Funding of dv programes

kev keckum made this Freedom of Information request to Bristol City Council

This request has been closed to new correspondence from the public body. Contact us if you think it ought be re-opened.

Gwrthodwyd y cais gan Bristol City Council.

Dear Bristol City Council,

Can you please inform me whether the Council are funding the Freedom Organisation?

http://www.freedomprogramme.co.uk/

To what degree are these funds made available? How often and to what level.

How many workers are publicly funded by BBC? Who are they?

Where do these funds originate?

What proportion of any finances made available to this group are provided for (groups concerned to support) male victims?

is there a specific budget for funding domestic violence programmes? How much is allocated to male victims?

How much funding and/or what kind of resources are made available for rehousing via the Freedom Programme?

Are funds made available by BCC for any other resources or requests made by the Freedom Programme?

Who makes the decision to fund this group?

How is that the gender bias of this group (lack of provision males and anti male rhetoric) is acceptable to the BCC?

Is there a mechanism to prevent abuse of resources by those who may use the Freedom Programme to gain access to resources and funding when they are not actual victims of domestic violence?

How does the BBC monitor abuses of its resources in this regard?

Yours faithfully,

Sean Geoghan

Freedom of Information, Bristol City Council

Thank you for your request for information. You should expect to receive a response within the 20 working day limit.

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Freedom of Information, Bristol City Council

Dear Mr Geoghan,

Thank you for your request for information, a copy of which is enclosed
below.  For ease of reference we can now respond within the text of your
request below.

 

For Head of Legal Services

Stephen McNamara

 

This response should answer your request in full, however if you are not
satisfied with this response or wish to lodge an appeal against any
exemptions that may have been applied, you can do so by writing to the
Data Protection Officer at Bristol City Council Legal Services, The
Council House, College Green, Bristol, or [1][Bristol City Council request email].  Details
of the complaints procedure can be found at
[2]http://www.bristol.gov.uk/complaints.

 

If, after you have exhausted the council’s complaints procedure, you are
still not satisfied with the response you have received you have the right
to complain to the Information Commissioner, details of your right to
complain can be found at [3]http://www.ico.gov.uk/complaints.aspx

 

Copyright notice
The provision of information by Bristol City Council under this scheme
does not imply a right to reproduce or commercially exploit such
information without the Council's express prior written permission.
Reproduction or commercial exploitation of materials supplied under this
scheme without the express permission of Bristol City Council may be an
infringement of copyright.
The Council is unable to grant permission to reproduce or re-use any
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Dear Bristol City Council,

    

     Can you please inform me whether the Council are funding the

     Freedom Organisation?

    

     http://www.freedomprogramme.co.uk/

    

To what degree are these funds made available? How often and to what
level.

 
Safer Bristol does not fund any” Freedom Organisation” but does fund a
survivor groupwork programme for women, which currently uses, amongst
other programmes, one adapted from the Freedom Programme (with their
author’s permission) which is described on the website shown. The Bristol
service is a commissioned service, worth £45,000pa. The contract was put
to tender and awarded to Novas Scarman Group (now People Can), starting
July 2009 and ends in March 2012.
 
How many workers are publicly funded by BBC? Who are they?
 
People Can employ a part-time survivor groupwork coordinator.  We are
unable to disclose further details as it is considered that this
information is “personal data” as defined by the data protection act.  As
a result section 40(2) of the freedom of Information Act applies.
 
Where do these funds originate?
 
This programme is funded through pooled funds originating from BCC and NHS
Bristol.
 

What proportion of any finances made available to this group are provided
for (groups concerned to support) male victims?

 
The contract is for survivors in general, with a target of maximising
opportunities for women survivors to attend, in keeping with the
proportionality of the impact of domestic violence and abuse.
 

is there a specific budget for funding domestic violence programmes? How
much is allocated to male victims?

 
Safer Bristol funds domestic violence and abuse programmes across the
city. All services bar one support both female and male victims. The
exception is for match funding for an Independent Domestic Violence
Advisor for female black and minority ethnic victims, jointly funded with
the Home Office.
 

How much funding and/or what kind of resources are made available for
rehousing via the Freedom Programme?

 
None. Survivor Groupwork via the Bristol Freedom Programme does not
include rehousing. It is an information programme for survivors.
 

Are funds made available by BCC for any other resources or requests made
by the Freedom Programme?

 
Please could you clarify this question.  It appears that you may not
understand what survivor groupwork is about, but we have tried to clarify
this in the answer above.
 
Who makes the decision to fund this group?
 
The Safer Bristol Domestic Violence and Abuse Joint Commissioning Group
decides which contracts to award and to which organisations.
 

How is that the gender bias of this group (lack of provision males and
anti male rhetoric) is acceptable to the BCC?

 
Safer Bristol is committed to providing for female and male victims of
domestic violence and abuse (DVA). This is reflected in its strategy and
its commissioning decisions. Women are significantly more likely to be
victims of DVA, so in line with proportionality, more funding is made
available to support female victims than male.
 

Is there a mechanism to prevent abuse of resources by those who may use
the Freedom Programme to gain access to resources and funding when they
are not actual victims of domestic violence?

 
Safer Bristol encourages good practice by providers to believe all who
describe themselves as victims of DVA, female and male, unless there is
evidence to contradict that assumption. In this way, we hope that services
remove one barrier to disclosure. All service providers, whether
commissioned or not, are encouraged to use an agreed risk assessment tool
and their professional judgment to assess victims of DVA.
 
How does the BBC monitor abuses of its resources in this regard?
 
All Safer Bristol commissioned services are required to account for the
use of funds quarterly.
 

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References

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2. http://www.bristol.gov.uk/complaints
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Dear Freedom of Information,

I am informed by Legal's Stephen McNamara above that the proportionately higher provision for women over male victims of domestic violence and abuse (DVA). That "This is reflected in its strategy and its commissioning decisions. Women are significantly more likely to be victims of DVA, so in line with proportionality, more funding is made available to support female victims than male."

Can Mr McNAmara refer please to current crime statistics which show that one in three victims are male (see below) and explain why such a statement has been made on BCC's behalf on what basis it is made? What statistics is he referring to specifically?
What is the current proportion of resources on a gender split exactly?
How does this reflect actuality?
Why does BCC and BAVA insist one in four women are victims of DVA? Where does such statistical evidence come from and why are you using it?

I refer to Dorset Council who have been challenged over the same unsubstantiated statistics and have decided to drop unsubstantiated data and adopt a gender free approach to the crime of DVA.
I shall be pursuing this council to fall into line with Equality legislation and adopt the same approach whist improving proportionately the resources it deploys in DVA funding to representatives of men's groups/ victims of DVA.

Sean Geoghegan

http://www.familylawweek.co.uk/site.aspx...

Two million have experienced domestic abuse in last twelve months

7% of women and 5% of men have suffered domestic abuse in last year

There were 2.0 million victims of domestic abuse in 2011/12, according to the Focus on Violent Crime and Sexual Offences 2011/12, published by the Office for National Statistics. 

There was no statistically significant change in the level of domestic abuse experienced in the last year between the 2010/11 and 2011/12 surveys. However, three of the four main categories of domestic abuse (non-sexual partner abuse, non-sexual family abuse and stalking) have all shown statistically significant decreases between the 2004/05 and 2011/12 surveys. Sexual assault has shown no statistically significant change over this time period.

Women were more likely to be a victim of domestic abuse. Some 7% of women and 5% of men were estimated to have experienced domestic abuse in the last year, equivalent to an estimated 1.2 million female and 800,000 male victims. For the purpose of the survey 'domestic abuse' includes non-physical abuse, threats, force, sexual assault or stalking carried out by a current or former partner or other family member.

4.2% of women and 3.0% of men reported having experienced non-sexual partner abuse. 4.2% of women and 2.7% of men reported having experienced stalking.

The survey also records incidents of sexual violence. 

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/crime-stat...

Key points

Violent and sexual crime covers a range of offence types. For example, violence spans minor assaults, such as pushing and shoving that result in no physical harm through to serious assault and murder. Sexual assault covers offences from indecent exposure to rape. In half of incidents identified by the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) (50%) and offences recorded by the police (56%), the violence resulted in no physical injury to the victim.
The 2011/12 CSEW shows that there were 2.1 million violent incidents in England and Wales with 3% of adults victimised. The number of violent incidents has halved from its peak in 1995 when the survey estimated over 4.2 million violent incidents.
Focusing on the most serious violence, the number of homicides currently recorded by the police has increased from 1961 to 2002/03, and shown a generally downward trend since. The number currently recorded for 2011/12 (540) is the lowest since 1989 (521).
Offences involving the use of firearms peaked later than overall violent crime with 24,094 offences being recorded by the police in 2003/04. Since then the number of such offences has fallen by 60% to 9,555 recorded offences in 2011/12. The current 16% fall between 2010/11 and 2011/12 is the eighth consecutive annual decrease in firearm offences.
With regard to sexual and domestic violence, the 2011/12 survey showed there were 536,000 victims of sexual assault in the last year and 2.0 million of domestic abuse. Although the estimated levels of domestic abuse experienced in the last year were lower than those in the 2004/05 CSEW (the baseline for this measure) there has been no statistically significant change since 2008/09. Sexual assault in the last year has shown no statistically significant change over this time period.
The CSEW showed that young men were most likely to be the victims of violence. The profile of victims of violent and sexual violence varied according to the type of offence. In 2011/12, as in previous years, more than two-thirds of homicide victims (68%) were male. In contrast, women were more likely to be a victim of domestic abuse. Some 7% of women and 5% of men were estimated to have experienced domestic abuse in the last year, equivalent to an estimated 1.2 million female and 800,000 male victims. Similarly, the survey found that young women were much more likely to be victims of sexual assault in the last year.
The relationship between victims and perpetrators also differed by gender. For example, homicides against men were most likely to be committed by a friend or acquaintance (39%), whilst homicides against women were most likely to be committed by a partner or ex-partner, (51%).
 

Yours sincerely,

kev keckum

Freedom of Information, Bristol City Council

Dear Mr Geoghegan,
 
We have received emails from you dated 21 January, 25 January, 26 January,
27 January, 3 February (two), 15 February, 16 February (two), 18 February
(three), 22 February (two), 26 February (five), 2 March, 8 March, 12 March
and 15 March.
 
We have responded to the emails dated 21 January, 25 January, 26 January,
27 January, 3 February (two).
 
Having considered your correspondence in accordance with the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 (FOIA), we have identified that s.14(1) of the FOIA
is engaged. Section 14(1) states that:
 
“Section 1(1) does not oblige a public authority to comply with a request
for information if the request is vexatious.”
 
We consider the requests made to be vexatious for the following reasons:
 
- we have received 23 emails from you over the past 53 days. These emails
have contained over 100 queries.
- these queries are all linked to DVA and the associated support and
spending and are therefore being treated as associated requests for the
purposes of the FOIA.
 
We will not be responding to the emails referred to above to which a
response has not already been provided. Nor will we be responding to any
further related requests.
 
On behalf of
Liam Nevin
Service Director - Legal Services
 
If you are not satisfied with this response or wish to lodge an appeal
against any exemptions that may have been applied, you can do so by
writing to the Data Protection Officer at Bristol City Council Legal
Services, The Council House, College Green, Bristol, or
[1][Bristol City Council request email].  Details of the complaints procedure can be found
at [2]http://www.bristol.gov.uk/complaints.
 
If, after you have exhausted the councils complaints procedure, you are
still not satisfied with the response you have received you have the right
to complain to the Information Commissioner, details of your right to
complain can be found at [3]http://www.ico.gov.uk/complaints.aspx
 
Copyright notice
 
The provision of information by Bristol City Council under this scheme
does not imply a right to reproduce or commercially exploit such
information without the Council's express prior written permission.
 
Reproduction or commercial exploitation of materials supplied under this
scheme without the express permission of Bristol City Council may be an
infringement of copyright.
The Council is unable to grant permission to reproduce or re-use any
material accessed through this scheme that is the property of third
parties. Permission to reproduce or re-use such material must be obtained
from the copyright holders.

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References

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