Examiners
are reminded that an official translation must be made by a translator registered with an official organisation such as the Institute of Linguists or the Institute of Translation & Interpreting. A translator who is employed by a recognised Translation company the later being a member of the Association of Translation Companies is also acceptable.
For details of acceptable marriages overseas, please see Marriage – Marriages Overseas.
Applicants who claim they are unable to provide a marriage certificate from overseas must be advised to contact the Embassy or High Commission for the country concerned for help in obtaining a certified copy of the marriage from the official record in the country concerned.
Where the authorities in the country concerned have been unable to trace a record of the marriage, or there are doubts about the authenticity of the marriage certificate produced. Please see Statutory Declarations.
Where the applicant is born after 30 June 2006 and their claim is through the father, marriage certificate is not needed as the claim is not dependent on the descent being legitimate. Provided the applicant’s full birth certificate shows the father’s name and was issued within a year of the birth this will establish their link to the father and together with evidence of the father’s claim to British nationality will be sufficient.
Where an applicant is claiming British nationality through their father and they are unable to provide a full birth certificate which includes father’s name, they should be referred to the United Kingdom Border Agency (UKBA) for advice.
Documents needed to establish a first time claim for those born in the UK
The list below provides details of the documents needed to establish a first time claim through parents for those born in the UK after 31.12.82.
Status through mother
Full birth certificate and mother’s British passport number issued before the date of birth of the child.
Or
Full birth certificate and mother’s British passport number issued after the date of birth of the child at section 4 plus her parents' details at section 8 if the mother is also born after 31.12.82 or overseas.
Or
Full birth certificate and evidence of mother’s claim to British nationality* (e.g. UK birth, registration or naturalisation certificate)
Or
Full birth certificate and mother’s foreign passport showing ILR at the time of the child’s birth
Status through father
Full birth certificate and father’s British passport number issued before the date of birth of the child at section 4 and his marriage certificate** to the child’s mother
Or
Full birth certificate and father’s British passport number issued after the date of birth of the child at section 4 and his marriage certificate** to the child’s mother, plus his parents' details at section 8, if he was also born after 31.12.82
Or
Full birth certificate and evidence of father’s claim to British nationality* (e.g. UK birth, registration or naturalisation certificate) and his marriage certificate** to the child’s mother
Or
Full birth certificate and father’s foreign passport showing he had ILR at the time of the child’s birth plus his marriage certificate** to the child’s mother.
* If the parent is also born after 31.12.82 their full birth certificate and parents documents will also be required to establish parent’s nationality unless they already hold a British passport.
** Born UK on or after 1 July 2006
For children born after 30 June 2006, the father’s marriage certificate is not needed but the full birth certificate must be issued within one year of birth and show father’s details.
Adopted UK after 31.12.82
Full adoption certificate showing that the adoption took place in the UK
Evidence that one of the adopters is a British citizen, e.g. UK passport, birth certificate, registration or naturalisation certificate issued before the date of adoption. If the adopter is born in the UK after 31.12.82 or born overseas
and they do not hold a UK passport, their FBC and parents' documents will also be required.
Or
Full Hague Convention adoption certificate showing that the adoption took place in a Hague Convention country on or after 1 June 2003
Evidence that one of the adopters is a British citizen, e.g. UK passport, birth certificate, registration or naturalisation certificate issued before the date of adoption. If the adopter is born in the UK after 31.12.82 or born overseas and they do not hold a UK passport, their FBC and parents' documents will also be required.
In the absence of a national passport showing the parent had indefinite leave to remain in the United Kingdom at the time of the child’s birth, we will accept a letter from the UK Border Agency confirming that the parent was granted ILR before the child’s birth.
Where the parent is an EU national, see policy on Treaty Rights.
Parent’s passport not on the system
In some cases the parents’ passports may not be on the system and it will provide a warning. The most likely explanation will be that the passport is an old blue style, or will be a machine readable passport issued before 1991, or a passport issued overseas before 1997.
Where the passport is an old blue it will need to be submitted to confirm the parent’s status, or they can provide the standard documents listed above.
Where the passport is a record that hasn’t been replicated the system, please see the procedures for Adding Records to the system.
Parent's names differ to that on birth certificate
Where a parent's names shown on the birth certificate differ to that of the documents produced, examiners need to be satisfied that the documents relate to the parent from whom the claim is derived. Where there is no evidence to establish the link between the documents this should be requested, for example, change of name deed, or marriage certificate etc.
Divorce documents
Where a divorce document is submitted in place of a marriage certificate, this may be accepted provided it shows a clear date of marriage, and the names of the parents.
DNA testing
DNA evidence is not a requirement of IPS and therefore it must not be requested. Where an applicant is unable to provide the relevant documents to prove nationality, they should be referred to UKBA – Please see Home Office Status Letters.
However, where an applicant provides DNA evidence to establish a claim and where relevant details agree, this may be considered along with the rest of the documentation provided.
Where DNA evidence is submitted with an application, examiners must only accept tests conducted by organisations accredited by the Ministry of Justice (MOJ). This is because the MOJ is empowered to prescribe the conditions that a body must meet in order to be eligible for accreditation, therefore we can be satisfied that it will be acceptable for our purposes.
There are currently only nine accredited bodies and these are:
• Anglia DNA Services Ltd., Norwich Research Park, Colney Lane, Norwich, Norfolk. NR4 7UH, Tel: 08454 - 65365; Fax 01603 - 450945; e-mail: [email address]; Website: http://www.angliadna.co.uk
• Barts and The London Queen Mary University of London , Haematology ICMS, Barts and The London, 4 Newark Street, London, E1 2AT, Tel: 020 7882 2274, Fax: 020 7882 2183, Email: [email address], Website: http://www.icms.qmul.ac.uk/
• Complement Genomics Ltd, Unit 128i Bioscience Centre, Business and Innovation Centre, Sunderland, SR5 2TA, Tel: 0191 516 6500/6632, Fax: 0191 516 6005, Email: [email address], Website: http://dadcheck.com/
• Crucial Genetics, University Department of Neurology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, Scotland. G51 4TF, Tel: 0870 - 88 88 088; Fax: 0870 88 88 089; E-mail: [email address]; Website: http://www.crucialgenetics.com
• DNA Diagnostics Ltd, Bioscience Building, Crown Street, Liverpool, L69 7ZB, Tel: 0845 230 1102, Fax: 0845 230 1103, E-mail: [email address], website: http://www.dnadiagnostics.co.uk/.
• Eurofins Medigenomix GmbH, Fraunhoferstr 22, D82152, Planegg/Martinsried, Germany, Tel: + 49 89 89 98 92 50, Fax: + 49 89 89 98 92 90, E-mail: [email address], Website: http://www.medigenomix.de/en/
• LGC Diagnostics Department LGC Building, Queens Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 ONJ, Tel: 020 8943 8400, Fax: 020 8943 8401, E-mail: [email address] : Website: http://www.lgc.co.uk/paternity
• Orchid Cellmark, Blackland's Way, Abingdon Business Park, Abingdon, Oxfordshire. OX14 1YX, Tel: 01235 - 528 - 609; Fax: 01235 528141; email: [email address]; website: www.cellmark.co.uk
• The Forensic Science Service Ltd., New Business Division, Sales and Operational Planning Office, Trident Court, 2920 Solihull Parkway, Birmingham Business Park, Birmingham. B37 7YN, Tel: 0845 - 120 -
7272; Fax: 0121 770 9289: e-mail: [email address] Website: http://paternity.forensic.gov.uk
Examiners must only accept DNA test results from the above nine organisations, and should note that this list is liable to change over time.
Where DNA evidence is submitted to confirm/contest parental responsibility (please see Children for more information), examiners should accept the evidence only where the test was conducted by one of the nine organisations listed above.
Where DNA evidence submitted was conducted by an organisation not on the list above (note that foreign based organisation can also be included on the list – see Eurofins above), then other guidance on the Children page will apply. That is only a birth certificate issued within the first year of the child’s birth, naming the father can be accepted by IPS staff as proof of paternity without reference to UKBA Nationality Group.
Note: As previously instructed IPS staff (including specialist areas staff) must not request DNA evidence or suggest its suitability as a form of documentation in support of passport applications. Where an applicant is unable to provide relevant documentation to prove nationality, the correct approach is to direct the applicant to UKBA.
Place of birth
The place of birth shown on the passport should be the same as the place of birth shown on the birth certificate. Please also see Place of Birth