Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Graduate applicants to the A100 course at HYMS'.


Legal Services
University of York
Heslington
York YO10 5DD
Information Governance Team
Email: xxx@xxxx.xx.xx
http://www.york.ac.uk/records-management/foi
Dear Dhylan Patel,
Freedom of Information Request Ref: F21_411
Thank you for your request for information from the University of York. Please see our response
below.
Please note for requests 1 and 2 below, that the University declines to release information
relating to the 2020/1 application cycle (for entry to the 2021/2 academic year) as the
application cycle is still active and the University considers the information to be exempt from
disclosure under section 43 (2) of the Freedom of Information Act 2000. Section 43 (2) states
that, ‘information is exempt information if its disclosure under the Act would, or would be
likely to prejudice the commercial interests of any person’.
The exemption at 43(2) is claimed because the untimely release of live application cycle data
into the public domain would be likely to influence the behaviour of competitor institutions
to the detriment of free and open competition and prejudice the University’s commercial
position by providing an understanding of our offer strategies in a highly competitive sector
and so harm the ability of universities to compete fairly and openly.
Universities operate in a global marketplace and compete for students, research
funding and accreditation. Competition is heightened as it also takes place in a
harsher economic climate and, in England and Wales, a particular funding environment.
Recent analysis shows that there is a high degree of applications in common between
institutions (applicants can apply for multiple institutions simultaneously). Institution-level
data for this and other institutions would give some insight to competing institutions on their
recruitment and levels of success in their respective recruitment strategies. This would give a
competitor an unfair advantage and allow them to alter their “offer making” and recruitment
behaviour. The sensitivity of the data in question here is heightened further, moreover, in the
context of more granular subject/course- level data for the active cycle. These commercial
sensitivities and the nature and likelihood of prejudice are reflected in, and further protected
by, competition law in the UK and European Community and competition authorities, which
prohibit the exchange of anticompetitive information. Accordingly, universities and
companies must be extremely careful when considering the release of commercially and
strategically sensitive information. While the Freedom of Information Act does not define
commercial interests, competition legislation recognises that the exchange or exposure of
commercially sensitive information, directly or indirectly, could allow another university to
deduce or infer a commercial strategy or could result in non-coordinated anti-competitive
effects. Disclosure could thus be used to support anti-competitive behaviour between
competing suppliers of courses or give an unfair advantage to another supplier.

An indirect exchange with the University’s competitors of information (a) which is not in the
public domain and (b) concerns the parameters of competition (in terms of its offering and
capacity) and (c) reduce or remove uncertainties inherent in the process of competition,
would make it easier for current or potential competitors to predict each other’s behaviour
and adjust their own behaviours and commercial strategies accordingly, to the disadvantage
of others and the detriment of free and fair competition.
The commercial interests of HYMS would be further undermined if individuals gain an
advantage over others in the selection process through up-to-date knowledge of the most
recent offer strategies. HYMS reputation is reliant on recruiting the most qualified applicants
possible, via a fair and equitable recruitment process. Further, placing information in the
public domain prematurely could lead to misinterpretation and misrepresentation of the data
possibly dissuading potential applicants, and/or leading to incorrect assumptions about the
nature of HYMS candidates.
Commercial sensitivities are often time sensitive and following the close of the current
admissions cycle, more information will be available.
As section 43(2) is a qualified exemption, the University has performed a public interest test and has,
on balance, concluded that release of this data would prejudice the commercial interests of the
University. Please see the public interest test at the end of this letter.
Further to my previous request, I had a few other queries regarding the admission of
graduate students to the A100 course at HYMS...

1.) What was the average pre-interview score for graduate students THAT were
interviewed for the A100 course for 2020 and 2021 entry? IF you do not have the average
pre-interview score for graduates, please give the average pre-interview score for the
application cohort that were invited to interview.

Information not held for the average pre-interview score for graduates.
Information held for the average pre-interview score for 2020/1 application cohort
62.9
2.) What was the average post-interview score for graduate students interviewed for the
A100 course for 2020 and 2021 entry that were subsequently given offers? IF you do not
have the average post-interview score for graduates given final offers, please give the
average post-interview score for the application cohort that were given final offers

Information held for the average score for graduates for 2020/1 application cohort
68.04

3.) At the point of receipt of applications, are graduates applications pooled separately to
school leaver applications or is everyone 'piled' together?

Graduate applications are screened according to the essential entry requirements for graduates, then
grouped with all other applications for scoring and ranking for interview selection.
4.) How are graduate applications scored pre-interview? Is this by the same process as
school leaver applications i.e. scored on GCSEs, SJT Band, UCAT Decile, and Contextual
Points? If not, please outline how graduate applications are assessed pre-interview. Please
outline the pre-interview scoring process in as much detail as possible.

Information held. Full details of the HYMS selection procedure can be found on the website.
All applicants are scored according to the same matrix.
5.) If graduate applicants are also scored on their GCSEs, how many GCSEs are we scored
on and which subjects are included in this?

Information held. All applicants to the A100 programme are scored on their top 6 GCSEs. There is no
subject restriction on these GCSEs.
6.) Post-interview, what factors are considered for graduate applicants when deciding
whether to give final offers?

Information held. Full details of the HYMS selection procedure can be found on the website.
Public Interest Test
As section 43 (2) is a qualified exemption, the University has performed a public interest test
and has, on balance, concluded that release of the data would prejudice the commercial
interests of the University.
The University recognises:

There is a presumption of a general public interest in disclosure; 

There is a strong public interest in accountability and the proper scrutiny of the
University’s actions and decisions as a public authority; 

Public confidence in the proper administration of University business can be served by
increasing the transparency of the processes in question.
The University recognises a number of factors may weigh against disclosing the withheld
information. There is a public interest in:

promoting market and consumer transparency while protecting public interests in
lawful and open competition;

the ability of public sector organisations to compete for resources fairly, without undue
advantage or prejudice;


avoiding the risk of applicants (and institutions) acting on 'noise' or subsequent
reinterpretation once in the public domain, which could restrict choice and act to the
detriment of applicants and institutions. Placing information into the public domain
prematurely could cause institutions to take competitive stances which might
disadvantage a particular applicant or group of applicants.

providing consistently presented and timed data, from across the sector (for instance
through information resources made available by the sector, such as the UCAS Course
Search
 and the KIS information, which provide more useful information to applicants
when considering what courses and providers to apply to);

having a fair and orderly application process, avoiding detrimental outcomes for
applicants, HE providers and students;

not prejudicing the financial or strategic position of the University (or any
organisation).
The
University
operates
in
a global market
and
faces
growing competition from a range of public, private and online providers of tertiary
education and targeted course offerings;

universities securing, fairly, best value for themselves, their students and stakeholders;

demonstrating respect for commercial and short-term sensitivities. The consistent
release of complete and stable data at an appropriate point, in line with other sector
bodies and standard reporting requirements not only avoids unfair competition but
prevents applicants and others using data as a proxy for course demand, quality and
suitability. 
In accordance with the provisions of section 17(4) of the FoIA, this letter acts as a Refusal Notice in
respect of the information withheld under section 43(2) above.
If you are dissatisfied with the handling of your request, you have the right to ask for an internal
review.
 Your internal review request should be submitted in writing by 26 November 2021 to
xxx@xxxx.xx.xx, detailing your grounds for appeal/complaint.
If you are not content with the outcome of the internal review, you have the right to apply directly to
the Information Commissioner for a decision.
I hope this information is useful.
Yours sincerely,
Information Governance Team