This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Latest version of JSP 950'.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
JSP 950 MEDICAL POLICY 
 
LEAFLET 6-7-7 
 
 

 
JOINT
 
 SERVICE MANUAL OF MEDICAL FITNESS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
Effective from 1000Z 12 Mar 21 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Intentionally blank 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 

JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3 link to page 5 link to page 9 link to page 14 link to page 17 link to page 18 link to page 26 link to page 33 link to page 37 link to page 39 link to page 44 link to page 46 link to page 48 link to page 51 link to page 52 link to page 55 link to page 57 link to page 64 link to page 67 link to page 72 link to page 75 link to page 78 link to page 81 link to page 84 link to page 86 link to page 91 link to page 93 link to page 99 link to page 102 link to page 113 link to page 120 link to page 122 link to page 131 link to page 134 link to page 137 link to page 138 link to page 140 link to page 142 link to page 144 link to page 145 link to page 148 link to page 149 link to page 150 link to page 165 link to page 171 link to page 179 link to page 182 link to page 190 link to page 193  
 
 
Contents 
Page Number 
Amendments table iii-vii 
 
Section One: 
Description of the PULHHEEMS System  
1-1 
 
Section Two: 
The Joint Medical Employment Standard  
2-1 
Annex A Medical Deployment Standard  
2-A-1  
Annex B Medical Employment Standard  
2-B-1 
Annex C Medical Limitations  
2-C-1 
 
Section Three: 
Occupational Health Assessments  
3-1 
Annex A Functional Interpretation of Grades for each Quality  
3-A-1  
Annex B Guidelines for the Conduct of the Pre-Service Medical Assessment  
3-B-1 
Annex C Assessment of Body Mass Index  
3-C-1 
Annex D Assessment of hearing acuity (H)  
3-D-1 
Annex E Assessment of distant visual acuity (E)  
3-E-1 
Annex F Evaluation of Mental Capacity (M) and Emotional Stability (S)  
2-F-1 
Annex G Assessment of Red/Green Colour Perception (CP)  
3-G-1 
Annex H Health declaration - example for use at demobilisation  
3-H-1 
Annex I Guidelines for Undertaking Screening Pure Tone Audiometry  
3-I-1 
 
Section Four: 
The Influence of Particular Conditions on Medical Fitness for Entry  
4-1 
Annex A Eyes Pre-entry  
4-A-1 
Annex B Ear Nose and Throat Pre-entry  
4-B-1 
Annex C Cardiovascular Pre-entry  
4-C-1 
Annex D Respiratory Pre-entry  
4-D-1 
Annex E Gastrointestinal Pre-entry  
4-E-1 
Annex F Renal and Urological Pre-entry  
4-F-1 
Annex G Neurological Pre-entry  
4-G-1 
Annex H Endocrine Pre-entry  
4-H-1 
Annex I Dermatological Pre-entry  
4-I-1 
Annex J Reproductive Pre-entry  
4-J-1 
Annex K Musculoskeletal Pre-entry  
4-K-1 
Annex L Psychiatry Pre-entry  
4-L-1 
Annex M Dental and Oro-Maxillofacial Pre-entry  
4-M-1 
Annex N Other Conditions Pre-Entry  
4-N-1 
 
Section Five: T
he Influence of Particular Conditions on Medical Fitness During Service   5-1 
to 5-3 
Annex A Eyes In-Service  
5-A-1 
Annex B Ear Nose and Throat In-Service  
5-B-1 
Annex C Cardiovascular In-Service  
5-C-1 
Annex D Respiratory In-Service  
5-D-1 
Annex E Gastrointestinal In-Service  
5-E-1 
Annex F Renal and Urological In-Service  
5-F-1 
Annex G Neurological In-Service  
5-G-1 
Annex H Endocrine In-Service  
5-H-1 
Annex I Dermatological In-Service  
5-I-1 
Annex J Reproductive In-Service  
5-J-1 
Annex K Musculoskeletal In-Service  
5-K-1 
Annex L Psychiatry In-Service  
5-L-1 
Annex M Dental and Oro-Maxillofacial In-Service  
5-M-1 
Annex N Other Conditions In-Service  
5-N-1 
 
Section Six: 
Harmonisation of Medical Boards Leading to Discharge 
6-1 
Annex A FMed 23 Revised 04/07   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6-A-1 
Return to Contents Page 
ii 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3 link to page 195 link to page 198  
 
 
Annex B FMed 23 Completion Instructions 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6-B-1 
Annex C Consent to Disclosure of Medical and Administrative Records and Information  
6-C-2 
following Naval Service Board of Survey (NSMBOS) – In accordance with Data Protection  
and Access to Medical Reports Legislation 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
iii 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Amendments table 
Date and 
Summary of amendments/remarks 
Version 
JSP 950 Part 1 Leaflet 6-7-7 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
New JSP format to comply with DRU JSP review. Merged leaflets 6-7-1 to 6-7-6 (inclusive). 
Section 1 Description of the PULHHEEMS system 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Jun 07. 
3 Jun 19 1.5 
Policy content unchanged.  Minor amendments to paragraph 19 approved by MES MJP. 
Section 2 The Joint Medical Employment Standard 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Major review. 
15 Dec 17 1.2 
Major review. 
3 Jun 19 1.5 
Amendment to paragraph 7 a (3) regarding sS rules for temporary JMES approved by MES MJP. 
Section 3 Annex C Medical Limitations 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to Hearing/Vision 2200 medical limitation. 
Amendment to Hearing/Vision 2201 medical limitation. 
Section 3 Occupational Health Assessments 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
29 Jul 19 1.6 
Section title change only. 
6 Apr 20 1.7 
Minor amendment to paras 3 b (1) and 11 only. 
Section 3 Annex A Functional Interpretation of Grades for each Quality 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 3 Annex B Guidelines for the Conduct of the Pre-Service Medical Assessment 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 3 Annex C Assessment of Body Mass Index 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 3 Annex D Assessment of hearing acuity (H) 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 3 Annex E Assessment of distant visual acuity (E) 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 3 Annex F Evaluation of Mental Capacity (M) and Emotional Stability (S) 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 3 Annex G Assessment of Red/Green Colour Perception (CP) 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Major review. 
Section 3 Annex H Health declaration - example for use at demobilisation 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 4 The influence of particular conditions on medical fitness for entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Apr 14.  
8 Sep 18 1.3 
Update of paragraph 4.2 General Requirements. 
29 Aug 19 1.6  Major review. 
Section 4 Annex A Eyes pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed 1 Feb 16. 
29 Jul 19 1.6 
Minor amendment to add Appendix 1 ‘Calculation of Spherical Equivalent’. 
6 Apr 20 1.7 
Deletion of footnote 3 from para 2 a (3). 
Section 4 Annex B Ear, nose and throat pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed 1 Feb 16. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to paragraph 2d: removed footnote 2. 
Section 4 Annex C Cardiovascular pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed 1 Feb 16. 
Return to Contents Page 
iv 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Amendments table 
Date and 
Summary of amendments/remarks 
Version 
6 Apr 20 1.7 
Amendments of paras 6-8. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  New paragraphs 16 & 17 inserted: Pericarditis.  
Section 4 Annex D Respiratory pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 4 Annex E Gastrointestinal pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to paragraph 12c: Bariatric Surgery.  
Section 4 Annex F Renal and urological pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged. Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 4 Annex G Neurological pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed 1 Feb 16. 
Section 4 Annex H Endocrine pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 4 Annex I Dermatological pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Jun 07. 
15 Dec 17 1.2  Major review. 
Section 4 Annex J Reproductive pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 06. 
Section 4 Annex K Musculoskeletal pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed 1 Feb 16. 
29 Aug 19 1.6  Major review. 
Section 4 Annex L Psychiatry pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
24 Sep18 1.4  Major review. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Removal of wording in paragraph 7. 
 
Amendment to paragraph 38: replaced reference to Lft 6-7-4 with the correct section of Lft 6-7-7. 
 
Section 4 Annex M Dental and oro-maxillo-facial pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Major review. 
Section 4 Annex N Other conditions pre-entry 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Apr 14. 
2 Sep 16 1.1 
Major review. 
3 Jun 19 1.5 
New footnote 10 to paragraph 11. 
Update of Table 1 ‘Recommended allergy and immunology clinics for military referrals’. 
29 Jul 19 1.6 
Amendment to paragraph 10a Huntingdon’s Disease agreed by MES MJP. 
6 Apr 20 1.7 
Amendment para 10 f Suxamethonium sensitivity. 
24 Aug 20 1.8  Amendment to paragraph on Sickle Cell Trait.  Addition of paragraphs on anticoagulation therapy 
 and COVID-19 infection. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to paragraphs 21-24: Immune System Disorders. 
Section 5 The influence of particular conditions on Medical Fitness during Service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
6 Apr 20 1.7 
Update of title. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to paragraph 1: update to footnote 1. 
Section 5 Annex A Eyes in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
29 Jul 19 1.6 
Minor amendment to paragraph 5a to refer to new Appendix 1 to Annex A Section 4. 
Section 5 Annex B Ear, nose and throat in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Return to Contents Page 

JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Amendments table 
Date and 
Summary of amendments/remarks 
Version 
Section 5 Annex C Cardiovascular in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Mar 14. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to paragraph 3: Hypertension. 
Section 5 Annex D Respiratory in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
3 Jun 19 1.5 
Major Review. 
Section 5 Annex E Gastrointestinal in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Apr 14. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to paragraph 11: replaced reference to Lft 6-7-5 with the correct section of Lft 6-7-7. 
Amendments to paragraph 12 – 13: Bariatric Surgery. 
Section 5 Annex F Renal and urological in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to paragraph 1b: removed reference to Lft 6-7-5. 
Section 5 Annex G Neurological in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 5 Annex H Endocrine in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
Section 5 Annex I Dermatological in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Apr 08. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to paragraph 1: replaced reference to Lft 6-7-5 with the correct section of Lft 6-7-7 
and replaced ‘medical y invalided’ with ‘medically discharged’. 
Section 5 Annex J Reproductive in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged. Last reviewed Apr 07. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to paragraph 1: replaced reference to Lft 6-7-5 with the correct section of Lft 6-7-7. 
Amendment to paragraph 2a: removed reference to Lft 6-7-5. 
Section 5 Annex K Musculoskeletal in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Feb 15. 
Section 5 Annex L Psychiatry in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Jan 16. 
3 Jun 19 1.5 
Major Review. 
Section 5 Annex M Dental and oro-maxillo-facial in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Oct 13. 
15 Dec 17 1.2  Major review. 
6 Apr 20 1.7 
Update of OMFS consultant contact details (removal of Table 1). 
Section 5 Annex N Other conditions in-service 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed 1 Feb 16. 
3 Jun 19 1.5 
Update of Table 1 ‘Recommended allergy and immunology clinics for military referrals’. 
29 Aug 19 1.6  Minor amendment to paragraph 5 line 3. 
24 Aug 20 1.8  Amendment to paragraph on Sickle Cell Trait.  Addition of paragraphs on anticoagulation therapy 
and COVID-19 infection. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to paragraph 4: replaced reference to Lft 6-7-4 with the correct section of Lft 6-7-7. 
Section 6 Harmonisation of Medical Boards leading to discharge 
1 Aug 16 1.0 
Content unchanged.  Last reviewed Apr 07 
3 Jun 19 1.5 
Minor amendment to paragraph 10c and Annex B paragraph 1 regarding FMed 23 approved by 
MES MJP. 
6 Apr 20 1.7 
Amendment of Annex C title only. 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Amendment to paragraph 7a: removed reference to Lft 6-7-5. 
Section 6 Annex A FMed 23 Revised 04/07 
Return to Contents Page 
vi 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Amendments table 
Date and 
Summary of amendments/remarks 
Version 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Content unchanged. Added to amendment table. 
Section 6 Annex B FMed 23 Completion Instructions 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Content unchanged. Added to amendment table. 
Section 6 Annex C Consent to Disclosure of Medical and Administrative Records and Information following 
Naval Service Board of Survey (NSMBOS) – In accordance with Data Protection and Access to Medical 
Reports Legislation 
12 Mar 21 1.9  Content unchanged. Added to amendment table. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
vii 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
SECTION ONE: DESCRIPTION OF THE PULHHEEMS SYSTEM 
General 
 
1. 
These medical standards are designed to provide a framework for the medical assessment 
of functional capacity of potential recruits and serving personnel from which can be derived a 
determination of fitness for service. They are to be applied by Service Medical Officers (MOs), 
Civilian Medical Practitioners (CMPs) and doctors carrying out assessments on behalf of the 
Service recruiting organisations. The award of an appropriate single-Service medical employment 
standard should be based on a sound knowledge of the individual’s intended or present job and a 
thorough clinical assessment. MOs and CMPs may draw on the expertise of specialist clinicians to 
evaluate diagnosis or prognosis and on the expertise of specialists in occupational medicine in the 
determination of fitness for work. In all cases, care should be taken to ensure that the 
PULHHEEMS profile awarded truly reflects the individual’s functional capacity and the medical 
employment standard awarded truly reflects medical employability. 
 
Purpose 
 
2. 
The PULHHEEMS system has been developed to provide a method for standardising and 
recording the medical functional assessment. It is used as a tool from which medical employability 
criteria can be derived and communicated to the Executive branches. 
 
The system 
 
3.  
In the United Kingdom Armed Forces, the classification system that leads to the award of the 
employment standard is the PULHHEEMS System of Medical Classification. The decision to award 
a particular employment standard must be based on function and the ability to perform the tasks 
involved in a given job. The presence of certain medical conditions will influence the PULHHEEMS 
profile; these are detailed in 3 and 4. The code letters in this acronym refer to a sub-division of 
physical and mental function as follows: 
 
 
P  
Physical Capacity 
 
U  
Upper Limbs 
 
L  
Locomotion 
 
HH   Hearing Acuity (right and left) 
 
EE   Visual Acuity (right and left, uncorrected and corrected) 
 
M  
Mental Capacity 
 
S  
Stability (Emotional) 
 
4. 
These subdivisions are known as qualities. The combined assessment of the group of 
qualities forms the PULHHEEMS profile. From this profile, each of the sSs can then award a 
medical employment standard appropriate to the individual that will ensure that he or she is not 
employed on duties for which he or she is medically unfit. Since medical employment standard 
systems are Service specific, they will not be discussed further here; clarification is provided in 
Section 5. 
 
The qualities in more detail 
 
5. 
The following list clarifies the factors to be considered when assessing each of the qualities: 
 
Return to Contents Page 
1-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
a. 
P – Physical capacity. This quality is used to indicate an individual’s overall physical 
and mental development, his or her potential for physical training and suitability for 
employment worldwide (i.e. the overall functional capacity). The ‘P’ grading is affected by 
other qualities in the PULHHEEMS profile, namely the ‘U’, ‘L’, ‘HH’, ‘EE’ ‘M’ and ‘S’ gradings. 
 
 
b. 
U – Upper limbs. This indicates the functionality of the hands, arms, shoulder girdle 
and cervical and thoracic spine. A reduced ‘U’ grading wil  also affect the ‘P’ grading. 
 
 
c. 
L – Locomotion. The ‘L’ grading refers to the functional efficiency of the locomotor 
system. This quality must therefore take into account assessment of the lumbar spine, pelvis, 
hips, legs, knees, ankles and feet. Observation of gait and mobility are also important. Any 
conditions affecting the function of the locomotor system wil  result in a reduced ‘L’ grading 
which wil  in turn be reflected in the ‘P’ grading. 
 
 
d. 
HH – Hearing. This quality assesses auditory acuity only. Diseases of the ear such as 
otitis externa are assessed under the ‘P’ quality. However, severe loss of hearing wil  affect 
the ‘P’ grading. 
 
 
e.  
EE – Visual acuity. This quality assesses visual acuity only. Diseases of the eye such 
as glaucoma are assessed under the ‘P’ quality. However, severe loss of visual acuity will 
affect the ‘P’ grading. 
 
 
f.  
M – Mental capacity. Mental capacity is not subject to formal medical assessment at 
recruitment. However, the recruit selection procedure, including interviews, and the 
individual’s academic record wil  allow judgement to be made on this quality. Subject 
changes are only likely to occur as a result of neurological disease or head injury. 
 
 
g.  
S – Stability (emotional). The ‘S’ quality indicates emotional stability which grades the 
individual’s ability to withstand the psychological stress of military life (especially operations).  
Amendments to the ‘S’ grade are usually required in cases of psychiatric illness but are not 
restricted to these circumstances. 
 
Grades of each quality 
 
6. 
Each quality has the potential to be awarded a grade of 1 to 8. However, only the ‘E’ 
quality uses all 8 possible gradings. The permitted gradings are tabulated as follows: 
 









 
 
 




 
 



















 
 




 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 



 
 













 
Additionally, the grading of P0 is used in the circumstances outlined in paragraphs 7 and 15. 
 
Functional interpretation of each grade 
 
7.  
Specific definitions for the grades of the P, U, L, M and S qualities are: 
 
Quality 
Definition 

Medically unfit for duty and under medical care (P quality only) 

Medically fit for unrestricted service worldwide 

Medically fit for duty with minor employment limitations 

Medically fit for duty within the limitations of pregnancy 

Medically fit for duty with major employment limitations 

Medically unfit for service 
Return to Contents Page 
1-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Employability includes functional capacity to deploy on operations. The following matrix should be 
used to provide guidance on the functional capacity of each grading under the U, L, M and S 
qualities: 
 
Degree  Functional capacity 
Service capacity 
 

Average 
Full 

Below Average 
Restricted 

Very limited 
Restricted 

Severely limited 
Unfit for any form of service 

Unfit for duty: under medical care 
Unfit for duty: under medical care 
 
8.  
The degrees of quality of HH and EE reflect discrete levels of performance under audiometric 
testing and testing of visual acuity. The standard in the RIGHT eye or ear is graded first, the LEFT 
side second. 
 
9.  
The audiometric standards with their corresponding gradings are detailed in Section 2, along 
with details of the audiometric examination and examination of the ears. 
 
10.   The system of grading visual acuity along with the ophthalmic examination and 
recording of the results are in Section 2. 
 
Assessments of functional capacity 
 
11.  On entry to the Armed Forces individuals are awarded a PULHHEEMS profile which is 
deemed permanent. The letter P signifying ‘Permanent’ may be inserted after the degree of P 
quality or after the single-Service Medical Employment Standard. Subsequent re-gradings are 
referred to as medical boarding, whether carried out at unit level or by a formally constituted 
Medical Board. Individuals who remain on duty with medical conditions that do not require 
immediate in-patient treatment are classified according to their functional capacities, but no lower 
than a grading of 7. Where a condition is expected to resolve, the letter R (signifying remediable) 
may be inserted after the degree of P quality or other quality, for example P3R L3 or P3R L3R. 
Non-remediable conditions do not require the R suffix. These gradings may be held in a temporary 
capacity indicated by a T suffix after the degree of P quality or after the single-Service Medical 
Employment Standard. The maximum period for which an individual may hold such a temporary 
grading is subject to single-Service regulations but should not normally exceed 18 months. Where 
a condition persists beyond 18 months, or it can be predicted that this will be the case at an earlier 
stage, a definitive standard (permanent) is to be awarded, without the letter R for remedial 
conditions. Reference is to be made in the medical board report on the likely duration of time 
before recovery might be expected if there remains a possibility of continuing improvement. 
 
12.  Personnel who are due to exit the Service, but who hold a temporary medical employment 
standard, may leave and a medical board may be held dependent upon single-Service 
employment regulations. An individual would not normally be given an extension of Service solely 
to allow assignation of a definitive (permanent) medical employment standard. Where an individual 
has a condition that would result in invaliding, but whose discharge date precedes medical board 
assessment, the case is to be discussed with the single-Service President of the medical board to 
determine the most suitable course of action. 
 
13.  The medical employment standard of an individual admitted to a hospital is not to be 
changed purely for this purpose unless the in-patient period exceeds or is expected to exceed one 
month. If this is the case, the award of a P0 grading is appropriate. Medical boarding prior to 
admission and after discharge is to make a functional assessment with respect to the 
PULHHEEMS profile and award an appropriate single-Service category in the normal way. 
 
14.  Individuals who are discharged from hospital and are fit for limited duty only, but whose full 
recovery is expected within a total period of 18 months of downgrading, are to be awarded R and T 
annotations as appropriate (see para 11). If their condition is expected to remain extant beyond 18 
Return to Contents Page 
1-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
months or is not remediable, a permanent category is to be awarded by a Medical Board. In all 
remediable cases, an expectation of the recovery period is to be recorded in the medical board 
record. Those discharged from hospital directly to a short period of sick leave need not be re-
assessed until the end of the period of sick leave, but before return to work. 
 
15.  Individuals who are discharged from hospital but are expected to remain unfit for duty for a 
prolonged period (greater than one month) are to be awarded a P0 grading. If it becomes apparent 
that a return to work is unlikely for medical reasons, P8 medical boarding is to be considered.  
Alternatively, an appropriate working medical category is to be awarded on return to duty. An 
individual should not normally be discharged from the Service with a P0 grading. Medical 
discharge will attract a grading of P8; administrative discharge associated with medical conditions 
may occur in those graded P7 or higher. 
 
16.  Pregnant serving women who are fit for duty are to be graded P4 with appropriate single-
Service medical employability limitations. Where other clinical conditions occur during or after 
pregnancy which merit re-grading in their own right, medical boarding is to take account of these 
and reflect them in the normal way. 
 
Assessment of the individual 
 
17.  Medical assessment is carried out under the PULHHEEMS system at entry and discharge, 
and at intervals during service (see Section 3). 
 
18.  All PULHHEEMS qualities and gradings should be governed by their functional assessment 
definitions found in Section 3. The P quality takes account of deployability and is affected by the 
ability to carry out the duties required within the individual’s employment group. 
 
Recording of assessments 
 
19.  The PULHHEEMS assessment is to be recorded on medical forms and electronic medical 
templates where boxes or drop-downs are provided for this purpose1. When a change is made 
through medical boarding, the new profile is to be recorded on the medical record. Medical board 
reports are to include the review date of the medical standard awarded if necessary. 
 
20.  Illustrative examples of medical board PULHHEEMS assessment for a number of conditions 
are given below: 
 
a. 
Year of birth 









 


1979 
3R 




 
 




 
Relevant clinical details 
Ht…..…..180…..…..cm 

 
 

Left inguinal hernia awaiting operation. 
CP………..2………….. 

 
 

Wt……….89……….kg 
 
This individual has a left inguinal hernia, which is considered remediable. The grading P3R will be 
retained until he is ready to be awarded a permanent grade. This may be P2, assuming full 
recovery. 
 
 
 
 
1 Appropriate FMed Forms (paper or electronic), or within the Grading Templates in the electronic medical record system. 
Return to Contents Page 
1-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
b. 
 
Year of birth 










 


1969 





 
 




 
Relevant clinical details 
Ht…..…..179…..…..cm 

 
 

Severe noise-induced hearing loss L>R. 
CP………..2………….. 

 
 

Wt……….77……….kg 
 
This individual has marked noise induced hearing loss in both ears. Note that in this case the HH 
gradings affect his physical capacity and thus his permanent P grading; a grade of P3 has been 
awarded. 
 
c. 
 
Year of birth 










 


1966 
7R 




 
 




 
Relevant clinical details 
Ht…..…..185…..…..cm 

 
 

Chronic depressive illness. 
CP………..3………….. 

 
 

Wt……….62……….kg 
 
This individual has a chronic depressive il ness and has been awarded a grading of 7 under the ‘S’ 
quality. Note that the il ness wil  also affect the individual’s physical capacity and deployability, so 
the ‘P’ grading has also been reduced to 7. 
Return to Contents Page 
1-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
SECTION TWO: THE JOINT MEDICAL EMPLOYMENT STANDARD  
Background 
 
1. 
Prior to Nov 09 the single-Services used variations on a common theme to describe medical 
employability of service personnel. However, because no common denominator existed, direct 
comparisons could not be made. To resolve this, the Joint Medical Employment Standard (JMES) 
system of classification was introduced. However, following its introduction differences in the extent 
of single-Service adoption meant that only some data (Medical Deployment Standard) was 
available for reporting to the Defence People and Training Board (DPTB) and the Defence Board 
(DB), and this data lacked sufficient granularity for useful reporting purposes (such as numbers fit 
for deployment to specific locations or environment) and manpower planning. 
 
2. 
In Feb 15, the JMES Harmonisation Working Group recommended modifications to the 
existing JMES system to promote consistency of use across the single-Services to provide better 
information for Executive decision-making purposes and the ability to offer more accurate 
information to the DPTB and the DB. 
 
3. 
This Leaflet describes the harmonised JMES system. 
 
Introduction 
 
4. 
The JMES is awarded by medical staff in order to inform commanders and career managers 
of the deployability and employability of Service Personnel. It describes the deployability, functional 
and geographical employability and specific medical limitations. 
 
5. 
Employment or deployment of a Service Person outwith their JMES must not be done lightly. 
The Chain of Command retains the authority to employ or deploy the Service Person outwith their 
JMES, but only in exceptional circumstances and after conducting a risk assessment.  
‘Exceptional’ is defined as:  
 
 
In an emergency; in extremis; where there is no other choice and not using that Service 
 
Person would result in very serious consequences. Financial reasons or standard manning 
 
difficulties would not necessarily be regarded as reasonable considerations. Unless life is 
 
at stake, it would be considered unreasonable to task a Service Person with a duty outwith 
 
their JMES.  
 
In this case, the risk of employment or deployment of the Service Person lies with the Chain of 
Command and medical advice from a consultant occupational physician must be sought. A Service 
Person’s JMES should not be altered to comply with Chain of Command requirements unless it is 
appropriate to do so and the patient has provided consent. Further direction for the Chain of 
Command can be found in Joint and single Service Employment Policy. 
 
6. 
Changes to the entry JMES and any subsequent changes will require a medical grading 
review in accordance with single-Service policy. 
 
a. 
BRd 1750A Handbook of Naval Medical Standards. 
 
b. 
AGAI 78 Army Medical Employment Policy PULHHEEMS Administrative Pamphlet 
(PAP). 
 
c. 
AP 1269A Royal Air Force Manual of Medical Fitness. 
 
 
 
JMES elements 
 

Return to Contents Page 
2-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
7. 
The JMES classification system is divided into 4 x Primary Elements and 2 x Detailed 
Elements: 
 
a. 
Primary elements 
 
(1) 
Date of award. This is the date the JMES assessment took place or the date 
when the medical assessment was last reviewed. 
 
 
(2) 
Date of review. The next review must take place in accordance with single-
Service policy by this date. 
 
(3) 
Permanency. When a Board awards a JMES a decision should be made as to 
whether the JMES is temporary (Temp), permanent (Perm) or not applicable (NA). The 
maximum period of validity of a temporary JMES is (except where an extension is 
approved under single Service rules): 
 
 
12 months for the Army 
 
12 months before referral to NSMBOS / Regional OH Board for the RN 
 
18 months for the RAF 
 
A permanent JMES may be awarded at any time if clinically indicated. When a 
temporary JMES is to become permanent, a formal Medical Board will be convened in 
accordance with single-Service policy. Permanent does not imply that the JMES can 
never change but serves to distinguish for personnel staff the longer-term health 
problems affecting function from the relatively short term, in order to assist with 
employment decisions. 
 
(4) 
Medical Deployment Standard (MDS). This is an overall deployability summary 
coding with the sub-categories of Medically Fully Deployable (MFD), Medically Limited 
Deployability (MLD) and Medically Not Deployable (MND). Further details are at Annex 
A. 
 
b. 
Detailed elements 
 
(1) 
Medical Employment Standard (MES). This is an alphanumeric code reflecting 
an individual’s fitness to be employed in the Air (A), Land (L) and Maritime (M) 
environments together with any additional specific Environment and Medical Support 
(E) considerations e.g. A4 L3 M4 E3. On DMICP the suffix ‘Legacy’ distinguishes 
between legacy and harmonised JMES awards. On JPA the inclusion of a hyphen, for 
example ‘A-1’, distinguishes between legacy and harmonised JMES awards. Further 
details are at Annex B. 
 
(2) 
Medical Limitations (MedLims). MedLims are applied as necessary and are 
visible on JPA e.g. 1206 Unfit to work in confined spaces. Further details are at Annex 
C. 
 
8. 
A typical JMES might read: 
 
Date of Award 
Date of Review 
Permanency 
MDS 
MES 
MedLim 
10 Aug 16 
10 Feb 17 
TEMP 
MLD 
A4 L3 M4 E3 
1206 
 
9. 
Communication of occupational medicine advice to the Chain of Command. JMES is 
communicated to the Chain of Command through JPA via a direct feed from DMICP. In addition, 
the single-Services utilise the following to provide additional information: 
 
 
a. 
RN - JMES Electronic Signal. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
2-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
b. 
Army - PAP Appendix 9 document. 
 
 
c. 
RAF - Reassessment of Employment Standard – Patient Advice Notice. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
2-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX A  
MEDICAL DEPLOYMENT STANDARD   
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. 
The Medical Deployment Standard (MDS) describes the medical capacity for deployment. 
 
2. 
Table 1 details the MDS codes and their meaning. 
 
Table 1 Medical Deployment Standard codes 
 
MDS code 
Description 
 
MFD 
1. 
Fit to deploy to all parts of the world on contingent or follow-on operations 
Medically Fully 
without any limitations or requirements for routine medical support beyond deployed 
Deployable 
Primary Healthcare. 
 
 
2. 
Deployment limited due to: 
 
 
a. 
A medical condition. 
 
 
 
b. 
Medical treatment needs. 
 
 
 
c. 
Medical support requirements. 
 
 
MLD 
 
d. 
Risk arising from exposure to specific climates e.g. heat or cold. 
Medically 
 
 
Limited 
 
e. 
The need to avoid specific exposures e.g. noise or chemicals. 
Deployability 
 
3. 
A grade of MLD requires a medical risk assessment (MRA) to be carried out 
for deployment. The decision on that deployment will depend on the medical 
condition, individual function, the proposed employment, length of the deployment 
and the medical support available. 
 
4. 
MLD personnel may vary from those with minimal limitations who can be used 
in a wide range of roles and situations to those who can only undertake a limited 
role or Career Employment Group (CEG) within a specific, well supported setting. 
 
 
5. 
Not deployable outside the United Kingdom. 
MND 
 
Medically Not 
6. 
May be admitted to or under the care of a Medical Facility (MF) or awaiting 
Deployable 
medical discharge (A6 L6 M6 E5 or 6). 
 
Return to Contents Page 
2-A-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX B  
MEDICAL EMPLOYMENT STANDARD   
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. 
The Medical Employment Standard (MES) relates to an individual’s employment in their 
branch/trade duties and is expressed as numerical degrees in four functional areas (detailed 
elements), indicated by the letters A, L, M and E. These reflect medical fitness for duties in the Air, 
Land and Maritime environments and any additional specific Environment and Medical Support 
considerations. All detailed elements of the MES are to be allocated for each individual.   
 
2. 
Distinguishing between legacy and harmonised JMES awards. On DMICP the suffix 
‘Legacy’ distinguishes between legacy and harmonised JMES awards. On JPA the inclusion of a 
hyphen, for example ‘A-1’, distinguishes between legacy and harmonised JMES awards. 
 
3. 
Where single-Service supplementary guidance is not present, information contained in the 
‘Description’ and ‘Guidance’ columns apply. 
 
4. 
Table 1 details the MES codes and their meaning. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
2-B-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Table 1 Medical Employment Standard codes 
 

AIR 
MES 
Single-Service Supplementary Guidance 
Description 
Guidance 
Code 
RN 
Army 
RAF 
Fit for flying duties without 
A1 
Only for aircrew. 
 
 
 
restriction. 
Fit for flying duties but has 
A2 
Only for aircrew. 
 
 
 
reduced hearing or eyesight. 
May be used for: 
Remotely Piloted Air 
Fit for duties in the air within 
Systems Operators2, 
A3 
the stated employment or 
Aircrew1. 
 
 
Gliding Instructors3, Flight 
MedLims. 
Medical Officers, Air 
Stewards. 
Fit to be flown in a passenger 
A4 
 
 
 
 
aircraft. 
Except as aeromedical evacuation 
A5 
Unfit to be taken into the air.  
 
 
 
patients. 
Duties in the aviation environment include, 
Personnel will usually be 
but not limited to, air traffic control, 
non-effective or given a 
Unfit for any duties in the 
A6 
baggage handling, aircraft towing, aircraft 
 
 
medical board 
aviation environment. 
maintenance, airfield driving and duties on 
recommendation for 
a flying station/base.   
discharge. 
 
 
 
1 Including other Career Employments Groups defined in AP 1269A Royal Air Force Manual of Medical Fitness 
2 RPAS Operators AP1269A Lft 4-02 para 20d AP 1269A Royal Air Force Manual of Medical Fitness 
3 VGS Gliding Instructors AP1269A Lft 4-02 para 16 AP 1269A Royal Air Force Manual of Medical Fitness 
Return to Contents Page 
2-B-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3 link to page 20  
 
 
LAND 
MES 
Single-Service Supplementary Guidance 
Description 
Guidance 
Code 
RN 
Army 
RAF 
L1 
Fit for unrestricted duty. 
 
 
 
 
May undertake 
Must have appropriate level of 
Operational Fitness Tests 
musculoskeletal fitness to undertake role 
RN5 / RM6 unfit for 
(OFTs)7 with appropriate 
and all expected duties in austere 
defined aspects of 
build-up training. Must be 
environments. Must be able to undertake 
mandatory fitness 
fit PJHQ4 Global Low to 
Pre-Employment Training (PET) and 
testing or modifications 
Medium Threat 
Fit for high readiness roles with 
Individual Pre-Deployment Training (IPDT) 
Minor limitations but fit for 
L2 
to command courses 
environments. 
minor limitations. 
to deliver the minimum personal military 
high-readiness roles. 
required but fully 
Operational deployments 
skills to allow an individual to carry out the  employable and 
are subject to Deployed 
requirements of their job specification 
deployable in 
MRA only if MDS is MLD.  
while maintaining their own Force 
branch/trade. 
No limitation on exposure 
Protection (FP) and positively contributing 
to weapons noise. Must 
to the FP of those around them.4 
be E1 or E2. 
Operational deployments 
Should not impose a significant and/or 
require deployed MRA 
constant demand on the medical services 
(PAP App 26) to be 
if deployed, on exercise or deployments. 
Able to undertake all 
completed by Unit CoC.  
The individual may deploy on operations 
branch/trade duties but has 
Fit for limited duties but with 
ROHT input to deployed 
L3 
or overseas exercises following 
 
difficulty with specified 
some restriction subject to MRA. 
MRA will not be required 
completion of a MRA. Have no limitations 
general Service activities 
unless annotated on App 
in their ability to function wearing personal 
eg running.   
9.  Routine activities (as 
equipment demanded of the environment, 
defined in PAP Chapter 5) 
branch/trade and rank. 
are covered by App 9. 
 
4 Joint Operational IPDT Policy. IPDT requirements are set against the overall risk to deployed personnel within an individual theatre. This assessment takes into account the identified risk from terrorism, armed 
attack, criminality and environmental factors including Road Traffic Accidents. Whilst there may be variations in IPDT requirements for personnel deployed on certain operations given their role and exposure to risk, 
the nature of certain Global operations require all personnel to be trained to a single standard to mitigate the expected threat.  Global Low Threat. Environments where the identified threats or risks to deployed 
personnel may not require FP restrictions to be imposed. This category also includes personnel deployed within Medium and High threat environments where the nature of their deployment does not expose them to 
the threat.  Global Medium Threat. Environments where there is an identified threat from terrorism, armed attack or high risk of environmental hazards to personnel operating in remote or isolated locations.  
Personnel deployed on Global Medium Threat deployments are required to complete enhanced training as defined by the JTRs, relevant to role or specific risks. Global High Threat. Environments where there is an 
identified high threat from terrorism, armed attacks, Insider Threat or violent criminality. Personnel deployed on Global High Threat deployments are required to complete enhanced training as defined by the JTRs, 
relevant to role or specific risks. 
5 BRd 51 (2) Physical Education and Executive Health Manual - RNFT Policy and Protocols 
6 Royal Marines Fitness Test Annex A  Feb 16 
7 MATT 2 Fitness Issue 11 Apr 19 
 
Return to Contents Page 
2-B-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
LAND 
MES 
Single-Service Supplementary Guidance 
Description 
Guidance 
Code 
RN 
Army 
RAF 
Operational deployments 
Individuals whose medical conditions have 
require deployed MRA 
Not able to undertake all 
the potential to pose a significant risk on 
(PAP App 26) completed  branch/trade duties. May 
Fit for certain deployed roles into  deployment in the land environment. May 
by Unit CoC. ROHT input  only deploy if accepted by 
Likely to be restricted to 
well-established MOB locations 
be reliant on an uninterrupted supply of 
to deployed MRA 
deployed location SMO 
L4 
Major Overseas Bases 
subject to Consultant 
medication and/or a reliable cold chain. 
required in all 
and cleared by a 
only. 
Occupational Physician MRA. 
Must be able to function wearing a helmet 
circumstances. Routine 
Consultant Occupational 
and the minimum theatre entry standard 
activities (as defined in 
Physician or Manning 
body armour. 
PAP Chapter 5) are 
Medical Casework. 
covered by App 9. 
Individuals who are unable to deploy due 
May be employed within 
to significant MedLims. May be fit limited 
Must be fit for branch / 
their branch/trade and 
Unfit deployment.  Fit for 
UK operations. Able to provide regular 
trade subject to allowable 
are fit for UK internal 
L5 
branch/trade and limited UK 
and effective service in the non-deployed 
limitations as defined in 
 
operations within the 
operations. 
land environment subject to meeting the 
PAP Table 6 (Functional 
bounds of their 
minimum requirements as specified in 
Interpretation of JMES). 
MedLims. 
single-Service employment policy. 
L6 temp requires ROHT 
Personnel will usually be 
sanction to extend > 6 
non-effective or given a 
Unfit for service in the land 
L6 
Unfit for any duties. 
 
months and DM(A) 
medical board 
environment. 
sanction to extend >12 
recommendation for 
months. 
discharge. 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
2-B-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
MARITIME 
MES 
Single-Service Supplementary Guidance 
Description 
Guidance 
Code 
RN 
Army8 
RAF 
RAF personnel who are 
May be employed and deployed worldwide 
augmentees or fit to be 
M1 
Fit for unrestricted duties. 
 
 
in the maritime environment. 
borne as augmentees9 to a 
ship’s company. 
Fit for duties at sea but may be restricted 
RAF personnel who are 
to specific size or type of vessel, have 
To be employed or 
augmentees or fit to be 
Fit for restricted duties afloat 
M2 
medical support needs or environmental 
deployed within the 
 
borne as augmentees to a 
within the limitations as stated. 
limitations as indicated by the MES and 
MedLims specified. 
ship’s company with 
MedLims. 
specific MedLims. 
Able to safely move around a ship 
Augmentees able to move 
Unfit to serve in a 
alongside or within the confines of a 
safely around a ship 
Fit for restricted duties in a vessel 
vessel at sea but may 
harbour including the ability to evacuate 
alongside or within the 
M3 
in harbour or alongside with the 
serve within the 
 
from the vessel and take emergency action 
confines of a harbour.  
limitations as stated. 
confines of a port or 
(e.g. firefighting and damage control) 
Able to evacuate and take 
harbour. 
without assistance. 
emergency action. 
Fit to move safely around a ship at sea, in 
harbour or alongside including using 
ladders and stairs, opening heavy hatches, 
stepping over hatch combings and 
RN personnel should 
tolerating a moving/rolling platform.10 Not 
not be graded M4.  
Commando and Port and 
Fit to be carried as embarked 
to be part of the firefighting or damage 
 
Maritime personnel 
Fit to travel by sea as a 
M4 
forces in transit. 
control organisation but must be able to 
RM personnel should 
should not normally be 
passenger. 
take emergency response and evacuation 
not normally be graded  graded M4. 
actions unaided.  
M4. 
Usual grading for Army and RAF 
personnel who do not have a regular 
maritime role.
 
 
8 Army personnel employed in the maritime environment should follow RN single-Service guidance. 
9 Augmentees are personnel who will work as part of or alongside the ship’s personnel as part of their role and may be expected to undertake damage control of firefighting duties. 
10 Ladders may be vertical or sloping, hatch combings are up to 30 cm above the deck, hatches may weigh ≥100 Kg and require up to 8 clips (rotating metal handles) to be moved to allow opening and 
closing the hatch. Some hatches are horizontal and require to be lifted open. The ability to complete these tasks whilst the platform is rolling or being subject to the motion of the seas should be considered. 
The ability to hear alarms and move around in poor lighting or smoke are essential to the ability to safely evacuate from the vessel unaided in case of an emergency. 
Return to Contents Page 
2-B-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
MARITIME 
MES 
Single-Service Supplementary Guidance 
Description 
Guidance 
Code 
RN 
Army8 
RAF 
Embedded RAF personnel 
Not to work on ships/submarines alongside 
with severe seasickness or 
Fit for restricted duties ashore 
M5 
and may not be able to complete all duties   
 
other medical condition(s) 
within the limitations as stated. 
required of their branch/trade ashore. 
incompatible with being on 
board a ship. 
Long-term sick or in a MTF for >28 days or 
Unfit for any duties in the 
M6 
given a medical board recommendation for   
 
 
maritime environment. 
discharge. 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
2-B-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
ENVIRONMENT AND MEDICAL SUPPORT 
MES 
Single-Service Supplementary Guidance 
Code 
Description 
Guidance 
RN 
Army 
RAF 
Fit to deploy on contingent and enduring 
operations with no requirement for medical 
Fit for worldwide service in all 
E1 
care within the deployed location beyond 
 
 
 
environments. 
deployed Primary Healthcare (or 
equivalent). 
Has a specific medical condition, which 
does not currently affect employability or 
deployability but may do so in future. Has 
Examples of medical 
Excludes any medical 
no climatic restriction and no requirement 
risk markers are early 
No functional limitation but 
condition that would 
Fit for unrestricted duties but with  for medical support bar adequate supply of  noise induced hearing 
has a stable controlled 
E2 
require review by a MO 
a medical risk marker. 
medication. The medical condition is stable  loss, stable chronic 
condition such as high 
before authorising 
with treatment.  Should loss of medication 
condition requiring 
blood pressure. 
occur for ≤ 1 week this should not lead to 
deployment.   
medical monitoring. 
clinical deterioration in the condition or 
functional degradation during that time. 
Environmental limitations 
or the individual requires 
Personnel may be 
access to additional 
employed in locations 
medical provision, but not 
Fit subject to limitations as will require 
with reduced health care  full UK care level (e.g. 
Personnel may require 
access to enhanced medical support, or 
provision. When advising  access to a 
guaranteed access to 
has specific medication requirements 
on employment or 
physiotherapist, dentist, 
Restricted employment outside 
an MO outside UK 
unlikely to be compatible with contingent 
deployment away from 
Mental Health Nurse, GP 
E3 
UK due to medical support or 
waters or only be 
operations. Fit to be in areas within 
the firm base the MO 
or a general hospital 
environmental requirements. 
deployable where 
limitations e.g. climatic injuries, hearing 
must ensure that in-
doctor). Requires basic 
access to Secondary 
loss, susceptibility to environmental 
theatre medical provision  MRA by station MO.  
Healthcare is possible. 
exposure. 
can meet the individual’s  Confirmation of the 
routine and emergency 
adequacy of medical 
needs. 
support by receiving 
medical authority is 
required.11 
 
11 An MRA may be enduring for a period of up to of 3 years across short-term deployments to a specified location. It should be reviewed by an MO if the risk assessment changes during this time (i.e. 
change in medical condition, treatment, follow-up requirements, JMES or medical support). 
Return to Contents Page 
2-B-7 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
ENVIRONMENT AND MEDICAL SUPPORT 
MES 
Single-Service Supplementary Guidance 
Code 
Description 
Guidance 
RN 
Army 
RAF 
Individual must have 
access to significant 
additional medical 
When advising on 
provision to full UK care 
Only to be employed out of the 
employment outside the 
Has a medical condition requiring access 
Limited to major 
level. Requires enhanced 
UK where there is access to 
UK the MO must ensure 
either routinely or as an emergency to 
Overseas Bases only 
MRA by Consultant in OM, 
E4 
established, ‘NHS equivalent or 
that in-theatre medical 
better’ Primary and Secondary 
medical care at a level available equivalent  (excludes Falklands 
normally Manning (Medical 
provision can meet the 
to that provided in the UK. 
and Diego Garcia). 
Casework). Confirmation 
Healthcare. 
individual’s routine and 
of the adequacy of medical 
emergency needs. 
support by receiving 
medical authority is 
required. 
Personnel with on-going 
Personnel for example 
See M grade for ability 
health care needs, which  requiring medical 
May be employed within the UK 
To be employed appropriately to their 
E5 
to be employed on a 
would be adversely 
treatment or follow-up 
only. 
MedLims within the UK. 
ship. 
affected by employment 
more frequent than 6 
outside of the UK. 
monthly. 
Pregnancy/Maternity. 
Only to be used when the woman has 
Prior to formal 
 
 
formally informed her employer of her 
declaration, to be 
pregnancy (e.g. using Mat B1) and she 
graded MND A4 L4 M3 
has given her consent in writing for MES to  E5. 
be displayed as E6 or a contemporaneous 
E6 
record has been made in the clinical notes 
confirming permission granted. E6 is to be 
maintained until the Service woman has 
successfully completed a return-to-work 
medical post pregnancy and/or maternity 
leave. 
Return to Contents Page 
2-B-8 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX C  
MEDICAL LIMITATIONS 
 
 
 
1. 
The JMES provides sufficient information to the Executive and line management to enable 
them to understand employability and deployability but does not give sufficient information to allow 
a precise understanding of how an individual may be employed. This is achieved by the use of 
Medical Limitations (MedLims) and their accompanying codes. 
 
2. 
In DMICP MedLims are listed in the order they are applied. More than 12 MedLims can be 
applied in DMICP but only 12 will be visible to personnel staff on JPA. If >12 MedLims are applied, 
MedLim ‘000’ wil  automatical y appear on JPA. This MedLim directs the CoC to seek further 
medical advice on employability.  
 
3. 
Medical Officers must only apply MedLims if they are fully conversant with the implications of 
doing so. If required, advice must be sought from suitably qualified and experienced medical 
personnel.   
 
4. 
Where sub-domains are annotated ‘(App 9)’, additional Appendix 9-specific MedLims are 
available, but only within DMICP Appendix 9 template drop-down menus. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
2-C-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Table 1 Medical Limitation codes 
 

1000 Series - Miscellaneous Domain 
MedLim 
Sub-domain 
Description 
Code 
> 12 MedLims allocated – CoC to seek further medical advice on 
MedLims (>12) 
000 
employability 
Restrictions on Service duties and employment not specified by a 
Not otherwise specified 
1100 
MedLim (details in med docs)  
Working conditions 
1200 
Unfit shift work 
Working conditions 
1201 
Unfit for night work 
Working conditions 
1202 
Unfit for lone working 
Working conditions 
1203 
Unfit to work at height  
Working conditions 
1204 
Unfit to work on gantries 
Working conditions 
1205 
Unfit to work underground 
Working conditions 
1206 
Unfit to work in confined spaces 
Working conditions 
1207 
Unfit to work without direct supervision 
Fit limited duties in trade or branch (type will be specified in Med 
Working conditions 
1208 
Docs)  
Working conditions 
1209 
Office duties only  
Working conditions 
1210 
Fit limited working hours agreed between MO and  Line Manager 
Working conditions 
1211 
Unfit to conduct EPPs 
Working conditions 
1212 
Passenger - land vehicles restriction  
(App 9) 
Working conditions 
1213 
Workplace restrictions 
(App 9) 
Employment 
1300 
Medical marker (no functional limitation)1 
Employment 
1301 
Employment subject to single-Service manning restriction 
Employment 
1302 
Enlisted below entry standards 
Employment (App 9) 
1303 
Refer to Appendix 9  
Safety critical duties 
1400 
Unfit to conduct safety critical duties 
Safety critical duties 
1401 
Unfit to undertake service driving 
Safety critical duties 
1402 
Unfit to undertake service driving with passengers 
Safety critical duties 
1403 
Unfit to drive specific vehicle (type will be specified in Med Docs) 
Safety critical duties 
1404 
Not to be responsible for operating machinery 
Safety critical duties 
1405 
Unfit for work with unguarded machinery 
Below required colour perception standard requires supervision for 
Safety critical duties 
1406 
colour discrimination tasks 
Food handling 
1500 
Unfit food handling 
Food handling 
1501 
Unfit for galley / kitchen duties 
Diet 
1600 
Must have opportunity for regular meals 
Diet 
1601 
To have access to a gluten free diet at all times  
Diet 
1602 
To have access to specialist diet (type will be specified in Med Docs) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1 Or additional medical condition(s) requiring a medical marker (no functional limitation). 
Return to Contents Page 
2-C-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
2000 Series - Aviation Domain 
MedLim 
Sub-domain 
Description 
Code 
Flying 
2000 
Unfit solo pilot - must fly with a pilot suitably qualified on type 
Flying 
2001 
Unfit solo (aircrew category will be specified in Med Docs) 
Flying 
2002 
Unfit specific aircraft (type(s) to be specified in Med Docs) 
Flying 
2003 
Fit (details to be specified in Med Docs) flying duties only 
Flying 
2004 
Unfit (conditions of flight to be specified in Med Docs) 
Flying 
2005 
Permanently unfit flying duties 
Flying 
2006 
Unfit to climb on aircraft 
Flying 
2007 
Unfit ejection seat aircraft 
Flying 
2008 
Restricted employability because of anthropometric limitations 
Controlling 
2100 
Unfit aircraft controlling duties 
Fit to control only when another qualified controller is on duty and in 
Controlling 
2101 
close proximity 
Aircrew assessed as hearing standard <H2 but with a satisfactory 
Hearing / Vision 
2200 
functional hearing test iaw AP1269A 
Must wear approved visual correction when flying or controlling 
Hearing / Vision 
2201 
aircraft and carry a spare pair of spectacles 
Must carry approved corrective flying spectacles when flying or 
Hearing / Vision 
2203 
controlling aircraft 
Respirators 
2300 
Unfit aircrew respirators 
STASS 
2400 
Fit dry/poolside STASS training only 
STASS 
2401 
Unfit any STASS training 
Parachuting 
2500 
Unfit land parachuting 
Parachuting 
2501 
Unfit sea parachuting 
 
3000 Series - Land Domain 
MedLim 
Sub-domain 
Description 
Code 
Limited operational land deployments. Employable within the confines 
Deployment 
3000 
of a rear echelon only 
No operational land deployments. Must not deploy to any operational 
Deployment 
3001 
arena 
Deployment  (App 9) 
3002 
Fit for short land deployments subject to Medical Risk Assessment 
Deployment 
3003 
Fit detachments in worldwide areas not exceeding 30 days 
Mobility (App 9) 
3100 
Infantry activities (including digging) restrictions 
Mobility (App 9) 
3101 
Travel on foot across rough terrain restrictions 
Mobility (App 9) 
3102 
Move tactically and adopting fire positions restrictions 
Field conditions (App 
3200 
Living in field conditions restrictions 
9) 
 
4000 Series - Maritime Domain 
MedLim 
Sub-domain 
Description 
Code 
Ships / submarines 
4000 
Fit to serve in frigates and above only 
Ships / submarines 
4001 
Fit for short visits to a ships / submarine alongside only 
Ships / submarines 
4002 
Fit to serve in ships or submarines at sea in UK waters only 
Fit to serve in ships or submarines at sea in UK and Northern 
Ships / submarines 
4003 
European waters only 
Fit for submarines in UK and US fleet exercise areas within medevac 
Ships / submarines 
4004 
range 
Ships / submarines 
4005 
Temporarily unfit submarine service 
Ships / submarines 
4006 
Permanently unfit submarine service 
Return to Contents Page 
2-C-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Permanently unfit service on a submarine at sea (fit SM duties 
Ships / submarines 
4007 
alongside / ashore) 
Permanently unfit service on a submarine at sea or alongside (fit SM 
Ships / submarines 
4008 
duties ashore only) 
Marine Craft 
4100 
Unfit fast boat transits and boat operations in rough sea states 
Royal Marines 
4200 
Permanently unfit for Royal Marines General Service 
Diving 
4300 
Temporarily unfit diving 
Diving 
4301 
Permanently unfit diving 
Fit to dive, with restrictions assigned by SMO Underwater 
Diving 
4302 
Med/NSMBOS.  DW MO for medical restrictor 
Unfit mixed gas diving, navigation and watch keeping duties – (for 
Diving 
4303 
CP4 divers iaw BR1750A 1219b) 
Sea survival / fire 
4400 
Unfit for BSSC or ISSC 
fighting 
Sea survival / fire 
4401 
Unfit BSSC / ISSC but fit Embarked Forces Fire Fighting Training 
fighting 
Sea survival / fire 
4402 
Unfit firefighting training and duties 
fighting 
Dockyard 
4500 
Unfit to work on dockyard edges 
Medical review 
4600 
Fit for short embarked deployments subject to MRA 
Fit to serve in ships, submarines or RM Units with a permanent MO 
Medical support 
4601 
borne only 
Needs access to a MO within 24 hours when deployed outside UK 
Medical support 
4602 
waters 
Needs access to a MO within 2 days when deployed outside UK 
Medical support 
4603 
waters 
Needs access to a MO within 3 days when deployed outside UK 
Medical support 
4604 
waters 
Needs access to a MO within 5 days when deployed outside UK 
Medical support 
4605 
waters 
Needs access to a MO within 7 days when deployed outside UK 
Medical support 
4606 
waters 
 
5000 Series - Environment and Medical Support Domain 
MedLim 
Sub-domain 
Description 
Code 
Geographical/Regional assignment restrictions (details specified in 
Geographical 
5000 
medical documents) 
Geographical 
5001 
Unfit to deploy, travel or reside in malarious areas 
Geographical 
5002 
Unfit Service outside base areas 
Climatic restrictions - To be employed in appropriate thermal 
Climatic (App 9) 
5100 
environment 
Climatic 
5101 
Unfit for work outdoors   
Unfit exposure to hot environments (including within the UK) seek 
Climatic 
5102 
guidance from medical staff 
Unfit exposure to cold environments (including within the UK) seek 
Climatic 
5103 
guidance from medical staff 
Climatic 
5104 
Unfit exposure to excessively wet environments 
Climatic 
5105 
Unfit exposure bright light / strong sunlight 
To wear Service / civilian PPE to ensure hands and feet are kept 
Climatic 
5106 
warm 
Climatic 
5107 
Fit to be employed in temperate climates only 
Unfit exposure skin irritants / sensitizers (type will be specified in Med 
Environmental hazards 
5200 
Docs) 
Unfit exposure to dusts, fumes and vapours (type will be specified in 
Environmental hazards 
5201 
Med Docs) 
Has (or may have) been exposed to environ hazard, avoid further 
Environmental hazards 
5202 
exposure, refer to med docs/JPA 
Return to Contents Page 
2-C-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Climatic 
5101 
Unfit for work outdoors   
Unfit exposure to hot environments (including within the UK) seek 
Climatic 
5102 
guidance from medical staff 
Unfit exposure to cold environments (including within the UK) seek 
Climatic 
5103 
guidance from medical staff 
Climatic 
5104 
Unfit exposure to excessively wet environments 
Climatic 
5105 
Unfit exposure bright light / strong sunlight 
To wear Service / civilian PPE to ensure hands and feet are kept 
Climatic 
5106 
warm 
Climatic 
5107 
Fit to be employed in temperate climates only 
Unfit exposure skin irritants / sensitizers (type will be specified in Med 
Environmental hazards 
5200 
Docs) 
Unfit exposure to dusts, fumes and vapours (type will be specified in 
Environmental hazards 
5201 
Med Docs) 
Has (or may have) been exposed to environ hazard, avoid further 
Environmental hazards 
5202 
exposure, refer to med docs/JPA 
Not to conduct safety critical duties if medical support device(s) 
Med support 
5300 
unavailable 
Med support 
5301 
To have access to appropriate power supply for medical equipment 
Med support 
5302 
Requires access to irradiated Blood Products 
ROHC auto-upgrade: if not upgraded MFD within 12 mths is to return 
Auto-upgrade 
5400 
to NSMBOS/FMB 
ROHC upgrade: if not upgraded MFD or MFD (8001 + or - 5504) 
Auto-upgrade 
5401 
within 12 mths return to NSMBOS/FMB2 
PMO/SMO upgrade: if not upgraded MFD or MFD (8001 + or - 5504) 
Auto-upgrade 
5402 
within 12 mths return to NSMBOS/FMB 
Must have MRA undertaken by ROHC prior to Exercise / IPDT / 
Medical review  
5500 
deployment 
Medical review 
5501 
To be made available for regular medical reviews 
Medical review 
5502 
For annual review by PMO / SMO 
Medical review 
5503 
For annual review by Regional OH Consultant 
Medical review 
5504 
Requires MRA prior to attendance on Command Course 
JCC / SCC  
5600 
Fit for modified JCC or SCC / JCC or SCC (RM Band) only 
 
6000 Series - Locomotion, Lifting and Carrying Domain 
MedLim 
Sub-domain 
Description 
Code 
Locomotion 
6000 
Unfit strenuous physical exertion 
Locomotion 
6001 
Requires to be seated at place of work 
Locomotion 
6002 
Fit sedentary duties only 
Locomotion 
6003 
Unable to sit for long periods 
Locomotion 
6004 
Unable to stand for long periods 
Locomotion 
6005 
Unfit for work kneeling down 
Locomotion 
6006 
Unfit marching / drill 
Locomotion 
6007 
Able to walk short distances only 
Locomotion 
6008 
Unable to climb stairs regularly in course of duty 
Locomotion 
6009 
Unable to climb vertical ladders 
Fit limited use of one hand / arm (details will be specified in Med 
Upper Limbs 
6100 
Docs) 
Lifting/Carrying 
6200 
Unfit heavy lifting 
Lifting/Carrying 
6201 
No load carrying 
 
 
2 To be revised at next template revision to: “5401: ROHC auto-upgrade: if not upgraded MFD or MLD (iaw current policy) within 12 
mths return to NSMBOS”. 
Return to Contents Page 
2-C-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
7000 Series Hearing and Vision Domain 
MedLim 
Description 
Description 
Code 
Hearing 
7000 
To have annual audiograms with subsequent review by PMO / SMO 
To ensure correct use of hearing personal protective equipment iaw 
Hearing 
7001 
Hearing Conservation Programme 
Hearing 
7002 
To avoid unprotected exposure to loud noise 
Hearing 
7003 
Unfit exposure to noise above (to be specified) level 
Hearing 
7004 
Unfit wearing of headsets 
Hearing 
7005 
Unfit split headsets 
To wear appropriate eye protection including specialist or tinted 
Vision 
7100 
eyewear 
 
8000 Series - Physical Fitness and Rehabilitation Domain 
MedLim 
Sub-domain 
Description 
Code 
Fitness testing 
8000 
Medically exempt from all requirements of RNFT / RAFFT / PFA 
Fit for Alternative Aerobic Assessment or Rockport Walk element of 
Fitness testing 
8001 
RNFT / RAFFT  
Fitness testing 
8002 
Unfit upper body / strength test element of the RNFT 
Fitness testing 
8003 
Unfit RM BFT / CFT / ACFT / speed marches 
Fitness testing 
8004 
Unfit AFT / OFT / speed marches 
Fitness testing (App 9) 
8005 
Unfit to walk 3.2km carrying 15kg  
Fitness testing 
8006 
Unfit OFT  
Fitness testing 
8007 
Unfit Alternative Aerobic Assessment  
Fitness testing 
8008 
Unfit press-ups 
Fitness testing 
8009 
Alternative press-up hand position allowed 
Fitness testing 
8010 
Unfit sit-ups 
PT 
8100 
Unfit running 
PT 
8101 
Unfit impact activity 
PT 
8102 
Unfit organised physical training; fit individual PT programme only 
PT 
8103 
Unfit Upper body PT 
PT 
8104 
Restricted lower limb non-impact physical training 
Rehabilitation 
8200 
Individual to be made available to follow rehabilitation PT programme 
Rehabilitation 
8201 
Graduated Rehabilitation as directed by Clinical Lead 
Graduated rehab including supervised phased return to limited sea 
Rehabilitation 
8202 
duties as directed by Clin Lead 
Fit travel outside UK on duty for adaptive sport/adventurous 
Rehabilitation 
8203 
trg/represent the Service following MRA 
Rehabilitation  
8204 
Unfit Multi Activity Course 
Rehabilitation  
8205 
Unfit Core Recovery Event 1 
Rehabilitation  
8206 
Unfit Core Recovery Event 2 
Rehabilitation  
8207 
Unfit Core Recovery Event 3 
Sport 
8300 
Unfit sport (to be specified in Med Docs) 
Sport 
8301 
Unfit contact sports 
Sport 
8302 
Unfit solo swimming 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
2-C-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
9000 Series - Military Tasks Domain 
MedLim 
Sub-domain 
Description 
Code 
Weapon handling 
9000 
Unfit handling live arms3 
Weapon handling 
9001 
Unfit live weapons / fit simulation 
Weapon handling 
9002 
Unfit APWT 
Weapon handling 
9003 
Ranges restrictions 
(App 9) 
Weapon handling 
9004 
Weapon handling restrictions 
(App 9) 
Guard / Ceremonial 
9200 
Unfit guard duties 
Guard / Ceremonial 
9201 
Unfit for ceremonial duties 
Personal Kit and 
9300 
Clothing restrictions / military PPE (to be specified in med docs) 
Equipment 
Personal Kit and 
9301 
Unfit wearing Service footwear (to be specified in Med Docs) 
Equipment 
Personal Kit and 
9302 
Unfit non-aircrew respirators 
Equipment 
Dog handling 
9400 
Unfit for dog handling 
Unfit CBRN threat areas, unable to tolerate CBRN protection and / or 
CBRN 
9500 
prophylactic measures 
Unit 
9600 
Unfit to return to original unit 
UKSF 
9700 
Permanently unfit UKSF Selection 
 
 
 
 
 
3 Unable to bear arms whether through psychiatric or physical reasons. Individuals are still fit to undertake weapons handling without live 
ammunition. 
Return to Contents Page 
2-C-7 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
SECTION THREE: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH ASSESSMENTS 
Aim  
 
1.  
The aim of this Section is to describe the requirements and processes of medical 
assessment for Armed Forces personnel. It applies to both regular and reserve forces.  
 
General  
 
2.  
Medical assessment including both history and examination where appropriate must be 
systematic and thorough. The medical assessment should produce not only an accurate picture of 
the person’s health, but also their functional capacity with regard to their current and likely future 
employment (including deployment). Careful assessment for age-related decrement of functional 
capacity or ill health is required. Any change in employment may require a further assessment. In 
all cases the medical assessment is to be carried out by medical personnel with sufficient training 
to recognise abnormal results in the screening tests used and to be able to deal with any health 
concerns raised, by onward referral if necessary. This Section does not cover statutory health 
examinations (e.g. isocyanate workers) for which reference should be made to the appropriate 
policy, guidelines and single-Service publications.  
 
3.  
Medical assessments are to be conducted on the following occasions for the purposes 
stated. Guidelines on the conduct of each assessment are provided in the following paragraphs.  
At each assessment a PULHHEEMS grade16 is to be recorded on the medical record and (with the 
individual’s consent) the result passed to the appropriate administrative office17. Each quality and 
the factors that affect it are described in Section 1 and the functional interpretation of grades for 
each quality are summarised at Annex A. Further guidance for the allocation of a grading by 
medical condition is given in the annexes to Sections 4 and 5.  
 
a.  
Pre-Service. The purpose of the pre-service medical examination is to determine 
medical fitness for employment (with respect to the period of engagement). Comprehensive 
guidelines are provided in paragraphs 5-7 and at Annex B.  
 
b.  
In-Service. In-Service assessments may be routine, for a specific requirement18 or on 
occasions when a medical board is required. Their purpose is to confirm continued fitness for 
present employment and they provide an opportunity for health promotion (activities in this 
latter respect are outwith the remit of this JSP). Further guidelines are provided in 
Paragraphs 8-10.  
 
(1)   Routine medical assessments remain appropriate where legislation demands 
enhanced health surveillance. Thus, specialist trade groups require more frequent 
medical assessment in line with regulatory frameworks such as the Diving at Work 
Regulations or MAA Regulatory Articles (as non-exhaustive examples applicable to 
divers and aviators respectively). 
 
(2)   Service Medical Boards19 are conducted to re-grade personnel following changes 
in their functional capacity and medical employability resulting from illness and/or injury, 
either on a temporary or permanent basis.  
 
c.  
Mobilisation and demobilisation (Reserve forces only). The purpose of the 
mobilisation medical assessment is to confirm fitness for mobilisation and/or deployment. 
The aim of the demobilisation medical is to identify any changes in health status that have 
occurred during mobilisation and to confirm fitness for future reserve service. Further 
guidelines are provided in paragraphs 11-13.  
 
16 Including suffixes to the grading in accordance with single Service guidelines. 
17 In accordance with single Service policy. 
18 E.g. change of commission or re-engagement. 
19 Refer to single Service guidelines for further instructions. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
d. 
Discharge. The discharge medical assessment is conducted at the termination of 
employment. Its purpose is to assess and record the medical status and functional capacity 
at the time of discharge including an appropriate PULHHEEMS grade. Further guidelines are 
provided in paragraph 14.  
 
4. 
Annexes C-G are provided to assist the assessment of Body Mass Index and the HEM
and CP qualities respectively.  
 
Guidelines for the pre-Service medical assessment  
 
5.  
General. The aim of pre-service medical assessment is to determine fitness for employment 
for the terms of initial engagement and (implicitly) fitness to join the Armed Forces Pension 
Scheme.  Because the pre-service medical assessment must be particularly thorough, 
comprehensive guidelines are provided at Annex B. Section 3 provides specific details of 
conditions of relevance for entry to service. The requirements for assessment for special 
employments (e.g. aircrew, divers) are not included in this Section and for which reference should 
be made to single-Service guidelines. 
 
6.  
History. Although a pre-employment health questionnaire may have been reviewed prior to 
personal assessment of the candidate, the guidelines are restricted to general principles and the 
verification of the history at the time of the examination. For guidelines on the evaluation of the 
and qualities, see Annex F.  
 
7.  
Physical Examination. Functional fitness must be determined and therefore the physical 
examination must be comprehensive in all cases. 
 
Guidelines for in-Service medical assessments  
 
8.  
General.  The aim of the in-service medical assessment is to confirm continued fitness for 
present employment. It may also provide an opportunity for health promotion although a full 
description of activities in this respect is outwith the remit of this JSP. Reference may be made to 
the guidelines for assessment at Annex B but the assessment need not in all cases be as 
comprehensive. Section 5 provides specific details of conditions of relevance during Service. 
 
9.  
History. There is more to be gained from a comprehensive review of medical history (since 
the last examination) than there is through physical examination. Episodes of ill health should be 
reviewed and in particular, an assessment made and recorded on whether there has been any 
interaction between health and work20. For guidelines on the evaluation of the and qualities, 
see Annex F.  
 
10.   Physical examination. Any mandatory health surveillance examinations must be conducted 
(e.g. audiometry for those on Hearing Conservation programmes). The examination may be 
targeted but sufficient evidence is to be gained from the examination to enable an accurate 
assessment for each PULHHEEMS quality. If there has been a significant decrement of functional 
capacity, adjustment to the P quality may be required. Audiometry and measurement of distant 
visual acuity, height, weight, blood pressure and urinalysis are to be recorded at each assessment. 
  
Guidelines for the assessment at mobilisation and de-mobilisation of Reserves  
 
11.   Mobilisation. The aim of the mobilisation medical assessment is to determine fitness for a 
reservist’s mobilised and/or deployed role(s). Reservists wil  already have had a pre-service 
medical assessment and may have had in-service assessments. The assessment must be 
thorough in order to detect conditions that may constrain performance in their role. This may 
include a request for focused and specific information from the Reservist’s GP with respect to 
 
20 Elucidation of all biopsychosocial factors is recommended. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
function. Additionally, experience has shown that reservists tend to be older than regulars. It is 
therefore recommended that the assessment should be as comprehensive as that described at 
Annex B.  
 
a.  
History. All aspects of the medical history since the last medical assessment should be 
explored and any intended deployed role21 determined to inform the decision on fitness for 
mobilisation. For additional guidelines on the evaluation of mental health, see Annex F.  
 
b.  
Physical examination. Sufficient evidence is to be gained from a targeted medical 
assessment to enable an accurate JMES. Audiometry and measurement of distant visual 
acuity, height, weight, blood pressure and urinalysis are to be recorded.  
 
12.   Demobilisation of Reservists. The following procedures apply:  
 
a.  
The purpose of the demobilisation medical is to identify any changes in health status 
that have occurred during mobilisation and to confirm fitness for future reserve service.  
 
b.  
A Health Declaration by the individual is to be completed, indicating whether or not 
there has been any change in health status during the period of mobilised service. Where 
there has been a change, the declaration is to include any known causes for the change and 
action taken as a result.  An example of such a health declaration is at Annex H.  
 
c.  
All personnel are to be offered the opportunity for a consultation with a doctor.  
 
d.  
Appropriate disposal of the F Med 965 theatre medical record is to be confirmed.  
 
Guidelines for the discharge medical assessment  
 
13.   General. The aim of the discharge medical assessment is to assess and record the medical 
status and functional capacity at the time of discharge including an appropriate PULHHEEMS 
profile. This assessment may be required as evidence of illness or injury attributed to service22and 
to inform any decision for re-enlistment. The results of the assessment must therefore be recorded 
meticulously. In particular, known exposures to hazards (physical, biological, chemical, 
psychological) that have potential adverse health effects (such as disease vectors or 
environmental and industrial hazards) must be listed. Reference may be made to the guidelines for 
assessment at Annex B but the assessment need not in all cases be as comprehensive. For 
discharges from Service for medical reasons, these instructions are complementary to Section 6 
Harmonisation of Medical Boards Leading to Discharge. The FMed 133 is normally completed at 
this assessment.  
 
14.  History. All episodes of ill health during service should be reviewed and in particular, an 
assessment made and recorded on whether there has been any interaction between health and 
work23. For guidelines on the evaluation of the and qualities, see Annex F. 
 
15.   Physical Examination. The examination may be targeted but sufficient evidence is to be 
gained from the examination to enable an accurate assessment for each PULHHEEMS quality. If 
there has been a significant age-related decrement of functional capacity, adjustment to the P 
grade may be required. Audiometry and measurement of distant visual acuity, height, weight, blood 
pressure and urinalysis are to be recorded.  
 
 
 
 
21 Both geographic and activity aspects are to be determined. 
22 The examining medical officer is not required to determine attributability. 
23 Elucidation of all biopsychosocial factors is recommended. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Annexes  
 
A. 
Functional Interpretation of Grades for each Quality.  
B. 
Guidelines for the Conduct of the Pre-Service Medical Assessment.  
C. 
Assessment of Body Mass Index.  
D. 
Assessment of hearing acuity (H).  
E. 
Assessment of distant visual acuity (E).  
F. 
Evaluation of Mental Capacity (M) and Emotional Stability (S).  
G. 
Assessment of Red/Green Colour Perception (CP).  
H. 
Health declaration - example for use at demobilisation.  
I. 
Guidelines for undertaking screening Pure Tone Audiometry. 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
3-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX A  
FUNCTIONAL INTERPRETATION OF GRADES FOR EACH QUALITY 
 
 
Grade 
P 
U 
L 
HH 
EE 
M 
S 
Factors to  Age, build 
Strength, range  Strength, range  Audiometrically 
Visual 
Mental capacity. 
Emotional stability. 
considered  strength and  of movement 
of movement 
assessed acuity 
acuity. 
stamina 
and general 
and efficiency 
of hearing. The 
efficiency of 
of feet, legs 
sum of the 
upper arm, 
pelvic girdle 
hearing loss at: 
shoulder girdle 
and lower back.   
and back 
FREQUENCIES 
Lower 
Upper 

 
 
 
45dB or  45 dB 
Not less 
 
 
less 
or less 
than 6/6. 
Good hearing 
 
*(RN only: Level 
not to be more 
than 30 dB at 6 
kHz or 20 dB at 
any other 
frequency) 

Medically fit 
Muscle power 
Can run, jump, 
84dB 
123dB 
Not less 
Ability under 
The absence of a 
for 
average. Able 
climb crawl and  or less 
or less 
than 6/9.   service conditions 
medical condition 
unrestricted 
to handle arms 
perform all 
Acceptable 
to learn to perform 
affecting normal 
service 
and do heavy 
kinds of manual  practical hearing 
successfully all 
emotional stability. 
worldwide.  
manual work.  
labour.  
for Service 
Service duties. 
purposes 
Includes capability 
to be trained as 
tradesperson or 
specialist 

Medically fit 
Must be able to  Capable of 
150dB 
210dB 
Not less 
Ability under 
The presence of a 
for duty with  use personal 
walking at least  or less 
or less 
than 
Service  
minor limitation to 
minor 
weapon  
5 miles and  
Impaired hearing.  6/12.  
conditions to learn 
emotional stability 
employment  and be capable  able to stand for  The hearing level 
to perform simple 
likely to affect  
limitations  
of wearing 
periods of at 
at which most 
unskilled duties.  
the individual’s 
protective 
least 2 hours 
personnel are 
 
ability to perform 
clothing.  
 
unfit for entry to 
their normal military 
 
the Service. 
duty and general 
 
military skills. 
Limitations to 
employment are to 
be stated (e.g. 
working patterns) 
preferably following 
discussion between 
clinicians and the 
individual’s line-
manager (following 
consent). Fit to 
handle live arms 
and perform 
mandatory military 
training but must be 
reviewed by a 
service-appointed 
medical officer prior 
to deployment.  

Medically fit 
 
 
More 
More 
Not less 
 
 
for duty 
than 
than 
than 
within the 
150DB   210dB   6/18. 
limitations of 
Very poor 
 
pregnancy.  
hearing. Below 
 
entry standard for 
the Services.  
 
 
 

Return to Contents Page 
3-A-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Grade 
P 
U 
L 
HH 
EE 
M 
S 

 
 
 
 
Not 
 
 
less 
than 
6/24. 

 
 
 
 
Not 
 
.  
less 
than 
6/36. 

Medically fit 
Capable of 
Able to walk 
 
Not 
Capable of 
The presence 
for duty with 
sedentary 
2 miles at 
less 
performing 
of a major 
major 
and routine 
own pace. 
than 
simple duties 
limitation to 
employment 
work of a 
Can stand 
6/60. 
under 
emotional 
limitations.  
lighter type.   for a 
 
supervision. Not 
stability likely to 
moderate 
able to bear 
significantly 
period.  
arms. Fit for 
affect the 
restricted 
individual’s 
service only.  
ability to 
perform their 
normal military 
duty and 
general military 
skills. Able to 
function within 
a military work 
environment. 
However, unfit 
to handle live 
arms or be 
deployed.  

Medically 
Medically 
Medically 
Medically unfit 
Less 
Medically unfit 
Defect of 
unfit for 
unfit for 
unfit for 
for service.  
than 
for service.  
emotional 
service.  
service.  
service.  
6/60. 
stability such 
that the 
individual is 
below P7 
criteria.  
Return to Contents Page 
3-A-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX B  
GUIDELINES FOR THE CONDUCT OF PRE-SERVICE MEDICAL 
ASSESSMENT 

 
1.  
Introduction. This Annex describes the pre-service medical assessment process. It includes 
an element of screening to assess an individual’s fitness for service, including the likelihood of 
developing a condition during service.  
 
2.  
Documentation. A pre-employment health questionnaire is to be completed in accordance 
with single-Service guidelines. The date and details of the pre-service medical assessment are to 
be recorded on the appropriate single-Service form, whether paper1 or electronic and, with the 
individual’s consent, the result passed to the appropriate administrative office.  
 
Preliminary assessments  
 
3.  
Appropriately trained medical staff may conduct and record the following preliminary 
assessments before a medical officer conducts the examination.  
 
a.  
The NHS Number is to be recorded (if not already recorded on the health 
questionnaire).  
b.  
Height, weight, BMI2 and, when applicable3, body fat percentage.  
c.  
Blood pressure4 (sitting). Two additional measurements are to be taken if the first 
recording is abnormal.  
d.  
Urinalysis (blood, protein and glucose). Two additional samples are to be tested if the 
first recording is abnormal5.  
e.  
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR). The predicted PEFR is to be calculated and the 
actual PEFR measured. Two additional measurements are to be taken if the first recording is 
abnormal. Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) and Forced Vital capacity (FVC) are to be 
measured if indicated6.  
f.  
Audiometry. See Annex D for further guidance on assessment and recording.  
g.  
Distant Visual Acuity (EE) and Red/Green Colour Perception (CP). See Annexes E and 
G for further guidance on assessment and recording.  
 
4. 
It is good practice for the examining medical officer to collect the individual from the waiting 
area and this is an ideal time for gait to be observed. Personal identity is to be verified, and 
completeness of medical documentation (health questionnaire and a record of preliminary 
assessments) confirmed.  
 
History  
 
5.  
Although the pre-employment health questionnaire will have been reviewed prior to personal 
assessment of the candidate, these guidelines are restricted to general principles and the 
verification of the history at the time of examination. It must be confirmed that there is no history of 
 
1 The individual’s name is to be recorded on each sheet of the paper record. 
2 See Annex C for Body Mass Index Guidelines. 
3 In accordance with single Service instructions. 
4 In accordance with British Hypertension Society guidelines.  
5 See Chapter 3, Leaflet 7, Paragraph 3.7.1. 
6 See Chapter 3, Leaflet 5, Paragraphs 3.5.2 – 3.5.6. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-B-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
any conditions incompatible with service. Section 4 provides specific details of the influence of 
conditions on PULHHEEMS assessment at entry. At this stage of the assessment, an evaluation of 
both the (intelligence or ability to learn) and (emotional stability) qualities should commence in 
order for an appropriate grade to be allocated at the end of the assessment. Further guidance on 
assessment of these qualities is provided at Annex F.  
 
6. 
The examining medical officer is to carefully review and verify the history. A summary of 
pertinent information e.g. significant illness/operations and dates is to be entered on the 
assessment record. In particular, the examining medical officer is to ensure that the individual is 
asked specifically, and expand where appropriate on a history of the following conditions:  
 
a.  
Asthma, wheezing, inhaler use.  
 
b.  
Mental ill-health issues, deliberate self-harm.  
 
c.  
Migraine.  
 
d.  
Skin conditions.  
 
e.  
Musculoskeletal conditions.  
 
f.  
A family history of disease, in particular if there is a history of sudden death particularly 
at an early age (<40 years) or lipid disorder.  
 
g.  
Use of tobacco, alcohol and any substance misuse.  
 
h.  
Specific dietary requirements/sensitivities.  
 
7. 
The following details should also be recorded on the assessment record:  
 
a.  
Occupational history.  
 
b.  
Current sporting and physical activity levels.  
 
c.  
Current medical problems together with medication (including oral contraception).  
 
d.  
Women are to be asked for the date of their last menstrual period, the date and result 
of their last cervical smear and any abnormal cervical smear results.  
 
8.  
Following a review of the history, the individual is to read, sign and date the verification 
declaration, and the examining medical officer is to countersign as a witness.  
 
Examination  
 
9. 
Introduction. A comprehensive clinical examination as set out below is to be performed and 
all systems are to be assessed. Medical Officers should use their clinical judgement in interpreting 
these guidelines to determine the depth and detail of examination required in each case. If 
abnormalities are suspected, further information may be sought from the individual’s normal 
providers of primary and secondary care. Any abnormality discovered by the examiner should be 
pursued to a level sufficient to make a PULHHEEMS grading. The functional interpretation of 
grades for each quality is given at Annex A. Specific medical conditions which affect entry and 
employment when serving are detailed in Sections 4 and 5 respectively.  
 
10.  Caveats. Chaperones are to be used in accordance with best practice7 and the name of the 
chaperone should be recorded. If a chaperone is declined, this must also be recorded. The routine 
 
7 https://www.gmc-uk.org/ethical-guidance/ethical-guidance-for-doctors/intimate-examinations-and-chaperones  
Return to Contents Page 
3-B-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
pre-service assessment does not require examination of the female breasts or genitalia. Inspection 
of the anus is not necessary in either male or female candidates.  
 
11.   General considerations. The nature of the medical examination should be explained to the 
candidate together with the reasons for examination of particular systems throughout the 
examination. At appropriate stages during the physical examination, individuals should be asked to 
undress down to their underwear to facilitate a full inspection and also to gain an overall 
impression of their physique8. The candidate’s speech, general appearance and any external signs 
of systemic disease should be noted throughout the interview and examination. Similarly, the skin 
appearance can be assessed throughout the examination although the examining doctor should 
specifically examine the scalp. If necessary, confirmation of the nature and location of declared 
tattoos are to be recorded9. The recommended procedure for examination in a logical order is set 
out below. A record of the findings is to be made against each element.  
 
12.  Head and neck. The inspection of the head and neck is to include: 
 
a. 
General: observation of faces and facial movements.  
 
b. 
Visual examination and function: external examination, pupil reaction to light and 
accommodation, ocular movements in all directions of gaze, visual fields by confrontation 
and fundoscopy10.  
 
c. 
Ears: Tympanic membranes, Valsalva manoeuvre.  
 
d. 
Nose: deformity, patency of nasal passages.  
 
e. 
Mouth: teeth, tongue, palate, speech.  
 
f. 
Cervical lymph nodes.  
 
g. 
Thyroid.  
 
h. 
Scalp: to exclude skin disease.  
 
i. 
Other cranial nerves and special senses. The sense of smell need not be tested.  
 
13.   Chest. Examination of the chest is to be performed with upper body clothing removed but 
there is no routine requirement for females to remove the bra. If it is necessary to move the bra in 
order to listen to heart sounds an explanation should be given to the patient. Examination should 
include:  
 
a.  Pulse (rate and rhythm). Peripheral pulses and radiofemoral delay if indicated. 
 
b.  Confirmation of blood pressure recording (by reference to previous clinical 
measurement). Repeat if indicated.  
 
c.  Location of apex beat, cardiac thrills and auscultation of the heart sounds. Carotid 
auscultation.  
 
d.  Respiratory rate, symmetry of chest, expansion, percussion and auscultation of breath 
sounds.  
 
e.   Axillary lymph nodes.  
 
 
8 Physically immature candidates may not be acceptable. 
9 In accordance with single Service procedures. 
10 With the examination room darkened. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-B-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
14.   Abdomen. Upper body clothing may now be replaced. The candidate should be asked to lie 
on their back on the couch to facilitate examination of the abdomen. Formal examination of the 
liver, spleen, kidneys, inguinal lymph nodes and testes is to be performed, and the absence of any 
herniae confirmed. Examination of female genitalia is not to be undertaken.  
 
15.   Examination of the musculoskeletal system. A formal and comprehensive clinical and 
functional examination11 of the musculoskeletal system is essential. Where relevant, movements 
should be conducted against resistance to determine muscle strength and neurological 
examination performed if indicated. For convenience, the assessment is described below by 
region.  
 
16.   Upper limbs. The upper limbs may be examined with the candidate standing, or sitting on 
the edge of the examination couch:  
 
a.  
Shoulder. Confirm symmetry, normal power, full active and passive movement 
(abduction, adduction, internal and external rotation).  
 
b.  
Elbow. Confirm symmetry, normal power, full active and passive movement (flexion, 
extension, pronation and supination). Tendon reflexes.  
 
c.  
Wrist. Confirm symmetry, normal power, and full active and passive movement (flexion 
and extension). Tendon reflexes.  
 
d.  
Hands. Confirm full function of fingers and thumb, dexterity and grip strength.  
 
e.  
Coordination. Confirm normal upper limb coordination.  
 
17.   Lower limbs. Examination of the lower limbs should be performed with the candidate lying 
or reclined on the examination couch for hips and knees, and with the legs hanging over the couch 
for ankles and feet.  
 
a. 
General. Confirm equal length of the legs.  
 
b.  
Hips. Confirm normal power, normal and symmetrical flexion, extension, adduction and 
straight leg raise, and with the knee and hip flexed at 90°, normal internal and external 
rotation.  
 
c.  
Knees.  
 
(1) 
Inspection. Confirm symmetrical quadriceps muscle mass.  
 
(2)   Palpation. Confirm the absence of effusion and joint line and tibial tubercle 
tenderness.  
 
(3)   Movement. Confirm normal power, symmetrical and normal flexion and 
extension and absence of crepitus. With the leg in extension confirm the integrity of the 
medial and lateral collateral ligaments. Confirm the integrity of the anterior and 
posterior cruciate ligaments (posterior sag, anterior drawer test, Lachman’s test), and 
of the menisci by McMurray’s test. Finally, patellar apprehension testing should be 
performed.  
 
(4) 
Tendon reflexes.  
 
d. 
Ankle. Confirm the absence of Achilles tendon tenderness or thickening. Confirm 
normal power, full and symmetrical movement: dorsiflexion, plantar flexion, inversion and 
 
11 A DVD titled: The Functional Orthopaedic Examination of the Potential Recruit is available from BDFL (Catalogue Number 
C52127/07). 
Return to Contents Page 
3-B-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
eversion (both passively and actively). Perform the ankle anterior drawer test to demonstrate 
integrity of the anterior talo-fibular ligament. Tendon reflexes.  
 
e. 
Feet and toes. Confirm normal power, normal and symmetrical movement of the 
midfoot and forefoot joints. Confirm normal movement of all toes and exclude the presence of 
deformities (club feet, flat feet, claw toes, scars and hard corns).  
 
18.  Spine.  The spine is best examined with the candidate standing.  
 
a. 
Cervical spine. Confirm normal and symmetrical flexion, extension, lateral flexion and 
rotation.  
 
b.  
Thoracic spine. Exclude kyphosis and scoliosis and confirm full thoracic rotation.  
 
c.  
Lumbo-sacral spine. Confirm flexion and a smooth spinal curve without bending the 
knees12, extension, lateral flexion and rotation.  
 
d.  
Coordination. Confirm normal spinal and lower limb coordination.  
 
19.  Dynamic functional assessment. Performance of the following exercises will further inform 
the assessment of the and qualities:  
 
a.  
Press-ups. The candidates should be asked to perform 3 or 4 press-ups: males – 
knees off floor, straight back, at shoulder width with the palms flat on the floor. The rise must 
be from nose-on-floor to elbows fully extended. Observation must ensure that the elbows are 
at the same level on each side and that there is no asymmetry of the upper limbs or thorax.  
If necessary, females may perform the exercise using the knees as the fulcrum point.  
 
b. 
Normal gait. Gait will already have been observed as the candidate enters the 
examination room but should be confirmed by taking normal steps across the room.  
 
c.  
Toe walking. The candidate should walk across the room on the tips of their toes with 
the feet fully extended.  
 
d. 
Heel walking. The candidate should walk across the room on the heels of their feet.  
 
e. 
Walking on the outer border of the feet. The candidate should walk across the room 
on the outer borders of the feet.  
 
f. 
Duck walking. The candidate takes 5-6 steps whilst squatting with the knees and hips 
flexed and the ankles fully dorsiflexed.  
 
g. 
Heel raises. 5 single heel raises should be performed with both arms outstretched and 
fingertips only in contact with the wall. The other leg is held with the knee flexed to 90°.  
 
h. 
Further dynamic functional assessment. Medical officers may request physical 
selection staff to further assess dynamic qualities during physical selection tests (e.g. gait 
during running tests, shoulder performance during chin-ups).  
 
20.   Summary. The examining medical officer is to ensure that a record of findings against each 
element has been made, provide a summary of the medical examination, provide the candidate 
with a PULHHEEMS grading together with a Pass / Fail / Deferral statement and then sign and 
date the record, with a note of their name in block capitals. If appropriate, the medical officer must 
also indicate if the candidate may undertake physical selection tests. Any attachments to the 
examination record must be indicated. 
 
12 Ideal: touch the floor. Minimum acceptable: reach the level of the ankle. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-B-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX C  
ASSESSMENT OF BODY MASS INDEX  
 
1. 
Introduction. The height – weight tables published in previous versions of JSP 346 Section 
2 are no longer relevant. It is recommended that the relationship between height and weight should 
be assessed with reference to Body Mass Index (BMI). Although BMI does not measure body fat 
directly, research has shown that BMI correlates well with direct measures of body fat. It is an 
inexpensive and easy-to-perform method of assessment of weight categories that correlate with 
health problems and is accepted by health authorities (including WHO) as a valid indicator of 
obesity for health risk assessment. Of particular importance are the relationships between BMI and 
(a) the risk of injury during military training and (b) cardiovascular risk. Body Mass Index is 
measured as follows: mass in kilograms divided by height in metres, squared, and therefore has 
the units kg/m2.  
 
2.  
A classification of cardiovascular disease risk based on both BMI and waist circumference 
has been adopted by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Effectiveness (NICE). The NICE 
classification of BMI and waist circumference is shown in tables below. A recent INM report1 has 
recommended that the latest guidance from NICE2, that BMI and waist circumference should be 
recorded. In addition, the INM report recommends that the disease risk criteria within the NICE 
guidelines be modified to provide statements on suitability for entry to the Armed Forces. 
 
Table C1: NICE classification of BMI. 
 
Classification 
BMI (kg/m2)  
Underweight  
≤18.5  
Healthy weight  
18.5-24.9  
Overweight  
25.0-29.9  
Obesity Class 1  
30.0-34.9  
Obesity Class 2  
35.0-39.9  
Obesity Class 3  
≥40  
 
Table C2: NICE classification of risk for waist circumference(cm). 
 
Waist Circumference Risk 
Men  
Women  
Low  
<94  
<80  
High  
94-102  
80-88  
Very High  
>102  
>88  
 
3. 
Pre-service assessment. Although sSs may have their own policies for entry for absolute 
height and weight3, the recommended BMI guidelines for entry into service are as follows:  
 
Table C3: Upper and lower BMI limits for entry. 
 
Age  
Male and 
Male and female  Male maximum 
Female 
(years)  
female 
maximum  
with additional 
maximum with 
minimum  
assessment  
additional 
assessment  

18+  
18  
28  
32  
30  
16 to <18  
17  
27  
27  
27  
 
4. 
The additional assessments required are measurement of waist circumference and 
satisfactory aerobic fitness4. For males waist circumference must be less than 94cm; for females 
waist circumference must be less than 80cm.  
 
1 INM Report No. 2007.026 dated Jun 07.  
2 https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg43  
3 Based on anthropometric and other considerations. 
4 As assessed by pre-employment physical selection tests and subject to single Service requirements. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-C-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
5.  
These requirements are based upon both research into risk of and type of training injuries 
and the health effects of the extremes of BMI. It is generally considered that health becomes an 
issue when the BMI is outside of a range of 18-30 and the health effects of being underweight or 
overweight are well known. However, the overall fitness and functional capacity of the individual 
should also be considered. For example, some individuals, such as body builders, who are lean 
but have a high BMI due to a high lean body mass, may be suitable for service. However, there is 
clear evidence that there is a significantly increased risk of musculoskeletal injury (particularly 
during military training and in females) in those with a low BMI5. Similarly, there is evidence that in 
individuals with a high BMI there is decreased muscle endurance and an associated increase in 
fatigue6.  
 
6. 
In-service, mobilisation and discharge assessments. BMI should not be used alone as a 
reason to change the quality but should be used as part of a comprehensive functional 
assessment to determine suitability for employment.  
 
7. 
Specialist employment groups. Single-Service height and weight standards will apply for 
entry into specialist employment groups, such as aircrew, parachutists, Royal Marines and 
submariners. These standards can be found in the relevant single-Service publications.  
 
8. 
Protocol for the assessment of waist circumference. The following protocol should be 
followed to ensure consistency in the assessment of waist circumference78:  
 
a.   The candidate’s waist should be exposed, sufficient for the relevant bony landmarks to 
be identified.  
 
b.   The candidate should be standing with the feet together, weight evenly distributed and 
with a relaxed arm position.  
 
c.   The candidate should breathe normally and the waist measurement is to be taken at 
the end of normal expiration.  
 
d.   The correct position is midway between the bottom of the ribcage and the uppermost 
border of the iliac crest.  
 
e.   The tape should be snug but not compress the skin.  
 
f.   If there is difficulty locating the bony landmarks the tape is to be placed at the level of 
the umbilicus.
 
5 Identifying Risk Factors for the Development of Training Injuries among Female Army Recruits. Greeves J, Leamon S, Bunting A, 
Panchel R, Mansfield H. QinetiQ Report 05/01990. Jul 2006.  
6 Fitness, performance and anthropometric characteristics of 19,195 Canadian Forces personnel, classified according to body mass 
index. Jette M, Sidney K, Lewis W. Mill Med. 1990;155:120-6. 
7 Garrow J, Summerbell C. Obesity [online]. Available from: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/Documents/college-
mds/haps/projects/HCNA/06HCNA3D2.pdf 
8 World Health Organization. Measuring obesity—classification and description of anthropometric data. Report on a WHO consultation 
on the epidemiology of obesity. Geneva: World Health Organization, 1987. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-C-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX D  
ASSESSMENT OF HEARING ACUITY (H)  
 
1.  
Personnel working in noisy working environments are at risk of hearing damage, which may 
result in deafness and/or tinnitus. Audiometry is the standard health surveillance tool for the 
assessment of noise-induced hearing loss and all new entrants must have their hearing acuity 
assessed by pure tone audiometry. This requirement will provide a baseline against which future 
audiometry can be compared and will also highlight any disorder of hearing at recruitment. The 
standards of hearing acuity required by individual trade groups are a single-Service issue and the 
relevant single-Service publications contain detailed information on these standards. For detailed 
information on health surveil ance once in service see the Surgeon General’s Policy Letter 12/061.  
 
2.  
Audiometric basis of assessment. The basis of audiometric assessment is the summing of 
high and low frequency levels in decibels (dB) over six frequencies. The frequencies used are 0.5, 
1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 kilohertz (kHz); the low frequencies being 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz and the high 
frequencies 3, 4 and 6 kHz. The hearing in each ear is assessed and recorded separately. The 
assessment is recorded under the first H for the right ear, and under the second H for the left ear. 
The higher value digit, representing the worst frequency group, determines the individual's overall 
hearing category for each ear.  
 
3. 
Audiometric standards. There are five grades of hearing acuity: 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8, described 
in the following table:  
 
Table D1: Grades of hearing acuity.  
 
Grades   Sum of hearing level at 
Sum of hearing level at high 
General description  
low frequencies in dB  
frequencies in dB  
1  
Not more than 45. (RN 
Not more than 45. (RN only: 
Good hearing  
only: No single level to be 
Level not to be more than 30 
more than 20dB)  
dB at 6 kHz or 20 dB at any 
other frequency)  
2  
Not more than 84  
Not more than123  
Acceptable hearing  
 
 
3  
Not more than 150  
Not more than 210  
Impaired hearing.  
 
 
4  
More than 150  
More than 210  
Poor hearing where continuing 
employment is subject to 
specialist assessment.  
8  
More than 150  
More than 210  
Poor hearing that has been 
assessed as being incompatible 
with continued service.  
 
4.  
During service any change in the H degree, other than a fall from H1 to H2, must be referred 
for an ENT opinion. Unilateral hearing loss also requires specialist assessment, with investigation 
as necessary. Those with unilateral or bilateral hearing loss who are considered suitable for 
continued employment in the Services must be subject to appropriate controls and education (both 
of the individual and their managers) to ensure appropriate protection from exposure to noise and 
to reduce the risk of any further deterioration in hearing.  
 
5.  
It is important to remember that hearing acuity does not necessarily correlate closely with 
hearing function or ability to undertake effectively and safely any particular employment role. Any 
functional impairment that is found to be due to impaired hearing should be reflected in the P 
 
1 SGPL 12/06: Noise at work health surveillance.   
Return to Contents Page 
3-D-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
quality. Restrictions on employment that are as a direct result of impaired hearing should also be 
reflected in the P quality. In both these cases the impaired hearing acuity will be reflected in the H 
quality for each ear. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-D-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX E 
ASSESSMENT OF DISTANT VISUAL ACUITY (E)  
 
1. 
This Annex provides details of distant visual acuity (VA) assessment only. Other 
ophthalmological examination requirements are detailed in Annex B and Annex G (red/green 
colour vision perception).  
 
Pre-Service assessment  
 
2. 
Accurate assessment of distant visual acuity (VA) is essential, as specified visual standards 
are critical in many Service trades. Failure to meet the standards is a cause of premature 
discharge and examiners must be wary of potential pit-falls in testing. Examining medical officers 
are to be aware of the potential for long term wear contact lens users to forget to declare their use 
of visual correction.  
 
3. 
Before being given an appointment for a pre-Service medical examination, the candidate is 
to be questioned as to whether he or she wears spectacles or contact lenses and one of the 
following procedures applied. All candidates who wear spectacles or contact lenses are to provide 
a visual correction prescription dated in the previous 6 months which may be requested prior to the 
pre-service assessment. However, if there is a discrepancy between VA measured at an optician 
and that recorded at the pre-service assessment, the latter should take precedence.  
 
a. 
New entrants who wear spectacles only are to be instructed to bring their spectacles 
with them when attending the medical examination.  
 
b. 
Contact lenses alter the curvature of the cornea and VA assessment immediately 
following their removal functionally improves VA. New entrants who wear contact lenses 
(hard or soft) and already have spectacles are therefore:  
 
(1)   To be instructed not to wear their soft contact lenses for at least a period of 48 
hours prior to their medical examination, or 10 days in the case of hard contact lenses.  
 
(2)   To be instructed to bring their spectacles with them when attending the medical 
examination.  
 
(3)   To be given an appointment at a date which will allow (1) above.  
 
b. 
New entrants who wear contact lenses but do not have spectacles are:  
 
(1) 
To be instructed not to wear their soft contact lenses for at least a period of 48 
hours prior to their medical examination, or 10 days in the case of hard contact lenses.  
They must however, bring them to the examination.  
 
(2)   To be given an appointment at a date which will allow (1) above.  
 
(3)   To have their VA assessed and recorded unaided first, and then to fit their 
contact lenses and have their aided VA assessed and recorded.  
 
(4)   At the pre-service medical examination, to be warned that if in all other respects 
their selection is successful, they will be required to be in possession of spectacles and 
 
an appropriate prescription at their initial medical examination  
 
Return to Contents Page 
3-E-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
(5)   To have the medical examination record1 annotated “corrected VA assessed with 
contact lenses only.”  
 
In-Service assessment  
 
4.  
Distant visual acuity (both uncorrected and corrected) is to be measured and recorded at 
each assessment.  
 
Distant visual acuity testing and recording 
 
 
5.  
Snellen chart. The following instructions should be observed to ensure accuracy in the use 
of distant vision test charts. A standard 6 metre Snellen chart is to be used, adequately illuminated, 
and set at exactly 6 metres2 from the candidate.  
 
a.  
Commencing with the right eye, each eye is tested separately. The eye not under 
examination is to be properly occluded, be directed towards the chart and the candidate must 
not be allowed to turn their head.  
 
b.  
The candidate may not screw up the eyes during testing; this includes the eye under 
cover.  
 
c.  
Since it is easy to memorise the top three letters of the chart, a prior view of the chart 
invalidates the test. The chart must be changed and the examination repeated.  
 
6.  
Near visual acuity testing. Near visual acuity testing is required for certain branches and 
trades. Single-Service guidance provides details of the testing procedures required and standards 
to be achieved.  
 
7.  
PULHHEEMS equivalents for visual acuity. The PULHHEEMS equivalents for corrected 
and uncorrected visual acuity are as follows:  
 
Visual acuity  
PULHHEEMS ‘E’ 
grade 
 
Not less than 6/6  
1  
Not less than 6/9  
2  
Not less than 6/12  
3  
Not less than 6/18  
4  
Not less than 6/24  
5  
Not less than 6/36  
6  
Not less than 6/60  
7  
Less than 6/60  
8  
 
8. 
Recording. The recording of visual acuity under EE shows the uncorrected and corrected 
vision in each eye separately, the first E representing the RIGHT eye, the second the LEFT eye.  
Under EE the upper numbers denote the uncorrected visual acuity and the lower numbers the 
corrected visual acuity. For example, a person with uncorrected vision R = 6/12, L = 6/18, 
corrected vision R = 6/6, L = 6/9 is recorded as:  
 











 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Period of validity of MES 
 
 
A person whose unaided vision is R = 6/6, L = 6/6 is recorded as: 









 
1 For example, serial 89 of FMed 1. 
2 If space is limited, an optician’s mirror may be used to double the distance of a 3m test lane, but the 6m chart must be used in all 
cases (i.e. the 3m un-reflected version is not to be used). 
Return to Contents Page 
3-E-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Period of validity of MES 
 
Return to Contents Page 
3-E-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX F  
EVALUATION OF MENTAL CAPACITY (M) AND EMOTIONAL STABILITY 
(S)    

 
 
General 
 
 
1. 
The physician is not expected to perform an exhaustive psychiatric examination; however, a 
limited enquiry should always be made. The most effective method is one of professional interest 
coupled with a respect for the candidate’s personality and feelings. Questioning should begin with 
points relevant to the situation but of low emotional content. This can lead onto a more general 
discussion of social background, work history and emotional relationships.  
 
Pre-Service assessment  
 
2. 
M quality. The quality is assessed in the recruit selection process by intelligence testing.  
 
3. 
S quality. Emotional stability (S) must be assessed by the examining medical officer. There 
is no adequate group test for temperament or personality and reliance must be placed on history. 
Contact with psychiatric services, substance abuse, eating disorders and contact with police and 
social services should all be elicited.  Any history of self-harm or post-traumatic stress must be 
sought.  
 
4. 
Further guidance. The medical examiner should follow the specific psychiatric guidance for 
entry as detailed in Section 4.  
 
In-Service assessment  
 
5. 
M quality. The quality for serving personnel is not equivalent to that applied in the pre-
service assessment. It is a clinical classification distinguishing those whose mental capacity makes 
them suitable for normal employment or deployment from those whose limited capacity may affect 
employability. Although the examining medical officer may make a recommendation, permanent re-
grading of the quality must always be made following assessment by a Service neurologist or 
clinical psychologist.  
 
6. 
S quality. Although the examining medical officer may make a recommendation, permanent 
re-grading of the quality must always be made following assessment from Service mental health 
specialists1.  
 
7. 
Further guidance. The medical examiner should follow the specific psychiatric guidelines for 
serving personnel as detailed in Section 5. Those who are below M2 and S2 will exhibit a reduction 
in their overall functional capacity, and this should be reflected in a reduced P quality.
 
1 Normally a psychiatrist but on occasions a community psychiatric nurse or clinical psychologist. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-F-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX G  
ASSESSMENT OF RED/GREEN COLOUR PERCEPTION (CP)  
 
1. 
Apart from certain uncommon cases of injury, disease, or a small number of drugs, colour 
perception (CP) alters little during Service life. The test on entry is regarded as final, and re-testing 
is only performed when a work-process risk assessment requires a review (in support of risk 
mitigation measures, i.e. where a level of colour perception is critical to the safe operation of new 
equipment introduced to Service) or for medical reasons.  
2. 
Testing of all candidates at entry is to comprise of a screen using Ishihara plates at the 
fitness for service medical. Further assessment using the City University Colour Assessment and 
Diagnosis (CAD1) test may be conducted in certain career employment groups, as defined by the 
single Services, if the candidate fails the Ishihara test or if a CAD score (otherwise known as a 
“colour vision” or CV category) is mandated as part of enhanced health surveil ance2. 
 
3. 
Service standards for CP are as follows:  
 
a. 
CP 1 (functionally normal CP). Attainment of CV-2 on CAD test (see table 1).  
 
b. 
CP 2 (normal CP). The correct recognition of the first 17 plates of the Ishihara test OR 
attainment of CV-0 or CV-1 on CAD test (see table 1). 
 
c.  
CP 3 (defective but safe CP). Attainment of CV-3 on CAD test.  
 
d.  
CP4 (poor to severely deficient CP).   
 
 (1) 
Army and RAF. Unable to pass Ishihara test AND / OR attainment of CV-4 or 
CV-5 on CAD test.   
 
 (2) 
RN. Unable to pass Ishihara test AND / OR attainment of CV-4 or CV-5 on CAD 
test BUT able to correctly recognise the colours used in relevant trade situations as 
assessed by an appropriate trade test (where offered – specific trades only). The test 
normally used is matched paired wires. Other tests may be used in specific situations. 
 
e.  
CP 5 (severely deficient CP). RN only: unable to pass any of the above tests. 
Procedures for CP testing  
Ishihara Testing   
4. 
Examination method. The Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates are to be used for colour 
vision testing in the first instance (where sS policy may stipulate appropriate use of either the 24 or 
38-plate edition depending on specific trade/regulatory requirements). The procedures below are to 
be followed. 
 
1 The CAD test has replaced the Holmes-Wright Lantern (HWL) test due to obsolescence of replacement parts. Research by Barbur et 
al
 
has shown that the CAD test may have 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the assessment of colour vision deficiency, providing 
an enhanced test for the diagnosis of CP deficiencies / assessment of CP functionality in specific trade groups. For reference, the CAD 
test offers a significant improvement on the DMS use of the Ishihara 24 plate test with zero errors which will fail 9.2% of colour normals 
and pass 1.7% of deutans, some of whom will have a severe CV deficiency; 0.6% of protans will also pass. While use of the HWL-A test 
on high intensity improves these figures some deutans and protans are still able to pass this test (22% and 1.4% respectively). As a 
result, CAD has been adopted as an industry standard across several sectors including aviation and maritime. 
2 Refer to sS policy on enhanced health surveillance. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-G-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
a. 
The test is conducted using only good diffused daylight direct onto the test plates or the 
alternative illuminant (fluorescent daylight lamp to BS 950 Part 1; 1967 [1980], all other light 
being excluded).  
b. 
The test plates are shown to the candidate at a distance of 50 to 100 cm for not more 
than 5 seconds. The candidate may wear spectacles or contact lenses3 if appropriate. The 
‘winding line’ plates do not normally need to be presented.  
c. 
Each number is read aloud by the candidate. They must not trace or handle the plates.  
d. 
The number of plates miscalled is recorded on the examination form (not applicable to 
the RAF).  
5. 
Assessment. If no errors are made the candidate is graded CP2: colour vision 
normal. Certain numbers might be miscalled by those with normal colour vision, particularly when 
under stress.  If no more than 3 plates are miscalled those plates are shown again. If no errors are 
made on the second presentation a grading of CP2 may be given. For candidates failing the test 
(more than 3 mistakes on the first presentation and any errors on a second presentation), the 
candidate is assessed as CP4 pending supplementary testing with CAD if required. 
CAD Testing  
6. 
Examination method. CAD is a computer-based test in which the candidate sees a 
coloured stimulus moving across the centre of the computer screen. The candidate must press a 
button to indicate the direction the stimulus has moved. It is not possible to identify the direction of 
movement if the colour is below the candidate’s chromatic detection threshold or is one of the 
colours that they confuse if colour vision deficient. The colour and intensity of the stimulus is 
changed until the candidate’s threshold for detecting each colour (red/green(RG)) is found4. CAD 
testing is performed only by suitably qualified and experienced assessors at designated single 
Service establishments (currently the RAF Centre of Aviation Medicine, Recruiting and Selection 
Department of Occupational Medicine at RAF Cranwell and the Institute of Naval Medicine).   
7. 
Assessment. The testing process provides a CAD Unit Threshold that equates to a CV-
category5. The screening programme will identify those candidates who have normal (CP2) or 
abnormal red/green colour vision (the full red/green programme must then be run to categorise 
further categorise CP1, CP3 and CP4). Table 1 provides how CV-categories map to CP standards 
(note that the CV and CP numbers do not directly correspond).  
Table 1: CV Categories 
CV 
Equivalent 
CAD Unit Threshold (RG) 
Description 
Category 
CP standard 
Normal trichromats (could be used for 
individuals required to undertake 
CV-0 
<= the mean for age 
CP2 
extremely demanding colour related 
tasks). 
<= the upper normal limit for 
CV-16 
Normal trichromats.  
CP2 
age 
<= 2.35 CAD Units but not 
Functionally normal trichromatic 
CV-2 
CP1 
CV1 
vision.    
 
3 Where contact lenses are used, the examiner is to check that these are not X-Chrom lenses. X-Chrom are not permitted to be used 
during the assessment (in such circumstances appropriate glasses should be worn).  
4 There is a separate programme to test for blue/yellow deficiencies which are normally acquired rather than congenital. 
5 CV categories have been set to provide an equivalent standard to those given by the HWL test (see footnote 1). 
6 CV-1 equates to a HWL pass on the dim B setting. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-G-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
CV-37 
<=4.00 CAD Units but not CV2  Safe trichromatic vision.    
CP3 
<=12.00 CAD Units but not 
CV-4 
Poor RG colour vision.   
CP4 
CV3 
CV-5 
>12.00 CAD Units but not CV4  Severe RG colour vision deficiency. 
CP4 
 
7 CV-3 equates to a HWL pass on the bright A setting. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-G-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX H 
DEMOBILISATION HEALTH DECLARATION EXAMPLE 
  
The requirement for and minimum content of medical assessments for Reserve Forces on 
demobilisation are mandated by the Surgeon General1. The health declaration that follows is an 
example that is currently used at RTMC Chilwell. 
 
1 D/DMSD/3202/2 dated 28 Apr 03. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-H-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
OFFICIAL SENSITIVE PERSONAL 
Medical in Confidence 
(when completed) 
 
Health declaration (to be attached to FMed 4 on demobilisation)  
 
Service Number 
Rank/Rate 
Surname 
Forename(s) 
DOB 
 
 
 
 
 
Maritime Reserves  
Army Reserves  
RAF Reserves  
Unit 
 
1a. 
Have you suffered any illness or injury, consulted your doctor or received any medication 
Yes  
No  
during your deployment? 
1b. 
Have you attended the dentist in theatre during your deployment? 
Yes  
No  
1c. 
Have you attended the physiotherapist in theatre during your deployment? 
Yes  
No  
1d. 
If you have answered yes to question 1a-c. or believe that your health has changed in any way during your 
deployment, please give details below: 
 
 
 
 
2a. 
Are you aware of any environmental exposure during your deployment (e.g. depleted 
Yes  
No  
uranium, noise, vibration or infectious disease)?  If yes, please give details below: 
 
 
 
 
2b. 
Do you require antimalarials for the next four weeks? 
Yes  
No  
2c. 
Have you been issued malaria/Leishmaniasis/depleted uranium warning cards? 
Yes  
No  
3. 
Do you want to see a Medical Officer? 
Yes  
No  
4. 
Do you want to see a mental health worker? 
Yes  
No  
Signature 
Date 
 
 

Investigations 
Urinalysis 
Peak Flow 
BP 
Pulse  Hearing 
Eyesight 
Protein 
 
 
 
 




Blood 
 
 
 
Glucose   
R (corrected) 
L (corrected) 
Signature of medical staff 
Date 
 
NB Patient will need to see a medical officer if there has been any significant change in medical/health condition 
during deployment. 
 
Summary of medical examination 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Disposal 
Fit  
Referred to GP 
Referred to NHS specialist 
Referred to other hospital specialist  
 
 
Signature of medical officer 
Date 
 
 
OFFICIAL SENSITIVE PERSONAL
Return to Contents Page 
3-H-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX I  
GUIDELINES FOR UNDERTAKING SCREENING PURE TONE 
AUDIOMETRY 

 
 
 
1. 
Pure tone audiometry is the standard health surveillance tool for hearing loss, including 
Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL). Audiometry is undertaken in medical centres using automated 
pure tone audiometry. In this form it is equivalent to industrial screening audiometry. More accurate 
clinical audiometry is available in Service approved audiology departments, such as the Defence 
Audiology Service (DAS) based at Institute of Naval Medicine.  
 
2. 
This leaflet deals with screening audiometry. It should be carried out in accordance with the 
guidelines below and at a frequency determined by appropriate risk assessment in line with JSP 
950 Lft 6-4-4, and as directed by single-Service and other relevant hearing conservation policy, 
e.g. operational mounting orders.  
 
Environment 
 
 

 For screening audiometry to be as accurate as possible, it is necessary to minimise 
extraneous noise, in case this masks the test tones and gives a false result. Criteria are laid down 
for test rooms and should be adhered to1. The frequencies most sensitive to environmental 
interference are the low frequencies of 1 kHz and below. These frequencies may result from 
people walking through or past a testing area – this should be taken into consideration when siting 
the test room. The requirements for audiometry should be considered during all new building work 
or contracts for facilities where audiometry will take place.  
 
4. 
In all but exceptional circumstances, it is necessary to use an audiometric soundproof booth 
to achieve acceptable testing conditions. Testing within MoD should be undertaken in an 
appropriate booth, which must be serviced and maintained to the correct standard2. A minority of 
people find audiometric booths claustrophobic and need to be tested outside the booth. Noise 
excluding headsets are not deemed suitable for MOD purposes, and so personnel should be 
referred for clinical audiometry in this scenario.  
 
Equipment 
 
 
5. 
Screening audiograms may be performed using an automatic screening audiometer. The 
audiometer is to be set to record in 5 dB increments, and not used in Bekesy mode. The currently 
approved audiometer is the Amplivox CA850 4A, although units with previous models3 which 
comply with requirements may continue to use them. The CA850 is available from MG&S Abbey 
Wood (NSN 6515-99-773-4626 Audiometer Screening CA850-4A Automatic Screening 
Incorporating Internal Database & Integrated Graphics c/w Audiocups+Designated Printer).  
 
6. 
Each audiometer should only be used with the earphones supplied with it. Earphones are 
calibrated to a particular audiometer, and it is not acceptable to swap earphones between 
audiometers. If earphones need to be changed, the audiometer must be sent for recalibration with 
the new earphones as laid out in Paras 8-10 below.  
 
7. 
Manual pure tone audiometry is the gold-standard of hearing threshold measurement. 
Manual audiograms are only to be conducted by personnel trained, as a minimum, to current 
British Society of Audiology Education Committee Guideline on The Training of Industrial 
Audiometricians standard. This is to ensure that manual audiometry is carried out in a repeatable 
 
1 BS EN ISO 8253-1:2010 Acoustics. Audiometric test methods Pure-tone air and bone conduction audiometry Jan 11. 
2 BS EN 60645-1 (IEC 60645-1) and the relevant BS EN ISO 389 (ISO 389) series standards. 
3 e.g. Microlab series. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-I-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
and accurate manner. Where manual audiometry is required a request for testing should be sent to 
an appropriate clinical audiology department such as DAS.  
 
Equipment maintenance, calibration and daily checks4 
 
 
8. 
Screening audiometers should comply with BS EN IEC 60645-1:2001, and are to be 
calibrated in accordance with BS EN ISO 389-1:2000.  
 
9. 
All equipment should be maintained, calibrated and used according to the recommendations 
of BS 6655:1986 EN 26189:1991 ISO 6189:1983 Specification for pure tone air conduction 
threshold audiometry for hearing conservation purposes. A basic calibration of each audiometer is 
to be performed by a competent laboratory annually. It is acceptable to use the manufacturer for 
this check.  
 
10.  The annual check must incorporate calibration of the earphones used with the audiometer. 
This is important, as the earphones are often the weakest link in the calibration chain, being easily 
damaged in use.  
 
11.  A listening check should be undertaken daily before use. An experienced and trained 
individual with good hearing5 should listen at each frequency and at 3 sound intensities to ensure 
that no extraneous noise is generated by the apparatus.  
 
Training for those carrying out audiometry 
 
 
12.  In order to ensure that screening audiometry is as accurate as possible, and does not miss 
early changes in hearing acuity, the test must be performed in a consistent manner with care. 
Personnel undertaking screening automatic audiometry should be trained in the procedure. Some 
training in audiometry is currently provided in Phase 2 at DMSTC and this will be expanded in early 
2014. In addition an e-learning package is being developed for use for update and refresher 
training in medical centres. Personnel newly arrived on a unit are to be supervised until they have 
demonstrated a satisfactory standard. All personnel undertaking audiometry are to be checked 
annually to ensure understanding of the procedure by a senior member of staff nominated by the 
senior MO - this check is to include independent validation of an entire audiometric screening test. 
This check may be undertaken locally, but should be recorded in local training documentation in a 
manner that is available to Healthcare Governance Assurance Visit teams. Any individual who has 
not performed audiometry within the past year is to undergo the local refresher training before 
performing unsupervised audiometric testing.  
 
Quality Control 
 
 
13.  It is important that audiometry is undertaken under standardised test conditions with close 
attention to quality control procedures. Quality control is important to improve the repeatability and 
reliability of the data produced. Comparisons between audiometric results taken over a period of 
time on one individual are an important part of interpretation in an on-going and effective 
audiometric programme. To ensure that results are comparable it is essential that standardised 
method of testing is used. Careful explanation to the subject of the procedure and familiarisation 
with the test tones before the test begins are also essential for the collection of reliable data. The 
criteria used to determine the accuracy with which results are obtained include:  
 
a. 
Whether repeat audiometry on the same individual and same day is consistent6,  
 
b. 
Appropriate and timely equipment calibration, and  
 
4 To be conducted in accordance with single-Service policy (AP 1269 11-04, APHCS Infrastructure and Equipment Policy) until replaced 
by DPHC Instructions.   
5 Preferably a Senior NCO or Practice Nurse with hearing no worse that H2 H2.   
6 Only required if there are clinical concerns over an audiometric result, or more general concerns about the quality of audiometry at a 
unit.   
Return to Contents Page 
3-I-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
c. 
The presence of background noise in the test environment.  
 
Procedure 
 
 
14.   An aide memoire for the procedure below is detailed in the protocol for performing screening 
audiometry flow-diagram.  
 
15.   It is civilian best practice that before undertaking an audiogram the identity of the individual 
should be checked against a photographic identity document (e.g. MOD 90, a photographic driving 
licence, or passport) to confirm their identity; this should be followed in DMS facilities7. If they had 
not had an audiogram before, the initial noise and health questionnaire at Appendix 2 should be 
completed. For subsequent audiograms, the previous medical records including last audiogram(s) 
should be available.  Any significant changes to personal details, job or noise exposure should be 
noted, and if necessary the questionnaire at Appendix 2 should be completed again.  
 
16.  Specific enquiry should be made about current problems, to include subjective hearing loss, 
Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (URTI) symptoms, earache, discharge from the ear, tinnitus or 
balance problems. With the exception of subjective hearing loss, individuals with any problems 
should be referred to an appropriate clinician8 before the test proceeds. The clinician should decide 
if audiometry can be performed same day or deferred.  
 
17.  The ear should be examined using an otoscope. If significant amounts of wax are present 
(here defined as obscuring more than 80% of the view of the tympanic membrane), the wax should 
be removed by somebody trained in the procedure. If ear drops or ear syringing are used, at least 
48 hours should be allowed post treatment before audiometry. If otoscopy reveals abnormalities, 
such as inflammation, fluid behind the tympanic membrane, perforation, blood or discharge) the 
individual should be referred to an appropriate clinician before the test proceeds. The clinician 
should decide if audiometry can be performed same day or deferred.  
 
18.  An explanation of the test procedure should be provided to the individual. They should be 
seated in the booth, and the tester should fit the earphones in the correct orientation (red right ear, 
blue left ear), ensuring they are properly seated and positioned over each ear, lining the speaker 
up with the ear canal. The individual should be observed throughout the test to ensure that they do 
not attempt to falsify the test (e.g. swapping headphones over halfway through, watching the light 
on the audiometer or rhythmically pressing the response button). The test should be completed 
using automatic computer mode, not Bekesy or manual mode. The frequencies 500 Hz, 1 kHz, 2 
kHz, 3 kHz, 4 kHz, 6 kHz and 8 kHz are to be recorded on every occasion for both ears. If 
automatic mode fails to record a valid result at any frequency, these should be repeated and added 
using manual mode. 
 
19.  When the audiogram is complete the tester should remove the headphones for the patient to 
reduce the likelihood of damage to the headphones. On completion of the test, results should be 
compared with the most recent previous audiogram (unless this is the initial test). If there is a 
difference of 15 dB or more9 at any frequency from the previous result, the test should be repeated 
on the following day10. Until the test has been repeated, the individual should be protected from 
further noise exposure. If a change of 15dB or more is confirmed on repeat testing, this may be 
regarded as reliable. Further action is detailed in the following paragraphs.  
 
20.  Inspect the audiogram for any obvious problems. See JSP 950 Lft 6-4-2 for guidance on 
inspection of audiometry. If urgent concerns are identified, the individual should be referred to an 
appropriate clinician immediately.   
 
7 Any attempt at impersonation should be dealt with as a disciplinary matter.   
8 This will normally be a medical officer but could include an appropriately trained nurse or audiologist.   
9 Changes up to and including 10dB at a single frequency between screening audiograms may not be reliable and may occur without ear 
disease being present. 
10 A minimum of 16 hours should be allowed between tests, ideally 24 hours. If there are no appointments available in an appropriate 
timescale, the test should be repeated within a maximum of 2 weeks. 
Return to Contents Page 
3-I-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
21.  If no urgent concerns are identified, the audiogram should be referred for routine review by 
an appropriate clinician. The individual should be booked for repeat audiometry at the appropriate 
frequency, and a diary entry made on DMICP  
 
Documentation 
 
 
22.   The audiogram is to be handled under a “Protect – Medical” caveat. The result is to be 
entered onto DMICP via the audiometry template, and the audiogram itself scanned onto DMICP 
as part of the patient record for medico-legal reasons. Once the audiogram has been successfully 
scanned into the patient record, the original audiogram can be shredded under normal 
arrangements for clinical records. Where there is no DMICP record (e.g. Civil Servants), the 
audiogram is to be stored in the individuals Medical File for a minimum of forty years.  
 
23.  When recording audiograms on DMICP, negative values are to be recorded as negative 
values, and not set to 0. Similarly, negative values are to be summed as negative, and not rounded 
up to 0. This is to ensure that the audiogram permits subsequent changes to be detected. For 
example look at the following audiogram: 
 
  
-10 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       dB 
HL 
40 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
50 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
60 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
70 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
80 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
90 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
100 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                    500      1k       2k        3k       4k        6k      8 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Frequency (Hz) 
This should be recorded as: 
 
Frequency 
dB 
 
500 
-5 
 
1kHz 
-5 
2kHz 

 
3kHz 
10 
 
4kHz 

 
6kHz 

 
8kHz 
10 
 
sum low tones 
-5 
 
sum high tones 
20 
Return to Contents Page 
3-I-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
24.   Policy on interpretation of audiograms can be found in JSP 950 Lft 6-4-2 ‘Assessing 
Audiograms - Guidance for Medical Staff’.

Return to Contents Page 
3-I-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3



 
 
 
Protocol for performing screening audiometry 
 
 
 

Baseline/Initial Test 
Subsequent Tests 
 
Initial noise and health 
Obtain records for the patient 
 
questionnaire – personal details, 
including last audiogram(s).  Note 
 
job, previous exposures, medical 
significant changes to personal 
 
history 
details, job or noise exposure. 
 
 
Current problems? 
 
Subjective hearing loss 
 
earache, discharge 
 
yes 
tinnitus and/or balance problems 
 
 
 
 
 
no 
 
 
 
 
Re-book: 
 
Abnormal: 
Following wax 
Inflamed 
Conduct otoscopic 
 
removal 
 
Fluid 
examination 
 
 
Perforation 
Blood 
 
wax 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
no  
 
 
 
wax 
 
 
 
 
Book for 
 
retest the 
Refer to: MO/OH 
Conduct test: 
 
following 
Nurse/Practice Nurse1 
Use computer mode, not Beksey of Manual 
 
day4: 
 
Monitor individual throughout test to ensure 
 
Protect from 
 
it is valid2 
 
further noise 
   
 
exposure 
 
 
pending retest 
 
Yes: 
 
 
 
Change confirmed 
Compare with last test3 
 
 
by repeat test 
 
Yes: 
 
 
 
 
Test not yet 
 
 
repeated 
 
 
Urgent concerns 
 
 
Is there a difference 
 
 
 
≥ 15 dB at any frequency from the previous test3 
 
 
 
no  
 
 
 
 

Inspect the audiogram for any obvious problems5 
 
 
no concerns  
Notes: 
1. Clinicians should decide if audiometry 
can be performed same day (e.g. 
subjective hearing loss, tinnitus) or 
deferred (e.g. otitis media). 
2. E.g. swapping headphones. 
3. Unless this is baseline entry 
Advise patient 
audiometry. 
of results: 
4. Audiometry should be repeated once 
Send audiogram 
to confirm result. If a difference ≥ 15 dB 
for routine review 
at any frequency is confirmed refer to 
by MO/OH 
MO/OH Nurse/Practice Nurse. 
5. See Section two for guidance on 
Nurse/Practice 
inspection of audiometry. 
Nurse 
 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
3-I-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3   AUDIOMETRY HEALTH QUESTIONNAIRE 
 
 
Service Number 
Rank/Rate 
Surname 
Forename(s) 
DOB 
 
 
 
 
 
RN/RM  
Army   
RAF  
Unit 
Initial/Entry 
 
Pre-Deployment 
 
Repeat Initial/Entry 
 
Repeat Pre-
 
Deployment 
Periodic/Routine   
Post-Deployment 
 
Repeat 
 
Repeat Post-
 
Periodic/Routine 
Deployment 
Special 
 
 Clinical 
 
Repeat Special 
 
Repeat Clinical 
 
Date of audiogram 
 
Ear Nose and Throat 
If yes, please give details 
 
Have you noticed any change in your hearing?  
Yes   
No  
1. 
 
 
Do you have trouble hearing or understanding 
Yes  
No  
2. 
normal conversation?  
Do other people complain about your hearing and/or 
Yes  
No  
3. 
the loudness at which you listen to radio/TV? 
Have any of your immediate blood relatives (mother, 
Yes  
No  
4. 
father, sister(s) and brother(s)) had hearing loss prior 
to the age of 50?  
Do you experience frequent earaches, ear infections, 
Yes  
No  
5. 
excessive earwax or discharge from the ear? 
Do you experience ringing or buzzing in the ear?  
Yes  
No  
6. 
 
Have you ever had a perforated/burst ear drum? If 
Yes  
No  
7. 
yes, when and reason? 
Have you consulted an Ear Nose & Throat specialist 
Yes  
No  
8. 
in the last year? If yes, when?  
Have you had ear surgery recommended or 
Yes  
No  
9. 
performed?  
 
Do you use a hearing aid, or have you ever been 
Yes  
No  
10. 
fitted for one?  
 
Past Medical History 
Have you had a cold, flu or sinus problem in the past 
Yes  
No  
11. 
7 days?  
 
Have you suffered any head injuries or loss of 
Yes  
No  
12. 
consciousness? If yes, when and reason?   
Occupational Health 
What is your present occupation?  
Yes  
No  
13. 
Reserves only: What is your civilian occupation?  
Does your current role (including civilian occupation 
Yes  
No  
for Reserves) involve regular exposure to any loud 
14. 
noise? (e.g. firearms, artillery fire, power tools, 
aircraft, motor boats, heavy machinery).  
Do you regularly use an i-Pod, MP3 player or 
Yes  
No  
15. 
equivalent device?  
Do you have any noisy hobbies e.g. shooting?  
Yes  
No  
16. 
 
Have you had a past exposure to explosion or blast?   Yes  
No  
17. 
 
In the past 48 hours have you been exposed to loud 
Yes  
No  
18. 
noise?  
Post-Deployment Testing Only 
Have you noticed any change e.g. loss of sensitivity 
Yes  
No  
1. 
or ringing in the ears, in your hearing since your last 
test?  
Were you exposed to any explosions or blasts when 
Yes  
No  
2. 
on operations?  
Did you wear hearing protection when exposed to 
Yes  
No  
3. 
noise? What did you use?  
Were the potential noise hazards that may be 
Yes  
No  
encountered in the operational theatre and their 
4. 
control measures covered during your PDT and 
RSOI training?  
Signature 
Date 
 
Return to Contents Page 
3-I-7 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
SECTION FOUR: THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICULAR CONDITIONS ON 
MEDICAL FITNESS FOR ENTRY  

1. 
Introduction. These standards represent the agreed tri-Service minimum medical standards 
for entry. The single Services may apply a higher standard, particularly in relation to branches or 
trade groups where there are specific occupational fitness requirements e.g. aircrew, divers, 
marines, parachutists and submariners. Specific regulations on these groups are found in single 
Service publications1 and referenced as appropriate in the annexes to this Section.  
2. 
General requirements. New entrants to the Armed Forces must be medically fit to meet the 
various challenges of Service roles in which they will be expected to deploy; potentially anywhere 
in the world, at short notice, in locations remote from established medical care. Those with pre-
existing conditions requiring periodic medical care or review, or with a requirement for long term 
medication, must be appropriately screened according to Section 3, in conjunction with the medical 
condition annexes.  
3. 
Physical activity. Prior to their application, potential recruits should be capable of 
undertaking regular and substantial levels of exercise comparable with military training without 
experiencing adverse effects (e.g. symptoms of lower limb pain). This is to ensure that applicants 
can achieve levels of exercise that will be encountered during initial military training and Service.  
The following activities may be considered representative of the type of activities required:  
a. 
Running 30 – 40 minutes a minimum of 3 x weekly. 
 
b. 
Hill walking with 10 kg load (backpack) for 90 – 120 minutes (6 – 8 miles) weekly.  
It is this level of activity that is implied when the phrase “activity comparable with military 
service/training” is used in relevant annexes. Demonstrable evidence of said activity should be 
considered and highlighted in any specialist referral (if indicated).  
Note: the potential candidate can only be advised to achieve an appropriate level of activity. Care 
must be taken to ensure that an “order” (and thus responsibility to the MOD) is not implied.  
4. 
Medical assessment.   
a. 
The recruitment medical assessment is to be based upon a functional assessment of 
the physical and mental potential to undertake military training, all general Service duties and 
serve in any environment worldwide for the period of the initial engagement being offered. 
Many conditions which may not limit civilian employment or sporting/recreational pursuits 
may be incompatible with military service. 
b. 
Potential recruits are normally only accepted where they meet the standard for full 
deployability. 
c. 
Candidates with a lesser grading will not normally be accepted unless formal authority 
has been granted by the relevant Personnel or Executive Branch following medical advice2.   
5. 
Definitions.  The following definitions apply throughout this section. 
FIT - Meets the Medical Entry Standard. Fit to undertake entry training and Service without 
restriction.
 
 
1 Current versions of BRd 1750A (RN), AGAI 78 (Army), AP1269A (RAF) and any associated DINs or single Service Policy Letters. 
2 BRd 1750A (RN), AGAI 78 (Army), AP 3391 Vol 3 Part B Lflt 220 (RAF). 
Return to Contents Page 
4-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
UNFIT - Not fit to undertake entry training and Service without additional medical risk. 
Normally UNFIT - The expectation is that the candidate is UNFIT, but in exceptional 
circumstances an experienced clinician may determine that the candidate is FIT3.   

6. 
Determining a candidate as FIT for Entry. The annexes to this section give policy on when 
a candidate can be found FIT. There are 3 scenarios where a candidate may be found FIT: 
a. 
In the absence of conditions that are listed as excluding entry. Candidates who 
meet the standard may be found FIT by examining clinicians. 
b. 
When candidates have a condition that determines they are ‘Normally UNFIT’. An 
examining clinician may determine that a candidate does not meet a medical standard and 
the Annex defines their condition as “are normally UNFIT”. In such a scenario, after taking 
into account medical history, examination and function (in the context of the proposed Career 
Employment Group (CEG)), such candidates may be found FIT. The decision that these 
candidates are FIT may only be made by single Service Medical Entry Staff4 (SSMES) or 
their delegated authority. The clinical justification for such decisions must be documented in 
the pre-employment medical assessment healthcare record. These candidates will still be fit 
to undertake entry training and Service without restriction. 
c. 
When candidates have a condition that determines they are ‘UNFIT’. Candidates 
who fulfil the criteria in the Annexes that would normally fulfil the definition of “are UNFIT” 
can, in some limited situations, after detailed consideration of medical history, examination 
and function and CEG be determined FIT in accordance with paragraph 9. Paragraph 9 gives 
single Service Occupational Physicians, responsible for Service Entry, discretion to use their 
clinical judgement. Such candidates will still be fit to undertake entry training and Service 
without restriction.  The clinical justification for such decisions must be documented in the 
pre-employment medical assessment healthcare record. 
7. 
Determining a candidate UNFIT for Entry. The annexes to this section give guidance on 
when a candidate is UNFIT.   
a. 
These candidates will not normally be recruited.   
 
b. 
Exceptionally candidates who are determined to be medically UNFIT may enter service 
through a single Service Executive/Personnel ‘waiver’5. Advice must be sought by the 
Executive/Personnel from an Occupational Physician from the SSMES on restrictions which 
may be needed in training and in Service to inform the Executive decision. The responsibility 
for the final decision to accept a candidate into service and the recruiting risk lie solely with 
the Executive/Personnel function6. 
c. 
When a JMES is allocated, these candidates are to have Med Lim 1302 allocated to 
facilitate longitudinal analysis and inform review of standards in future. 
8.  
Seeking additional guidance. While this section and its annexes provide general direction, 
each case must be assessed on merit, with the intention to facilitate decision-making by examining 
clinicians. In addition, advice can be sought from SSMES on any candidate and in particular for 
those conditions not covered in the appropriate section.  
 
3 See paragraph 6b. 
4 SSMES must have appropriate oversight from a Consultant in Occupational Medicine. 
5 See Paragraph 4.  Detail is included in single Service publications listed at Footnote 1. 
6 The Army’s waiver use relates to special enlistment (specialist Knowledge, Skills & Experience). It is not a route open to most 
candidates who are rejected as UNFIT as it is not another level of appeal. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
9. 
Discretion for single-Service Occupational Physicians responsible for Service Entry
Occasionally, exclusion of a candidate in particular circumstances may be considered 
unreasonable. In such cases some discretion, consistent with single Service policies or on advice 
from the SSMES, may be appropriate and would normally require an Occupational Medicine 
Consultant opinion.  Such candidates will be determined to be medically FIT. Candidates who the 
SSMES declare UNFIT can still enter if supported by the Executive through the waiver system (see 
paragraph 7). 
10.  It may be appropriate to seek clinical opinion from civilian consultants, Service-appointed 
consultants or single Service or Defence Consultant Advisers through the SSMES (as required by 
single Service recruiting policy). In these cases, it is important for the referring medical officer to 
ask for an opinion about the nature and prognosis of a condition including likely requirements for 
treatment/medication and follow-up. The effect on function and fitness for service can then be 
determined by discussion with SSMES. In many cases an opinion rather than a formal consultation 
with the candidate will satisfy this requirement.  
11.  Incidental findings. Where previously undiagnosed conditions are discovered by examining 
clinicians, candidates are to be informed and their permission sought for their usual general 
practitioner (GP) to be notified. When such permission is not obtained, candidates should be 
encouraged to report the circumstances to their own GP. Agreement to notify or not is to be 
recorded in the entry medical assessment paperwork. A letter to the GP is to be given to the 
candidate and a copy of the letter is to be retained in the applicant’s entry medical examination 
record.  
12.  Specific conditions. Annexes A – N contain guidance on the effects of specific conditions 
on the fitness of a potential recruit to enter initial military training. The annexes are laid out by 
system, except for Annex N which contains a mixture of conditions that do not sit in the other 
annexes. Where the candidate presents with a condition not listed in the annexes, the opinion of 
the SSMES must be sought. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX A  
EYES PRE-ENTRY  
 
1. 
Diseases of the eye and orbit are assessed and recorded under P. The entries under EE are 
records of visual acuity only (see Section 3); however, the refractive limit below at sub-paragraph 
2a(3), is included as, outside this range, eyes are rarely structurally normal. Consideration must be 
given to whether a lesion is progressive and likely to lead to future incapacity. Where doubt exists 
advice should be sought from the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the 
selection of recruits who will seek an ophthalmology opinion where required. The minimum 
standards for both uncorrected and corrected visual acuity on recruitment are determined by 
single-Service authorities. These standards are dependent upon the proposed employment and 
trade group; irrespective of this, the minimum standard is subject to the magnitude of correction 
required stated below.  
 
2. 
The following conditions, in either or both eyes, will normally exclude entry: 
 
a. 
General. 
 
(1) 
Orbital fractures and reconstruction if causing, or having the potential to cause, 
disability. The presence of metalwork, provided ocular function and mobility are normal, 
would not be a bar to entry. 
 
(2) 
Monocular (or uniocular) vision1; or reduction of corrected vision in one eye to 
below either entry EE standard. 
 
(3) 
Refractive errors; greater than a total of +6.00 and -6.002 dioptres in any 
meridian. To calculate the refractive error see Appendix 1. 
 
(4) 
History of penetrating injury to either eye with abnormal function is considered 
UNFIT. Those with such a history who achieve the VA and other visual functional 
requirements should be referred for a Service ophthalmological opinion. 
 
(5) 
Scotoma or limitation of binocular visual field, from all causes. 
 
(6) 
Night blindness whether congenital or acquired. 
 
(7) 
Neoplasm. 
 
(8) 
Ophthalmic migraine (see Annex G Neurological). 
 
(9) 
Glaucoma or history of ocular hypertension. 
 
b. 
Ocular motility. 
 
(1) 
Nystagmus that impairs visual function. 
 
(2) 
History of incomitant squint. 
 
(3)   Squint surgery within preceding 6 months. 
 
 
1 Uniocular: When one eye is normal and the other eye is either absent or is blind. Blind Eye:  An eye possessing a best attainable 
corrected Snellen visual acuity (VA) of 6/60 or worse. Monocular. When an individual has two seeing eyes, one eye with normal vision 
but the other eye possessing a best corrected VA between 6/60 and 6/24. 
2 Letter DCA Ophthalmology 4 Apr 13 to align with RCOpth definition of high myopia. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-A-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
(4) 
 Diplopia. 
 
c. 
Lids. 
 
(1) 
Blepharitis, chronic; acute, until controlled. 
 
(2) 
Blepharospasm that impairs visual function. 
 
(3) 
Damage to the eyelids or eyelid movement sufficient to impair protection of the 
eye or affecting the visual fields. 
 
(4) 
Entropion or ectropion 
 
(5) 
 Ptosis, affecting the visual fields.  
 
d. 
Lacrimal apparatus.  
 
(1) 
Persistent chronic epiphora. 
 
(2) 
Dacryocystitis, chronic; acute, until cured. 
 
(3) 
Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eye syndrome). 
 
e. 
Conjunctiva. 
 
(1) 
Conjunctivitis, chronic; acute, until cured. 
 
(2) 
Pterygium3; if threatening the visual axis. 
 
f. 
Cornea. 
 
(1) 
Keratitis, more than one episode; acute until cured. 
 
(2) 
Keratoconus. 
 
(3) 
Any type of corneal dystrophy. 
 
(4) 
Corneal graft. 
 
(5) 
Refractive surgery: Radial Keratotomy (RK) and Astigmatic Keratotomy (AK) 
remain an absolute bar to entry. However, Photorefractive (Excimer) Keratectomy 
(PRK) or Laser Epithelial Keratomileusis (LASEK) or Intrastromal corneal rings (ICRs), 
otherwise known as Intrastromal Corneal Segments (ICSs), if meeting the specific 
requirements given below at Corneal refractive surgery section below, may be 
acceptable. 
 
(6) 
Ulcer, recurrent. 
 
(7) 
Vascularisation or opacity reducing visual acuity (VA) below single-Service entry 
standards. 
 
g. 
Lens. 
 
(1) 
Aphakia. 
 
 
3 Recurrence is 10-30% after surgery, depending on type of surgery.   
Return to Contents Page 
4-A-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
(2) 
Pseudophakia (intraocular lens implant). 
 
(3) 
Opacity (including cataracts or past cataract surgery).  Specialist opinion is 
normally required. 
 
(4) 
Dislocation, partial or complete. 
 
h. 
Uveal tract.  
 
(1) 
Coloboma (excluding iris)4. 
 
(2) 
Uveitis5 that is chronic or recurrent; anterior, intermediate or posterior (syn-iritis, 
pars-planitis, vitritis, choroiditis, panuveitis). 
 
i. 
Retina. 
 
(1) 
Vascular lesions. 
 
(2) 
Retinitis, active or recurrent. 
 
(3) 
Retinal detachment 6
  All cases with a history of retinal detachment are to be 
referred to an ophthalmologist. 
 
(4) 
Retinitis pigmentosa. Non progressive sectoral RP may be acceptable following 
ophthalmological review. 
 
(5) 
Macular dystrophies or degenerations. 
 
j. 
Sclera.  A history of scleritis. 
 
k. 
Optic Nerve. 
 
(1) 
Neuritis. 
 
(2) 
Neuropathy. 
 
(3) 
Atrophy (primary or secondary). 
 
(4) 
Papilloedema. 
 
Corneal Refractive Surgery
 
3. 
It is recommended that the following methods of surgical correction of myopia or 
hypermetropia are now considered suitable for entry on an individual, case by case basis for non-
specialist employment groups and subject to single-Service requirements: 
a.  
Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK)  
 
b.  
Laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK)  
 
c. 
Laser in-situ keratomileusis LASIK.  
 
 
4 Iris colobomata are generally benign, unless associated with other systemic syndromes and are normally acceptable. 
5 Prognosis after traumatic uveitis, e.g. from intra-ocular foreign body, is good and recurrence uncommon. Candidates may be 
determined FIT following a favourable assessment by a specialist. 
6 There will be cases that may be acceptable, e.g. if the retina has been adequately reattached and the vision is good, the refraction 
stable and within limits, no significant anisometropia, the visual field full and the ocular motility normal. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-A-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
d. 
Intrastromal corneal rings (ICRs), otherwise known as intrastromal corneal segments 
(ICSs)  
 
Entry will not be considered for radial keratotomy (RK), or astigmatic keratotomy (AK), or any other 
form of incisional refractive surgery, other than those procedures listed above. All invasive 
intraocular surgical procedures will remain a bar to entry. 
4. 
In order to be considered the prospective entry candidate must provide appropriate 
documentary evidence that they fulfil the following criteria: 
a. 
The total preoperative refractive error was not outside the limits for selection, and in no 
case  than +6.00 or –6.00 dioptre [Equivalent Spherical Error (ESE)] in either eye. 
 
b. 
The preoperative best spectacle corrected visual acuity was within selection limits and; 
c. 
At least 6 months have elapsed since the date of the last surgery or enhancement 
procedure; 
 
d. 
The candidate is at least 22 years old and; 
e. 
There have been no significant visual side effects secondary to the surgery  affecting 
daily  activities or night vision, such as glare, halos or discomfort, no requirement for topical 
eye medication and; 

Stability of refraction post procedure; no more than 0.50 dioptre difference in the 
spherical equivalent of either eye should be demonstrated by two consecutive post-treatment 
refractions  separated by a minimum of 3 months and; 
g. 
Paper case review by a Service ophthalmologist or Service-approved ophthalmologist 
for confirmation that the candidate is acceptable. 
5. 
A single revision of CRS is acceptable, subject to the candidate meeting all the criteria as 
above, including the preoperative limits before the first CR
Return to Contents Page 
4-A-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Appendix 1 
Calculation of Spherical Equivalent (Equivalent Spherical Error (ESE)) 
1. 
The spherical equivalent is the sum of the spherical component of refraction added to (or 
subtracted from) HALF of the cylindrical component of refraction.  For example: 
 
a. 
Spherical +4.00D with cylindrical +2.00D = (+4) + (2/2) = ESE 5.00 
 
b. 
Spherical  -7.00D with cylindrical +3.00D = (-7) + (3/2) = ESE -5.50 
2. 
The standard refers ONLY to the calculated spherical equivalent, and the individual 
components, namely spherical and cylindrical are NOT to be used in isolation.  For example: 
a. 
Spherical +7.00D with cylindrical -4.00D = (+7) + (-4/2) = ESE + 5.00.  In this example, 
even though the spherical component is greater than +6.00, the calculated Spherical 
Equivalent is only +5.00.  The candidate is therefore FIT. 
b. 
Spherical -5.50D with cylindrical -3.00D = (-5.5) + (-3/2) = ESE -7.00.  In this example, 
even though the spherical component is less than -6.00 and the cylindrical component is less 
than -6.00, the Spherical Equivalent is greater than -6.00.  The candidate is therefore UNFIT. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-A-A1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX B  
EAR, NOSE AND THROAT PRE-ENTRY 
 
Introduction 
 
1. 
Disorders of the ear nose and throat are assessed and recorded under the P factor. Entries 
under HH are records of auditory acuity only. Consideration must be given as to whether a 
condition gives rise to a degree of incapacity that is sufficient to impair an individual’s ability to 
perform the normal tasks expected of the individual, either currently or in the future; whether the 
condition may be exacerbated by exposure to the service environment, or whether the condition is 
likely to give rise to a continuing need for medical supervision or treatment. In cases of doubt, an 
opinion should be sought from the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the 
selection of recruits who may request advice from a Service consultant otorhinolaryngologist (ORL). 
 
Ears, nose and throat – general 
 
2. 
Candidates with the following conditions will normally be UNFIT: 
 
 
a. 
Existing or past history of malignant disease. 
 
 
b. 
Wegener’s granulomatosis1. 
 
 
c. 
Narrowing of the airway sufficient to cause limited exercise tolerance. 
 
 
d. 
Persistent facial nerve palsy. 
 
Ears 
 
3. 
Deformity of the external ear. Candidates with deformity of the external ear sufficient to 
interfere with the wearing of normal hearing protection or use of communication headsets are 
normally UNFIT. 
 
4. 
Otitis Externa. Candidates with recurrent or persistent otitis externa are UNFIT. 
 
5. 
Acute Otitis Media (AOM). Candidates with recurrent AOM are normally UNFIT.  
However, candidates may be determined FIT provided the last episode was not less than one 
year2 ago, the tympanic membrane (TM) has healed, the hearing acuity is within entry limits and 
tympanometry is normal. Following an isolated episode of AOM, a candidate may be determined 
FIT as soon as the TM and hearing have returned to normal. 
 
6. 
Perforation. Candidates with a perforated TM are UNFIT. However, candidates may be 
determined FIT not less than three months3  after spontaneous healing or successful surgery to 
repair a perforation, provided that the TM has returned to normal, hearing acuity is within entry 
limits and tympanometry is normal. 
 
7. 
Ventilation tubes. Candidates with ventilation tubes (grommets, T tubes) are UNFIT. As 
’glue ear’ may recur, candidates may be considered FIT not less than six months after the tube 
has been expelled or removed, provided that the TM has healed, hearing acuity is within entry 
limits and tympanometry is normal4. 
 
1 This is one of a number of conditions whose main feature is vasculitis. 
2 Service ORL consultant opinion. 
3 Service ORL consultant opinion. 
4 Tympanometry is not mandatory if the ventilation tube was expelled more than 12 months ago, the TMs appear mobile and hearing is 
within normal limits. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-B-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
8. 
Myringitis. Candidates with myringitis are UNFIT. 
 
9. 
Chronic Otitis Media (COM). Candidates with active COM (including cholesteatoma) are 
UNFIT. However, candidates with inactive or healed COM who are no longer under ORL follow-
up may be determined FIT provided that the TM has healed, hearing acuity is within entry limits 
and tympanometry is normal. 
 
10.  Mastoidectomy.  Candidates may be considered FIT not less than two years after 
successful mastoid surgery provided that the tympanic membrane has healed, hearing acuity is 
within entry limits and tympanometry is normal. All cases should be reviewed by a Service ORL 
consultant prior to acceptance to determine whether the cavity is stable and whether the condition 
is likely to give rise to a continuing need for medical supervision or treatment. 
 
11.  Otosclerosis. Otosclerosis is a progressive condition resulting in hearing loss. Candidates 
with this condition are therefore UNFIT even if hearing acuity is within the entry limits. 
 
12.  Hearing loss. Candidates with hearing loss sufficient to require external or intra-aural 
hearing aids or cochlear implants are UNFIT. Entry limits for hearing acuity are based on 
unaided hearing thresholds. 
 
13.  Meniere’s disease. Candidates with Meniere’s disease are UNFIT. 
 
Nose and sinuses 
 
14.  Nasal deformity. Candidates with deformity of the nose sufficient to interfere with the use 
of face masks, breathing apparatus and other similar devices are UNFIT. Candidates may, 
however, be determined FIT following successful reconstructive surgery on the advice of the 
single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
 
15.  Epistaxis. Candidates with recurrent epistaxis (more than one episode per week (average) 
over three months or more), unless treated and free of recurrence for at least six months, are 
UNFIT.  Candidates with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia are UNFIT. 
 
16.  Rhinosinusitis. Candidates with chronic rhinosinusitis requiring medication are normally 
UNFIT but may be referred to single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the 
selection of recruits. 
 
17.  Nasal polyposis. Candidates with active nasal polyposis are normally UNFIT. Those 
with a history of treated polyposis may be acceptable following referral to the single-Service 
Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
 
Pharynx, larynx and trachea 
 
18.  Adenoid hypertrophy. Candidates may be determined FIT following successful 
adenoidectomy. 
 
19.  Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome. Candidates with obstructive 
sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome are UNFIT. 
 
20.  Cleft lip/palate. Candidates who have had successful surgery to correct a cleft lip/palate 
may be determined FIT. Candidates with persistent/uncorrected cleft lip/palate should be 
referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
Those who have on-going treatment requirements should be deferred until treatment is 
complete. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-B-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
21.  Laryngeal conditions. Candidates with respiratory papillomatosis or a history of respiratory 
papillomatosis, whether treated or not, are UNFIT. Other laryngeal conditions will be assessed on 
their likelihood of recurrence and functional impact. 
 
22.   Tracheostomy. Candidates with an open tracheostomy are d UNFIT.  Candidates presenting 
with a healed tracheostomy may be determined FIT5.
 
5 The reason for tracheostomy should be explored to ensure there are no associated disabilities. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-B-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX C  
CARDIOVASCULAR PRE-ENTRY 
  
Heart disease 
 
1. 
Candidates with established heart disease are UNFIT, except in the following specific 
circumstances. 
 
2. 
Congenital heart conditions.Candidates who have undergone successful correction of the 
following conditions may be determined FIT, subject to the availability of relevant specialist 
correspondence: 
a. 
Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) 
b. 
Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) 
c. 
Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD) 
All cases must be referred to the single-Service occupational physician responsible for the 
selection of recruits. 
 
3. 
Cardiac murmurs. Although cardiac murmurs may be of no pathological significance, all 
murmurs are to be assessed by a consultant cardiologist or consultant general physician.  The 
following guidance applies after confirmation of the cause of the murmur: 
a. 
Benign physiological murmurs. Grade FIT. 
b. 
Mitral Valve Leaflet Prolapse. If uncomplicated, functionally acceptable and 
requiring no treatment, grade FIT. 
c. 
Bicuspid aortic valve and other valvular conditions.  Normally UNFIT. 
4. 
Disturbances of rhythm. 
a. 
Candidates with any symptomatic dysrhythmia or those who require medication to 
suppress disturbance of rhythm should be considered UNFIT. 
b. 
Candidates with asymptomatic dysrhythmia or who have had dysrhythmic foci or 
accessory pathways ablated should be assessed on an individual basis with the benefit of a 
full report from that individual’s specialist physician.  Advice should be sought from the 
single-Service occupational physician responsible for the selection of recruits.  Many of 
these candidates may be determined FIT if a procedure is deemed to have been curative. 
c. 
Where candidates are required to have an ECG as part of their entry medical this 
should be formally read by a service approved physician1  to allow the exclusion of subtle, 
asymptomatic cardiac diagnoses such as Brugada Syndrome or undiagnosed accessory 
pathways. 
5. 
Cardiomyopathy.  A family history, which must be specifically sought, of sudden death 
before the age of 40 raises the question of inherited cardiomyopathy.  Where there is a familial 
 
1 For Royal Navy divers ECGs may be read by the HSE AMED conducting the diving medical. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-C-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
history, assessment by a consultant cardiologist is required, with as much information about the 
family as possible. If a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy is made all such candidates should be 
considered UNFIT. 
 
Hyperlipidaemia 

 
6.  
Candidates with uncontrolled hyperlipidaemia are UNFIT due to the increased morbidity 
associated with their condition.  
 
7.  
Candidates with previously elevated lipids (including familial hypercholesterolaemia), on 
appropriate primary prevention medications2, should be referred to the SSMES responsible for the 
selection of recruits for case review, seeking specialist advice from a single-Service cardiologist or 
endocrinologist with expertise and experience in managing dyslipidaemia, if required.  
 
8.  
Due to the possibility of side-effects of statins on muscle, candidates taking a statin should 
have a stable medication history for 6 months and normal exercise tolerance whilst completing 
exercise compatible with military training requirements over at least the last 3 months without 
unusual muscle pain or fatigue. If acceptable for entry they are FIT with an E2 marker for annual 
medical review. 
 
Hypertension 
 
9. 
Blood pressure should be measured in accordance with the British Hypertension Society 
(BHS) guidelines (BHS IV).  Cases of suspected “white coat” hypertension must be carefully 
evaluated.  Where there is doubt, a 24-hour ambulatory record, should be obtained and 
interpreted3,4,5 .  Candidates with uncontrolled hypertension6 are UNFIT.  Candidates with 
treated hypertension will normally be UNFIT. 
 
Peripheral vascular diseases 
 
10.  Raynaud’s phenomenon or vasospastic disease.  Candidates with primary or secondary 
Raynaud’s or similar phenomena are UNFIT7 . 
 
11.  Congenital arterio-venous malformations.  Candidates with congenital arterio-venous 
malformations affecting function are UNFIT.  Other congenital A-V malformations should be 
discussed with the single-Service consultant occupational physician responsible for the selection 
of recruits. 
 
12.  Congenital lymphoedema.  All candidates with congenital lymphoedema are UNFIT. 
 
13.  Deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The opinion of the single-Service occupational physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits should be sought on candidates with a previous history of 
DVT.  The referral should detail the clinical circumstances and investigations of the DVT episode. 
 
14.  Thrombophilia. All candidates with thrombophilia should be referred to the single-Service 
occupational physician responsible for the selection of recruits for an opinion as to medical 
suitability for Service. 
 
 
2 To be managed in accordance with NICE guidelines. 
3 https://bihsoc.org/guidelines/  
4 https://bihsoc.org/bp-monitors/  
5 Ambulatory BP monitoring values are usually lower than clinic measurements and thresholds and targets should, therefore, be 
adjusted downwards (e.g. by 10/5mmHg). 
6 BHS IV defines hypertension as a sustained systolic BP ≥ 140 mm Hg and/or sustained diastolic BP ≥ 90 mm Hg. 
7 Candidates deemed manageable by lifestyle changes alone are unfit for entry as the ability to keep the periphery warm at all times 
cannot be guaranteed and the functional capacity of affected individuals is likely to be impaired. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-C-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
15.  Varicose veins. Candidates with symptomatic varicose veins affecting lower limb function 
should normally be UNFIT.  Those with asymptomatic minor varicosities, or who have undergone 
successful treatment, may be determined FIT. 
 
16.   Pericarditis. Pericarditis is a challenging disease with a significant recurrence rate and 
presenting significant challenge in an occupational context. Candidates with a history of pericarditis 
in the 2 years prior to application are UNFIT. Candidates with a single episode of pericarditis who 
meet the following criteria are normally FIT: 
 
a. 
Episode resolved more than 2 years prior to application.  
 
b. 
Episode lasted no more than 6 weeks. 
 
c. 
Normal ECG.  
 
d. 
Normal echocardiogram. 
 
17.  Candidates with a history of complicated pericarditis (persistence beyond 6 weeks, 
recurrence, constrictive) are normally UNFIT; cases of doubt should be referred to SSMES for 
spec med opinion. Any known underlying causative condition should also be considered under the 
relevant Annex. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-C-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX D  
RESPIRATORY PRE-ENTRY  
 
Introduction 
 
1. 
It is important that conditions adversely affecting respiratory fitness are identified at the pre- 
employment stage.  Active disease, or a significant decrease in pulmonary function (standardised 
for age, gender and race) from whatever cause, is a bar to entry. 
 
Wheezing 
 
2. 
Wheezing (including asthma) is common and recruiting medical officers must take a careful 
respiratory history including: 
 
 
a. 
Symptoms of wheezy bronchitis, night-time or recurrent cough.  
 
b. 
Exercise and cold induced wheeze. 
 
c. 
Previous use of bronchodilators, inhalers and/or oral medication1. 
 
 
d. 
Admission to hospital (including Emergency Department) for wheeze. 
 
It may be necessary to obtain a report from the applicant's general practitioner to clarify the 
history. 
 
3.  
In cases where the examining medical officer has concerns or the diagnosis is in doubt, 
guidance should be sought from the single-Service occupational physician responsible for 
recruiting. This includes where the PEFR result at selection examination is less than 80% of 
predicted, adjusted for age, gender, height and ethnicity. 
 
4.  
Candidates with symptoms confined to age less than 5yrs of age2, or a single episode of 
wheeze associated with an acute respiratory tract infection (during which bronchodilator / inhaled 
steroid treatment may have been prescribed) may be determined FIT. 
 
5. 
Candidates with a recorded history of asthma, with the following features, would be 
normally be UNFIT. 
 
 
a. 
Those who have experienced symptoms or taken, or been prescribed any form of 
treatment within the last 4 yrs. 
 
 
b. 
Those who have required more than one course of oral steroids3. 
 
 
c. 
Those who have required more than one nebulisation since the age of 5. 
 
 
d. 
Those who have had a single admission to Intensive care or high dependency, or 
multiple admissions to hospital. 
 
6.  
All others with a history of wheeze, particularly those with an atopic tendency require 
investigation by the protocol below. 
 
1 Includes oral steroids, repeated courses of antibiotics and other oral asthma treatments. 
2 BTS Guidelines 
3 Past treatment is used as a proxy for severity. Those treated abroad may have been given more aggressive therapy than in usual in 
UK, which might unnecessarily debar some individuals. If there is concern this may have been the case, efforts should be made to 
obtain the medical records from the event to gauge severity, and a candidate may be assessed by the protocol at 6. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-D-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3







 
 
 
 
 
 
 

  Candidates identified as requiring 
further assessment  for wheeze 
(JSP 950 6-7-7 Section 4 Annex D) 
Examining  doctor  to send respiratory 
questionnaire  to GP and  start 4 week 
peak  flow  diary 
Concerns raised from clinical 
examination or respiratory 
questionnaire? 
no 
Peak flow diary greater or equal to 15% diurnal variability?  
(To calculate variability, divide the difference between the highest and lowest recorded 
PEFR values by the highest recorded value X 100). 
 
 
 
yes 
no 
borderline 
Referral to single-Service Entry 
medical authority for consideration of 
assessment/formal respiratory function 
un
 
satisfactory 
testing 
 
satisfactory 
 
In accordance  with single  service  policy,  individual  services  may require  additional 
respiratory function  testing for specific  occupational  groups. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-D-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Pneumothorax 
 
7.   Spontaneous pneumothorax. If left untreated, ipsi and contra-lateral recurrence rates of 
this condition are high4.  Therefore, candidates who have had a spontaneous pneumothorax at 
any time without 
definitive treatment are normally UNFIT.  Candidates who have had definitive 
treatment (normally bilateral open or Video-Assisted Thoracostomy (VAT) pleurectomy5 ) may be 
determined FIT provided there is no evidence of subpleural blebs or bullae and they have 
achieved activity compatible with military service for a period of at least 3 months6, subject to 
approval from the single-Service occupational physician responsible for recruiting. 
 
8. 
Traumatic pneumothorax. Candidates who have suffered traumatic pneumothorax are at 
no greater risk of recurrence than the normal population.  Therefore once these candidates have 
made a full clinical recovery, they may be determined FIT provided lung function is normal. 
 
Chronic bronchitis, emphysema and bronchiectasis 
 
9.   Candidates with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis or other 
chronic pulmonary condition are UNFIT. 
 
Tuberculosis 
 
10.   Candidates with active tuberculosis should be determined UNFIT7.  Full details of those with 
a history of confirmed, latent or suspected tuberculosis should be obtained and the candidate 
referred to the single-Service occupational physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
Individuals with a history compatible with an increased risk of TB should be referred to their GP 
for investigation prior to selection. 
 
 
 
4 4 54.2% incidence of recurrence over four years following primary spontaneous pneumothorax . Sadikot RT,Greene T,Meadows 
K,Arnold AG. Recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax. Thorax, September 1997, vol./is. 52/9(805-9). 
5 Pleurodesis is not considered definitive treatment for certain occupational groups (e.g. aircrew and divers). VAT is not acceptable for 
aircrew. 
6 See Section 4, Paragraph 3. 
7 Health clearance for serious communicable diseases – Report from the Ad hoc Risk Assessment Expert Group, Dec 2002. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-D-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX E  
GASTROINTESTINAL PRE-ENTRY  
 
Upper GI Tract Disorders  
 
1. 
Oesophageal disease. Candidates with a current or past history of oesophageal disease, 
including, but not limited to ulceration, varices, fistula or achalasia are UNFIT.  Gastro 
Oesophageal Reflux Disease (GORD) responding to lifestyle changes and not requiring regular 
medication may be determined FIT.   
 
a. 
Motility disorders and oesophagitis. Candidates with a current history of 
motility disorders, chronic, or recurrent oesophagitis are UNFIT.   
 
 
b. 
Hiatus hernia surgery. Candidates who have had any form of surgical correction for 
 
hiatus hernia are UNFIT.   
 
c. 
Anti-reflux surgery.  Those who have undergone surgery purely to resolve reflux and 
who   are asymptomatic and free of any complications1 12 months post-surgery should be 
referred to the single-Service consultant occupational physician responsible for recruiting for 
a final decision on fitness for entry.   
 
2. 
Dyspepsia. Those with a history of dyspepsia that has caused frequent disability, no matter 
how long ago are UNFIT. Those with mild and infrequent symptoms not requiring any medication 
may be determined FIT. The exception is where dyspepsia has been attributed to H pylori infection 
which has been successfully eradicated. In this case, candidates may be accepted if symptom-
free for one year after treatment.  
 
3. 
Peptic ulcer disease. Candidates with a history of surgery for peptic ulceration or 
perforation are UNFIT.  Medically resolved peptic ulcer disease should be assessed as for 
dyspepsia above. 
 
4. 
Pernicious anaemia. Candidates with pernicious anaemia may be determined FIT subject to 
the following caveat.  The history must be confirmed and an appropriate autoantibody screen2  and 
fasting blood glucose should not show any abnormality (apart from the antibodies involved in 
pernicious anaemia).  Those with other antibodies or elevated fasting blood sugar should normally 
be UNFIT (due to the risk of developing other auto-immune conditions). 
 
Bowel conditions 
 
5. 
Irritable bowel syndrome.  Candidates with a current or past history of irritable bowel 
syndrome requiring medical follow-up/review, requiring medication within the previous two years 
or of sufficient severity to interfere with normal daily activities3  are UNFIT.  Those with mild 
symptoms not requiring any medication, who are able to cope with a varied diet4  may be 
determined FIT with a E2 risk marker. In cases of doubt an opinion should be sought from the 
single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for selection of recruits.   
 
6. 
Inflammatory bowel disease. Candidates with a history of inflammatory bowel 
disease, including but not limited to unspecified regional enteritis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative 
colitis or ulcerative proctitis are UNFIT, regardless of treatment (including surgery).   
 
 
1 Complications include dysphagia, gas trapping (inability to belch) or return of reflux. 
2 Associated with auto-immune thyroid disease, vitiligo, hypoparathyroidism, Addison’s disease and diabetes.  As antibody tests can be 
false positive, it may be necessary to refer for confirmation of diagnosis. 
3 Examples include time off school or work. 
4 The requirement to cope with the diet while deployed, at sea or on field rations, should be borne in mind. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-E-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
7. 
Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Opinion should be sought from the single-Service 
Occupational Physician responsible for selection of recruits5. 
 
8. 
Hirschsprung’s disease. Candidates with Hirschsprung’s Disease are normally UNFIT 6.  
 
Intestinal malabsorption syndromes 
 
9. 
Gluten sensitivity.  Candidates with a history of gluten sensitive enteropathy (Coeliac 
Disease) or gluten sensitivity are UNFIT.  
 
10.   Lactose and other food intolerance. Candidates with a confirmed history of lactose 
intolerance and/or any other food intolerance which requires an exclusion diet to prevent 
symptoms and/or which require any form of medical intervention are UNFIT.   
 
Herniae 
 
11.  Candidates are normally UNFIT if any hernia (inguinal, epigastric or incisional) is present.  
However, those with an easily reducible periumbilical hernia that does not affect physical activity 
may be determined FIT.  Candidates with repaired and soundly healed herniae may be determined 
FIT provided that they are able to tolerate activities comparable with military training/Service over 
a minimum period of 3 months7.  However, candidates with a repaired incisional hernia (especially 
if originally extensive) should be referred for specialist surgical advice as this type of hernia is 
more liable to recur.   
 
Surgical procedures 
 
12.  Candidates with a history of open or laparoscopic abdominal surgery should be assessed 
following the guidance below.  Care should be exercised to ensure that the original reason for 
such surgery is not disqualifying in itself.   
 
a. 
Candidates who have undergone surgery during the preceding 6 months are 
normally UNFIT. 
 
b. 
Laparoscopy. Candidates who have had diagnostic laparoscopy and other 
procedures such as appendicectomy and laparoscopic sterilisation with a low risk of late 
complications may be assessed as FIT on return to full physical activity. 
 
c. 
Bariatric surgery.  Because of the significant risks of complications, candidates who 
have undergone bariatric surgery within the last two years are graded UNFIT. Where more 
than two years have passed since surgery, candidates are to be assessed on a case-by-
case basis by the single-Service consultant occupational physician responsible for the 
selection of recruits. Because of the high rate of complications, including slippage and 
erosion, candidates who have undergone gastric banding are graded UNFIT. Candidates 
who have undergone other procedures, such as sleeve gastrectomy, and gastric bypass 
(requiring Roux-en-Y reconstruction), with stable weight and in whom there are no surgical 
or metabolic complications, and no ongoing requirement for dietary supplementation, may 
be graded FIT. 
 
d. 
Pouch surgery.  Any applicant who has undergone colectomy and pouch surgery 
should be considered UNFIT as they all require prolonged follow-up and have significant 
long-term morbidity. 
 
 
5 Practice parameters for the treatment of patients with dominantly inherited colorectal cancer (Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and 
Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal cancer). Diseases of the Colon & Rectum 2003;46 (8):1001-1012.  http://www.acpgbi.org.uk/ - 
Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.  http://www.acpgbi.org.uk/content/uploads/2007-CC-Management-
Guidelines.pdf 
6 Even after surgery, perfect continence is unlikely and usually requires management with intermittent laxatives, enemas, and revision 
surgery. 
7 See Section 4 Introduction. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-E-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Anal and perianal conditions 
 
13.  Pilonidal sinus. Candidates with active disease or a history of more than two planned, 
definitive surgical procedures for pilonidal sinus are UNFIT.  A past history of acute abscess 
drainage does not on its own bar entry. Those who have had wide excision with healing by 
secondary intention will not be accepted until 12 months have elapsed since complete healing of 
the wound.   
 
14.   Haemorrhoids. Candidates with active haemorrhoids (internal or external), when large, 
symptomatic, or with a history of bleeding within the last 8 weeks, are UNFIT.   
 
Liver, biliary tree and pancreas 
 
15.  Candidates with a developmental or chronic disease of the liver, biliary tree or pancreas 
are normally UNFIT. 
 
a. 
Viral hepatitis. Candidates with a current acute or chronic hepatitis, hepatitis carrier 
state, hepatitis in the preceding 6 months, or persistence of symptoms after 6 months, or 
objective evidence of impairment of liver function are UNFIT8.   
 
b. 
Pancreatitis. Candidates with a single episode of acute viral pancreatitis with 
complete recovery and no evidence of chronic pancreatitis or diabetes may be considered 
FIT at least 1 year after recovery. However, candidates with a history of alcohol-induced 
pancreatitis are UNFIT.   
 
c. 
Cholecystitis. Candidates with a current or past history of symptomatic cholecystitis, 
acute or chronic, with or without cholelithiasis, or other disorders of the gallbladder and 
biliary system are UNFIT unless surgically treated.  Cholecystectomy is acceptable if 
performed greater than 6 months prior to examination and the candidate remains 
asymptomatic. Candidates who have had fibre-optic procedures to correct sphincter 
dysfunction or cholelithiasis if performed more than 6 months prior to examination and 
remain asymptomatic may be determined FIT.   
 
d. 
Metabolic liver disease. Candidates with a current or past history of metabolic liver 
disease, including, but not limited to haemochromatosis, Wilson's disease and alpha-1 
anti-trypsin deficiency, are normally UNFIT.   
 
e. 
Hepatosplenomegaly. Candidates with hepatosplenomegaly from whatever cause 
are UNFIT.   
 
f. 
Gilbert’s syndrome. Gilbert’s syndrome affects 5% of the population and may 
present as jaundice under a variety of stressors such as minor illness and reduced calorie 
intake. It can also be discovered as an isolated hyperbilirubinaemia (<100umol/l)9 .  
Candidates with Gilbert’s syndrome may be determined FIT if asymptomatic. 
 
Splenectomy 
 
16.  Policy on splenectomy is at Annex N - Other Conditions.
 
8 See also Section 4 Annex N Miscellaneous Conditions. 
9 Davidson’s Principles & Practice of Medicine 19th Ed; p. 843. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-E-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX F  
RENAL AND UROLOGICAL PRE-ENTRY  
 
1. 
Where not otherwise stated in the text, Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) can be either 
measured or calculated (eGFR)1.  
 
2. 
Abnormalities of urinalysis. A persistent abnormality of urinalysis is defined as painless 
haematuria ≥1+ and/or proteinuria ≥1+ (trace can be ignored). For the management of proteinuria 
and painless non-visible haematuria see fig 1. The candidate is UNFIT until pathology has been 
excluded to satisfaction of the single-Service occupational physician responsible for recruiting.  
Any episode of clot colic is UNFIT.  
 
3. 
Nephritis. Candidates with a history of nephritis are normally UNFIT. However, they may be 
accepted subject to review by the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for selection 
of recruits providing that:  
 
a.  
There is no persisting abnormality on urinalysis.  
 
b.  
Blood pressure is normal.  
 
c.  
There is a GFR or eGFR of at least 60ml/min.  
 
Those having made a complete recovery from acute glomerulonephritis or a single attack of 
pyelonephritis (without predisposing factors) more than two years earlier, may be determined FIT.  
If urinalysis shows proteinuria, then this should be assessed objectively. If protein excretion 
exceeds 400 mg/24 hours2 then the candidate should be rejected unless specialist consultation 
determines the condition to be benign orthostatic proteinuria. Those with a history of asymptomatic 
haematuria for several years and are normotensive, have no pathological proteinuria and normal 
renal function may be acceptable subject to formal nephrological assessment. [DCA Medicine]  
 
4. 
Urinary Tract Infection. Candidates with a history of recurrent infection in childhood, or one 
proven infection in a male or two in a female since puberty should not be accepted until a full report 
from their GP confirms that they have a normal urinary tract (such patients will require urological 
assessment). If an abnormality is discovered then referral to the single-Service Occupational 
Physician responsible for selection of recruits is indicated. A history of mild vesicoureteric reflux 
(Grades I-III) where an individual has been discharged from follow-up, has been free of infection3, 
has no requirement for antibiotic prophylaxis, normal urinalysis and normal blood pressure may be 
determined FIT. Those with Grades IV-V that required surgical correction and have been 
discharged from follow-up, should additionally demonstrate a GFR or eGFR of at least 60ml/min.  
 
5. 
Urethral abnormality. Candidates with unsuccessful or continuing treatment for urethral 
abnormalities are UNFIT. Those who have been successfully treated for minor urethral stricture 
may be determined FIT on the condition that they have been discharged from follow-up. 
Candidates with genital piercing (excluding the urethra) that has fully healed without complications 
may be determined FIT. Due to the risk of developing urethral stricture at a later date, candidates 
with history of genital piercing involving the urethra may only be accepted as FIT on a case by 
case basis after obtaining the relevant urologists opinion. Those deemed at unacceptable risk by 
the Service urologist are UNFIT.  
 
 
1 If calculated then the preferred method is the CKD-EPI Calculator Levi A.S, Steven L.A et al A new equation to estimate glomerular 
filtration rate Ann Intern Med 2009; 150 (9) 604-612 (Calculator found at http://touchcalc.com/e_gfr  
2 Or equivalent albumin/creatinine or protein/creatinine ratio. 
3 There is no published time period, but 12 months is suggested by military urology adviser. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-F-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
6. 
Urinary incontinence. Candidates with a history of diurnal urinary incontinence, or of 
nocturnal enuresis in the two years preceding entry are UNFIT and barred from entry regardless of 
the presence of normal neurological and psychological investigations.  
 
7. 
Genital infections. Candidates with a current or past history of genital infection or 
ulceration, including, but not limited to herpes genitalis or condyloma acuminatum, if of sufficient 
severity to require frequent intervention or to interfere with normal function, are UNFIT.  
 
8. 
Congenital Abnormality. Candidates with known polycystic disease, mega-ureter or other 
congenital anomalies are normally UNFIT. The following exceptions apply:  
 
a.  
Polycystic kidney disease. Candidates with a family history of polycystic kidney 
disease require screening ultrasound after the age of 16 years before being accepted.  
 
b.  
Hypospadias. Candidates with current hypospadias, when not accompanied by 
evidence of urinary tract infection, urethral stricture, or voiding dysfunction, may be 
determined FIT after urological assessment.  
 
c.  
Pelviureteric Junction (PUJ) Obstruction. Candidates with surgically-corrected PUJ 
obstruction may be determined FIT provided there is evidence of correction and preservation 
of good renal function (as assessed on isotope renography, no earlier than 12 months post-
surgery). Candidates with unilateral PUJ obstruction with a non-functioning kidney or those 
treated with nephrectomy should be regarded as having a single kidney (see 09).  
 
d.  
Mega-ureter. Candidates with a history of surgically corrected mega-ureter may be 
determined FIT if the GFR exceeds 60ml/min4 and they have been discharged from follow-up.  
All candidates should be referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible 
for selection of recruits.  
 
9. 
Absence, loss or malfunction of a kidney. Candidates with only one functioning kidney 
may be acceptable provided that there is no evidence of disease in the remaining kidney, i.e. no 
persistent abnormality on urinalysis and a GFR or eGFR of at least 60ml/min, in the absence of 
raised blood pressure. All cases meeting the above criteria and potentially acceptable should be 
referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for selection of recruits.  
Candidates with renal transplants are UNFIT.   
 
10.  Urolithiasis. Candidates who have a confirmed history of calculus formation are UNFIT. A 
candidate with a history of a single episode of ureteric spasm (renal colic), which has been  
investigated without demonstration of underlying pathology, may be determined FIT. Those with a 
history of recurrent (more than one) ureteric spasm are UNFIT.   
 
11.  Urological malignant disorders. Candidates with successfully treated malignant disease of 
the bladder or kidney should be referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible 
for selection of recruits. Candidates with malignant urological diseases are normally UNFIT but 
those with Wilms’ tumour treated in early childhood may be determined FIT.   
 
12.  Other painful urological conditions. Candidates with non-specific groin or pelvic pain or 
undiagnosed loin pain are unsuitable for service and UNFIT. Candidates may re-apply after being 
symptom-free and off treatment for one year.  the presence of normal neurological and 
psychological investigations.  
 
4 Total residual GFR/eGFR. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-F-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX G  
NEUROLOGICAL PRE-ENTRY 
 
1. 
Candidates with a history of some nervous system diseases may be acceptable for service 
but be excluded from employments that require more stringent medical standards including aircrew 
and occupational diving. Where there is doubt about either the diagnosis or suitability for entry, 
cases should be referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection 
of recruits. 
 
2. 
Candidates with diseases of the nervous system with a progressive or recurrent course are 
normally UNFIT. 
 
Seizures and epilepsy 
 
3. 
Candidates diagnosed as having epilepsy1  or who have had more than one seizure after their 
sixth birthday are UNFIT. The following should be noted: 
 
 
a
Febrile convulsions. Candidates with febrile convulsions before their sixth birthday2, 
 
and with no subsequent seizures, may be determined FIT. 
 
b. 
Single seizures. Candidates with a single seizure less than 5 years prior to entry are 
UNFIT. Candidates who have had a single seizure more than 5 years before entry, and who 
have not been on treatment during this interval, can be determined FIT (in accordance with 
DVLA Group 2 entitlement standards3). They may still be unable to enter some trades or 
branches, subject to single-Service regulations. Such candidates must be referred to the 
single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
 
c. 
Provoked seizures. Those with a history of provoked seizures should be assessed on 
a case by case basis and advice sought from the single-Service Occupational Physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits. Consideration will also need to be given to fitness for 
service in relation to the provoking stimulus. It must be clear that the seizure had been 
provoked by a stimulus that does not carry any risk of recurrence and does not represent the 
unmasking of any underlying vulnerability. 
 
 
d. 
Petit Mal (absence seizures). Candidates with a history of typical childhood absence 
 
seizures with onset before the age of 10 years4, who have had no such seizures for 5 years 
 
(without treatment) may be determined FIT. 
 
 
e. 
Benign rolandic epilepsy of childhood. Candidates with a confirmed diagnosis of 
 
typical rolandic epilepsy of childhood, who have been seizure-free for 5 years (without 
 
treatment) may be determined FIT. 
 
Headache 
 
4. 
Headaches are common and those who have infrequent mild headaches may be accepted as 
FIT.  Candidates with headaches with any of the following features in the last 2 years should be 
determined UNFIT: 
 
 
1 Diagnosis of epilepsy must be made by a medical practitioner with expertise and training in epilepsy (NICE Clinical Guideline 20) 
2 Advice from Consultant Adviser in neurology to the RAF. 
3 DVLA Current medical guidelines: DVLA guidance for professionals 
 https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/current-medical-guidelines-dvla-guidance-for-professionals  
4 Advice from Defence Consultant Adviser in neurology. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-G-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
a. 
Are severe enough to disrupt normal activities, including loss of time from school or 
 
work. 
 
 
b. 
Require treatment by pharmacy (GSL) or prescription only medicine. 
 
 
 
c. 
Are aggravated by lack of sleep, missed meals or anxiety and occur more often than 
 
once every six months. 
 
 
d. 
Require prophylactic treatment. 
 
Migraine 
 
5. 
The diagnostic criteria for migraine5 without aura are at least 5 attacks fulfilling criteria a-c: 
 
 
a. 
Headache attacks lasting 4-72 hours (when untreated in adults).  
 
 
b. 
Headache has at least two of the following characteristics: 
 
 
 
(1) 
Unilateral location 
 
 
 
(2) 
Pulsating quality 
 
 
 
(3) 
Moderate or severe pain intensity 
 
 
 
(4) 
Aggravation by or causing avoidance of routine physical activity  
 
 
c. 
During the headache, at least one of the following is present: 
 
 
 
(1) 
Nausea and/or vomiting 
 
 
 
(2) 
Photophobia and phonophobia 
 
 
 
(3) 
Not attributable to another disorder. 
 
6. 
The following are known trigger factors for migraine that should be sought in any candidate 
presenting with recurrent headaches: 
 
 
a. 
Relaxation after stress. 
 
 
b. 
Missing meals, sleep deprivation, long distance travel etc. 
 
 
c. 
Bright light and loud noise. 
 
 
d. 
Dietary e.g. alcohol, cheese, citrus fruits, chocolate.  
 
 
e. 
Menstruation. 
 
7. 
Candidates with any of the following criteria should be considered UNFIT: 
 
 
a. 
One episode of migraine in the last two years with any of the following associated 
 
history: 
 
 
5 Diagnostic criteria for migraine (from ICHD-II3). 
Return to Contents Page 
4-G-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
 
(1) 
Moderate to severe pain6 (score of 5 or more on the WHO step ladder pain  
 
 
scale7). 
 
 
 
(2) 
Photophobia8, phonophobia and/or other neurological features. 
 
 
b. 
Two or more episodes of migraine in the last 2 years irrespective of their severity or 
trigger. 
 
 
c. 
Use of prophylactic medication for migraine in the last 2 years. 
 
Head Injuries9,10 
 
8. 
Candidates with a past history of head injury who show any evidence of persisting intellectual, 
psychiatric or neurological symptoms or signs should be considered UNFIT. Head injuries may be 
classified according to the following criteria: 
 
 
a. 
Mild. 
 
 
 
(1) 
Loss of consciousness lasting for less than 30 minutes.  
 
 
 
(2) 
Amnesia lasting for less than 30 minutes. 
 
 
b. 
Moderate.  Any of the following: 
 
 
 
(1) 
Loss of consciousness lasting for 30 minutes to 24 hours.  
 
 
 
(2) 
Amnesia lasting for 30 minutes to 24 hours. 
 
 
 
(3) 
An undisplaced skull fracture. 
 
 
c. 
Severe.  Any of the following: 
 
 
 
(1) 
Loss of consciousness for more than 24 hours.  
 
 
 
(2) 
Amnesia for more than 24 hours 
 
 
 
(3) 
Intracranial haematoma11 
 
 
 
(4) 
Depressed skull fracture 
 
 
 
(5) 
Brain contusion. 
 
9. 
The risk of seizures following head injury is directly related to the severity of the head injury. 
Seizures occurring within 7 days of a head injury are considered to be provoked seizures. As a 
result of the significant risk of continuing seizures following head injury: 
 
a. 
Candidates with a history of mild head injury may be determined FIT as long as they are 
free of post-concussion symptoms. 
 
 
6 Pain intensity is a strongest indicator of disability at work (Steward WF, Lipton RB, Simon D. Work related disability: results from the 
American Migraine study. Cephalalgia 1996; 16: 231-8. Oslo. ISSN 0933-1024). 
7 WHO step ladder pain scale: 1 to 10 where 1 = No Pain and 10 = Intense Pain. 
8 Photophobia will limit ability to work in, for example, bright light and possibly whilst driving. 
9 Annegers, JF et al; A population-based study of seizures after traumatic brain injuriesN Engl J Med. 1998 Jan 1;338(1):20-4 
10 Christensen, J et al; Long-term risk of epilepsy after traumatic brain injury in children and young adults: a population-based cohort 
study. Lancet 2009; 373: 1105-10. 
11 All intracranial haematomata, including epidural, subdural and subarachnoid. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-G-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
b. 
Candidates with a history of moderate head injury may be determined FIT providing 2 
years have elapsed since the head injury and during this interval they have been seizure and 
medication-free and have no long term neuro-behavioural sequelae. 
 
c. 
Candidates with a history of severe head injury will normally be UNFIT, however, be 
determined FIT providing 5 years have elapsed since the head injury and during this interval 
they have been seizure and medication-free and have no evidence of long term neuro-
behavioural sequelae 
 
Hydrocephalus 
 
10.  Candidates with a history of hydrocephalus or intra-cranial shunt (working or blocked) are 
normally UNFIT. However, candidates with a history of resolved infant hydrocephalus may be 
determined FIT but are to be referred to single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the 
selection of recruits. 
 
Neurosurgery and tumours 
 
11.  Neurosurgery. Candidates with a history of neurosurgery are normally UNFIT because of the 
risk of post-surgery seizure. Such candidates should be referred to the single-Service Occupational 
Physician responsible for the selection of recruits for further assessment. 
 
12.  Tumours. Candidates with a history of intracranial tumour are normally UNFIT. 
 
Loss of Consciousness/altered awareness 
 
13.  A full history should be taken including note of any pro-dromal symptoms, length of 
unconsciousness, degree of amnesia and any confusion on recovery.  Candidates with symptoms 
suggestive of a cardiovascular or neurological aetiology must be fully investigated.  The results of 
any cardiological and neurological investigations must be normal or any underlying abnormalities 
fully treated before acceptance can be considered. 
 
14.  Simple faint. These have definite provoking factors, are unlikely to occur whilst lying or sitting 
and are benign in nature. Candidates with non-recurring faints may be determined FIT. Candidates 
with recurring faints are normally UNFIT. 
 
15.  Unexplained loss of consciousness or altered awareness. Candidates who have had a 
single episode with no definite provoking factors, who have normal cardiac and neurological 
examination and a normal ECG, may be determined FIT providing 12 months have elapsed since 
the episode and they are considered to be at low risk of recurrence12 .Candidates with recurring 
episodes where no underlying cause can be found should normally be determined UNFIT. 
 
16.  Loss of consciousness/altered awareness where epilepsy is strongly suspected.  
Factors that may indicate that epilepsy is a likely diagnosis include amnesia for more than 5 
minutes, injury, tongue biting, incontinence, having remained conscious but with confused 
behaviour and post attack headache.Such candidates should only be accepted after 5 years with no 
recurrence13. 
 
Involuntary Movements/Tics 
 
17.  Candidates with significant involuntary movement disorders, including Tourette’s and other 
similar syndromes, should be determined UNFIT. 
 
 
12 Based on DVLA medical standards criteria. 
13 DVLA requirements for Class 2 licensing. See also Hart et al. National General Practice Study of epilepsy: recurrence after first 
seizure. Lancet Vol 336 pp 1271-1274. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-G-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
18.  Candidates with slight involuntary movements (including mild tics) may be determined FIT 
after appropriate functional assessment. Advice should be sought from the single-Service 
Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-G-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX H  
ENDOCRINE PRE-ENTRY 
 
1. 
Disorders of the endocrine system frequently result in the need for continuous medication, 
the withdrawal of which may lead to severe or even life-threatening consequences, and the 
requirement for regular medical review, often at secondary care level. Many such disorders are 
associated with other medical conditions, themselves necessitating treatment and follow-up. For 
these reasons, candidates suffering from endocrine disease will normally be UNFIT. Specific 
guidance is given for the following conditions: 
 
2.  
Diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous condition in which hyperglycaemia 
is the hallmark. Both the disease and its treatment can lead to disabilities and complications1 which 
affect the employability of individuals in the Armed Forces. Candidates with a history of diabetes 
mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance (including gestational diabetes2) according to WHO criteria 
are, therefore, UNFIT. If glycosuria is found on urinalysis, a normal glucose tolerance test is 
required before the candidate can be accepted.  
 
3.  
Pituitary conditions. Hyper and hypo-secretory conditions of the pituitary gland are likely to 
result in long -term treatment and follow up, with potentially life-threatening effects resulting from 
non-compliance with medication. Candidates with an established diagnosis are UNFIT.  
 
4.  
Adrenal conditions. Due to the life-threatening nature of failure to comply with therapy, e.g. 
when the supply of medication cannot be guaranteed, candidates with an established diagnosis of 
adrenal conditions requiring treatment are UNFIT. Candidates with a previous history who have not 
required treatment for a year and who have been discharged from follow-up should be referred to 
the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
 
Thyroid conditions 
 
 
5.  
Hypo-thyroid disease. Successfully treated hypothyroidism poses little health risk from 
short-term failure to take medication3. Its association with a number of health risks in the longer 
term4 and the requirement for continuous medication and regular monitoring would normally result 
in a grading of UNFIT. However, after consultation with a single-Service consultant occupational 
physician responsible for the selection of recruits, candidates may be determined FIT if they are 
euthyroid on a stable dose of medication for at least 1 year and following exclusion of associated 
autoimmune conditions5.  
 
6.  
Hyperthyroid disease. Candidates with a hyperactive thyroid may be accepted as FIT 
following successful definitive treatment with radioactive iodine or surgery, provided at least a year 
has elapsed6 and the candidate is euthyroid without therapy. Candidates who have received 
treatment with carbimazole or thiouracil are UNFIT because of a high risk of recurrence of 
hyperthyroidism7. 
 
Other Endocrine Conditions  
 
7.  
Candidates with carcinoid tumours, thymic tumours and multiple adenomata are UNFIT 
because of the need for continuous monitoring and regular medication.  
 
1 For example: hypoglycaemia, infections, metabolic disturbance, retinopathy, peripheral vascular disease, coronary heart disease, 
neuropathy and renal disease. 
2 Approximately 50% develop DM in 15 years. 
3 Functional impairment (including muscular fatigue, cold intolerance and slowing of cognition) would develop over 1-2 months. 
4 For example: cardiovascular disease, obesity, hypertension, depressive illness, menstrual disorders.  
5 For example: Addison’s disease, coeliac disease, pernicious anaemia and some cases of primary ovarian failure.  
6 Following RAI, approx 5% of patients per year will become hypothyroid (dose dependent) and require replacement therapy. 
7 e.g., 36% relapse rate 2 years following cessation of an 18-month course of carbimazole: Antithyroid drugs and Graves’ disease – 
prospective randomized assessment of long-term treatment. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 1999 Jan;50(1):127-32.   
Return to Contents Page 
4-H-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
8.  
Candidates with a history of other endocrine disease should be discussed with the single-
Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits to determine the need for 
specialist opinion. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-H-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX I  
DERMATOLOGICAL PRE-ENTRY 
 
General 
 
1. 
When assessing a candidate’s fitness for entry, the potential for military service to either cause 
or aggravate existing skin disease must be evaluated. Chronic skin disease may require frequent 
and extensive periods of treatment during which the individual would not be fit for unrestricted 
service. Skin disease may affect the ability to wear military clothing or the ability to operate military 
equipment. Further restrictions may be required dependent on the individual’s intended Service or 
Career Employment Group, in which case guidelines are available in single-Service publications1 or 
opinion should be sought from the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the 
selection of recruits. 
 
2.  
Acne. Candidates with acne that may affect the ability to wear military clothing or to operate 
military equipment should normally be considered UNFIT, or entry should be deferred until the 
disease has been successfully treated. Candidates under treatment with isotretinoin may be 
determined FIT eight weeks after completing successful treatment by which time most adverse 
effects will have settled. Candidates using topical treatments and/or oral antibiotics may be 
determined FIT providing the pre-treatment severity of acne would not have affected the ability to 
wear military clothing or the ability to operate military equipment. 
 
Dermatitis 
 
3. 
Candidates with a history of mild episodes of skin irritation that is not atopic or contact 
dermatitis, is not affecting the hands or affecting function, and with no history of childhood atopic 
dermatitis (eczema), may be determined FIT. Candidates with active dermatitis of any type are 
normally UNFIT. 
 
4.  
Atopic dermatitis (or eczema). A history of atopic dermatitis is considered to increase the 
likelihood of irritant contact dermatitis on exposure to irritants (such as oils, greases, detergents).  
Candidates who have a history of severe atopic dermatitis are normally UNFIT. Severe atopic 
dermatitis (or eczema) is defined as having required or caused ANY of the following: 
 
a. 
Secondary care involvement whether inpatient or outpatient.  
 
b. 
Occlusive dressings.  
 
c. 
Systemic immunomodulatory therapy.  
 
d. 
Phototherapy.  
 
e. 
Intense scratching.  
 
f. 
Insomnia. 
 
g. 
School/work absence.  
 
h. 
Maintenance therapy (other than emollients).  
 
Furthermore, candidates who have a history of atopic dermatitis with any of the following, 
regardless of severity, are also normally UNFIT: 
 
1 BRd 1750A Handbook of Naval Medical Standards  PULHHEEMS Administrative Pamphlet (PAP)  AP 1269A Royal Air Force Manual 
of Medical Fitness.
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-I-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3 link to page 95  
 
 
 
 
i. 
Involvement of the hands. 
 
 
j. 
An episode within the last 1 year. 
 
k. 
Prescription-only topical immunomodulatory2 treatment in the last 3 years. 
 
5. 
In candidates with atopic dermatitis, who do not have any of the above exclusions, the 
presence of the following known risks factors should be enquired after: 
 
a.  
Functional impairment such as difficulty with school/work, sleep disturbance, inability to 
do sport or other social activities or inability to wear certain footwear due to dermatitis. 
 
b.  
Previous episodes of non-atopic dermatitis of the hand(s). 
 
If none of these risk factors are present, the candidate may be determined FIT. If any of the above 
is present, the candidate should be referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits. 
 
6.  
Contact dermatitis. All Service Personnel may be called upon to operate in environments 
where exposure to skin irritants and or sensitisers cannot always be adequately controlled.  
 
a. 
Irritant contact dermatitis. Candidates with a confirmed history of irritant contact 
dermatitis are normally UNFIT. However, where a candidate has experienced isolated 
episodes of irritant contact dermatitis as a result of an defined exposure, unlikely to be 
encountered during military Service, they should be referred to single-Service Occupational 
Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
 
b. 
Allergic contact dermatitis. Candidates with history of allergic contact dermatitis 
confirmed by patch testing should be referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits. 
 
7. 
Pompholyx. Candidates with a history of pompholyx type dermatitis (recurrent vesicular 
eczema affecting hands and / or feet) are normally UNFIT.  
 
Psoriasis3 
 
8. 
Non-cutaneous manifestations. Candidates with non-cutaneous manifestations are UNFIT.   
 
9. 
Active psoriasis.   
 
a. 
Candidates who have active psoriasis with any of the following are normally UNFIT: 
 
(1) 
Affecting >5% Body Surface Area (BSA)  
 
(2) 
Have required treatment with phototherapy or systemic agents. 
 
b. 
Candidates with active psoriasis may be determined FIT provided that: 
 
 
(1) 
The extent of the disease has always been <5% BSA. 
 
 
(2) 
The disease has not involved hands4 and/or feet.  
 
(3) 
The disease would not affect the ability to wear military clothing or the ability to 
operate military equipment. 
 
2 Including prescription-only topical steroids and topical calcineurin inhibitors.  Emollients are acceptable. 
3 See also Fig 1 Psoriasis flow chart. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-I-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3 link to page 95  
 
 
 
10.  Previous history of psoriasis.   
 
a. 
Candidates with a previous history of psoriasis affecting <5% BSA may be determined 
FIT if it did not involve hands4 and/or feet.  
 
b. 
Candidates with a previous history of psoriasis affecting >5% BSA may be determined 
FIT only if: 
 
(1) 
They have remained free from symptoms whilst off treatment for 5 years. 
 
(2) 
They only required topical treatments. 
 
(3) 
The disease has not involved hands4 and/or feet.  
 
(4) 
Would not affect the ability to wear military clothing or the ability to operate 
military equipment. 
 
11.  In all cases, candidates who meet the criteria for entry but require topical treatment to sustain 
function and skin integrity should be referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits for consideration of the requirement for an E2 medical 
marker. 
 
12.  Submarine service. Psoriasis, even mild, can be particularly problematic in the enclosed 
environment of a submarine. If being selected for submarine service, candidates with past or 
present evidence of psoriasis who are otherwise considered fit for entry are to be referred to the 
single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits to the Royal Navy. 
 
13.  Guttate psoriasis. Candidates with a history of a single episode of guttate psoriasis which 
has fully resolved (irrespective of treatment) may be determined FIT. Candidates with more than 
one episode of guttate psoriasis should be referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits. 
 
Other skin diseases 
 
14.   Cysts, scars and keloids. Candidates are normally UNFIT if the size or location of cysts, 
scars or keloids (from whatever cause) could affect the ability to wear military clothing or the ability 
to operate military equipment. 
 
15.  Birthmarks. Consideration should be given to the potential that a birthmark may be a 
cutaneous manifestation of a genodermatosis such as neurofibromatosis, or a neurological 
condition such as Sturge-Weber. Candidates are normally UNFIT if the size or location of 
pigmented or vascular lesions could affect the ability to wear military clothing or the ability to 
operate military equipment.  
 
16.  Bullous dermatoses. Candidates with any immuno-bullous disease such as dermatitis 
herpetiformis or any genetic bullous disease such as epidermolysis bullosa are UNFIT. 
 
17.  Fungal infections. Candidates with extensive or recalcitrant fungal disease or disease that 
could affect the ability to wear military clothing or the ability to operate military equipment are 
normally UNFIT. 
 
18.  Viral warts and veruccas. Candidates with extensive or recalcitrant viral warts and or 
veruccas that could affect the ability to wear military clothing or the ability to operate military 
equipment are normally UNFIT. 
 
4 Mild nail involvement is acceptable. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-I-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
19.  Folliculitis. Single-Service policy5 should be considered when a candidate has had a 
condition such as folliculitis barbae or pseudofolliculitis which may prevent them from shaving.  
Candidates with extensive or recalcitrant inflammation of the hair follicles that could affect the 
ability to wear military clothing or the ability to operate military equipment are normally UNFIT. 
 
20.  Lichen planus. Candidates with generalised disease that is not responsive to treatment are 
normally UNFIT. 
 
21.  Cutaneous leishmaniasis. Candidates undergoing  treatment are UNFIT. Following 
successful treatment, candidates who have been discharged from follow-up may be determined 
FIT. 
 
22.  Hyperhidrosis. Candidates with disease affecting function are normally UNFIT. 
 
23.  Malignant skin disease. Candidates with a history of malignant skin disease, which has 
been successfully treated and who are regarded as cured, may be considered for Service entry 
provided that they have been discharged from regular follow-up and that no treatment is required. 
A clinical report is to be obtained in all cases. A decision on medical fitness for entry and the 
requirement for an E2 medical marker is to be made by the single-Service Occupational Physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits. 
 
a. 
Malignant melanoma. To be considered for Service entry candidates with a history of 
malignant melanoma must have completed treatment and been discharged from follow-up in 
accordance with national guidelines6. Candidates with a history of more than one malignant 
melanoma are normally UNFIT. 
 
b. 
Squamous cell carcinoma. To be considered for Service entry candidates with a 
history of squamous cell carcinoma must have completed treatment and been discharged 
from follow-up in accordance with national guidelines7.  Candidates with a history of more 
than one squamous cell carcinoma are normally UNFIT.   
 
c. 
Basal cell carcinoma. Candidates with a history of a single episode of basal cell 
carcinoma may be determined FIT, but must have completed treatment and been discharged 
from follow-up.  Candidates with a history of more than one basal cell carcinoma may be 
considered for Service entry following referral to the single-Service Occupational Physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits. 
 
24.  Pre-malignant skin conditions. Candidates with a history of pre-malignant skin conditions 
who remain under active dermatological review are normally UNFIT. 
 
a. 
Candidates with a history of keratinocyte derived disease such as actinic keratosis, 
Bowen’s disease, vulval or penile intra-epithelial neoplasia who remain under active 
dermatological review are normally UNFIT. Candidates who have completed treatment and 
have been discharged from follow-up may be determined FIT.  
 
b. 
Candidates with a history of melanocyte derived disease such as atypical mole 
syndrome or dysplastic naevi who remain under active dermatological review are normally 
 
5 Single-Service policy on facial hair is detailed in: RN BR3(1), Part 6, Chapter 38. Army AGAI, Volume 2, Chapter 59 Annex B. RAF 
AP1358, Chapter 1.  
Beards are permitted on religious ground.  Muslim, Sikh and Rastafarian men are permitted to wear uncut beards 
in normal circumstances.  For occupational or operational reasons, where a hazard clearly exists, individuals have to be prepared to 
modify or remove their beards, for instance to enable the correct wearing of a respirator or breathing apparatus. 
6 Royal College of Physicians and British Association of Dermatologists (Sep 07) Number 7 The prevention, diagnosis, referral and 
management of melanoma of the skin Concise Guidelines http://www.bad.org.uk/shared/get-file.ashx?id=793&itemtype=document.  
NICE (Jul 15) NG 14 Melanoma: assessment and management https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng14. 
7 British Association of Dermatologists (Nov 09) Multi-professional Guidelines for the Management of the Patient with Primary 
Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma http://www.bad.org.uk/shared/get-file.ashx?id=59&itemtype=document. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-I-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
UNFIT.  Candidates who have a history of complete excision of dysplastic naevus, who have 
been discharged from follow-up may be determined FIT. 
 
25.  Photosensitivity. Candidates with any condition sensitive to or aggravated by exposure to 
sunlight not adequately controlled by sunscreens, are normally UNFIT. 
 
26.  Vitiligo. Candidates with vitiligo have a comparable risk profile for photosensitivity and skin 
cancer as those with Type 1 skin8.  Candidates with vitiligo not associated with any other auto-
immune disorder may be determined FIT. 
 
27.  Scleroderma. Refer to JSP 950 Part 1 6-7-7 Section 4 Annex K Musculoskeletal. 
 
28.  Urticaria and angio-oedema. 
 
a. 
Acute urticaria and angio-oedema. Refer to JSP 950 Part 1 6-7-7 Section 4 Annex N 
Other Conditions. 
 
b. 
Chronic spontaneous urticaria. Candidates who have a history of chronic 
spontaneous urticaria (symptoms > 6 weeks) requiring regular medication are normally 
UNFIT.  Candidates with chronic spontaneous urticaria which has fully resolved and free 
from treatment for 2 years may be determined FIT. 
 
c. 
Chronic physical urticaria. Candidates with a history of chronic physical urticaria i.e. 
in response to heat, cold, physical exercise or sunlight are UNFIT. 
 
8 The Fitzpatrick skin type scale type 1 Ivory: pale skin, light or red hair, prone to freckles.  Burns very easily and rarely tans. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-I-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3

























 
 
 
Fig 1 Psoriasis flow chart 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-cutaneous 
 
manifestation(s)  Yes 
 UNFIT 
psoriasis? 
 
 
No 
 
A single episode of 
Yes 
May be determined FIT 
guttate psoriasis which 
 
has fully resolved 
 
Guttate psoriasis 
Yes 
(irrespective of 
 
treatment)? 
No 
Refer to the single-Service Occupational 
Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
No 
 
 
 
Affecting >5% Body Surface Area 
Yes 
Normally UNFIT 
 
Active psoriasis? 
Yes 
and/or  required treatment with 
phototherapy or systemic agents? 
 
 
No 
No
 
 
 
 
 
Has it involved hands 
Previous history 
<5% BSA 
(mild nail involvement is 
Yes 
Normally UNFIT 
 
of psoriasis?  
acceptable) and/or feet? 
 
 
>5% 
BSA 
 
 
No 
 
Symptom-free 
UNF  
whilst off treatment 
IT 
No 
for 5 yrs? 
 
Would it affect the ability 
 
to wear military clothing 
 
Yes 
or the ability to operate 
Yes 
Normally UNFIT 
 
military equipment? 
 
Only required 
UNFIT  
No 
topical treatments? 
 
No 
 
Yes 
 
May be determined FIT 
 
Refer to the single-Service 
Occupational Physician responsible 
 
Is topical treatment to 
Has it involved hands 
sustain function and 
Yes 
for the selection of recruits for 
UNFIT  
Yes  (mild nail involvement is 
skin integrity required? 
consideration of the requirement for 
acceptable) and/or feet? 
an E2 medical marker. 
 
 
 
No 
No 
 
 
 
Would it have affected 
the ability to wear military 
UNF  
IT 
Yes 
clothing or the ability to 
May be determined FIT 
 
operate military? 
equipment? 
 
 
No 
Submarine Service 
 
Psoriasis, even mild, can be particularly problematic in the 
 
enclosed environment of a submarine.  If being selected for 
May be determined  FIT 
submarine service, candidates with past or present evidence 
 
of psoriasis who are otherwise considered fit for entry are to 
 
be referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician 
 
responsible for the selection of recruits to the Royal Navy. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-I-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX J  
REPRODUCTIVE PRE-ENTRY 
 
1.  
A careful menstrual, obstetric and gynaecological history must be taken and recorded. In 
every case the date of the last menstrual period must be recorded. Where a positive history of 
menstrual or pelvic disorder is elicited, then full details must be sought. It should be noted that: 
 
a.  
Examination of the genitalia, external or internal, is not required at the recruit medical 
examination and should not be performed. There are no indications for such examinations 
during an occupational health assessment. 
 
b.  
Similarly, breast examination is not required. However, a history should include 
enquiry with particular reference to chronic mastalgia, cyclical or otherwise. Candidates with 
this problem should normally be UNFIT.  Enquiry should be made of ergonomic difficulties 
encountered or discomfort should gross hypertrophy be apparent. Such difficulties should 
be considered on a case by case basis, in particular whether she can  perform the required 
duties. 
 
Gynaecological conditions 
 
2. 
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)1.  Candidates with an established diagnosis of chronic 
PID are normally UNFIT. However, a candidate with a single, confirmed episode that has not 
recurred within 12 months may be FIT 2. A past history of pelvic Chlamydial infection should not in 
itself preclude service. Suggestive but unconfirmed histories of PID should result in more detailed 
enquiry being made and advice from a single-Service Consultant Occupational Physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits sought in doubtful cases. 
 
3.  
Menorrhagia. Candidates with menorrhagia sufficient to warrant time off school or work 
are normally UNFIT. 
 
4. 
 Amenorrhea. Amenorrhea can usually be disregarded provided there is no serious 
cause3 and pregnancy has been excluded4. 
 
5. 
Dysmenorrhoea. Candidates with dysmenorrhoea sufficient to warrant time off school or 
work are normally UNFIT. Those with mild or moderate dysmenorrhoea manageable with mild 
analgesia may be FIT. 
 
6. 
Endometriosis. This condition is recurrent, progressive and causes chronic ill health in up 
to 50% of patients5. Therefore, candidates with symptomatic endometriosis confirmed by a 
Gynaecologist are normally UNFIT. However, candidates with endometrial deposits discovered 
incidentally at laparoscopy  may be FIT provided they are symptom-free. 
 
7. 
Chronic pelvic pain  syndrome. Chronic pelvic pain is a common indication for referral 
to a gynaecologist6 and has a multi-factorial aetiology. Candidates with chronic pelvic pain 
syndrome are difficult to manage and should be determined UNFIT. 
 
 
1 The best means of definitive diagnosis of PID is visualisation of the Fallopian tubes by laparoscopy. 
2 If clear for 12 months, PID is highly unlikely to become chronic unless there is a fresh infection.  20% of PID patients get chronic pelvic 
pain and this will become evident before 12 months. All cases should be carefully assessed by obtaining evidence from the candidate’s 
gynaecologist. (No audited evidence is available, but consensus opinion provided from Birmingham Women’s Hospital). 
3 Including but not limited to anorexia (3.14.24) and PCOS (11). 
4 Referral back to the candidate’s GP is recommended to exclude pregnancy. Pregnancy testing is not to be performed at the recruit 
medical examination. 
5 Evidence from Birmingham Women’s Hospital. 
6 Annual incidence of 38 per 1000 between ages 12 –70 years. Evidence from Birmingham Women’s Hospital. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-J-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
8.  
Uterine and ovarian tumours. Candidates with symptomatic fibroids, other uterine tumours 
or ovarian tumours are normally UNFIT. However, asymptomatic small fibroids, ovarian cysts and 
recurrent follicular cysts are common. These are unlikely to affect full operational fitness7. 
Candidates with incidentally discovered asymptomatic8 benign tumours in which the uterus is not 
enlarged or causing encroachment on the uterine cavity may be graded FIT. 
 
9.  
Uterine prolapse.  Candidates with symptomatic prolapse are normally UNFIT. Those who 
have undergone satisfactory surgical repair may be determined FIT. 
 
10.  Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN).  The following guidelines9  should be applied: 
 
a. 
 Borderline smears10.  Women with smears that show borderline changes may not 
have proceeded to histological investigation but should have had colposcopic examination 
(evidence of which must be obtained). Those with no abnormalities on colposcopy can be 
returned to routine  follow-up after normal smears have been demonstrated at the 6 and 12 
month point.  Therefore candidates with a normal smear at both these points may be 
determined FIT. 
 
b.  
CIN 1. It is recommended that women with CIN 1 are returned to the routine 
screening programme once they have had normal follow-up smear results at the 6 and 12 
months. Therefore candidates with a normal smears at both these points may be 
determined FIT. 
 
c.  
CIN  2 and 3. It is recommended that these women undergo annual screening for at 
least ten years because of clear evidence of persisting risk of invasive carcinoma. 
However, provided there is evidence of a normal follow-up smear result at the 6 and 12 
month points, these candidates may also be determined FIT. 
 
d.  
Invasive carcinoma. Candidates with a history of invasive carcinoma are UNFIT. 
 
e.  
Other. Those with other cervical abnormalities, including viral changes, may be 
determined FIT following two consecutive normal smears at least six months apart. 
 
11.  Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)11. PCOS is not an acute problem and often goes 
completely undiagnosed. The mainstay of treatment for PCOS is weight loss which may be 
assisted by metformin. Candidates whose symptoms have been adequately controlled (i.e. regular 
menses) and whose BMI has been maintained at = 29 for at least 12 months by oral 
contraceptives or metformin12 may be determined FIT.All other candidates are UNFIT. 
 
Obstetric conditions 
 
12.  Candidates who declare pregnancy prior to entry13 are unfit for service until at least three 
months after the end of a pregnancy involving vaginal or Caesarean delivery. Provided that 
evidence is available of a satisfactory post-natal examination, requiring no subsequent follow-
up, and breast feeding has ceased, candidates may then be determined FIT. Those who 
become pregnant after acceptance14 should be re-graded P4 in accordance with current single-
 
7 Consensus opinion from Birmingham Women’s Hospital. 
8 Pain and bleeding must be excluded – gynaecological evidence is recommended especially to determine the reason for the 
investigation during which the diagnosis is made. 
9 Based on Colposcopy and Programme management: Guidelines for the NHS Cervical Screening Programme NHSCSP Publication 
No.20. (April 2004). http://www.cancerscreening.nhs.uk/cervical/publications/nhscsp20.pdf  with confirmed advice from Birmingham 
Women’s Hospital. 
10 The term “dyskaryosis” is no longer used – contemporaneous advice from Birmingham Women’s Hospital, whose unit were 
instrumental in preparing the guidelines at footnote 124. 
11 Evidence provided by Birmingham Women’s Hospital. 
12 Side effects must be absent. These are commonly gastrointestinal, usually in the form of nausea, and can be ameliorated by taking 
the medication with food. Stopping treatment with metformin has no sequelae and if BMI = 29 there is no increased incidence of NIDDM. 
13 Entry as defined by single-Service administrative policies - usually, before a provisional date of entry has been assigned. 
14 Provisional entry date assigned. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-J-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Service policies. The  extant policy on pregnant workers is detailed in Section 5 Annex J. 
Account should be taken of the following: 
 
a.  
A woman may be determined FIT and accepted for service four weeks after a 
spontaneous or induced termination of pregnancy provided there is full recovery. 
 
b.  
In candidates with a history of ectopic pregnancy either with or without salpingectomy, 
a report is to be obtained from the GP giving information on the history and any 
predisposing factors.  Candidates treated by salpingectomy  which is not associated with 
pelvic inflammatory or other disease may be determined FIT. Other cases are to be 
discussed with single-Service Occupational Physicians responsible for the selection of 
recruits. 
 
c.  
Candidates with a history of underlying malignancy (e.g. gestational trophoblastic 
disease – including hydatidiform mole, invasive mole, choriocarcinoma, placental site 
trophoblastic tumour) should be determined UNFIT.However, candidates who have been 
disease-free and treated simply by evacuation of the uterus and whose ßHCG levels have 
been normal for 2 years may be determined FIT 15. Because of adverse effects on other 
systems, candidates who have required treatment with methotrexate are normally UNFIT 
unless the candidate can provide evidence that other system function16 has returned to 
normal. 
 
15 Absence of disease should be confirmed by a consultant in gynaecological oncology. There is no increased risk of recurrence in this 
group unless pregnancy occurs. The risk of recurrence is increased for 3 months after each pregnancy and with each subsequent 
pregnancy. (Evidence provided by Birmingham Women’s Hospital). 
16 Especially bone marrow suppression. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-J-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX K  
MUSCULOSKELETAL PRE-ENTRY 
 
1. 
This Annex must be used in conjunction with the guidance in Section 3, Section 4 
Introduction and any issued by single Services. 
Introduction 
2. 
Candidates require a robust physical frame to cope with the physical demands of military 
training and subsequent Service. Musculoskeletal injury remains the greatest single cause of 
medical discharge from training and service, so it is essential to identify and assess any conditions, 
inherent or acquired, that might predispose to injury. Conditions are grouped as follows: 
a. 
General (including fractures). 
b. 
Conditions affecting the function of the upper part of the body (including cervical spine) 
and conditions affecting lower limb and spine function. 
3. 
Enquiry about level of physical activity comparable with military service is especially 
important in the assessment of these conditions including recovery from previous injury or surgery.  
See also Section 3 paragraph 3. To determine the impact of any musculoskeletal condition the 
following aspects are to be assessed: 
a. 
Structure. The candidate must not have any deformity or anatomical derangements 
that might interfere with function or the use of standard issue military equipment e.g. clothing 
(especially gloves and boots). 
b. 
Function. The candidate must not have any limitation of range of movement (ROM), 
dexterity, strength or endurance likely to interfere with military training or Service (formal 
assessment advised in certain cases, eg weapon handling)1. 
c. 
Symptoms and signs. The candidate should be assessed for any pain, or instability, 
particularly on or exacerbated by activity comparable with military training or Service. 
4. 
Referral for specialist opinion. Initial referral for advice on employability of candidates with 
orthopaedic/rheumatological conditions should be to the single-Service Medical Entry staff 
(SSMES) for occupational medicine (OM) opinion. A clinical assessment may be sought to inform 
the OM opinion. 
General 
5. 
Amputation. Candidates with amputations are normally UNFIT. For single-digit amputation 
see paragraphs 32 and 56. 
Arthropathies and connective tissue disorders 
6. 
Ligamentous laxity (hypermobility). Generalised ligamentous laxity (hypermobility) may be 
responsible for locomotor symptoms or future joint problems. Candidates with a formal diagnosis of 
hypermobility syndrome made in adulthood are normally UNFIT. Candidates with hyperextension 
of >10 degrees2 in either knee are normally UNFIT3 but if asymptomatic, have good knee control 
 
1 Care must be taken to assess for a level of compensatory measures. 
2 Examine the knee and measure hyper-extension with goniometer with patient supine. 
3 A candidate with >10 degrees of hypermobility is unlikely to be able to lock their joints to achieve the required level of function. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-K-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
and undertaking exercise comparable with military activity may be referred to SSMES for 
consideration of referral for specialist assessment. 
7. 
Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. If a candidate has a formal diagnosis, they are UNFIT due to the 
associated medical risks and complications.  
8. 
Septic arthritis. A fully functional candidate with a history of a brief episode of infection more 
than 12 months ago which was not complicated by any of the following are FIT. 
 
a. 
Secondary osteo-arthritis. 
 
b. 
Functionally-significant deformity. 
 
c. 
Significant imaging changes that are likely to impact on future service. 
9. 
Candidates with a history of septic arthritis complicated by secondary arthritis, functionally 
significant deformity, decreased ROM or imaging changes are normally UNFIT. Candidates with a 
history of septic arthritis without these complications must be referred to SSMES for a decision on 
fitness for entry. 
Chronic arthritis 
10.  Arthritis occurring in candidates younger than 30 years of age is a poor prognostic sign. 
Candidates with an incidental finding of minor age-related osteoarthritis that does not affect 
function and are asymptomatic are normally FIT.  
11.  Other arthritidies. A candidate of any age with a history of rheumatoid arthritis, anklyosing 
spondylitis or psoriatic arthritis is normally UNFIT.   
12.  Inflammatory arthritis. Candidates with a single episode of reactive arthropathy, with no 
symptoms for 2 years or more, not on any treatment, and with no underlying joint damage, may be 
FIT following referral to the SSMES. Candidates with a family history of inflammatory arthritis and 
who are known to be HLA B-27 positive are FIT as long as they meet functional requirements. 
13.  Gout. Candidates with a history of gout with no symptoms for 2 years or more, not on any 
treatment, and with no underlying joint damage, are normally FIT.  
14.  Connective tissue disease and vasculitis causing arthritis. Candidates with these 
conditions are UNFIT.   
15.  Juvenile Chronic Arthritis (JCA). JCA can be a systemic disease. Candidates who have 
been disease and symptom-free for a minimum of 2 years, with no evidence of joint damage or 
systemic disease, with activity comparable with military training for 3 months, may be suitable for 
entry subject to referral to SSMES. Candidates with a history of confirmed systemic involvement 
(e.g. cardiac/respiratory/neurological/ophthalmological involvement) are UNFIT.   
16.  Osteomyelitis. An episode of osteomyelitis from which the candidate has recovered with full 
asymptomatic function and no deformity may be FIT after referral to SSMES. Candidates with 
evidence of active disease are UNFIT. 
17.  Osteochondritis dissecans. If the defect has been shown to have fully resolved (following 
medication and/or surgery) with no other lesion and no symptoms the candidate may be FIT 
following referral to SSMES. Candidates with a residual defect, loose bodies or abnormal imaging 
are UNFIT. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-K-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
18.  Osteochondral defects. In weight bearing joints, the location and size of the defect is critical 
to determine whether this affects the weight bearing surface. Candidates with osteochondral 
defects are to be referred to SSMES who may seek a specialist opinion as to the significance of 
the defect. 
19.  Connective tissue disorders. Candidates with a history of systemic lupus erythematosus, 
scleroderma, polyarteritis nodosa, polymyositis and other connective tissue disorders are normally 
UNFIT. 
20.  Myopathy and myositis. Those with minimal post-traumatic wasting, causing no significant 
loss of function, are FIT provided functional assessment is normal. All cases of myopathy with 
muscle wasting are UNFIT. 
Fractures 
21.  General guidance about previous fractures of all appendicular skeletal bones is provided 
below. Specific guidance may also be found under conditions affecting the upper limb and lower 
limb and back assessment. 
22.  Previous traumatic fractures without surgical fixation. For those with normal function and 
with no deformity, a period of at least 12 months must have elapsed since the fracture before 
selection. This is due to remodelling following fracture which often takes up to 12 months. In cases 
of doubt, consult the SSMES. Specific guidance is given below. 
a. 
Long bones. Candidates with fractures where union is confirmed without a deformity 
affecting function, who have been asymptomatic for 3 months while undertaking activity 
comparable with military training and have full function of the joints above and below the 
injury are FIT. If there is deformity with no symptoms and full function, referral to SSMES 
should be considered. Candidates with any symptoms or deformity resulting in dysfunction 
are UNFIT. 
b. 
Flat bones (e.g. pelvis, scapula). Fractures with union confirmed, no deformity, and 
where the candidate is asymptomatic having undertaken exercise comparable with military 
training for 3 months are FIT. 
c. 
Patellar fractures. Whilst technically an intra-articular fracture, candidates who are 
able to perform activity comparable with military training for 3 months, should be assessed on 
a case-by-case basis by SSMES.   
d. 
Intra-Articular fractures involving the upper and lower limb joints. Early 
osteoarthritis is the norm. Candidates must have normal function and have demonstrated the 
ability to undertake exercise comparable with typical military activities. Modern trauma 
surgery aims to minimise the risk of post-traumatic degenerative changes, but it cannot undo 
damage at the time of injury.   
(1) 
If the candidate has abnormal alignment or remains symptomatic, they are 
UNFIT.   
(2) 
If the candidate has normal alignment and is asymptomatic they may be FIT 
subject to referral to a SSMES. Fitness will depend on many factors including function, 
the type of injury, type of fracture, type of fixation and any subsequent complications.   
(3) 
Intra-articular fractures of toes, other than the great toe, are normally FIT.  
(4) 
Those of the fingers are normally FIT. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-K-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
e. 
Candidates with the following simple (non-fixed) fractures may be considered FIT after 
6 months. In cases of doubt consult the SSMES. 
(1) 
Metacarpal and phalangeal fractures. 
(2) 
Clavicular shaft fracture, not involving the acromioclavicular or sternoclavicular 
joints. Where these joints are involved the candidate should be referred to SSMES. 
(3) 
Extra articular distal radial fracture. 
(4) 
Un-displaced distal fibular4 Weber A fracture. 
23.  All pathological fractures are normally UNFIT. 
24.  Previous traumatic fracture with surgical fixation5. For those with normal function and 
with no significant deformity, a period of at least 12 months must have elapsed since the fracture 
before selection due to remodelling following fracture which often takes up to 12 months. In cases 
of doubt consult SSMES. 
25.  Upper limb fractures. Candidates with upper limb fractures where: 
a. 
Union is confirmed. 
b. 
There is no deformity. 
c. 
There is no tenderness over the area of metalwork / fracture site. 
d. 
There are no symptoms with exercise comparable with military training over the last 3 
months. 
e. 
There is full function of the joints above and below the injury are FIT.   
26.  Lower limb fractures. The same conditions apply to candidates with lower limb fractures. If 
surgery has resulted in restitution of anatomy, candidates are normally FIT provided they are 
symptom-free with activity comparable with military training for 3 months and should be referred to 
SSMES. Candidates who have undergone complex surgery involving joints or surgical fixation of 
major upper and lower limb joints are normally UNFIT as early osteoarthritis is the norm.. 
27.  Stress fractures. Candidates recovered from uncomplicated, single stress fractures who are 
symptom free with proven activity comparable with military training for a minimum of 3 months and 
radiological confirmation of healing are FIT. Candidates with any femoral neck stress fracture or 
multiple or recurrent stress fractures at any site are normally UNFIT. Previous pre-disposing factors 
should be considered. 
28.  Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) and tibial stress injuries. Acute conditions should 
be deferred for a period of at least 6 months and reassessed following rehabilitation. Candidates 
must have full function and be asymptomatic with exercise comparable with military training over 
the last 3 months in order to be found FIT. 
 
4 Fractures at, around or proximal to the syndesmosis must be referred to the single-Service Occupational Physicians responsible for the 
selection of recruits. 
5 In general, asymptomatic metalwork does not need to be removed - M Townend, P Parker. Metalwork Removal in Potential Army 
Recruits. Evidence Based Changes to Entry Criteria. J R Army Med Corps 2005; 151: 2-4). 
Return to Contents Page 
4-K-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
29.  Joint replacements. Candidates who have had joint prostheses (including articular 
resurfacing) are normally UNFIT. 
30.  Osteopenia and osteoporosis. Candidates with a current diagnosis6 of osteopaenia or 
osteoporosis due to any cause, are normally UNFIT. Candidates with a past history of osteopaenia 
which has fully resolved with confirmation of normal bone mass using DXA (Dual Energy X-Ray 
Absorptiometry – whole body, lumbar spine and hip) may be considered FIT following referral to 
SSMES. 
Conditions Affecting the Upper Body and Limb 
31.  Deformities of individual parts of the upper limbs, such as loss of any finger or parts of a 
finger or other parts of the hand are assessed according to functional capacity. Particular 
consideration must be given to manual dexterity. To assist examiners, the following guidance is 
provided. 
32.  Fingers and hands. Candidates with loss of any finger of either hand should be assessed 
according to residual functional capacity and are normally FIT. Those with more extensive loss 
affecting function are UNFIT. Candidates with loss of an opposable thumb are UNFIT. However, 
those who have had a finger reconstructed to replace a thumb at an early age should be 
functionally assessed (including the use of CBRN gloves) and can be found FIT if fully functional.  
Candidates with any other deformity if symptom-free with full function including firing weapons and 
compatibility with clothing (especially CBRN gloves) are FIT. 
33.  Wrist. Candidates with significant loss of function of wrist movement are UNFIT. Those with 
non-union of fractures of the carpal bones or a painful wrist with limitation of movement are UNFIT.  
Candidates with good function are FIT. In cases of doubt candidates can be referred to SSMES for 
a functional assessment. 
34.  Elbow. Candidates with less than 15 degrees loss of extension7 and, or flexion (usually 
following injury) with normal pronation and supination and able to hold a prolonged (more than 20 
seconds) press-up position (elbows flexed, in accordance with Section 3) symptom-free are FIT.  
Those with greater loss are normally UNFIT. Candidates who have lost more than 20 degrees of 
either pronation or supination are normally UNFIT. Varus or valgus angulation should not preclude 
entry provided that normal function can be demonstrated. 
35.  Shoulder. Candidates with any functional limitation of shoulder movement are UNFIT. The 
following guidance is provided for candidates who have suffered shoulder dislocation. Subluxation 
requiring acute medical intervention should be considered as for dislocation. Each shoulder should 
be reviewed separately. Clinical evaluation should include an assessment looking for full ROM, 
with resisted assessment of the shoulder in external rotation and abduction. If this causes pain or a 
feeling of instability (where symptoms improve when the clinician supports the candidate’s shoulder 
by placing a hand on the anterior aspect), then the candidate is UNFIT. 
a. 
In all cases, at least 12 months must have elapsed since the dislocation/surgery. 
b. 
Candidates with a single episode of dislocation, who have full shoulder function, are 
asymptomatic, and with negative apprehension test8 be FIT subject to referral for further 
assessment. 
 
6 Osteopaenia is defined as a T Score of between -1 and -2.5 SD http://www.iofbonehealth.org/diagnosing-osteoporosis.  
7 Some degree of loss of full extension of the elbow (up to 15 degrees) without significant loss of function is not uncommon in the young 
active general population (DCA Orthopaedics opinion). 
8 Shoulder apprehension test: candidate’s elbow is flexed to 90 degrees and the shoulder is abducted to 90 degrees.  The examiner 
holds the candidate’s wrist and with the other hand applies forward pressure from behind the shoulder.  The shoulder is then externally 
rotated by manoeuvring the wrist.  The test is positive if the manoeuvre produces pain. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-K-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
c. 
Candidates with two or more dislocations (in the same shoulder), who are symptomatic, 
have evidence of early arthritic change or have a positive apprehension test are UNFIT. 
d. 
Candidates with multiple dislocations (in the same shoulder), who subsequently 
undergo a stabilisation procedure and full rehabilitation and who go on to be asymptomatic 
and fully functional with a negative apprehension test are normally FIT. 
36.  Clavicle fractures and clavicular joint disruptions. The interaction between load carriage 
equipment and mal-union or un-united fracture of the clavicle often results in pain. At least 12 
months must have elapsed since the fracture/dislocation/surgery with the exception of a simple 
fracture of the clavicular shaft that may be considered for assessment after 6 months. The 
following guidance is provided for fractures and sprains: 
a. 
Fractured clavicle. Candidates with a deformity from a fractured clavicle that is 
asymptomatic9, allows full shoulder movement and does not cause symptoms with load 
carriage during activity comparable with military training for 3 months are FIT. Candidates 
with deformity that causes symptoms, restriction of movement or interferes with load carriage 
or the wearing of restraint harnesses are UNFIT.  
b. 
Sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular dislocations. Candidates with deformity 
that is asymptomatic, allows full shoulder movement and does not cause symptoms with 
restraint harnesses or load carriage during activity comparable with military training for 3 
months may be FIT10. Candidates with deformity that causes symptoms, restriction of 
movement or interferes with load carriage are UNFIT. 
c. 
Acromioclavicular sprain. Candidates with a Grade I/II sprain who are asymptomatic 
with normal function are FIT. Candidates with Grade III sprains are to be referred to SSMES.  
Candidates with Grade IV-VI sprains are normally UNFIT. 
37.  Candidates with a chronic history of pain related to overuse (e.g. para-tendonitis crepitans), 
or of upper limb disorders, such as a proven carpal tunnel syndrome, bursitis and epicondylitis, are 
normally UNFIT. In cases of doubt the advice of the SSMES should be sought.  
Conditions affecting the lower limb and spine 
38.  Service life places great demands upon the lower limbs and spine. Even minor abnormalities 
and conditions can be exacerbated by and may break down during training. Lower limb injuries 
(especially knee) are the main cause of medical discharge during training and of early medical 
discharge from service. Searching enquiry must be made to elicit any history of injury or symptoms. 
This should include particular reference to physical activity (see paragraph 2), sports undertaken 
and symptoms arising in association with footwear of any kind. Decisions on FIT or UNFIT should 
take into account functional capacity and prognosis. 
Spinal conditions 
39.  General. Normal structure and function of the spine is an essential requirement for military 
service.  The following spinal conditions must be given careful consideration. 
40.  Abnormality of the spine11. Candidates with minimal abnormal scoliosis12, kyphosis or 
lordosis with no associated back pain with full and free movement of all spinal segments (cervical, 
 
9 The effect of any plates must also be considered as they could be a rub point for load carriage. 
10 Function is often restricted and specialist assessment may be required. 
11 No symptomatic structural abnormality fares well in military training. 
12 Adams' forward bend test (forward bending at the waist, viewed from anterior, posterior, and lateral aspects) provides a good 
prospective for identifying thoracic, thoracolumbar, or lumbar paraspinal and thoracic cavity prominences (which result from abnormal 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-K-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
thoracic and lumbar) are FIT. Candidates with more than minimal abnormality and normal function 
should be discussed with SSMES. Candidates with scoliosis or other curvature requiring treatment, 
that is associated with an on-going disease process/neuromuscular or neurological dysfunction or 
back pain are UNFIT13. 
41.  Radiological abnormalities of the spine. Incidental radiological abnormalities of 
questionable or no clinical significance should be discussed with the SSMES as they may be 
compatible with a grading of FIT. 
42.  Scheuermann’s disease. This must be a radiological diagnosis. Candidates who have 
achieved 3 months activity comparable with military training (especially load-carrying ability) 
without symptoms are to be referred to SSMES. Candidates who are currently symptomatic are 
UNFIT. 
43.  Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. All candidates who have been diagnosed with these 
conditions (whatever the degree of slip for spondylolisthesis) but are now asymptomatic during 
activity comparable with military training for a minimum of 3 months are to be referred to SSMES 
responsible for the selection of recruits; it should be noted that those with a slip of grade II or more 
are normally UNFIT. Candidates who are currently symptomatic are normally UNFIT. 
44.  Spina bifida occulta. This condition can only be diagnosed with imaging. Candidates with 
an incidental finding, without history of symptoms and in the absence of other abnormality may be 
FIT. Candidates with either present or previous symptoms are to be normally UNFIT. 
45.  Spinal fracture. Candidates with resolved spinous and transverse process fractures, or 
functionally insignificant fractures, are FIT. Any history of other spinal fractures, including wedge 
fractures of the vertebral body, are normally UNFIT14.   
46.  Previous spinal surgery. Candidates with a history of any orthopaedic spinal surgery are 
normally UNFIT. However, candidates who have had a single-level discectomy (e.g. for 
sequestered disc) may be FIT subject to referral to SSMES responsible for the selection of recruits 
providing the candidate is at least 12 months post-operation, is asymptomatic when undertaking 
activity comparable with military service and has been doing so for at least 3 months and there is 
no evidence of treatment or injury related secondary effects. 
47.  Cervical spine. Those with insignificant non-bony neck injuries that resolve fully and quickly 
with minimal clinical input may be assessed FIT once fully functional. Candidates with more 
significant previous non-bony neck injury (e.g. whiplash or muscular sporting injury) are FIT 
provided they have been asymptomatic for at least 6 months including during exercise comparable 
with military training for 3 months. Those with any ongoing symptoms or chronicity are normally 
UNFIT. 
 
 
vertebral rotation as well as from a combination of abnormal spinal curvature in the coronal and sagittal planes). Bending forward 
accentuates paraspinal and rib prominences, which is suggestive of scoliosis. This is the hallmark examination finding that leads to a 
suspicion of scoliosis during screening evaluation. A positive result is observation of an asymmetric paraspinal prominence. The 
presence of an asymmetric scapular prominence may suggest an upper thoracic curve. A scoliometer is used to quantify right- and left-
sided asymmetries (paraspinal prominences) identified on Adams' forward bend test. A positive result is one of >5 degrees at any 
paraspinal prominence (thoracic or lumbar).  Patients with scoliometer values of 5 degrees or greater correlate with Cobb angle 
measurements of at least 10 degrees which represents a commonly agreed-upon cut-off point used to direct treatment decisions. 
http://bestpractice.bmj.com/best-practice/monograph/979/diagnosis/step-by-step.html. 
13 Altered biomechanics will affect load-carrying ability. 
14 DCA Orthopaedics: Approximately 30% of individuals with a wedge compression fracture will become symptom free in 2-3 months 
with no residual disability and no risk of late complications; another 40% will have occasional back pain when the back is stressed but 
this will not affect function; the remaining 30% will continue with back pain that will restrict any heavy work.  However, the prognosis is 
not entirely proportional to the degree of deformity.  The reason for this is not established but a change in the general shape of the spine 
affects its mechanical performance and such candidates are likely to suffer recurrent episodes of back pain. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-K-7 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
Back pain 
48.  There is strong evidence15 that a history of back pain is the best predictor of future 
problems. When assessing candidates with a history of back pain it is important to consider the 
nature of the pain, frequency and duration of symptoms, their effect on function and what 
treatment, if any was needed.  What has happened since the episode(s) is more important than the 
episode itself. There is no evidence to support the determination of fitness for service based on the 
number of episodes of back pain alone.   
49.  Episodes where a candidate has been unable to work, attend college etc, for a period of 
time, should be explored in detail. If the episode relates to an acute injury (e.g. during sports or 
road traffic collision), then the recovery and subsequent function is more important than the 
specifics of the initial injury (except where the injury sustained would exclude for other reasons i.e. 
spinal fracture).   
50.  Recurrent non-specific mechanical lower back pain (LBP) should be assessed carefully 
considering current function and requirement for healthcare professional support. There may be 
many reasons why candidates are now fully functional with no recent episodes. Effective reasons 
include loss of weight and appropriate conditioning etc. Exercise history can be useful, and the pre-
Service Medical Assessment will allow a judgement on conditioning to be made. Referral to 
SSMES can be made for candidates where the examining clinician requires further advice.  
a. 
Those with isolated episodes of LBP, that resolve fully and quickly with minimal clinical 
input may be assessed FIT once fully functional.  
b. 
Candidates with longer isolated episodes of pre-existing LBP, that may have required 
greater clinical input, are normally FIT provided they have been asymptomatic for at least 6 
months (where history includes exercise comparable with military training for 3 months). 
c. 
Candidates with any episode of chronic back pain lasting 12 weeks or more are 
normally UNFIT. 
d. 
Candidates with a history of sciatic pain with or without back pain are normally UNFIT. 
e. 
Those who have had a successful single-level discectomy should be assessed in 
accordance with paragraph 46.  
Leg length discrepancy 
51.  Leg length should be measured in accordance with Section 3. Candidates with a discrepancy 
of <1.5cm may be FIT provided the functional assessment is normal. Those with a discrepancy of 
1.5-2.5cm who can achieve activity comparable with military training for a minimum of 3 months 
are to be referred to the SSMES for further assessment. Those with a discrepancy of >2.5cm, are 
normally UNFIT. This degree of discrepancy will cause functional decrement. 
Feet and toes 
52.  Hallux rigidus. Candidates with Hallux rigidus are normally UNFIT. 
 
15 a. Occupational Health Guidelines for the Management of Low Back Pain 2000 - Evidence Review and Recommendations. Waddell, 
G, Burton, K https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/dff9/5228f2572c83fb7c1c3022e3e83ef38aef15.pdf.  b.  Acute low back pain: systematic 
review of its prognosis Pengel LHM, Herbert RD, Maher CG, Refshauge KM. BMJ 2003;327:323-7. c. Predicting who develops chronic 
low back pain in primary care: a prospective study. Thomas E, Silman AJ, Croft PR, Papageorgiou AC, Jayson MIV, Macfarlane GJ.    
BMJ 1999;318:1662-7. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-K-8 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
53.  Hallux valgus. Candidates who are asymptomatic with no over-riding or callosity of the 
second toe; or who have had hallux valgus osteotomy, have normal function and are asymptomatic 
during activity comparable with military training are to be referred to SSMES. At least 12 months 
must have elapsed since the surgery. Candidates with existing hallux valgus are normally UNFIT. 
54.  Foot deformities. Candidates with minor conditions that allow the usage of normal footwear 
(with orthotics if necessary) and are asymptomatic during activity comparable with military training 
for 3 months are FIT.   
a. 
Candidates who use custom-made footwear are normally UNFIT.   
b. 
Those who require an orthotic but can use issued boots are normally FIT.  
55.  Hammer, mallet and clawed toes. Candidates with mild conditions without history of 
symptoms are FIT.  Those with fixed clawing of toes, hammer or mallet toes are normally UNFIT. 
56.  Loss of toes. Those with loss of terminal phalanx of great toe with no painful stump may be 
FIT. Those with total or sub-total loss of other toes are FIT subject to normal outcome on functional 
testing. Candidates with total loss of either great toe are normally UNFIT.   
57.  Flat feet. Candidates with flat feet causing no symptoms are FIT. Those with mobile flat feet 
causing symptoms or with rigid flat feet are normally UNFIT. 
58.  Claw feet. Candidates with a deformity that has not caused symptoms in the past, where the 
foot is mobile, without pressure areas or fixed clawing may be FIT if the condition is considered 
compatible with the demands associated with training and the wearing of boots and if there is no 
associated neurological disorder (such as peroneal muscular dystrophy, etc). Candidates with a 
positive past history, or limitation of movements or evidence of pressure areas are normally UNFIT. 
59.  Club-foot and talipes. Those with any degree of clubfoot, corrected or otherwise, are 
normally UNFIT. Those who are confirmed to have positional talipes which has resolved with 
physiotherapy are normally FIT. 
Ankle joint 
60.  Candidates with previous ankle sprain or fracture may be FIT provided that they have made 
a full recovery, have no limitation of movement, and are asymptomatic during activity comparable 
with military training for 3 months. Candidates who have had a ligamentous repair (e.g. Brostrom-
Gould Repair) or ligamentous replacement (e.g. Evans Tenodesis) are to be referred to SSMES 
when at least 12 months has elapsed post-surgery, normal function has been restored and there 
are no symptoms during activity comparable with military training for 3 months. Candidates with an 
unstable or stiff ankle are normally UNFIT. Candidates with limitation of ankle movement are 
normally UNFIT. 
Knee joint and anterior knee pain/overuse patellofemoral pain syndrome 
61.  Knee problems account for a large proportion of the medical discharges that occur during 
recruit training. Candidates with chronic symptoms of the knee(s) are normally UNFIT. 
a. 
Those with insignificant isolated episodes of knee pain that resolve fully and quickly 
with minimal clinical input may be assessed FIT once fully functional. 
b. 
Candidates with more significant episodes of previous knee pain may be FIT provided 
they are asymptomatic for at least 6 months and having undertaken exercise comparable 
with military training for 3 months.  
Return to Contents Page 
4-K-9 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
c. 
Candidates with any episode of chronic (at least 12 weeks duration) knee pain are 
normally UNFIT.  
62.  Osgood-Schlatter’s Disease. Candidates who have been symptom-free for at least 12 
months for Osgood-Schlatter’s disease during activity comparable with military training for 3 
months may be FIT.   
63.  Knee injuries. Candidates with confirmed meniscal tears who are at least 12 months post-
injury and are fully functional after conservative management while undertaking exercise 
comparable with military training for 3 months may be FIT after referral to SSMES. Candidates who 
are at least 12 months post-surgery for an arthroscopic partial or sub-total meniscectomy and who 
are asymptomatic during activity comparable with military training for 3 months are FIT. Those who 
have had complete or open meniscectomy16 or meniscal transplantation (including autologous 
chondrocyte transplantation17) are normally UNFIT. 
64.  Knee ligaments. 
a. 
Candidates with any history of complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior 
cruciate ligament (PCL) rupture whether managed conservatively or surgically are UNFIT. 
b. 
Candidates with a history of partial tears of the ACL or PCL are to be referred to the 
SSMES. 
c. 
Candidates with a history of partial or complete rupture of any other knee ligaments are 
to be referred to the SSMES. 
d. 
Candidates with slight laxity of the ACL or other ligaments without a history of injury 
and without any loss of function are FIT. 
Hip joint 
65.  Any symptomatic hip condition is UNFIT. Candidates with any history of hip disease or 
fixation, regardless of apparent recovery, are to be referred to the SSMES. 
66.  Slipped femoral epiphysis. Candidates with a history of slipped femoral epiphysis where 
the hip has been remodelled to normality, have a full range of internal and external rotation and are 
asymptomatic during activity comparable with military training for 3 months may be FIT subject to 
referral to the SSMES. 
67.  Congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH). CDH predisposes individuals to early 
degenerative changes. Candidates with CDH are UNFIT unless there is substantial evidence to 
support a physically active childhood and adolescence and imaging confirms normal anatomy. 
68.  Dislocation of the hip (other than congenital)18. This condition requires careful 
assessment as in 95% of cases there are also associated injuries (especially if the original 
reduction took place more than 6 hours post injury). Posterior dislocations are more likely to have 
poorer outcomes. There must be confirmation of normal anatomy, no evidence of osteoarthritis and 
no sciatic nerve injury. Candidates who have normal function, have undertaken activity comparable 
with military training for 3 months, are more than 5 years post injury may be FIT subject to SSMES 
referral and orthopaedic assessment. 
 
16 This technique is out-dated and does not leave sufficient “bridging” for the opposing meniscus for military activities. 
17 There is insufficient current evidence on this technique. 
18 KE Dreinhofer, Bone & Joint J, Vol 76, 1 Jan 94. P Kellam, J Orth Trauma 2016. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-K-10 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
69.  Candidates with associated ligamentous disruption (except ligamentum teres, which is 
disrupted in all dislocations), intra-articular fracture, labral tears, chondral defect or osteochondral 
fragmentation or open surgical reduction are UNFIT. Candidates who have had a perfectly reduced 
fracture fixed with open reduction and internal fixation, with normal function and no signs of osteo 
or avascular necrosis at 5 years, may be FIT pending SSMES and military orthopaedic consultant 
referral. 
70.  Perthes disease. The affected hip is almost always abnormal. Candidates with Perthes 
disease are UNFIT if there is any abnormality on the most recent imaging. If imaging confirms 
normal anatomy and the candidate is asymptomatic with a full range of hip movement and a 
satisfactory functional assessment, the candidates is to be referred to the SSMES. Enquiry should 
be made as to exercise comparable with military training that has been undertaken e.g. running, 
sport, hill-walking and this information should be included in the referral19.
 
19 Candidates should not be deferred to undertake an exercise programme prior to referral since, as most will not be acceptable as 
military training and service will accelerate degenerative change in an abnormal hip, there is a risk that the candidate could 
subsequently argue that the exercise programme resulted in a deterioration of the condition of the affected hip. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-K-11 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX L  
PSYCHIATRY PRE-ENTRY  
 
Special Conditions Affecting the M Grading 
1. 
The M grading is a clinical quality distinguishing those whose mental capacity makes them 
suitable for normal training and posting, from those of limited intellectual capacity who necessitate 
rejection.The recruit selection test procedures will usually provide an objective assessment of 
mental ability to facilitate grading. 
2. 
The M grading is dependent not only on the candidate’s innate ability, but also on their 
capacity to use that ability. No formal clinical assessment is practicable or required during the 
examination. A history of head injury, indications of learning difficulties and a practical application of 
knowledge gained should be sought by exploring the candidate’s school career, literacy, nature of 
employment since leaving school, hobbies and interests, etc before grading M2. 
Special Condition Affecting Fitness for Service 
General 
3. 
Examining medical officers should have a good knowledge of mental health matters and in all 
cases, a critical examination of the candidate’s psychiatric history is imperative to determine 
suitability for military Service. For candidates with a previous mental health diagnosis, identifying 
vulnerabilities which may contribute to the presentation of a further disorder during Service wil  be 
helped by ensuring that: 
 
a. 
the diagnosis of a mental health disorder was correct and made by a suitably qualified 
professional; 
 
b. 
the aetiology or perceived stressor preceding the onset of the disorder was identified; 
 
c. 
timely evidence-based therapy was provided. 
 
4.  It is important to differentiate between conditions representing understandable emotional and 
behavioural responses to significant life events (e.g. parental divorce, bereavement) and those 
disorders with a hereditary or complex aetiology (e.g. depression).  Whilst the former may settle 
within acceptable time frames and with no psychiatric input, the latter are more likely to have a 
significant effect on function and greater risk of relapse. Candidates with a diagnosis made during 
adolescence require particular scrutiny. This is to ensure that individuals who have presented at a 
time of normal and understandable emotional turmoil are not unnecessarily declared UNFIT if they 
are symptom free and have developed coping strategies adequate for Service life.  
 
5.  If there is insufficient evidence presented at the pre-employment medical examination (or prior 
questionnaire screening) to enable a decision, additional clarifying evidence (e.g. 
contemporaneous medical records) should be requested from the candidate or the candidate’s GP. 
When specified within this policy or where uncertainty remains, the case should be referred to the 
single Service occupational physician responsible for Service entry.  
 
6.  Candidates with current psychiatric disease or dysfunctional behaviour are always UNFIT. In 
certain circumstances they may become FIT after a prescribed period of time once the condition 
has resolved. 
 
7.  The guidance given in this section is based on evidence  for prognosis and recurrence rates for 
most of the mental health conditions listed in the ICD-10 classification of mental and behavioural 
Return to Contents Page 
4-L-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
disorders1. Advice is provided for all relevant diagnostic groups and the ICD Code is given for ease 
of reference.   
 
Dementias (F00-F03) 
 
8. 
These are rare in the recruit age group although in theory variant Creutzfeldt – Jakob disease 
could occur.  Candidates are UNFIT. 
 
Organic Amnesic Syndrome (F04) 
 
9. 
Recovery from this condition is extremely rare.  Candidates are UNFIT. 
 
Delirium (F05) 
 
10.  The causes of delirium are numerous though, in the recruit age group, delirium is most likely 
to have been due to high temperature associated with severe infection.  In such cases there should 
be no bar to recruitment provided the infection was acute and single and has completely remitted. If 
this was not the case, then the cause should be determined and the case discussed with the sS 
occupational physician responsible for Service entry. 
Other Mental Disorders due to Physiological Conditions (F06-F09) 
11.  This group of conditions are caused by a variety of aetiological factors.  Most of the conditions 
have a serious underlying cause and candidates are normally UNFIT.  In cases of doubt, the 
examining physician should seek the opinion of the single Service occupational physician 
responsible for service entry. 
12.  Candidates with a history of post-concussion syndrome (F07.2) may be determined FIT 
provided that the candidate has been symptom-free, including from vestibular disturbances and 
mental health co-morbidities, for 1 year prior to application. (See 6-7-7 Section 4 Annex G 4G.08 
for the neurological assessment of head injuries.) 
Mental and Behavioural Disorder due to Psychoactive Substances (F10-F19)2 
13.  Illicit Drugs. Discovery of the use of any il icit drugs is not a clinical matter per se.  It 
becomes a clinical matter when illness, most particularly drug dependence, has occurred. 
Examining medical officers are not obliged to inform recruiting staff if a history of substance 
abuse not resulting in clinical illness is volunteered during the course of an examination.
 
14.  Drugs. Candidates with current drug related health problems are UNFIT. Before accepting 
anyone with a previous history of drug-related health problems, referral to the single Service 
occupational physician responsible for Service entry is recommended as the risk of relapse must be 
carefully considered.           
 
a. 
Candidates in whom there is evidence of drug dependence in the 3 years prior to 
application are normally UNFIT.  If there is unequivocal evidence from an addiction clinic that 
the candidate has been clean3  for more than 3 years prior to application then recruitment may 
be permitted.  
b. 
Candidates that have been diagnosed with harmful use of drugs not amounting to drug 
dependence in the 2 years prior to application are normally UNFIT. If there is good evidence in 
the candidate’s medical history that the individual has been clean3 and symptom free for more 
 
1 Some categories are not included either because they are only used by mental health researchers or because they are irrelevant for 
military candidates. 
2 F10 relates to alcohol. F11 to F19 relates to opioids, cocaine, cannabis and other drugs. 
3 Defined as absolutely no drug use. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-L-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
than 2 years prior to application with no ongoing treatment, then recruitment may be 
permitted. 
c. 
A history of infrequent recreational use without evidence of damage to health is not a 
medical bar to entry. 
15.  Alcohol misuse. If there is good evidence that prior to application the candidate has been 
symptom-free and has not been undergoing any treatment, then recruitment may be permitted. It is 
advised that corroborative evidence is sought and in cases of doubt, the examining physician 
should seek the opinion of the single Service occupational physician for service entry. 
a. 
Candidates with a history of alcohol dependence (F10.2) with or without associated 
problems (F10.3-F10.7) are UNFIT4. Those who have been alcohol dependent have a 70% 
chance of relapse, with only 30% remaining abstinent or being able to drink in a controlled 
way.  
b. 
Candidates who have been diagnosed with harmful use of alcohol (F10.1) in the 2 
years prior to application are normally UNFIT. The prognosis of those who have been 
diagnosed with harmful use of alcohol not amounting to dependence (F10.1) is variable and 
the risk remains. 
Schizophrenic and Delusional Disorders (F20-F29) 
16.  With the exception of acute and transient psychotic disorders (F23), all candidates with 
diagnoses in this category are UNFIT. These disorders represent a variety of ill-understood 
conditions whose relationship to schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders is uncertain. Even 
though such conditions often have many of the qualities of “good prognosis” schizophrenia there is 
still a significant relapse rate of up to 30%.  If there is very clear evidence that the illness was short-
lived, i.e. fully abated (with or without treatment) within 1 month of diagnosis, and due to an obvious 
cause, the candidate should be discussed with the single Service occupational physician 
responsible for Service entry. Where an organic cause (such as a toxic reaction to a drug or an 
acute severe infection5) is evident, candidates may be determined FIT but where the cause is found 
to be functional, i.e. resulting from a mental health condition, candidates wil  be UNFIT.    
Mood (Affective) Disorders (F30-F39) 
17.  Disorders of mood, especially depression, are not confined to this category as diagnoses may 
also be classified in the anxiety and stress-related categories (F41 and F43).  Disorders in this 
group range from the profoundly disabling psychotic affective disorders (e.g. mania) to less 
distressing, mild and transient lowering of mood secondary to a minor life stressor.  In some 
individuals the genetic predisposition is so strong that the condition may become overt with no 
triggering stressor.  However, in most cases of affective disorder, an episode of illness is 
precipitated by a stressful life event. 
18.  Candidates with a diagnosis of a single episode of mild or moderate depression (F32.0, 32.1) 
with a clear precipitating stressor may be determined FIT provided that all treatment, including 
medication, has been completed and the individual must be free from symptoms and off medication 
for 1 year.  
19.  A diagnosis of a single episode of severe depression without psychosis (F32.2) suggests a 
greater impact on functioning, a requirement for more extensive therapy and higher risk of relapse. 
To be determined FIT, al  treatment (including medication) must be completed and the candidate 
must be free from symptoms and off medication for 2 years. The episode of depression itself and 
the treatment pathway should not be more than 24 months in total6. 
 
4 Alcohol is a legal drug and lifetime risk of relapse is high. 
5 i.e. similar to delirium. 
6 DCA Advice - the natural recovery of depression is about 2 years and with treatment around 6-9 months with some needing 
maintenance medication for 6-12 months. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-L-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
20.  A candidate with a history of two of more episodes of depression or a recurring or persistent 
depressive disorder (F33), severe depression with psychosis, manic disorder (F30) or bipolar 
affective disorder (F31) wil  be UNFIT. If there is a doubt about the diagnosis the case should be 
referred to single service occupational physician responsible for Service entry.  
Phobic Anxiety Disorder (F40) 
21.  In these disorders, severe physiological arousal occurs which is markedly disproportionate to 
the seriousness or danger of the triggering stimulus.  Phobias may be classified into 3 major 
groupings of specific phobia, social phobia and agoraphobia.  Specific phobias developing in 
childhood have a poorer prognosis than those starting in adult life and if untreated, can persist for 
many years.  However, phobias are very amenable to treatment and a candidate may normally be 
determined FIT provided that al  treatment, including medication, has been completed and the 
individual has been free from symptoms and off medication for 1 year. Candidates presenting with 
a history of 2 or more episodes wil  be UNFIT.   
Other Anxiety Disorders (F41) 
 
22.  As discussed in paragraph 3, it is important to differentiate short term anxiety presenting as 
part of a normal reaction to a clear trigger, such as exams, from a more significant presentation 
meeting the diagnostic criteria for a condition such as panic disorder or generalised anxiety 
disorder. Even with a clear diagnosis of an anxiety disorder candidates may present with a history 
ranging from a single brief stress-related episode to a longstanding condition, seemingly more 
related to a vulnerable personality than to external stressors. In those cases where it is clear that 
the condition was brief and triggered by significant life stress then the candidate may be determined 
FIT as long as they have been symptom and treatment-free for at least 1 year. Candidates with two 
or more episodes of anxiety or with a longstanding history of panic or generalised anxiety disorder 
are UNFIT. 
Adjustment Disorders (F43.2) 
23.  Adjustment disorders are characterised by excessive emotional and behavioural symptoms 
in response to a perceived stressor, however the presence of symptoms of depression or anxiety 
often make diagnostic distinction uncertain. The emotional response, any maladaptive coping 
strategies and reduced functioning would be expected to develop within 3 months of the stressor 
and settle within 6 months; if the latter is not the case the diagnosis should reflect the enduring 
symptoms of anxiety and depression. Understanding the aetiology of the disorder is imperative in 
deciding whether the emotional response was commensurate with the stressor and thus the 
individual’s capacity to withstand further stress. 
24.  Candidates with a diagnosis of adjustment disorder may normally be determined FIT provided 
that all treatment, including medication, has been completed and the individual has been free from 
symptoms and off medication for 1 year. Candidates with two or more episodes are UNFIT.  
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) (F42) 
25.  Candidates with a history of OCD are UNFIT. 
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (F43.1) 
26.  A previous history of PTSD, diagnosed by a consultant psychiatrist or clinical psychologist, is 
a significant risk factor for the development of further PTSD. Because of the likelihood of Service 
personnel being involved in stressful operational environments, the candidate should normally be 
determined UNFIT, even if previously treated. In cases where the diagnosis is uncertain or not made 
by a consultant psychiatrist or clinical psychologist, the examining physician should seek the 
opinion of the single service occupational physician responsible for Service entry. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-L-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Dissociative Disorders (F44) 
27.  These disorders include dissociative fugue where the sufferer goes into a trance-like state, 
and conversion disorders, where there is loss of sensation or loss of function of limbs or loss of 
vision or similar incapacity.  All candidates with this diagnosis, whether from an organic or 
psychological7 cause, should normal y be determined UNFIT. 
Somatoform Disorders (F45) 
28.  Candidates with a somatisation disorder diagnosed by a consultant psychiatrist or clinical 
psychologist, including somatisation and hypochondriacal disorder, are normally UNFIT. 
Eating Disorders (F50) 
29. 
Candidates with a confirmed diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (F50.0) or the atypical form of this 
condition (F50.1) are UNFIT.  For anorexia nervosa it is not currently possible to reliably distinguish 
between the 20% of sufferers who make a full recovery and do not relapse in the future, from the 
remainder who relapse and remit or who remain severely ill.  
30.  Candidates with a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa (F50.2) without co-morbidity such as 
anorexia, atypical eating disorder patterns or personality disorder, may be determined FIT one year 
after recovery provided they are fully functioning and symptom-free. Candidates meeting this 
criteria and candidates for whom the diagnosis is uncertain should be discussed with the single 
Service occupational physician responsible for Service entry. Candidates with two or more discrete 
episodes are UNFIT. 
31.  Candidates with Other Specified Feeding and Eating Disorders (F50.9) are UNFIT. 
Mental Disorder Associated with the Puerperium (F53) 
32.  Candidates with a history of puerperal psychosis (F53.1) from which they have fully 
recovered, should be discussed with a single Service occupational physician responsible for 
Service entry.  
33.  Candidates with a history of puerperal depression have an increased risk of developing a 
depressive episode outside of the puerperium. The guidelines to be followed are the same as 
those for mood (affective) disorders (F30-F39) (Paras 17 - 20).  
Disorders of Personality (F60-F69) 
34.  ICD-10 lists a number of categories under this heading.  All of these conditions indicate deeply 
ingrained and enduring patterns of behaviour, and candidates with a diagnosis in this group must be 
determined UNFIT. In cases of doubt, the examining physician should seek the opinion of the single 
Service occupational physician responsible for Service entry. 
35.  Disorders of sexual preference (F65) e.g. fetishism, exhibitionism, voyeurism, paedophilia and 
sadomasochism are listed with the personality disorders.  Such cases should be discussed with the 
single Service occupational physician responsible for Service entry. 
Gender Identity Disorders (F64) 
36.  Candidates with Gender Identity Disorders may present untreated, during treatment or having 
completed all hormonal and surgical treatment. In each case the candidate is required to meet the 
same physical and mental entry standards as any other candidate.  JSP 889 ‘Policy for the 
 
7 Even in cases in which there is clear causative stressor. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-L-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Recruitment and Management of Transgender personnel in the Armed Forces’8 gives the 
overarching MOD policy with the medical aspects of recruiting covered in Annex A. 
37.  Candidates who have completed transition (and, where appropriate, have been stabilised on 
hormone medication and fully recovered from surgery) may be determined FIT, subject to fulfil ing 
the normal medical standards according to the individual’s legal gender, including any time periods 
required in this Annex to allow for the resolution of psychological problems encountered before or 
during the transition process.  Any ongoing hormone therapy must be compatible with world-wide 
Service and have been stable for at least 6 months. Refer to JSP 889 Annex D for further guidance. 
38.  Candidates in transition.  Transition is an extremely stressful period and may involve regular 
treatment (surgical or hormonal) and follow-up.  It is likely that the requirements for treatment and 
review, as well as the psychological stresses of this period, will normally be UNFIT. 
a. 
Candidates who are undergoing surgical procedures should normal y be considered 
UNFIT until those procedures are complete and the normal recovery times for surgery laid 
out in the appropriate Annexes9 of this JSP have been achieved and then assessed in line 
with para 37 above. 
b. 
Candidates undergoing hormone treatment must be stable for at least 6 months on a 
medication regimen and the medication and review requirements must not preclude world-
wide service before they can be determined FIT. If the hormone therapy is a prelude to 
surgical procedures then the candidate should normally be UNFIT until that surgery and 
appropriate recovery is complete. 
c. 
Whilst gender identity disorders themselves are not a reason for referral for psychiatric 
assessment, candidates in transition should be carefully assessed for previous and ongoing 
psychiatric conditions or distress which should be graded in accordance with the relevant 
paragraph of this Annex. 
d. 
Where any doubt exists about the suitability of a candidate for military service the 
examining physician should seek the opinion of the single Service occupational physician 
responsible for Service entry. 
e. 
For assessment of the risks of musculoskeletal injury in military training see Section 4 
Annex K. 
39.  Candidates currently experiencing gender dysphoria are normally considered UNFIT in line 
with para 6 of this Annex. 
Disorders of Psychological Development (F80-F89) 
40.  Candidates diagnosed with autism (F84) or similar disorders by a specialist autism service are 
normally UNFIT.  Candidates diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome (F84.5) by a specialist autism 
service may appear unremarkable on examination but should normally be UNFIT. If there is doubt 
about the diagnosis or the condition is mild and does not cause disability, candidates should be 
referred to the single Service occupational physician responsible for Service entry. In cases of mild, 
entirely non-disabling Asperger’s Syndrome, the single Service occupational physician may advise 
single Service recruiting staff psychiatric assessment is not required. This because pre-entry tests 
of suitability for military life (e.g. selection interviews and tests) are as good a form of assessment as 
a psychiatric assessment.  
 
 
8 JSP 889 'Policy for the Recruitment and Management of Transgender Personnel in the Armed Forces' (V1.1 Aug 19). 
9 Annexes E, F and J. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-L-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
The Hyperkinetic Disorders (F90) 
41.  Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most common diagnosis to present in 
this category. There is a large spectrum of behaviour in children and adolescents that attracts this 
diagnosis. Symptoms suggestive of this disorder may also be part of normal adolescent behaviour 
or be presenting features of anxiety or depressive disorders. For an unambiguous diagnosis there 
must be an early onset (prior to the age of 7 years10) with impaired attention and overactivity, both 
of which occur in all kinds of locations (e.g. home, school, sports centre, doctor’s surgery). This is 
because the impaired attention and hyperactivity is excessive when compared with other children 
of the same age and IQ.   
 
42.  ADHD can be associated with co-morbid common mental disorders (CMD) and substance 
misuse. In cases where a CMD or substance misuse is present, the prognosis is poor and 
candidates should be determined UNFIT. 
43.  Candidates with ADHD but without co-morbidities may be determined FIT if the candidate has 
been stable without evidence of dysfunctional behaviour for one year prior to application11  without 
medication. Corroborative evidence should be sought to confirm that the individual has been 
functioning normally (e.g. maintenance of regular employment, attendance at school or college) 
and where there is doubt the case should be referred to the single Service occupational physician. 
44.  Candidates with a diagnosis of hyperkinetic conduct disorder with evidence of violent and/or 
delinquent behaviour should be determined UNFIT as current evidence indicates that these forms of 
the condition are unlikely to improve with time. 
Intentional Self-Harm (X60-X84) 
45.  The spectrum of intent in respect of intentional self-harm ranges from stress relief by cutting, 
through manipulative behaviour or emotional blackmail of others to serious suicidal intent. It is often 
difficult to tell from a candidate’s recorded history where past episodes lie on this spectrum. 
Candidates with a history of self-harm may have taken a medication overdose. Superficial cutting, 
typically of the arms, thighs or abdomen, is also common.Evidence suggests that cutting is often a 
maladaptive way of relieving stress and is more appropriately termed self-mutilation.It may be 
linked to acute stressors but might also be indicative of long term personality problems or a history 
of past childhood abuse. 
46.  Candidates with a single episode of self-harm or self-mutilation occurring more than 2 years 
before application in response to a stressful event may be determined FIT provided the 2 year 
interim has been free from all symptoms. If there was no precipitating stressful event then the 
candidate should normally be considered UNFIT, as this indicates an enduring endogenous risk of 
further self-harm.  
47.  Candidates with a history of 2 or more episodes, even with clear stressors, should normally 
be considered UNFIT, as repetition indicates a substantial risk of further repetition and a significant 
increase in risk of later death by suicide. If multiple episodes occur over a short period of time 
(weeks rather than months), and can clearly be ascribed to the same single stressful event, then 
for the purposes of selection these may be regarded as a single episode. Additionally, if 2 or more 
episodes are attributable to independent stressors but there is robust evidence that the candidate 
has subsequently developed coping strategies adequate for Service life, the case may be referred 
to the single Service occupational physician with responsibility for Service entry in line with para 5. 
 
10 Developmental course of ADHD symptomatology during the transition from childhood to adolescence: a review with 
recommendations. Willoughby MT. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 44.1 (2003), pp 88-106. 
11 This is developed from an overview of all available prognostic evidence. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-L-7 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX M  
DENTAL AND ORO-MAXILLOFACIAL PRE-ENTRY 
 
General 
 
1. 
Candidates with dental diseases or other oral conditions that are treatable by a general 
dental practitioner, are not normally rejected. Candidates should have: 
 
a. 
An acceptable and functional occlusion of either natural teeth or well-fitting standard 
prostheses. 
 
b. 
Healthy gums and oral mucosa, with no obvious soft tissue disease or deformity. 
 
Oral neglect and/or dental caries
 
 
2. 
If gross oral neglect is found1, candidates would not normally be fit to enlist. In cases of  
doubt, the opinion of the sS Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits is to be 
obtained. Where doubt regarding dental fitness for Service entry exists, the candidate may be 
referred to a Service Dental Officer2.  
 
Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Dentinogenesis Imperfecta 
 
3. 
Candidates with a history of hypocalcified Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) and Dentinogenesis 
Imperfecta (DI) will require further assessment by the sS Occupational Physician responsible for 
the selection of recruits. Whilst the dentition may be treated or remediable3, the possibility of 
osteogenesis imperfecta must be considered in candidates presenting with DI. 
 
Dental Phobia 
 
4. 
Candidates who cannot tolerate routine primary care dentistry under local anaesthetic and  
require conscious sedation or general anaesthesia are normally UNFIT. In cases of doubt, the 
opinion of the sS Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits is to be obtained4. 
 
Cleft lip and/or palate
 
 
5. 
Candidates with uncorrected cleft lip and/or palate are UNFIT. Candidates with corrected  
cleft-lip and/or palate, or any gross abnormalities of the dento-facial complex and associated soft 
tissues, should be referred to the sS Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of 
recruits5 if the condition is likely to affect wearing protective headgear and/or respirators. 
 
Facial Fracture and Orthognathic Surgery 
 
6. 
Candidates with a history of facial fractures, including those who have undergone 
Orthognathic Surgery and who continue to have symptoms should be considered UNFIT until these 
are resolved. Candidates with retained metalwork may be determined FIT if asymptomatic, with 
confirmation of fracture healing and no residual deformity.  In cases of doubt, the opinion of the sS 
Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits is to be obtained4. 
 
1 Gross oral neglect includes multiple open carious cavities. It should be noted by non-dental assessor that anterior incisor and canine 
teeth are usually the last teeth to be affected and is an indicator of high levels of disease.   
2 Service Dental Officers asked for opinion, should determine TN (Treatment Need) by visual examination only, radiographs are not to 
be taken. Utilising the DPHC(Dental)/ARTD Project Molar agreement of 2 hours of dentistry per recruit, if the opinion is that disease 
cannot be stabilised within 2 hours i.e. >TN4, the candidate is to be determined UNFIT. 
3 Further advice/assessment by a Service Restorative specialist may be required. 
4 Further advice/assessment by the sS Dental/Oral Health SO1 may be required. 
5 Further advice/assessment by a Service Oro-Maxillo-Facial specialist may be required. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-M-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
 
 
Orthodontic treatment 
 
7. 
Active orthodontic treatment involves the use of both fixed and removable appliances.  On  
completion of active treatment, the use of fixed or removable retention devices is frequently 
required for enduring stability. 
 
8. 
Active Orthodontic Treatment. Candidates who are undergoing active orthodontic  
treatment will normally be UNFIT until treatment is complete, as confirmed by a report from the 
treating practitioner. This is because of the difficulties of continuing with orthodontic treatment 
during initial training. 
 
a.  Active Appliances. The removal of active appliances simply to facilitate Service entry 
is not to be undertaken or advised. Candidates presenting having had appliances removed 
simply to facilitate entry shall be considered UNFIT until the treatment for which the 
appliance was fitted is complete. 
 
b.  Fixed and Removable Retention Devices. Fixed and removable retention devices 
required for enduring stability on completion of active treatment, must continue to be worn 
and will not preclude entry to the service. 
 
Orthodontic Treatment for Army Foundation College Harrogate and Defence Sixth Form 
College Wellbeck Candidates 
 
9. 
Entry to these establishments is constrained by age. Recruits to these establishments must  
be considered on a case-by-case basis by the sS Occupational Physician responsible for the 
selection of recruits and may be accepted if treatment can be managed within the constraints of the 
training timetable. Individuals applying to either establishment must make arrangements to 
continue orthodontic treatment with their civilian orthodontist/dental practitioner for the duration of 
their studies. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-M-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX N  
OTHER CONDITIONS PRE-ENTRY  
 
Blood diseases 
1. 
Candidates with a known history of chronic blood disease, such as G6PD deficiency, 
homozygous or double heterozygous sickle cell disease, hereditary spherocytosis, homozygous α 
or β thalassaemia, haemoglobinopathy, or any haemorrhagic disorder resulting in abnormal 
coagulation are UNFIT (Below Entry Standards). 
2. 
Sickle cell trait (Hb A/S). This usually benign condition is associated with normal 
development and exercise tolerance. All candidates1 should be asked about sickle cell trait (SCT). 
The following applies: 
a. 
Individuals with SCT have a higher risk of exertional rhabdomyolysis and other 
conditions such as hyposthenuria (a reduced ability to concentrate urine), DVT and splenic 
infarction. In a candidate with SCT, any demonstrable history of exertional rhabdomyolysis or 
other significant complication related to SCT, will result in the candidate being UNFIT.  
Therefore, a history of passing black urine (likened to ‘flat cola’) after exercise should be 
sought in all candidates. Its presence is likely to indicate myoglobinuria secondary to 
rhabdomyolysis and such candidates are UNFIT. 
b. 
A rare complication of SCT is Exertional Collapse Associated with Sickle Cell Trait 
(ECAST).  This can result in serious illness and death. Candidates with a history of ECAST 
are UNFIT.  
c. 
Candidates with a history of heat illness and SCT must be assessed as per heat illness 
at paragraph 14 and JSP 5392. 
d. 
Candidates with SCT are to be awarded an E2 marker (where a deployable SP should 
normally be graded A4 L1 M1 E2). This is to be reviewed on completion of Phase 1 (and if 
retained, Phase 2) training. 
3. 
Heterozygous α or β thalassaemia. The heterozygous α or β thalassaemia traits are 
usually asymptomatic with a hypochromic, microcytic blood picture and little or no anaemia. These 
and other haemoglobinopathy traits are unlikely to produce significant clinical or haematological 
abnormalities. Candidates with asymptomatic trait conditions may be determined FIT. Double 
heterozygotes with Hb S/C thalassaemia, Hb S/C or Hb S/D have disease of varying clinical 
severity. Candidates with a history of these double heterozygous conditions must be carefully 
assessed and referred to the sS Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
Blood Borne Viruses (BBVs)  
4. 
Routine pre-employment blood test for screening for BBVs is not required.  For those who 
declare a relevant history: 
a. 
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). A candidate known to be HIV seropositive is 
UNFIT, irrespective of their current treatment, viral load and CD4 count. 
b. 
Viral hepatitis. Candidates known to be chronically infected with hepatitis B or 
hepatitis C is normally UNFIT.  To be determined FIT, those who have a past history of 
hepatitis B or hepatitis C must provide the following: 
 
1 SCT is present in 1 in 4 West Africans, 1 in 10 Caribbean and 1 in 76 of all babies born in UK. https://www.sicklecellsociety.org/about-
sickle-cell/. 
2 JSP 539 ‘Heat illness and cold injury: prevention and management’. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-N-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3 link to page 123  
 
 
(1).  Hepatitis B. Evidence that they are hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) negative 
and Hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) positive. 
(2).  Hepatitis C. Evidence that they have undetectable hepatitis C viral load by 
polymerase chain reaction (PCR). If antiviral therapy has previously been used to cure 
Hepatitis C, this PCR must be taken at least 6 months after finishing antiviral therapy. 
5. 
Defence Medical Services (DMS) Healthcare Workers (HCWs) screening and 
immunisation on entry. DMS HCWs must have Standard and Additional Health checks during the 
first week of Phase 1 training and graded in accordance with  JSP 950 Part 1 Leaflet 6-8-1 
Defence Medical Services Uniformed and Civilian Healthcare Workers: Tuberculosis and Blood-
Borne Viruses Screening and Management3
. Candidates with a history of BBV infection or failure 
to respond to hepatitis B vaccination should be referred to the single-Service Occupational 
Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
Venous thromboembolic disease 
6. 
A past history of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) is the strongest predictor for a future 
thrombotic event4. Candidates with a past history of VTE, whether on treatment or not, should 
normally be UNFIT because of the unavoidable risks associated with service that can predispose 
personnel to thrombotic events5. 
Thrombophilia 
7. 
Thrombophilic gene mutations, including but not limited to Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin 
20210A, expressed either in heterozygote or homozygote form and present individually or in 
combination, have previously been thought to be predictive of future thrombotic events. However, 
current expert opinion4 is that family or personal medical history of a DVT or PE is the strongest 
predictor for a future thrombotic event and that asymptomatic single heterozygote thrombophilic 
gene mutations do not have any predictive value. The evidence for the predictive attributes of 
homozygous or complex heterozygous mutations is less clear. Consequently, candidates with 
asymptomatic thrombophilic gene mutations, in the absence of an adverse family history may be 
determined FIT. Complex cases (including those where there are difficulties defining the presence 
of a significant family history) should be referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits. 
8. 
Anti-coagluation therapy6. Personnel who require anti-coagulation therapy (including 
warfarin and direct oral anti-coagulants7) are UNFIT.  
Irradiated blood products 
9.      Personnel who require irradiated blood products8 should be determined UNFIT as such blood 
products are not routinely available when deployed. Irradiated blood products are required to 
prevent potentially fatal transfusion-associated graft versus host disease for the following: 
          a.      Patients treated with the following drugs: 
                   (1)     Fludarabine.  
                   (2)     Cladribine. 
                   (3)     Pentostatin. 
 
3 Candidates should be informed during the pre-Service recruitment process that they will be required to undergo screening for TB 
and BBVs in accordance with this policy. 
4 Baglin T Author, Management of Thrombophilia: Who to Screen?  Pathophysiology of Haemostasis and Thrombosis 2003/2004, Vol. 
33, No. 5-6. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15692251/. 
5 Enforced prolonged immobility (e. military transport), relative dehydration in hot environments. 
6 This excludes anti-platelet medication (e.g. aspirin, clopidogrel).  
7 Including apixaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban and other analogous variants. 
8 Treleaven J et al, Guidelines on the use of irradiated blood components prepared by the British Committee for Standards in 
Haematology blood transfusion task force 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, British Journal of Haematology, 152. Irradiation_BJH_2011. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-N-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
                   (4)     Alemtuzumab. 
(5) 
Other novel purine analogues and related agents until evidence of safety emerges. 
b.      Hodgkin's lymphoma (lifelong following diagnosis).           
c. 
Aplastic anaemia patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy with anti-thymocyte 
 
globulin and/or Alemtuzumab. 
d. 
Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency. 
COVID-19 infection  
10.  COVID-19 infection ranges from asymptomatic to severe clinical illness requiring 
hospitalisation and ventilation for prolonged periods. The sequelae of this infection will vary 
significantly between affected individuals and the extent and duration of these are not yet fully 
understood. In candidates with a history of COVID-19 consideration should be given to the 
presence of any underlying chronic condition that may have resulted in increased susceptibility to 
COVID-19, in accordance with the relevant section of this JSP. Candidates with recent COVID-19 
infection must be deferred until free from symptoms for four weeks.All candidates must be back to 
their baseline exercise tolerance following COVID-19 infection (see para 3 in the ‘Introduction’ to 
Section 4). The following applies: 
a. 
Asymptomatic. Candidates who have had asymptomatic infection can be considered 
FIT (including fit to undertake physical selection tests). 
b. 
Mild. Candidates who had mild symptoms (breathlessness on significant exertion, e.g. 
2-3 flights of stairs) over 4 weeks ago and who are back to their baseline exercise tolerance 
can be considered FIT (including fit to undertake physical selection tests).  
c. 
Moderate. Candidates who have had moderate COVID-19 symptoms (breathlessness 
on mild exertion/activities of daily living, chest pain, fast palpitations or pre-syncope) are to 
be considered temporarily UNFIT for a period of 6 months from the point of infection. When 
baseline exercise tolerance is recovered, the candidate can then be considered FIT.  
d. 
Severe. Candidates who have had severe COVID-19 symptoms (breathlessness at 
rest, chest pain, syncope) or have been hospitalised have a high risk of significant sequelae 
are UNFIT. 
Chronic fatigue syndrome and associated disorders 
11.  Candidates diagnosed as suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome or the group of associated 
disorders e.g. fibromyalgia (FM), myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), or post-viral fatigue syndrome 
(PVFS), are UNFIT. Those with a history of this disorder lasting no more than 6 months, who have 
been certified by their GP or specialist to have had no further symptoms and have been 
undertaking activities compatible with military training and service for more than two years, should 
be referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits 
before acceptance9. 
Congenital, chromosomal and genetic disorders 
12.  There is a wide spectrum of congenital disorders. The following list is not exhaustive and 
advice should be sought from the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the 
selection of recruits in the case of those with genetic disorders not covered below. Guidance on 
candidates with specific conditions is detailed below: 
 
9 Professor Simon Wessely’s observations on CFS: ‘Those who have fully recovered and been symptom free for 6 months to a year - in 
other words regard this as something that they have had, recovered from and put behind them, tend to do well.  This may be due to 
simple passage of time, or receiving treatment such as cognitive behaviour therapy or antidepressants.  Of more concern are those who 
are still symptomatic and/or consider themselves still to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of viral infections/stress or other 
precipitants.  The key, therefore, should be first whether or not they have recovered, and second, whether or not they consider 
themselves still vulnerable to relapse’ – personal communication 11 Dec 06.  Also see Cairns R, Hotopf. M. (2005): "A systematic review 
describing the prognosis of chronic fatigue syndrome."  Occupational Medicine; 55: p2 0-31. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-N-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
a. 
Huntington’s disease. Candidates known to be carriers of the gene associated with 
this condition are NORMALLY graded UNFIT10. Candidates with a proven, immediate family 
history of this condition are NORMALLY graded UNFIT unless known not to carry the gene7.  
Genetic testing should not be initiated solely for the purposes of recruitment. 
b. 
Phenylketonuria. These candidates are UNFIT. Although there is no clear evidence 
which provides overwhelming support for the need for lifelong dietary treatment, regular 
annual clinical review remains essential. Dietary restrictions are still generally necessary with 
protein supplements normally required and the military cannot guarantee that specialist diet 
will be available11. 
c. 
Malignant hyperpyrexia. Candidates known to be carriers of the gene associated with 
this condition are UNFIT due to the risk of a patient with this condition obstructing the critical 
pathways associated with casualty treatment and evacuation. 
d. 
Neurofibromatosis Types 1 and 2. Candidates known to be carriers of either of the 
genes associated with these conditions are UNFIT. There are associated conditions of 
unpredictable onset, including intra-cerebral tumours (most commonly optic nerve gliomas), 
renal artery stenosis and thyroid carcinoma. The risk of seizures is approximately 20 x higher 
than that of the general population12. 
e. 
Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP). Candidates with a family history of FAP are 
at risk of developing this condition and its associated consequences. Individual assessment 
is required on employability and an opinion should be sought from the single-Service 
Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits13. 
f. 
Suxamethonium sensitivity. Candidates who are homozygous for the atypical 
cholinesterase gene who have been identified as requiring special anaesthetic precautions 
are to be determined UNFIT due to the risk of those with this condition obstructing the critical 
pathways associated with casualty treatment and evacuation. Those who are heterozygous 
of the atypical cholinesterase gene should be subject to SSMES opinion14. 
Malignant disease 
13.  Candidates with a history of malignant disease are normally UNFIT. In cases which have 
been successfully treated and are regarded as cured, candidates may be determined FIT provided 
that they have been discharged from regular follow-up and that no treatment is required15. A clinical 
report is to be obtained giving risks of recurrence over time, risks of present or future complications 
from treatment given, and is to be forwarded to the single-Service Occupational Physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits for consideration. However, some drugs, particularly the 
anthracyclines16 and bleomycin, and trans-thoracic radiotherapy are associated with cardiac and 
lung side effects respectively. All such candidates require appropriate cardiological or respiratory 
assessment.  The following also apply: 
 
10 The genetics of Huntington’s disease are complex and the likelihood of a candidate developing Huntington’s and the likely age of 
presentation are dependent on the number of gene repeats.  In some cases, it is possible to predict these with a high degree of 
certainty, based either on genetic testing of immediate relatives or of the candidate themselves.  If there is clear evidence that a 
candidate is unlikely to develop Huntington’s disease during a Service career, then they may, on a case by case basis, be considered 
FIT.  Supporting evidence must be endorsed by an appropriately qualified and experienced specialist.  Any successful candidate will 
require an appropriate medical marker. 
11 From National Society for PKU ‘Management of PKU’ Feb 2004. 
12 Adams & Victor: Principles of Neurology. 
13 Practice parameters for the treatment of patients with dominantly inherited colorectal cancer (Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and 
Hereditary Non-polyposis Colorectal cancer).  Diseases of the Colon & Rectum 2003;46 (8): pp1001-1012.  Also see 
http://www.acpgbi.org.uk/.   
14 CBRN opinion highlights that this should not generate a concern with respect to work in a CBRN environment. 
15 Candidates who are being followed-up for the purposes of clinical trials, long-term studies into treatment or disease effects or for long-
term holistic or psycho-social issues (where no active treatment or investigations are undertaken) may be considered to meet this 
criterion. 
16 Particularly used in leukaemias, malignant lymphomata and other myeloproliferative disorders. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-N-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3 link to page 75 link to page 84  
 
 
a. 
Acute Lymphatic Leukaemia (ALL). Candidates with ALL may be determined FIT if 
they have remained free of recurrence for a period of 5 years from the completion of 
treatment. 
b. 
Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML). AML has a high rate of relapse within a 5-year 
period. Candidates who remain disease-free for 5 years may be determined FIT following 
referral to the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
Conditions affected by climate 
14.  Heat illness. Candidates who have suffered an episode of heat illness (with or without 
physical exertion) are UNFIT unless they have been shown to thermoregulate normally during an 
exercise-in-heat stress test17. Candidates who suffer from any of the disorders associated with 
malignant hyperthermia, including an isolated abnormal ryanodine test, are UNFIT. 
15.  Disorders of sweating. Candidates with hypohydrosis or anhydrosis affecting more than 5% 
of the body surface area should be determined UNFIT unless they are shown to thermoregulate 
normally during an exercise-in-heat stress test. 
16.  Cold injury. Candidates who have previously been discharged from Service due to non-
freezing cold injury should be determined UNFIT.  Those who suffered an episode of freezing or 
non-freezing cold injury in the past but were not discharged due to this episode and who are now 
asymptomatic are to be referred for assessment at the Cold Injuries Clinic at the Institute of Naval 
Medicine. Following assessment, a decision on suitability for recruitment will be made by the 
single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
17.  Raynaud’s disease or phenomenon. Candidates diagnosed with Raynaud’s disease or 
phenomenon are UNFIT (also refer to Section 4 Annex C Cardiovascular).  
Tropical disease 
18.  Candidates with a history of tropical disease who have made a full recovery and are 
considered cured may be determined FIT. Enquiry should be made about previous foreign travel 
and residence and those with an equivocal history of tropical disease should be referred to the 
single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits. 
Splenectomy 
19.  Candidates who have had a splenectomy, or have reduced splenic function, are more 
susceptible to a number of potentially life-threatening infections i.e. haemophilus influenzae, 
neisseria meningitidis, malaria, capnocytophaga canimorsus and babesiosis. Therefore, 
candidates who have had a splenectomy for any reason are UNFIT.  Candidates with reduced 
splenic function (e.g. partial splenectomy or splenunculus) who require regular prophylactic 
antibiotics or specific immunisations are also UNFIT. 
Transplantation of organs 
20.  Candidates with transplanted organs are UNFIT. Candidates who have donated a kidney and 
are otherwise well may be graded P2 MFD not earlier than 6 months post-surgery, providing they 
meet the requirements of paragraph 9 in Section 4 Annex F Renal and Urological. 
Immune system disorders 
21.    Anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis is an increasingly common diagnosis and refers to a severe 
allergic reaction in which prominent dermal and systemic signs and symptoms manifest which may 
include urticaria, angioedema, hypotension and bronchospasm and which require treatment with 
adrenaline or hospitalisation. A candidate with a past history of anaphylaxis is UNFIT.  
 
17 Such as those available at the Institute of Naval Medicine. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-N-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
22.   Allergy. This includes a past history of Type 1 (immediate IgE mediated reaction), regardless 
of trigger.  Candidates are to be assessed on a case by case basis. The following points are to be 
considered in all cases:    
a.  
Although it is not entirely possible to predict the severity of subsequent reactions based 
on previous history18, assessment must include clinical history, speed of onset, severity of 
response, frequency and the need for and level of treatment received. 
b.  
IgE levels should be interpreted with caution as they are not independent predictors of 
symptom severity. There are no tests with adequate sensitivity and specificity to indicate who 
might be at risk of a fatal reaction.    
c.  
In cases of Oral Allergy Syndrome (Birch Pollen Food Syndrome) if reliance on 
medication is absent/low, the deliberate avoidance of allergen is not required, and the 
candidate has very mild symptoms with British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology 
(BSACI) considered risk of incapacitation as being very low; then they may be assessed as 
FIT.  (For further information about BSACI, see sub-paragraph g.)  
d.  
In cases of Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis (Hay fever), if reliance on medication is 
absent/low, the deliberate avoidance of allergen is not required, and the candidate has very 
mild symptoms then they may be assessed as FIT.  
e.  
Cross-reactivity often exists within groups of allergens (e.g. ground nuts and tree 
nuts).    
f.  
The nature of Military Service is such that it is not possible to guarantee an individual’s 
ability to self-police an allergy to the triggers above thorough labelling or identification of 
trigger constituents.    
g.  
In cases of doubt over the history of allergy or where self-administered adrenaline 
injection has been prescribed but there is doubt over its necessity, candidates may wish to 
ask their general practitioner to refer them to an allergist for opinion. Referral should be made 
to the Lead Consultant at one of the clinics shown in Table 1, which are approved by the 
British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology19. In the case of food allergy, allergic 
response could be assessed by serum or skin tests followed by a sequential challenge test 
(e.g. eating up to 10 peanuts). No reaction to the tests would equate to the same risk as an 
individual without a history of food allergy. Wasp and bee sting desensitisation may be 
undertaken although future anaphylaxis cannot be ruled out; however, those who had 
previously reacted to stings, but then went on to have further stings without problem could be 
considered to have no greater risk than the general population if they then sustain multiple 
stings.20  
h.  
Candidates with a history of allergy to drugs should have a careful history taken, 
including whether the allergy has been formally confirmed. Candidates with an allergy to 
morphine, drugs used in prophylaxis or treatment in a CBRN environment or anaesthetic 
agents likely to be used on operations should be referred to the single-Service Occupational 
Physician responsible for the selection of recruits and are likely to be UNFIT.  
23.   Candidates with other immune system conditions that makes the candidate more vulnerable 
to developing infections are UNFIT due to the risks of worldwide deployed service.    
 
18  Pumphrey: Anaphylaxis: can we tell who is at risk of a fatal reaction?; Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 4: pP2 85-29. DOI: 
10.1097/01.all.0000136762.89313.0b.  
19 https://www.bsaci.org/. 
20 Professor Frew, Joint Committee on Immunology and Allergy, presentation to MES WG Mar 11. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-N-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
24.   Advice in all cases of doubt should be sought from the single-Service Occupational Physician 
responsible for the selection of recruits.  
Table 1 – Recommended allergy and immunology clinics for military referrals. 
Region 
Hospital Clinic/Service 
Bath 
Adult Allergy Clinic, Combe Park, Bath BA1 3NG  
Belfast 
Regional Immunology Clinic, Immunology Day Centre, Belfast, BT12 6BN  
Birmingham 
Allergy University Hospitals Birmingham, Mindelsohn Way, Birmingham B15 2GW 
Adult Allergy Clinic, City Hospital, SWBH NHS Trust, Dudley Road, Birmingham, B18 
Birmingham 
7QH 
Adult Allergy Clinic, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Bordesely Green East 
Birmingham 
Birmingham B9 5SS  
Cambridge 
Allergy Clinic, Addenbrookes Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ 
Cardiff 
Allergy Clinic, University Hospital Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XW  
Edinburgh 
Allergy Clinic, Royal Infimrary Edinburgh, Lauriston Place Edinburgh EH3 9HA 
Essex 
Allery Clinic, Broomfield Hospital, Court Road Chelmsford CM1 7ET 
West of Scotland Anaphylaxis Service, West Glasgow ACH, Dalnair St, Glasgow G3 
Glasgow 
8SJ  
General Adult Allergy Clinic, St James' University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds LS9 
Leeds 
7TF 
Leicester 
Allergy Clinic, Glenfield Hospital, Groby Road, Leicester LE3 9QP 
London 
Allergy Clinic, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS 
London 
Department of Allergy, Guys Hospital, Great Maze Pond, London, SE1 9RT 
London 
Asthma and Allergy Clinic, Royal Brompton Hospital, Fulham Road, London, SW3 6NP 
Frankland Allergy Clinic, St Marys Hospital, Imperial College NHS Trust, Praed Street, 
London 
London W2 1NY  
Manchester 
Allergy Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Southmoor Road, Manchester M23 9LT 
Manchester 
Allergy Clinic, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL 
Adult and Paediatric Allergy Clinic, Churchill and John Radcliffe Hospitals, Headington, 
Oxford 
Oxford OX3 7LJ  
Peninsula Allergy and Immunology Service, Derriford Hospital, Derriford Road, 
Plymouth 
Plymouth, PL6 8DH 
Clinical Immunology and Allergy Unit, Northern General Hospital, Herries Road, 
Sheffield 
Sheffield S5 7AU 
Adult Allergy Clinic, Southampton University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of 
Southampton 
Asthma, Allergy & Clinical Immunlogy (AACI), Room CG89, Mailpoint 52, Level G, 
West Wing, Tremona Road, Southampton SO16 6YD 
Clinical Immunology Clinic, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Hilton Road, 
Staffordshire 
Stoke-On-Trent ST4 6QG 
Surrey 
Adult Allergy Clinic, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Egerton Road, Guildford, GU2 7XX 
Sleep disorders 
25.  Insomnia. Candidates with a current or past history of insomnia should be assessed for 
possible underlying causes of the insomnia with a full physical and mental health assessment to 
exclude cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, pain, medication, depressive or anxiety related 
causes. Any underlying cause identified should be considered elsewhere in Section 4. Candidates 
with any history of insomnia within the last 2 years, having no discernible underlying cause, 
causing significant dysfunction or requiring prescribed hypnotic medication21 must be referred to 
 
21 Pre-existing significant insomnia is a significant risk factor for development of PTSD or Depression post-Deployment.  Insomnia varies 
from “normal” experience of sleeplessness from time-to-time to that requiring significant hypnotic treatment. Up to 14 days hypnotic 
treatment can be considered not significant treatment, thereafter it is.  A one off or infrequent requirement for treatment (up to 14 days 
hypnotic treatment in any 3 month period) can also be regarded as not achieving the significance threshold for barring entry. However, 
 
Return to Contents Page 
4-N-7 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3 link to page 129  
 
 
the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for the selection of recruits and are likely to 
be UNFIT. 
26.  Hypersomnolence disorders. As for insomnia, candidates with a current or past history of 
other hypersomnolence disorders should be assessed for possible underlying causes with a full 
physical and mental health assessment to exclude cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, pain, 
medication, depressive or anxiety related causes. Any underlying cause identified should be 
considered elsewhere in Section 4. Candidates with a history of hypersomnolence with no 
underlying cause are UNFIT 
27.  Parasomnias.  Parasomnias are episodic disorders of arousal, partial arousal or sleep-stage 
transition that may be initiated or worsened by sleep. Candidates suffering Common parasomnias 
include: 
a. 
Non-Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep arousal disorders. This includes sleep 
walking and night terrors22. Candidates with any non-REM sleep arousal disorder who are 
dependent on strict sleep hygiene measures or hypnotic medication to remain symptom-free 
are UNFIT. 
(1) 
Sleep walking. Candidates with a history of sleep walking experienced after the 
age of 13 are UNFIT. A childhood history of sleep walking (up to age 13) should be 
referred to the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for selection of 
recruits23 and those candidates who have not required specialist medical assessment 
or intervention may be determined FIT.   
(2) 
Night terrors. Candidates with a history of night terrors experienced after the age 
of 13 are UNFIT. A childhood history of night terrors (up to age 13)  should be referred 
to the single-Service Occupational Physician responsible for selection of recruits23 and 
those candidates who have not required specialist medical assessment or intervention 
may be determined FIT. 
b. 
REM sleep behaviour disorder. REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder is characterised by 
the intermittent loss of [the usual] REM sleep electromyographic (EMG) atonia and by the 
appearance of elaborate motor activity associated with dream mentation. Candidates with a 
history of REM sleep behaviour disorder are UNFIT.  
c. 
Nightmare disorder. Nightmares are frightening dreams that usually awaken the 
sleeper from REM sleep (Night Terrors are Non-REM sleep events and do not involve 
awakening). Candidates with a current history of nightmares causing significant dysfunction 
in daily activities are UNFIT. Candidates with a past history of such nightmares should have 
no underlying psychiatric cause affecting fitness elsewhere in this policy, and should be 
symptom free for a period of two years before being accepted as fit for entry. 
28.  Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. Candidates with a sleep specialist confirmed 
history of circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder are UNFIT. 
29.  Narcolepsy. Candidates with a sleep specialist confirmed history of Narcolepsy, current or 
past, are UNFIT24. 
 
in all cases, irrespective of the type or degree of treatment, careful consideration must be given to the effect on function in the military 
setting of sedating side-effects of hypnotic medication.  Reference for increased risk of mental disorder in those with insomnia: Gehrman 
P; Seelig AD; Jacobson IG; Boyko EJ; Hooper TI; Gackstetter GD; Ulmer CS; Smith TC; for the Millennium Cohort Study Team. 
Predeployment sleep duration and insomnia symptoms as risk factors for new-onset mental health disorders following military 
deployment. SLEEP 2013;36(7):1009-1018. 
22 Epidemiological evidence shows that these arousal disorders are common in childhood:  25% in under 5 year olds; but prevalence 
drops with age:  up-to 6.5% in 13 and under; 2.3 – 2.6% in age group 15 – 64.  Reference:  International Classification of Sleep 
Disorders. 3rd Edition.  American Academy of Sleep Disorders 2014; pp 233-239. 
23 To check for presence of any current sleep or other mental health symptoms, or history of hereditary factors, and consideration of 
employment group suitability with respect to functional requirements. 
24 Narcolepsy is a life-long condition; it can be managed but not cured.  Reference: Narcolepsy Fact Sheet.  National Institute of 
Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders/Narcolepsy-Information-Page   
Return to Contents Page 
4-N-8 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
30.  Breathing related sleep disorders. Candidates with obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea 
syndrome are UNFIT. Candidates with a past history should be referred to single-Service 
Occupational Physician responsible for selection of recruits.  
31.  Restless leg syndrome. This condition is common (general population prevalence is 15%), 
and in majority of cases is mild and causes little dysfunction. Candidates with a history of restless 
legs syndrome causing any disability should be referred to single-Service Occupational Physician 
responsible for selection of recruits. Underlying causes, including anaemia, chronic neck or spine 
pathology should be excluded. 
Return to Contents Page 
4-N-9 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
SECTION FIVE: THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICULAR CONDITIONS ON 
MEDICAL FITNESS DURING SERVICE 

GENERAL 
 
1. 
Personnel in the Armed Forces are subject to both intensive training and physically 
arduous, mentally taxing, operational tours.  Stringent entry standards are required; however for 
serving personnel the physical requirements placed on them may change as they progress 
through their career.  Personnel must undergo appropriate1 medical reviews to ensure that their 
functional capacity is sufficient to meet the demands of their employment and that this 
employment will not have a deleterious effect on the health of the individual. 
 
2. 
This Section gives guidance on appropriate medical grading during service. Adherence to 
this guidance will both ensure standardisation and a dynamic and responsive assessment of 
personnel with regard to their best employment within the Services, thus facilitating the most 
efficient use of manpower by management.  Variance from these standards can only be 
sanctioned by a Service Consultant Occupational Physician either working independently or as 
part of a Service Medical Board or single-Service Medical Authority. 
 
3. 
When there is a change to an individual’s P grade and/or joint medical employment standard 
(JMES) their line manager must be notified and the employing authority informed including whether 
the change is permanent or temporary.  Initial grading would normally be carried out by the Unit 
Medical Officer with advice from or referral to secondary care and/or occupational medicine if 
appropriate.  Those with protracted or serious conditions that are likely to lead to a permanent 
change in P grade and JMES or requiring invaliding from the Service should be reviewed by a 
Service2  occupational medicine consultant.  Review by an appropriate secondary care specialist 
may be sought for advice on diagnosis, prognosis and treatment3. 
 
4. 
Account should be taken of the following points and any areas of concern discussed with a 
Service Occupational Physician: 
 
a. 
Individuals with conditions requiring periodic medical care, review or medication and 
those in whom deterioration might occur, may not be fully deployable, but may be suited for 
limited deployment or other employment. 
 
b. 
In assessing overall employability it is not sufficient simply to consider an individual’s 
fitness for their current defined post.  It is important to consider the: 
 
(1) 
General Service duties that may be required of all Service personnel.  
(2) 
Specific branch/trade duties. 
(3) 
Potential branch/trade duties required on deployed operations. 
 
5. 
Certain categories of employment (e.g. Special Forces, Submariners, Parachutists, Divers 
and, Aircrew) require more stringent standards, which are promulgated separately. 
 
 
 
 
1 As stated in JSP 950 Leaflet 6-7-7 and single Service policy. 
2 ‘Service’ is defined as being employed by the single Services or DPHC. 
3 3 See Paragraph 13. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Medical board procedures 
Temporary downgrading 
6. 
The majority of disorders will be managed in the first instance within primary healthcare. 
For those conditions likely to last more than 28 days (Army 56 days), alterations to the P grade 
and JMES are to be initiated by the unit medical officer.  Referral to secondary care should be 
made on clinical need.  Advice on employability can be sought from a Service Occupational 
Physician. 
 
7. 
Individuals who are temporarily incapable of any employment and are under medical 
supervision or treatment either in hospital or the community are to be designated P0 as required 
by single-Service policy. 
 
Permanent downgrading and medical discharge 
 

Any personnel developing a permanent condition that degrades their functional capacity for 
the foreseeable future4  may need to be permanently re-graded or invalided.  Permanent grading 
will be undertaken in accordance with single-Service medical boarding procedures. The aim of the 
Medical Board is to determine the functional capacity of individuals and their fitness for work.  
Advice and recommendations are to be given to the employer, stating what limitations to 
employment are necessary as a result of an individual’s medical fitness status. 
 
9. 
Conditions compatible with limited employment within the Services will normally attract a 
change in P grade and JMES.  To enable a judgement to be reached on the individual’s medical 
grade there is a requirement to access all available information on an individual’s employment, 
career, welfare, and medical detail.  The ‘wants and desires’ of individuals, their medical officer 
and employing unit should not form the basis for a recommendation of a medical grade. 
 
10.  The decision on employment in a grade will be made by the employing authority, taking into 
account the ability of the Service to accommodate the employment restrictions.To achieve co- 
ordination of this process appropriate to single-Service requirements, employment boards (which 
may include representatives drawn from the manning authority, personnel management, employing 
unit and medical service) will take decisions on future employment based on medical board 
recommendations. 
 
11.  Medical discharge boards should be conducted in accordance with Section 6. A 
recommendation for discharge should only be made for those individuals who are assessed by a 
Medical Board as being MND. 
 
Role of clinical consultants in the determination of employability 
 
12.  Occupational physicians and unit medical staff are responsible for the medical grading of 
personnel under their care.To support this, other consultants will provide opinions relating to 
restrictions to activities or functional capabilities 
 
13.  Defence clinical consultants, when asked, are to: 
 
a. 
Provide a diagnosis and an occupationally orientated prognosis, together with as 
much generic advice as possible on medical restrictions affecting functional capability in 
the Service environment. 
 
b. 
Provide supplementary information at the request of unit medical staff and Service 
Occupational Physicians or provide written reports to service Medical Boards. 
 
 
4 Foreseeable future – The maximum period of validity of a Temporary P grade is normally 12 months for the RN and Army and 18 
months for the RAF. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
c. 
In exceptional circumstances, make themselves available in person to assist 
Medical Boards/Boards of Survey at the request of the Board President. 
 
Principles of occupational medicine practice 
 
14.  In order to assess fitness for work effectively, medical staff need to be aware of the 
employment requirements and working conditions of their patients.  This awareness is best 
achieved through regular involvement in visiting and assessing workplaces, liaison with 
management, and through enhancement of knowledge of activities outside the immediate unit 
environment (e.g. Branch and Trade requirements or the requirements of specific courses that 
must be completed).  Medical staff should gain experience of the wider Service and Joint 
environments through activities such as visits to other units, unit exercises and operational 
deployments.    Essential to this undertaking is an understanding of the basic tenets of 
occupational medicine practice.  Readers are directed to guidance from Faculty of Occupational 
Medicine 
(FOM) publications5. 
 
15.  In the Services, the PULHHEEMS system describes individual functional capacity for work 
(See Section 1).  In turn, this allows a ‘fitness for work’ grading to be conveyed to the employer 
using the JMES system (see Section 2), whilst at the same time maintaining the individual’s 
medical confidentiality, protecting their health and facilitating their most appropriate employment 
within the organisation. 
 
16.  All Medical Officers are to familiarise themselves with MOD Health and Safety (H&S) 
practices for reporting of Prescribed Diseases or Diseases reportable under RIDDOR6, as detailed 
in JSP 3757.  This publication gives direction on the implementation of UK H&S regulations within 
the MOD for line managers to discharge their H&S responsibilities, and is important to medical 
officers who provide advice to patients and their line-management.  In addition, medical officers 
should be aware of JSP 4428 , and single-Service accident reporting systems, which should be 
initiated by line managers to report any condition (disease or injury) or dangerous occurrence 
developing in association with work. 
 
17.  Whilst not having any direct responsibility for implementing H&S legislation (unless they also 
have direct line management responsibility), all healthcare workers who are employed with a remit 
to provide care in an occupational setting should be aware of the following basic tenets of good 
H&S practice: 
 
a. 
All placements within the workplace should take account of any risk(s) to the individual 
following a risk assessment, and risks the individual brings to that workplace and co-workers 
and any special requirements of the work being undertaken (e.g. safety critical tasks). 
 
b. 
Prevention is the key to minimising the risk of development of any occupational 
disorders. 
 
c. 
Control measures should include the hierarchy of elimination, substitution, 
engineering controls, good working practice and the use of personal protective equipment 
(PPE). 
 
 
5 https://www.fom.ac.uk/  
6 Reporting of Diseases Injuries and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations. 
7 JSP375 MOD Health and Safety Handbook Volume 2 Leaflet 14. 
8 JSP 442 Accident Reporting System. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX A  
EYES IN-SERVICE  
 
1. 
Diseases of the eye and orbit are assessed and recorded under P.  The entries under EE 
are records of visual acuity only. The uncorrected refractive limits are generally acceptable (with 
the exception of those undergoing refractive error surgical correction).  Outside this range, eyes 
are rarely structurally normal, and unless all other visual parameters are normal, should lead to 
medical downgrading as indicated above.  Consideration must be given to whether a lesion is 
progressive and likely to lead to future incapacity.  Where doubt exists referral should be made to 
a consultant ophthalmologist.  The following should be noted: 
 
a. 
The discovery or first development of any significant functional loss in visual acuity, or 
field defects, ocular mobility, or conditions or diseases affecting either intra-ocular (uveal 
tract, lens defects etc) or extra-ocular structures (i.e.  lids, lachrymal system) in either or both 
eyes, will normally necessitate specialist opinion from an ophthalmologist, together with 
appropriate grading based on their advice. 
 
 
b. 
The combined impact on overall visual function of visual acuity, visual field, contrast 
sensitivity, colour perception, ocular mobility, and structural integrity of one or both eyes, will 
be reflected in the medical category.  Primarily this will be determined by the limitation of 
functional capacity in one or both eyes, and its likely effects on the individual’s employability. 
For example: 
 
(1) 
Individuals with right sided monocular1  loss of vision and whose main military 
employment is largely dependent on binocular or uni-ocular vision (e.g. infantryman, 
pilots, air traffic control, vocational drivers etc). In these cases the visual function alone 
will not be the only determinant of their suitability for continued Service (See Section 5 
paragraphs 7-10). 
 
(2) 
Those suffering from night blindness, which if affecting employment and ability 
to function in a military environment, would need to be regraded no higher than P3. 
 
c. 
Special work problems and restrictions.  Those with significant defective vision are 
at increased risk of accidents, particularly in hazardous situations.  Restrictions should apply 
to any individual with defective vision, restricted visual fields, or imbalance of the eyes with 
diplopia.  Careful consideration needs to be given for those employed to work in the 
following circumstances: 
 
(1) 
Work at heights, e.g.  on ladders, gantries, or scaffolding, where they might 
overstep the boundaries and fall. 
 
(2) 
Work in the vicinity of moving machinery. 
 
(3) 
Driving of vehicles, both on public highways and heavy plant operation at 
construction, industrial, and other sites. 
 
(4) 
Operation of cranes, hoists, and fork lift trucks2. 
 
Uniocular. When one eye is normal and the other eye is either absent or is blind. 
Blind Eye. An eye possessing a best attainable corrected Snellen visual acuity (VA) of 6/60 or worse. 
Monocular. When an individual has two seeing eyes, one eye with normal vision but the other eye possessing a best corrected VA 
between 6/60 and 6/24. 
2 JSP 950 Leaflet 6-6-2 ‘Medical standards for mechanical handling equipment operators’. Safe use of lifting equipment. Lifting 
Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998. Approved Code of Practice and Guidance L113 HSE Books 1998 ISBN 0 7176 
1628 2. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-A-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
d. 
Colour perception (CP).  Normal CP has greater importance in those single 
Services, and trade groups, which place a reliance on colour coding for safety and 
technical reasons.  CP requirements are detailed in the respective single Service 
publications on employment standards. 
 
Corneal Refractive Surgery 
 
2. 
Corneal Refractive Surgery (CRS) for aviation and diving must be specifically approved by 
the single Service employing authorities before being considered.  Guidance for aircrew is in 
AP1269A. 
 
3. 
The following methods of surgical correction of myopia or hypermetropia may be 
considered suitable for serving personnel on an individual, case by case basis: 
 
a. 
Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK)/ Laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK).  
b. 
Laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) 
c. 
Intrastromal corneal rings (ICRs), otherwise known as intrastromal corneal 
segments (ICSs). 
 
4. 
Radial keratotomy (RK), or astigmatic keratotomy (AK) and other form of intrusive refractive 
surgery, not listed above, are not acceptable. Serving personnel identified as having previously 
undergone these surgical operations should be brought before a Medical Board with an opinion 
from a service ophthalmologist. 
 
5. 
In order to be considered for a grading of P2 all personnel who have undergone refractive 
surgery must fulfil the following criteria and provide supporting documentary evidence when 
required: 
 
a. 
The pre-operatively refractive error was not more than +6.00 or –6.00 dioptre 
[Equivalent Spherical Error (ESE)] in either eye. To calculate the refractive error see Sect 4 
Annex A Appendix 1. 
 
b. 
The best spectacle corrected visual acuity meets the appropriate single-Service 
standard.  
c. 
To protect against the development of issues such as UV light related haze on 
operations, at least 6 months to have elapsed since the date of the last surgery.  In 
exceptional circumstances, on the advice of single Service CAs Ophth, this may be 
reduced to 3 months. 
 
d. 
There have been no significant visual side effects secondary to the surgery affecting 
daily activities. 
 
e. 
Refraction is stable, as defined by two refractions performed at least 1 month apart 
with no more than 0.50 dioptre difference in ESE in each eye. 
 
6. 
It should be emphasised to personnel contemplating these procedures that they may not 
be rendered spectacle independent, and that there is a low risk of permanent side effects.  They 
must be told that failure to meet the required standards as given above may result in them being 
regraded no higher than P3 and it is possible that significant deterioration in vision may require a 
grade of P7 or P8.  This advice should be recorded in their medical record. 
 
7. 
Personnel having refractive surgery are obliged to disclose it to their medical officer.  The 
individual must be referred to a Service consultant ophthalmologist who will make assessment of 
Return to Contents Page 
5-A-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
the visual function and Service suitability.  Personnel who do not meet the required criteria for P2 
must be referred to the appropriate Medical Board. 
 
8. 
These procedures are not available from public funding, unless authorised by the single 
Services in the following circumstances: 
 
a. 
As a requirement for individuals to meet operational imperatives (i.e.  where 
correction by spectacles or contact lenses is not practicable for occupational reasons). 
 
b. 
Where correction by spectacles or contact lenses is not practicable for clinical 
reasons, on the recommendation of a Service consultant ophthalmologist. 
 
9. 
A single revision of CRS is acceptable, subject to the same criteria above being met. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-A-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX B  
EAR, NOSE AND THROAT IN-SERVICE  
 
1. 
Diseases of the ear are assessed and recorded under P. The entries under HH are records 
of hearing acuity only as determined by audiometry.  The discovery of any functional loss in 
hearing acuity (with or without tinnitus),  balance problems (with or without nystagmus), or any 
of the conditions as detailed in Annex B should be reflected in the P quality.  This will be 
determined primarily by the limitation of functional capacity in one or both ears.  The effects on 
employability are reflected in JMES.  The following should be noted: 
 
 
a. 
There is a requirement for compliance with single Service Hearing Conservation 
Programmes (HCP), and current Health and Safety legislation. 
 
 
b. 
Generally, perfect hearing is not essential, however, there may be circumstances 
when for safety and/or technical reasons, satisfactory hearing is deemed an absolute 
requirement of specific employment groups, e.g.  aircrew, divers, sonar operators etc, and 
where there is a need to hear verbal signals and instructions. Speech pattern recognition 
(identifying any low frequency decrement) is a better indicator of hearing function than 
reliance on H grades, which do not discriminate between high and low frequency hearing 
loss. 
 
 
c. 
Further guidance on interpretation of audiograms and deployability can be found in 
JSP 950 6-4-2. 
 
2. 
Balance. Persistent or frequently recurring balance problems, no matter what the 
aetiology, should be reflected in the P quality. 
 
3. 
Tinnitus.  Tinnitus may occur alone or in combination with loss of hearing acuity. Any effect 
on function should be reflected in the P quality. 
 
4. 
Sleep Apnoea.  Service personnel who develop sleep apnoea should be graded according 
to their degree of disability and their treatment needs.  Evidence of compliance with treatment 
should be sought to inform the grading decision. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-B-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX C  
CARDIOVASCULAR IN-SERVICE  
 
 
1. 
When advising on employability and deployability a full assessment of cardiovascular risk 
should be undertaken.  Particular consideration should be given to the risk of sudden or subtle 
incapacitation. 
 
2. 
Special work problems and restrictions. In established cardiovascular disease, 
the following should be considered: 
 
a. 
Driving.  Fitness to return to driving after a cardiac event normally follows Driver 
Vehicle Licensing Authority (DVLA) guidance1.  Additionally an individual risk assessment 
for Service specific driving tasks must be undertaken. 
 
b. 
Pacemakers and implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs)2.  Depending on the 
manufacturer and type of the pacemaker or ICD fitted, electromagnetic fields (EMF) from a 
wide variety of electrical devices may have the potential to produce induction currents, which 
can adversely affect the pacemaker causing dysrhythmias or cause the ICD to deliver a 
shock. Those with pacemakers/ICDs should be warned of this possibility, and employment 
may need to be restricted to avoid exposure to strong EMF. 
 
c. 
Environmental. Ability to work in hot and cold climates, confined spaces or at 
altitude requires an individual risk assessment. 
 
d. 
Diving.  Vocational divers are covered by BRd1750A which prohibits those with an 
organic heart condition from diving.  BRd1750A applies to military vocational divers and all 
sports diving under military auspices.   If in doubt advice should be sought from Senior 
Medical Officer (SMO) Diving Medicine at the Institute of Naval Medicine. 
 
e. 
Flying.  Fitness to fly as a passenger on transport aircraft after a cardiac event 
normally follows British Cardiac Society (BCS) Guidance3.  Guidance for aircrew is 
contained within AP1269A. 
 
Hypertension 
 
3. 
Hypertension is defined and measured in accordance with current National Institute for 
Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines.4 Those with treated mild hypertension and an 
acceptable cardiovascular risk profile, whose functional capacity is otherwise unaffected may 
be graded MFD with an E2 medical marker. Those with untreated, significantly elevated (> 160 
mmHg systolic and/or >100 mmHg diastolic) or labile hypertension should be regraded MND 
where treatment is recommended/required. Any subsequent return to MLD or MFD should 
 
1 For further information on this you are referred to the Driver Vehicle Licensing Authority (DVLA) website and the publication For 
medical practitioners - At a glance guide to the current medical standards of fitness to drive November 2014 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/418165/aagv1.pdf. 
2 Details of the device must be established from the patient’s cardiologist or surgeon and device manufacturer. 
3 https://www.bcs.com/documents/BCS_FITNESS_TO_FLY_REPORT.pdf  
4 NICE (2019) Hypertension in adults: diagnosis and management NG136. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-C-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
include evidence of stable, well-controlled blood pressure, with consideration given to fitness 
for safety critical duties5 and/or physical exertion restrictions6. 
 
Peripheral vascular disorders 
 
4. 
Account should be taken of the following: 
 
a. 
Peripheral vascular disease. Peripheral vascular disease is likely to affect 
functional capacity and personnel should be assessed and graded accordingly. 
 
b. 
Varicose veins. The functional limitations imposed on those with minor varicosities 
will determine the grade.  Following surgery with satisfactory outcome, individuals may be 
graded P2 MFD.  Less than satisfactory treatment may necessitate the individual being 
graded P3 MLD or P7, depending on the severity.  In addition, the effect of varicose veins 
on the locomotor system is assessed under L of PULHHEEMS. 
 
Cardiomyopathies 
 
5. 
In dilated, hypertrophic and restrictive cardiomyopathy there is a risk of progressive 
haemodynamic deterioration, emboli and sudden death, even in patients who have previously 
been asymptomatic.  All personnel are to be assessed by a cardiologist and a service 
occupational physician to assess their risks and functional limitations.  The highest achievable 
grading will be P3 MLD. 
 
Arrythmogenic Syndromes 
 
6. 
A variety of syndromes leading to an enhanced risk of arrhythmia exist.  These include 
Wolf-Parkinson White and other accessory pathways, Brugada Syndrome, and arrythmogenic 
right ventricular cardiomyopathy as well as isolated atrial fibrillation.  Following assessment 
and treatment by a cardiologist and assessment by a service occupational physician grading 
should be based on the risk of arrhythmia, likely severity of the symptoms, need to restrict 
physical activities and the need for ongoing medication and review. Treatment may include 
implantation of a pacemaker or ICD (see 2.b above).Unless treatment fully resolves the 
symptoms and the risk of future episodes the highest achievable grade will be P3 MLD. 
Grading changes of those with asymptomatic incidental findings should be based on the 
advice on future risks of the treating a cardiologist and include discussion with a single-Service 
occupational physician as necessary. 
 
 
5 Military aircrew in flying roles should only be managed by a MAME qualified doctor in accordance with: AP1269A Lflt 5.02 
Cardiovascular System and Lflt 5.19 Drugs for Aircrew and Controllers.  
DVLA: Assessing fitness to drive A guide for medical professionals, Group 2 drivers must not drive and must notify DVLA if resting BP is 
consistently >180 mmHg systolic and/or >100 mmHg diastolic.  
CAA: https://www.caa.co.uk/uploadedFiles/CAA/Content/Standard_Content/Medical/Cardiology/Flow_Charts/Hypertension%20FC.pdf  
Unfit or Certificate issue delayed if BP exceeds 160 systolic and/or 95 diastolic  
MCA: Seafarers, Temporarily unfit if >170 systolic or >100 diastolic mmHg until investigated and treated.  
HSE: The medical examination and assessment of commercial divers (MA1) BP >160 mmHg systolic or >100 mg diastolic is a 
contraindication to diving. 
6 European Society of Cardiology 2020 ESC Guidelines on Sports Cardiology and Exercise in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease 
ESC Clinic Practice Guidelines 
para 4.2.3 “When BP is uncontrolled, temporary restriction from competitive sports is recommended, with 
the possible exception of skill sports”. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-C-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX D  
RESPIRATORY IN-SERVICE  
 
1. 
Service Personnel developing respiratory conditions such as wheezing diatheses (inclusive 
of asthma), severe hay fever, spontaneous pneumothorax, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and/or 
bronchiectasis are normally graded no higher than MLD if any of the following apply: 
a. 
Degradation in functional capacity and/or performance. 
b. 
Failure to respond satisfactorily to treatment. 
c. 
Dependent on treatment. 
Special Work Problems and Restrictions 
2. 
Certain work environments or safety critical areas require higher standards of respiratory 
fitness e.g. aircrew, divers, submariners and career employment groups utilising breathing 
apparatus or respiratory protective equipment, work in hyper/hypo-baric atmospheres, or in 
confined spaces1. 
Asthma 
3. 
A proportion of Service Personnel will develop asthma in Service. It is essential that a high 
index of suspicion is maintained to differentiate occupational asthma from non-occupational 
causes. The following points should be noted: 
a. 
Any work involving potential respiratory sensitisers is to be subject to a risk 
assessment, together with appropriate health surveillance for the Service Person.   
b. 
The most frequently reported causative agents include isocyanates, flour and grain 
dust, colophony and fluxes, latex, animals, aldehydes and wood dust.   
c. 
Certain employment groups are at increased risk of developing occupational asthma. 
These include individuals directly or indirectly exposed to hazards arising from the following 
activities/occupations: paint spraying, baking, chemical workers, animal handling, welding, 
plastics and rubber workers, metal working, electrical and electronic production workers, 
painting, dental professionals, printers, soldering, safety equipment fitters, healthcare 
workers, and laboratory workers. 
d. 
A diagnosis of occupational asthma should only be made following appropriate 
investigation by a Consultant Respiratory Physician in liaison with a Service Consultant 
Occupational Physician. The aim of management is to identify the cause and minimise or 
remove the individual from further exposure. Complete avoidance of exposure may or may 
not improve symptoms and bronchial hyper-responsiveness.  
e. 
Personnel with pre-existing non-occupational asthma may be permitted to work with 
respiratory sensitisers, providing that they follow the standard requirements for exposure 
control and health surveillance. 
4. 
Irrespective of causation, Service Personnel should be graded appropriate to their: 
 
1 Further details contained in BRd 1750A Handbook of Naval Medical Standards, AP 1269A Royal Air Force Manual of Medical Fitness 
Return to Contents Page 
5-D-1 
 JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
a. 
Employment. 
b. 
Residual function.  
c. 
Requirement for supportive therapy. 
d. 
Control of symptoms. 
5. 
Service Personnel with a diagnosis of asthma who are taking treatment up to and including 
the “initial add-on therapy” step of the British Thoracic Society 2016 Guideline2  will normally be 
graded no higher than MLD. If asthma is well controlled (no exacerbations, less than 3 doses per 
week of reliever therapy and an ACT score3 greater than 23 on two occasions at least 6 weeks 
apart) for 6 months, Service Personnel may potentially be graded MFD following review by a 
Service Consultant Occupational Physician.  
6. 
 Poor symptom control or continuous or frequent use of oral steroids.  Service Personnel 
unable to achieve complete control4  or continuous or frequent use of oral steroids are normally 
graded MND.   
7. 
Exercise induced asthma. For most patients, exercise induced asthma is an expression of 
poorly-controlled asthma and regular treatment including inhaled corticosteroids should be 
reviewed. Service Personnel should be graded as above. 
Tuberculosis  
8. 
Service Personnel infected with respiratory tuberculosis should be initially graded MND 
pending Consultant Respiratory Physician and Service Consultant Occupational Physician review. 
Sleep apnoea 
9. 
Service Personnel who develop sleep apnoea should be graded according to their degree of 
disability and treatment needs. Objective evidence of adequate control5 should be sought to inform 
the grading decision. The opinion of a Consultant Respiratory Physician is to be sought. Service 
Personnel with a confirmed specialist diagnosis of sleep apnoea are normally graded no higher 
than MLD. 
 
2 British Thoracic Society – British Guidelines on the Management of Asthma (2016) Page 70 https://www.brit-thoracic.org.uk/quality-
improvement/guidelines/asthma. 
3https://www.asthma.com/content/dam/NA_Pharma/Country/US/Unbranded/Consumer/Common/Images/MPY/documents/80108R0_Ast
hmaControlTest_ICAD.pdf. 
4 Complete control is defined in British Thoracic Society – British Guidelines on the Management of Asthma (2016) Page 62 
https://www.brit-thoracic.org.uk/quality-improvement/guidelines/asthma. 
5 Apnoea Hypoapnoea Index (AHI) within the normal range, greater than 90% usage data of CPAP machine and Epworth Sleepiness 
Score <7. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-D-2 
 JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX E  
GASTROINTESTINAL IN-SERVICE  
  
General 
 
1. 
Alimentary system problems are common and can result in chronic ill health and/or 
invaliding. The presence of continuing signs and symptoms should be managed in accordance 
with current clinical guidelines. Individuals may require to be permanently graded to P3 or P7, or 
recommended for medical discharge (P8). Each case should be dealt with on merit.   
 
Special work problems and restrictions 
 
2. 
Non-infective conditions generally require no specific work limitations although the avoidance 
of stressful environments, shift work, and remote locations may be advisable in those with ongoing 
symptoms. Those with infective disease must be excluded from work involving food handling until 
medically certified as free from disease and fit to work. Similarly, healthcare workers will require 
restriction of duties dependent on the relative risk of the infective agent, and their speciality.   
 
Dyspeptic Disease 
 
3. 
Following a diagnosis of presumptive peptic ulcer disease, individuals are graded P7 MND for 
three months. After completion of a course of ulcer healing therapy and/or Helicobacter pylori 
eradication treatment, those who remain symptom-free at the end of the 3 month period may be 
graded P2 MFD. In cases complicated by perforation or significant haemorrhage, individuals are to 
be made P7 MND for one year before considering a return to P2 MFD, subject to satisfactory 
endoscopic review. 
 
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) 
 
4. 
The response of IBS to treatment is very variable.Grading will be dependant upon the 
influence of symptoms on the ability to conduct activities of daily living as well as work roles.  Of 
particular importance is the ability to avoid dietary triggers when deployed away from home.  Only 
those with mild symptoms not requiring medication and who have triggers that are easily 
avoidable if deployed may be P2 MFD. 
 
Coeliac disease and gluten sensitivity 
 
5. 
Care should be taken in grading patients with Coeliac disease as there is evidence that 
poor dietary control is associated with a wide range of potential GI and non-GI complications, 
including malignancy.  The MOD is responsible for ensuring service personnel have access to a 
gluten free diet as far as is reasonably practicable; however, gluten-free ration packs are not 
available.  The potential inability to provide a continuous gluten-free diet means that service 
personnel with Coeliac disease must have a risk assessment performed by a single-Service 
occupational medicine consultant prior to deployment.  The assessment must include defining 
whether a reliable supply of gluten-free produce is available and whether appropriate catering 
facilities exist to produce gluten-free food in the proposed deployed location 
 
6. 
Where sSs are able reliably to provide a gluten free diet and appropriate preparation 
facilities, or where appointments or postings are to units in countries1  where a gluten-free diet is 
achievable then a grading of no higher than P3 MLD (ALME L3) may be awarded by a 
consultant occupational physician led Medical Board.  Appropriate Med Lim Codes or restrictions 
may need to be applied to ensure that the service person is not moved away from that assessed 
 
1 Including BFG, Cyprus and Gibraltar, appointments to embassies in developed countries, exchange posts in developed countries and 
other appointments where pre-boarding assessment indicates that the service-person can achieve an unbroken gluten-free diet. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-E-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
catering facility and supply chain.  Where any of these requirements are not achievable a 
grading no higher than P7 MND is to be applied. 
 
Inflammatory bowel disease
 
 
7. 
Medical grading of patients with inflammatory bowel disease relates to the level of ongoing 
symptoms, number and frequency of recurrences, known triggers (and the ability to avoid them) 
and the requirement for medication, surgery and follow-up.  They are to be graded no higher than 
P3 MLD. 
 
Liver Disease 
 
8. 
Abnormal liver function (2 tests 1 month apart) should be graded dependant upon the 
underlying cause.  Chronic viral hepatitis, particularly in HCW, is graded in accordance with 
current BBV policy.Other conditions, including hepatosplenomegaly, are likely to achieve P3 
MLD as the highest grade, dependant upon response to treatment and the requirement for 
medication and regular follow up.  Those with Gilbert’s Syndrome may remain P2 MFD with an E2 
risk marker unless episodes are sufficiently frequent to affect daily living or ability to work. 
 
9. 
The discovery of evidence of oesophageal varices on endoscopy will lead to a grading no 
higher than P7 MND. 
 
Pancreatitis 
 
10.  Patients with a single episode of pancreatitis may be graded P2 MFD at least 6 months 
post full recovery as long as any underlying or triggering cause has been treated.  Those with 
recurrent episodes should be graded no higher than P3 MLD. 
 
Food allergy and intolerance 
 
11.  Those developing food allergy or intolerance in service should be graded on a case by case 
basis.  Grading should be based on the effects of symptoms, the severity of the response and the 
ability to avoid triggers in the deployed environment.  The advice of a specialist physician in 
allergy or immunology should be sought.   Those formally diagnosed with a significant allergic 
response sufficient to require them to carry a self-administered adrenaline autoinjector (Epipen or 
similar) are to be graded no higher than P3 MLD in accordance with single Service policies.  See 
also Section 5 Annex N – Other Conditions in Service. 
 
Bariatric surgery
 
12.    NICE advises that bariatric surgery is appropriate for patients with a BMI < 50 or < 40 if 
additional complications are present. Because of the potential for post-operative complications, 
including mal-absorption, dumping syndrome and problems with anastomoses and gastric bands, 
all personnel contemplating gastric surgery should be carefully counselled about the occupational 
implications. Due to the very high rate of complications, specifically slippage and erosions, gastric 
bands should be avoided. Sleeve gastrectomy, and gastric bypass (requiring Roux-en-Y 
reconstruction) are considered preferable, with sleeve gastrectomy the more straightforward.  
13.    All personnel undergoing bariatric surgery require a two year follow up period, during which 
the most likely appropriate medical category will be MND. If, after two years their weight is stable, 
there are no surgical or metabolic complications, and no ongoing requirement for dietary 
supplementation, then the Serviceperson may be regraded MFD. If there is an ongoing 
requirement for dietary supplementation, then the highest medical category will be MLD. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-E-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX F  
RENAL AND UROLOGICAL IN-SERVICE  
 
Urinary disorders  
 
1. 
A persistent abnormality of urinalysis (defined as haematuria of any degree and proteinuria 
above "trace" on dipstick testing on each of three occasions), with or without raised blood pressure, 
may indicate a nephrological pathology. Any persistent abnormality should be investigated, with 
referral to a nephrologist, as appropriate. 
 
a. 
Nephro-urological conditions. Permanent medical grading of P3 or P7 should be 
considered for any personnel developing nephro-urological conditions (e.g. nephritis (acute 
glomerulonephritis, pyelonephritis), urinary incontinence, recurrent urolithiasis or malignant 
disease), which either degrades the functional capacity and/or fails to respond satisfactorily 
to treatment (whether there is persisting abnormality of urinalysis, blood pressure, and 
glomerular filtration rate/creatinine clearance rate, or not).  
 
b. 
Special work problems and restrictions. Personnel with renal or urinary tract 
disease should be subject to appropriate risk assessment prior to any deployment or posting. 
 
Impaired renal function 
 
 
2. 
Individuals requiring haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation need regular 
specialist follow-up and are likely to have limited functional capacity. They will normally be unfit for 
operational deployment and will have major employment limitations.  
 
Nephrectomy 
 
 
3. 
PULHHEEMS assessment post-nephrectomy will depend on the underlying pathology and 
the surgical outcome.  
 
a. 
If the nephrectomy was for disease or trauma and specialist opinion confirms that the 
remaining kidney is fully functional, with no likelihood of recurrence or progression of the 
condition, a grading of P2 can be considered.  
 
b. 
Those who have donated a kidney should be graded P7 for a minimum period of 6 
months after which, if fully fit, they may be re-graded P2. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-F-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX G 
NEUROLOGICAL IN-SERVICE  
 
Peripheral neuropathy 
 
1. 
Peripheral neuropathies require consideration of impact on function and any underlying 
condition.  This is further considered under the respective sections dealing with upper and lower 
limb function at Section 5 Annex K. 
 
Seizures and epilepsy 
 
2. 
Those who suffer a single seizure after entry are to be referred for a neurological opinion. 
are to be graded P7 MND for a period of 18 months with appropriate risk assessment and 
restrictions on employment.  Certain occupations may be incompatible with a history of even a 
solitary seizure1  and specific employment guidance should be sought. 
 
a. 
Single seizures.  Individuals in whom no abnormalities are detected, including a 
normal MRI brain and EEG, may be graded P2  following a period of 18 months without 
anticonvulsant treatment dependent upon consultant neurologist advice on the risk of 
recurrence. 
 
b. 
Recurrent seizures.  Whilst under investigation individuals are to be graded no 
higher than P7 MND.  Those who are well controlled on medication are to be permanently 
graded P7, or exceptionally P3 after assessment by a Service consultant occupational 
physician.  All others are to be permanently graded no higher than P7 or P8 as appropriate. 
 
Head injury2,3 
 
3. 
Head injuries may be classified according to the following criteria: 
 
a. 
Mild. 
 
(1) 
Loss of consciousness lasting for less than 30 minutes.  
(2) 
Amnesia lasting for less than 30 minutes. 
b. 
Moderate.    Any of the following 
 
(1) 
Loss of consciousness lasting for 30 minutes to 24 hours.  
(2) 
Amnesia lasting for 30 minutes to 24 hours. 
 
(3)   An undisplaced skull fracture.  
c. 
Severe.   Any of the following: 
(1) 
Loss of consciousness for more than 24 hours. 
 
(2) 
Amnesia for more than 24 hours. 
 
1 Aircrew, divers and holders of DVLA Group 2 licence. 
2 Annegers, JF et al; A population-based study of seizures after traumatic brain injuries. N Engl J Med. 1998 Jan 1;338(1):20-4. 
3 Christensen, J et al; Long-term risk of epilepsy after traumatic brain injury in children and young adults: a population-based cohort 
study. Lancet 2009; 373: 1105-10. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-G-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
(3) 
Intracranial haematoma4.  
(4) 
Depressed skull fracture.  
(5) 
Brain contusion. 
4. 
Personnel with a history of head injury, particularly those with a history compatible with a 
severe or moderate injury or with evidence of persisting intellectual, psychiatric or neurological 
disability require neurological and psychometric assessment.  Where there is considered to be a 
significant risk of post-traumatic epilepsy, grading should be in accordance with that outlined at 
paragraphs 2 above. 
 
Loss of consciousness/altered awareness 
 
5. 
A full history should be taken including any pro-dromal symptoms, length of time 
unconscious, degree of amnesia and any confusion on recovery.  A witness account should be 
recorded if available.  Neurological and/or cardiac investigation should be carried out as 
appropriate.  Temporary re-grading (P7) and restriction of duties will be necessary to protect the 
individual whilst the episode is investigated.  Personnel should be considered unfit to handle live 
weapons during this period.  Grading thereafter will depend on the immediate or likely longer term 
effect on functional capacity. 
 
6. 
Simple faint.  Unless the diagnosis is uncertain non-recurrent cases may be graded P2.  
For those with recurrent faints, an assessment of the effect on functional capacity and risk of 
recurrence should be made and an appropriate medical grade given. 
 
7. 
Unexplained loss of consciousness or altered awareness.  Candidates who have had a 
single episode with no definite provoking factors, who have normal cardiac and neurological 
examination and a normal ECG, may be graded P2 providing 6 months have elapsed since the 
episode and they are considered to be at low risk of recurrence.  Those whose job requires DVLA 
Gp 2 licensing will require a downgrading for a minimum of 12 months.  Candidates with recurring 
episodes where no underlying cause can be found should be graded according to effect on 
functional capacity in role, but they should remain downgraded for at least 12 months after the last 
episode. 
 
8. 
Loss of consciousness/altered awareness where epilepsy is strongly suspected.  
Factors that may indicate that epilepsy is a likely diagnosis include amnesia for more than 5 
minutes, injury, tongue biting, incontinence, having remained conscious but with confused 
behaviour and post attack headache. Such individuals should be managed in accordance with 
para 2 above. 
 
Narcolepsy 
 
9. 
Personnel suffering from narcolepsy should normally be graded no higher than P7.  A higher 
grade may be considered provided satisfactory control of symptoms has been achieved on 
medication.  Individuals may be graded P2 once off medication and asymptomatic for one year. 
 
CVA (including TIAs)
 
 
10.  Personnel who have had a CVA should be graded initially according to their functional ability, 
risk of recurrence and neurological deficit.  Personnel who have been fully investigated and made 
a full recovery remain at increased risk of a further event.  They should normally be graded no 
higher than P3. 
 
 
4 All intracranial haematomata, including epidural, subdural and subarachnoid. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-G-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
Headaches and migraine
 
 
11.  Personnel suffering from recurrent headaches should be graded according the frequency of 
the headaches, requirement for medication, degree of functional impairment and the requirement 
to avoid trigger factors. 
 
Demyelinating disorders 
 
12.  Personnel diagnosed with demyelinating disorders would normally be graded no higher 
than P7 as it is not always possible to predict a deterioration in their symptoms.  However, the 
natural history may encompass a very benign disease course and following neurological advice 
and input from a consultant occupational physician a grade of P3 may be awarded. Disease 
modifying medications have further implications for grading and in most situations individuals will 
normally be graded no higher than P7 and specialist advice sought should any immunisations be 
required. 
 
Neurological tumours 
 
13.  Personnel undergoing treatment for neurological tumours would normally be graded no 
higher than P7.  Grading will otherwise depend on effect on function, requirement for treatment, 
specialist review and likelihood of sudden and/or subtle incapacitation. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-G-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX H  
ENDOCRINE IN-SERVICE  
 
Diabetes Mellitus 
 
1. 
Clear differentiation should be made between those personnel suffering from insulin 
dependent or non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and the respective risk levels with military 
service.  For this reason all cases should be graded P7 MND when first diagnosed while their 
disorder is assessed.  Following assessment, they are graded as follows: 
 
a. 
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (Type 2 DM).  Those suffering from Type 2 DM (i.e. 
asymptomatic glycosuria), controlled by diet or medications without a significant risk of 
hypoglycaemia1, with no other signs or risk factors present (e.g.  a personal/family history of 
heart disease, stroke, other endocrine dysfunction, smoker, obesity, hyperlipidaemia, eye or 
renal disease etc), and whose functional capacity is otherwise unaffected, may 
exceptionally be graded P2 MFD E22  by a formal medical board or Regional Occupational 
Health Consultant.  Normally those in this category with anything other than 
asymptomatic glycosuria should be graded P3 MLD or P7 MLD/ MND.  
This includes 
individuals on sulphonylurea and other medications which carry a risk of hypoglycaemia 
including those requiring insulin therapy. 
 
b. 
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 DM).Those with well controlled Type 1 DM, with 
no other signs or risk factors present (see paragraph 1.a above), and whose functional 
capacity is otherwise unaffected, may be graded P3 MLD3; all others should be graded no 
higher than P7. 
 
c. 
Special work problems and restrictions.  There remain a number of restrictions 
that need to be considered for patients with DM: 
 
(1) 
Fitness for aircrew, diving, seafaring duties, adventurous training etc. 
 
(2) 
Vocational Group 2 drivers are subject to individual assessment by DVLA. 
 
(3) 
Shift work and lone working can be problematic; however, if sensible working 
practices are adopted, it is not absolutely contra-indicated. 
 
(4) 
All require appropriate access to both nutritional and medical supportive 
facilities. 
 
(5) 
Personnel who undertake safety-critical tasks or who are lone workers should 
have a risk assessment of their risk of hypoglycaemia and incapacitation before 
returning to those duties. 
 
Other Endocrine Conditions 
 
2. 
Those with a history of other endocrine disorders (i.e.  thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal or 
pituitary dysfunction), which either degrades the functional capacity and/or fails to respond 
satisfactorily to treatment or replacement therapy, may need to be graded P3 or P7, or P8, as 
appropriate.  A risk assessment including the treatment requirements, the need for follow-up, and 
the potential for sudden onset of symptoms must be undertaken as part of the grading decision. 
 
 
1 Biguanides, Thiazolidinediones and Alpha Glucosidase inhibitors. 
2 Specific occupational groups require further assessment in accordance with single-Service Regulations, BR1750A and AP1269A. 
3 This is subject to individual circumstances and single Service requirements. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-H-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX I  
DERMATOLOGICAL IN-SERVICE  
 
General 
1. 
Extensive skin disease is not compatible with operational military service (i.e. on ships, in 
front line units, or aircrew); limited skin disease may be acceptable.  Acute self-limiting 
conditions do not affect permanent grading, unless they recur frequently. The types of chronic 
skin conditions, which may cause concern, were previously detailed in the Section on entry 
standards (e.g. acne, eczema/dermatitis, psoriasis, hyperhidrosis, vitiligo, chronic urticaria and 
angio-oedema, photosensitivity or photo-aggravated dermatoses, cold-related dermatoses, viral 
warts, malignant melanoma, and keloid or scarring etc).  It is important with serving personnel 
that differentiation is made between dermatoses of non-occupational and occupational aetiology 
and recorded in the F Med 4; however, it is not always easy to make this distinction.  Those with 
a history of any significant skin disorder as detailed above, which either degrades the functional 
capacity and, or fails to respond satisfactorily to treatment, may require to be graded P3 or P7, 
or medically discharged (P8), as appropriate (see Section 5 paras 6-11). 
 
Special work problems and restrictions 
 
2. 
Some or all of these diseases may be subject to significant exacerbation with exposure to 
extremes of climate (i.e. humidity, cold, heat, and sunlight), stress, or specific employment 
groups (catering, vehicle mechanics/automotive repairs, healthcare work, etc), which may 
degrade the individual’s performance. 
 
a. 
Public health risks. Certain skin disorders can be at significantly increased risk of 
developing bacterial colonisation, which makes working in the catering trade, and also 
certain areas of health care, both impractical and contraindicated for potential public health 
reasons. 
 
b. 
Employment considerations.  Whatever the aetiology, some dermatoses may not 
be amenable to treatment, and/or it may not be reasonably practicable for the individual to 
avoid the exacerbating hazard in that employment. Therefore those individuals who 
develop skin conditions require an individual assessment. In these cases it may be 
necessary to consider change to the employment. An individual may therefore be unfit to 
continue in a specific branch, although remaining fit for general service employment.  If a 
branch transfer is unable to be arranged, medical invaliding may then be necessary. 
 
Occupational skin disorders 
 
3. 
Certain employment groups (e.g. caterers, healthcare and laboratory workers, painters, 
printers and vehicle mechanics) are at increased risk of developing occupational dermatitis. This is 
an industrial prescribed disease and as such may be eligible for compensation. It is important 
therefore that the diagnosis should only be made following extensive and appropriate investigation 
by a consultant dermatologist in liaison with a Service consultant occupational physician.  
Prevention is the key to minimising the risk of developing of occupational disorders; see Section 5 
paragraphs 14-17. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-I-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
REPRODUCTIVE IN-SERVICE  
ANNEX J 
Females general 
1. 
With the development of breast, menstrual or pelvic disorders a menstrual, obstetric and 
gynaecological history should be taken and recorded.  The effect on functional capacity at work 
should be evaluated.  Examination of the breasts or genitalia is not required at routine 
PULHHEEMS examination and should not be performed unless there is a clinical need, and a 
systematic enquiry indicates doing so.  Any condition which either degrades the functional capacity 
and, or, fails to respond satisfactorily to treatment, may lead to permanent regrading P3 or P7, or 
medically discharged (P8), as appropriate (see Section 5 paras 6-11). 
 
Gynaecological conditions 
 
2. 
Further details on those conditions which commonly arise are given below: 
 
a. 
Amenorrhoea.  Pregnancy should always be excluded.  Amenorrhea is not usually 
problematic and may be related to dietary factors and/or exercise.  Specialist opinion may 
be necessary to confirm the absence of serious pathology.       
 
b. 
Dysmenorrhoea.  Those with mild or moderate dysmenorrhoea, manageable with 
mild analgesia, may be graded P2. 
 
c. 
Endometriosis.  This can be recurrent and progressive in up to 50% of patients. 
Medical grading will be dependent on the severity and degradation in functional capacity. 
 
d. 
Uterine and ovarian tumours. Those with significant fibroids, and other uterine or 
ovarian tumours who have benefited from successful treatment of benign lesions, may after 
six months, be re-graded P2.  Small fibroids and ovarian cysts, particularly recurrent 
follicular cysts, are common and, more often than not, benign.  If there is no effect on 
functional capacity, individuals may be graded P2. 
 
e. 
Uterine prolapse. Those undergoing surgical repair should be graded P7R or P0 as 
appropriate, but with successful outcome they may be re-graded P2 after 6 months. 
Women with residual deficiencies (e.g. symptomatic prolapse), affecting their functional 
capacity will be graded P3, P7, or P8, if their condition renders them unfit for any form of 
military service. 
 
f. 
Cervical dysplasia. Those with abnormalities previously found at cervical cytology 
are graded as follows: 
 
(1) 
CIN 1 or 2.  May remain P2, but require continuing review at six monthly 
intervals, or as determined by clinical best practice. 
 
(2) 
CIN 3. On diagnosis, re-grading to P7R should be undertaken.  Following 
satisfactory surgical treatment (with concomitant temporary downgrading), and 
following two consecutive normal smears, at least six months apart, they may be re- 
graded P2. 
 
(3) 
Invasive carcinoma and other cervical abnormalities.  A history of invasive 
carcinoma and those with other cervical abnormalities, including viral changes, 
should be treated on individual merit and graded accordingly. 
 
g. 
Polycystic Ovary.  A history of polycystic ovary, which has never given rise to acute 
symptoms, need not affect the grading; all others who develop symptoms should be graded 
appropriate to any degradation in function. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
Infertility 
 
3. 
Infertility affects 1 in 7 couples in the UK.  It may not produce physical symptoms but the 
emotional stresses can be considerable.  The mental and physical stresses, on both men and 
women, of the necessary investigations and treatments may affect functional capacity and 
deployability and the individual should be graded appropriately. 
 
Obstetric conditions 
 
4. 
Personnel who declare pregnancies are graded P4 until at least three months after vaginal 
or caesarean delivery.  Provided that evidence is available of satisfactory post-natal examination, 
requiring no subsequent follow up, they may then be graded P2, if their functional capacity meets 
the Standards.  Extant policy on pregnant workers is detailed in Appendix 1. The latter details the 
obligations on Serving personnel when first aware of pregnancy, and on the employer with regard 
to a risk assessment of the workplace where servicewomen are, or may be employed, under the 
Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999. 
 
5. 
After pregnancy, consideration should be given for a rehabilitation or remedial exercise 
programme to enable them to attain the necessary fitness and functional capacity, and this may 
preclude regrading to P2 for a further 3 to 6 months; with any caveat in accordance with current 
single-Service policies. The employment policy concerning maternity arrangements for 
servicewomen is published elsewhere. 
 
 
a. 
Spontaneous or induced termination of pregnancy. If not already graded P4, 
personnel should be temporarily graded P3R or P7R as appropriate, for at least four weeks after a 
spontaneous or induced termination of pregnancy. 
 
 
b. 
Ectopic pregnancy.  Those suffering an ectopic pregnancy should be graded P7R. 
If treatment has been successful and without complication, they are usually fit to be considered 
for upgrade to P2 approximately 6 months following surgery; this decision should be made on 
individual functional capacity. 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE GUIDANCE OF MEDICAL OFFICERS: MEDICAL ASPECTS OF 
LEGISLATION ON PREGNANT WORKERS
 
 
References 
 
A. 
Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.  
B. 
JSP 375 Vol 2 Ch 36 
C. 
JSP 950 Part 6 Section 7. PULHHEEMS: A Joint Service System of Medical Classification.  
D. 
New and Expectant Mothers at Work; a guide for employers (HS(G)122)HSE, 19941. 
E. 
Workplace (Health Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992. 
F. 
D/AMD/521/3/1 dated 6 January 1995 
 
Introduction 
 
1. 
UK legislation to implement the European Directive on Pregnant Workers was introduced 
with effect from 1 December 1994. The legislation has been formulated under regulations which 
apply to three groups of workers: 
 
a. 
Those who are pregnant. 
 
b. 
Those who have recently given birth  
c. 
Those who are breast feeding. 
2. 
The regulations require employers to: 
a. 
Assess the risks to the health and safety of each of these groups of workers.  
b. 
Ensure that these workers are not exposed to risks identified by the risk 
assessment, which would present a danger to their health and safety. 
 
c. 
Change the worker’s hours and, or conditions of work to avoid any risk that remains 
after taking whatever preventative action is reasonable; or offer alternative work; or if neither 
is possible, give paid leave from work for as long as is necessary to protect the health and 
safety of the worker, her unborn child or breast-fed infant. 
 
3. 
The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (MHSWR) 1999 (at Reference 
A) requires employers to assess risks to all workers and in respect to MOD is further described in 
Reference B. Although the specific provisions of Reference A apply only after the pregnant worker 
has informed her employer of her pregnancy, it is prudent that assessments of workplaces, where 
Service women are, or may be, employed, should include anticipatory consideration of the three 
groups described in paragraph 1, above. 
 
Definitions 
 
4. 
The phrase “new or expectant mother” means a service woman who is pregnant, who has 
given birth within the previous six months or who is breast-feeding. “Given birth” is defined in the 
regulations as “delivered a living child or, after 24 weeks of pregnancy, a stillborn child”. 
 
Broad employment policy
 
 
5. 
It is for line managers to conduct the assessments and to define the physical demands of 
particular jobs, seeking advice from specialists, including medical officers, as required.The 
appropriate employment of Service women is a command responsibility but medical officers might 
contribute advice to assist in this process.  Medical officers will be expected to provide opinion on 
the employability of individual pregnant Service women in specified jobs according to their 
particular medical circumstances.  A medical officer will, in practice, assist managers in conducting 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
risk assessments in relation to individual pregnant Service women and their abilities to perform the 
tasks entailed without undue risk to their health and safety, or that of the unborn babies. 
 
Employment category 
 
6. 
On diagnosis of pregnancy. A pregnant Service woman is to be regarded P4 qualified 
by the appropriate single-service caveat, i.e.: 
 
a. 
RN “No Sea Service” 
 
b. 
Army “RE(PP)”. 
 
c. 
RAF “Base Areas Only”. 
 
7. 
She will remain in this category until regraded, when and as appropriate, after the birth of 
the child or following miscarriage.  This PES is intended to protect both mother and child from the 
more environmentally extreme exposures of military service.  It is unnecessary for pregnant 
women serving abroad to be returned to UK provided that adequate primary and obstetric care is 
available, or unless they elect to do so.  However, judgements about specific employability, within 
this restricted PES, are likely still to be required. 
 
8. 
On return to work.  Employment grading on return to duty post-confinement should address 
both the requirements of Reference A and any residual physical limitations on the ability of the 
Service woman to resume military duties. Medical re-grading will take account of any specialist 
post-natal review but will in any case be determined on an individual basis.  The P4 category may 
require to be extended beyond return to duty. (Authority for regrading - Any medical officer with 
responsibility for primary or relevant specialist care of a Service woman may regrade her on 
diagnosis of pregnancy and on return to duty post-confinement1). 
 
Specific Service considerations 
 
9. 
Service women covered by Reference A should not be required to undertake training or 
testing in relation to otherwise compulsory military fitness standards.  They might, however, be 
encouraged to participate in suitably graded low impact recreational aerobic exercise as advised 
by medical officers while avoiding contact sports and games. 
 
10.  Reference D makes explicit mention of both night work and shift work, which are 
common components of military employment.  The principles described at paragraph 5 will 
inform decisions on the appropriateness of such work for Service women considered under 
the provisions of Reference A. These Service women may be excused such work at the 
discretion of medical officers 
 
11.  Any authorised medical officer (see paragraph 10) may, of course, further downgrade the 
PULHHEEMS or adjust the medical employment standard as the individual conditions and 
circumstances of pregnant Service women require. 
 
Specific hazards
 
 
12.  Tables 1 and 2 below, adapted from Reference D, list the agents, processes and working 
conditions included in the initiating European Directive and directs attention to other relevant 
legislation; additionally, however, Reference E requires employers to provide rest facilities for 
pregnant women and nursing mothers and should be private and include or be close to sanitary 
facilities.This should be used as a checklist (not exhaustive), and due account must be taken of 
the factors considered during risk assessment.  Reference A requires that women to whom the 
 
1 Subject to single-Service procedures on medical grading. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
regulations apply should not be exposed to these identified hazards at work if assessment reveals 
risk which exceeds that which might be encountered outside the workplace. 
 
13.  In addition to Table 1, the annotated bibliography at Reference F should provide additional 
and more Service-specific assistance to medical officers who will also have access to specialised 
advice through usual Service channels. 
 
Tables: 
 
1. 
Agents, Processes and Working Conditions Giving Rise to Risk in Pregnancy and 
Breastfeeding. 
 
2. 
The Employability of Pregnant Service Women - Guidelines for Medical Officers (Revised) 
January 1995. 
 
A.  Occupational Hazards To Pregnant Servicewomen- Physical Agents 
B.  Occupational Hazards To Pregnant Servicewomen- Biological Agents 
C.  Occupational Hazards To Pregnant Servicewomen - Chemical Agents 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Table Agents, processes and working conditions giving rise to risk in pregnancy and breastfeeding2 
 
Physical 
Risk 
How to avoid risk 
Other 
Agents 
legislation 
Shocks, 
Regular exposure may increase risk of 
Avoid work likely to involve uncomfortable 
None specific. 
vibration or 
miscarriage.  May be increased risk of prematurity 
whole body vibration or where abdomen is 
movement 
or low birth weight.  Breastfeeding mothers at no 
exposed to shocks or jolts. 
greater risk than other workers. 
Manual 
Pregnant workers especially at risk; hormonal 
Varies according to circumstances: alter 
Manual 
handling of 
changes can affect ligaments; postural problems 
task to reduce risks for all employees, or 
Handling 
loads where  may increase as pregnancy progresses.  Risks for 
address specific needs of the individual, or  Operations 
there is a 
those who have recently given birth, e.g. limitations 
provide aids to reduce risk. 
Regulations 
risk of injury  on lifting and handling capability after caesarean 
1992. 
section.  Breastfeeding mothers at no greater risk 
than other workers. 
Noise 
No specific risk, but prolonged exposure may lead 
Requirements of Noise at Work 
Noise at Work 
to increased blood pressure and tiredness. 
Regulations 1989 should be sufficient. 
Regulations 
1989 
Ionizing 
Significant exposure can harm the foetus.  If a 
Design worker procedures to keep 
Ionising 
Radiation 
nursing mother works with radioactive liquids or 
exposure of the pregnant woman as low as  Radiations 
dusts the child can be exposed, particularly 
reasonably practicable and certainly below  Regulations 
through contamination of the mother’s skin.  
the statutory dose limit for pregnant 
1999 and 
Possible risk to foetus from significant amounts of 
women.  Nursing mothers should not be 
supporting 
radioactive contamination breathed in or ingested 
employed where the risk of radioactive 
Approved 
by the mother. 
contamination is high. 
Codes of 
Practice. 
Working conditions should be such as to 
make it unlikely that a pregnant woman 
might receive high accidental exposure. 
Non-iodising  Optical Radiation: pregnant or breastfeeding 
Exposure to electric and magnetic fields 
None specific. 
electro-
mothers at no greater risk than other workers.  
should not exceed restrictions on human 
magnetic 
Electromagnetic fields and waves: exposure within 
exposure published by National 
radiation 
current recommendations is not known to cause 
Radiological Protection Board. 
harm, but extreme overexposure to radio- frequency 
could cause harm by raising body temperature. 
Extremes of  When pregnant, women tolerate heat less well and 
Take great care when exposed to 
None specific. 
cold or heat  may more readily faint or be liable to heat stress.  
prolonged heat.  Rest facilities access to 
Breastfeeding may be impaired by heat 
refreshments would help. 
dehydration.  No specific problems from working in 
extreme cold. 
Movements  Fatigue is associated with miscarriage, premature 
Ensure that hours, volume and pacing of 
None specific 
and 
birth and low birth weight.  Excessive physical or 
work are not excessive and that, where 
postures, 
mental pressure may cause stress, anxiety and 
possible employees have some control 
travelling, 
raised blood pressure.  Pregnant employees may 
over how their work is organized.  Ensure 
mental and 
experience problems in working at heights or in 
that seating is available where appropriate.  
physical 
tightly fitting workplaces. 
Give longer or more frequent rest breaks.  
fatigue and 
Adjust workstations or work procedures. 
other 
physical 
burdens 
 
2 This list is not exhaustive. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Physical 
Risk 
How to avoid risk 
Other 
Agents 
legislation 
Work in 
Compressed air risk of bends.  Not clear whether 
Pregnant employees should not work in 
Work in 
hyperbaric 
pregnant women are more at risk but foetus could 
compressed air.  Pregnant employees 
Compressed Air 
atmosphere  be seriously harmed.  Small increase in risk for 
should not dive at all during pregnancy. 
Regulations 
those who have recently given birth.  No 
1996. 
physiological reason why breastfeeding mothers 
should not work in compressed air, but practical 
difficulties.  Diving: possible effects on foetus.  No 
evidence that breastfeeding and diving are 
incompatible. 
 
Biological 
Risk 
How to avoid risk 
Other 
Agents 
legislation 
Any 
Many of these agents can affect the unborn child if 
Depends on the risk assessment.  Control 
Control of 
biological 
the mother is infected during pregnancy. Examples 
measures may include physical 
Substances 
agent of 
are hepatitis B, HIV, TB, syphilis, chickenpox and 
containment, hygiene measures or use of 
Hazardous 
hazard 
typhoid.  For most workers the risk of infection is not  vaccines.  If there is a known high risk of 
to Health 
groups 2, 3 
higher at work than from living in the community, 
exposure to a highly infectious agent, a 
Regulations 
and 4 
but exposure to infection is more likely in certain 
pregnant employee should avoid exposure  1999.  
occupations such as laboratory workers, health care  altogether. 
Approved Code 
and looking after animals. 
of Practice on 
the control of 
biological 
agents; 
approved list of 
biological 
agents. 
Biological 
Rubella (German measles), Toxoplasma and 
See above. 
See above. 
agent 
some other biological agents can harm the foetus. 
known to 
Risk of infection is generally no higher for workers 
cause 
than others, except in exposed occupations (see 
abortion 
above). 
of the 
foetus or 
physical and 
neurological 
damage 
(included in 
hazard 
groups 2, 3 
and 4 
 
Chemical 
Risk 
How to avoid risk 
Other 
Agents 
legislation 
Substances  R40: possible risk of irreversible effects 
With the exception of lead (see below) and  Control of 
Labelled 
R45: may cause cancer 
asbestos these substances all fall 
Substances 
R40, R45, 
R46: may cause heritable genetic damage 
within the scope of the Control of 
Hazardous 
R46 and 
R47: may cause birth defects - due to be replaced 
Substances Hazardous to Health 
to Health 
R47 
by the risk phrases: 
Regulations.  Employers are required 
Regulations 
R61: may cause harm to the unborn child 
to assess health risks and where 
1999. 
R63: possible risk of harm to the unborn child 
appropriate prevent or control them, 
Chemicals 
R64: may cause harm to breastfed babies. 
having regard for women who are 
(Hazard 
Actual risk can only be determined following a risk 
pregnant or have recently given birth. 
Information and 
assessment of a particular substance at the place 
Packaging) 
of work. 
Regulations 
1994. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-7 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Chemical 
Risk 
How to avoid risk 
Other 
Agents 
legislation 
Chemicals 
Includes manufacture of auramine; exposure to 
Covered by the Control of Substances 
Control of 
agents and 
aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons present in coal 
Hazardous to Health Regulations (see 
Substances 
industrial 
soots, tar, pitch, fumes or dust; exposure to dusts, 
above). 
Hazardous 
processes 
fumes and sprays produced during the roasting and 
to Health 
in Annex 1 
electro-refining of cupro-nickel matters; and strong 
Regulations 
to EC 
acid process in the manufacture of isopropyl 
1999 
Directive 
alcohol. 
90/394/EEC 
on the 
Control of 
Carcino-
genic 
Substances 
Mercury 
Exposure to organic mercury compounds during 
Covered by requirements of the Control of 
Control of 
and mercury  pregnancy can slow the growth of the unborn 
Substances Hazardous to Health 
Substances 
derivatives 
baby, disrupt the nervous system and cause the 
Regulations.  HSE Guidance Notes EH17:  Hazardous 
mother to be poisoned.  No clear evidence of 
Mercury - health and safety precautions 
to Health 
adverse effects on developing foetus of 
and MS 12: Mercury - medical surveillance  Regulations 
exposure to mercury and inorganic mercury 
give practical guidance on risks of working  1999 
compounds.  No indication that mothers are 
with mercury and how to control them. 
more likely to suffer greater adverse effects 
from mercury and its compounds after birth of 
the baby.  Potential for health effects in children 
from exposure of mother to mercury and its 
compounds is uncertain. 
Antimitotic 
In the long term, damage to genetic information 
No known threshold limit; exposure must 
Control of 
(cytotoxic) 
in sperm and egg.  Some can cause cancer. 
be reduced to as low a level as is 
Substances 
drugs 
reasonably practical.  Assessment of risk 
Hazardous 
should look particularly at preparation of 
to Health 
the drug for use (pharmacists, nurses), 
Regulations 
administration of the drug, and disposal of 
1999. 
waste (chemical and human). Those who 
are trying to conceive or are pregnant or 
breastfeeding should be fully informed of 
the reproductive hazard HSE Guidance 
Note MS21 Precautions for the sofa 
handling of cytotoxic drugs gives guidance 
on hazards and avoidance/reduction of 
risk. 
Chemical 
HSE Guidance Note EH40: Occupational 
Take special precautions to prevent skin 
Control of 
agents of 
exposure limits contains tables of inhalation 
contact.  Where possible use engineering 
Substances 
known and 
exposure limits for certain hazardous substances. 
methods to control exposure in preference  Hazardous 
dangerous 
Risks will depend on the way the substance is 
to personal protective equipment.  The 
to Health 
skin 
being used as well as on its hazardous properties. 
Control of Pesticides Regulations 1986 set  Regulations 
absorption 
out general restrictions on the way that 
1999. Control of 
(includes 
pesticides can be used. 
Pesticides 
some 
Regulations 
pesticides) 
1997 
(Amended). 
Carbon 
Carbon monoxide crossing the placenta can 
HSE Guidance Note EH43: Carbon 
None specific, 
monoxide 
result in the foetus being starved of oxygen. Level 
monoxide gives guidance on risks and how  except for 
and duration of maternal exposure are important 
to control them. 
general 
factors in the effect on the foetus.  No indication 
requirements of 
that breastfed babies suffer adverse effects from 
Control of 
the mother’s exposure, to carbon monoxide, nor 
Substances 
that the mother is significantly more sensitive to 
Hazardous to 
carbon monoxide after giving birth. 
Health 
Regulations 
1999. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-8 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Chemical 
Risk 
How to avoid risk 
Other 
Agents 
legislation 
Lead and 
Occupational exposure to lead in the early 
The Approved Code of Practice Control of 
Control of Lead 
lead 
1900s, when exposure was poorly controlled, 
lead at work sets out exposure limits for 
at Work 
derivatives, 
was associated with spontaneous abortion, 
lead and maximum permissible blood 
Regulations 
in so far as 
stillbirth and infertility.  More recent studies 
lead levels for workers who are 
1998. 
they are 
associate low-level lead exposure form 
exposed to lead to such a degree that 
capable of 
environmental sources before the baby is born 
they are subject to medical surveillance. 
with mild decreases in intellectual performance 
being 
Once pregnancy is confirmed, women 
in childhood.  Effects on breastfed babies of their 
who are subject to medical surveillance 
absorbed by  mothers’ lead exposure have not been studied, but  under the lead regulations will normally 
the human 
lead can enter breast mild and it is thought that the 
be suspended from work which 
organism 
nervous system of young children is particularly 
exposes them significantly to lead. 
sensitive to the toxic effects of lead. 
Work with 
Although there has been widespread anxiety 
Pregnant women do not need to stop 
Health and 
display 
about radiation emissions from display screen 
working with VDUs, but to avoid problems 
Safety (Display 
screen 
equipment and possible effects on pregnant 
caused by stress and anxiety those who 
Screen 
equipment 
women, there is substantial evidence that these 
are worried about the effects should be 
Equipment) 
(VDUs) 
concerns are unfounded. 
given the opportunity to discuss their 
Regulations 
concerns with someone adequately 
1992 
informed of current authoritative scientific 
information and advice. 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-9 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Table 2 The employability of pregnant Servicewomen - guidelines for Medical Officers 
 
a. 
Occupational Hazards To Pregnant Servicewomen- Physical Agents 
 
Agents 
Human Reproductive Hazard 
Scientific Evidence 
Recommendation for MO 
Ionising 
With high maternal exposures 
Numerous studies 
Pregnant radiologists and radiographers are 
Radiation 
only: congenital malformations, 
at a theoretical risk. However, the nationally-
especially of central nervous 
recommended exposure levels for pregnant 
system (including microcephaly 
women are generally one-tenth of the upper 
and mental retardation). With 
limits recommended for non-pregnant 
lower maternal exposures: 
workers. This should constitute sufficient 
increased incidence of 
protection for the foetus. There is not 
childhood cancers, particularly 
therefore any requirement for an MO to 
leukaemias. 
impose additional restrictions. 
Non-
Congenital malformations, 
There exists one import study3 of 
MO should restrict pregnant 
Ionising 
perinatal 
physiotherapists who had used 
physiotherapists from all duties involving 
Radiation -
deaths. 
short-wave therapeutic equipment 
short-wave therapeutic equipment. 
Short- 
whilst pregnant, with adverse 
Pregnant servicewomen complaining of 
Wave 
effects on their pregnancies.  
soft tissue or skeletal injuries should not be 
Equipment 
There are no known studies on 
referred by MO for any treatment involving 
the reproductive hazards of high-
short-wave therapeutic equipment. MO 
frequency radio sets (which 
should restrict pregnant servicewomen 
operate on short wavelengths), 
from all duties with Clansman HF or VHF 
but a sensible precaution would 
sets, or any other high-frequency radio 
be to avoid them in pregnancy. 
sets.  The restriction should apply to both 
transmitters and receivers. 
Non-
??Spontaneous abortion. 
In fact the electromagnetic radiation  Where advice is sought from a pregnant 
Ionising 
??Congenital malformations. 
emitted from VDUs is rarely if ever 
VDU user, MO should offer reassurance that 
Radiation -
above natural background levels, 
there is no substantiated risk. If the 
Visual 
except at the extremely low 
individual remains unconvinced or anxious, 
Display 
frequency end of the range1. The 
the MO should agree to restrict work with 
Units 
epidemiological evidence to date 
VDUs. 
(VDUs) 
does not support the suggestion 
that there is a casual relationship 
between adverse pregnancy 
outcome and VDU use . 
Tracked 
?Spontaneous abortion. 
Some studies have shown that 
As a sensible precaution, MO should restrict 
Vehicle 
?Foetal growth retardation. 
prolonged exposure to industrial 
pregnant servicewomen from any travel in 
Noise 
??Impaired hearing in offspring.  noise jeopardises the outcome of 
tracked vehicles. The same exclusion should 
pregnancy, particularly when 
apply to any travel (unless of only a few 
combined with shift work. However,  minutes’ duration) in rotary wing aircraft, i.e. 
the majority of studies have not 
helicopters. 
demonstrated such effects. 
 
The preliminary data relating to the 
Gunfire 
??Impaired hearing in offspring.  There are no known studies 
As a sensible precaution, MO should restrict 
effect of industrial noise exposure 
Noise 
demonstrating a casual relationship  pregnant servicewomen from all exposure to 
of the mother on hearing levels in 
between impulse noise and 
gunfire noise. Therefore: 
the offspring are difficult to 
damage to the foetal auditory 
 
 
interp
appa r
r e
att. 
us. It would be difficult, 
 
Pregnant servicewomen 
however, to defend a legal action 
 
should not be armed. 
against MOD alleging childhood 
 
deafness as a consequence of 
 
They should not take part in  any range 
exposure to gunfire noise in utero. 
 
duties, nor any military exercise where 
 
they are likely to be exposed at close  
 
range to small arms noise, heavy 
 
weapons noise, or pyrotechnics noise. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-10 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Agents 
Human Reproductive Hazard 
Scientific Evidence 
Recommendation for MO 
Vibration -
?Preterm labour.  
Some studies12 have shown 
As sensible precaution, MO should 
Whole- 
?Low birth weight. 
whole-body vibration to be a 
impose the following restrictions on the 
Body 
hazard in pregnancy. Moreover 
employability of pregnant 
the European Physical Agents 
servicewomen: 
(Vibration) Directive 
 
(2002/44/EC) seeks to impose 
No off-road travel in military vehicles. 
extremely conservative upper 
 
limits for the daily vibration 
No usage of fork lift trucks only limited 
exposure of employees (even 
travel (no more than a few minutes 
where not pregnant). 
duration) in rotary wing aircraft, i.e. 
helicopters. 
Vibration -
??Preterm labour. 
Although formal studies are few, 
Based on a detailed work history, MO should 
Hand- 
??Low birth weight. 
the effects on pregnancy of 
restrict prolonged usage in pregnancy of: 
Transmitted 
prolonged hand- transmitted 
 
vibration are likely to be similar to 
Pneumatic or electric power tools (e.g. 
those for whole-body vibration. 
drilling machines, power saws, 
grinders, chipping hammers). 
 
Vibrating work pieces (e.g.  mobile 
generators, compressors, pumps). 
Heavy 
?Adverse outcome of 
Some studies have shown heavy 
MO should restrict all duties involving heavy 
Lifting 
pregnancy 
lifting in pregnancy to constitute a 
lifting (e.g. movement of stores, erection of 
hazard to the foetus. 
tentage, casualty handling). This is likely to 
be a hazard in many trades. 
Long/ 
??Preterm labour. 
Some studies have suggested that 
MO should consider restricting work where 
Irregular 
??Low birth weight. 
long/irregular hours of work are a 
there is a likelihood of a pregnant 
Hours of 
hazard in pregnancy. However, 
servicewoman having to undertake 
Work 
there are also conflicting studies of 
particularly long and irregular hours of work. 
no effect with this parameter. 
Night Work 
??Adverse outcome of 
Animal studies have shown that the  As a sensible precaution, MO should restrict 
pregnancy 
foetus is adversely affected by 
all night duties where the pregnant 
inversion of the normal light/dark 
servicewoman complains of excessive 
cycle of the mother.  There are no 
fatigue resulting from night work. 
known human studies 
demonstrating a casual relationship 
between night work and damage to 
the foetus. 
Physical 
??Adverse outcome of 
In fact, maternal exercise is well-
MO should not restrict normal PT or 
Exercise 
pregnancy, 
tolerated by the foetus at least up 
adventurous training in a pregnant 
if excessive. 
to 70% of maximal exercise. 
servicewoman, unless there are clear 
The exercise should be in regular 
contraindications to physical exercise. These 
short bursts rather than arduous 
contraindications include:  
one-off efforts. A maximum 
 
 
maternal heart rate of 140 
 
acute infectious disease,  
 
beats/min is recommended. 
 
multiple pregnancy,    
Exercise should be avoided only if 
 
incompetent cervix,  
there are any adverse obstetric 
 
intrauterine growth retardation, 
history or risk factors, or a previous   
hypertension,  
history of inactivity. 
 
uterine bleeding,  
 
ruptured membranes.  
 
Pregnant servicewomen should not 
undertake BFT or CFT. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-11 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Agents 
Human Reproductive Hazard 
Scientific Evidence 
Recommendation for MO 
Trauma 
?Spontaneous abortion 
In fact the foetus is well-protected 
MO should restrict all sports in all pregnant 
within the pelvis and later by the 
servicewomen after the first trimester. 
layers of the abdominal wall and 
Military parachuting must not be undertaken 
uterus with the amniotic fluid. 
at any stage of pregnancy. MO should 
 
advise pregnant service women who work in 
However, largely for medico legal 
equine divisions (e.g. RAVC and RMP 
reasons, most sporting bodies bar 
personnel) to avoid all contact with horses 
pregnant women from participating 
on account of possible trauma. If this is 
beyond the second trimester. 
impossible, the MO should consider 
imposing a formal restriction. 
Extremes 
?Neural tube defects 
Animal studies and retrospective 
MO should advise pregnant servicewomen 
Of Heat 
data in women have shown 
to exercise during the cool part of the day, 
maternal hypothermia to be a risk 
and to ensure adequate hydration at all 
factor.  The prolonged fever (>39C 
times. Pregnant servicewomen must not 
for 3 days) cited in these reports, 
undertake CBRN training, other than in 
however, does not equate with the 
CBRN Dress Category Zero or CBRN Dress 
mild temperature changes 
Category 1. 
experienced during most 
occupational activities. 
Extremes 
?Adverse outcome of 
Some studies have shown cold to 
MO should advise pregnant servicewomen 
Of Cold 
pregnancy 
be a hazard in pregnancy. 
of the theoretical risk.  They should not 
However, there are also conflicting 
undertake any adventurous training which 
studies of no effect with this 
might entail prolonged exposure to extreme 
parameter . 
cold. During exceptionally cold weather (e.g. 
in Germany, Norway) pregnant 
servicewomen should be excused guard 
duty. 
Electrical 
?Adverse outcome of 
There is anecdotal evidence in the 
MO must assess the risk realistically. In 
Contact 
pregnancy 
obstetrical literature of low voltage 
most military employments, and with most 
(110 -220 volts) electrical shock to 
electrical equipments, there is likely to be no 
a pregnant woman having the 
danger at all to the pregnant servicewoman. 
potential for harm to the foetus, 
If a known danger of electrical hazard from 
including death. 
old or unreliable military equipment (as e.g. 
from some armoured vehicle power packs) 
exists, the MO should restrict pregnant 
servicewomen from all contact with such 
equipment. 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-12 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
b. 
 
Occupational Hazards To Pregnant Servicewomen- Biological Agents. 
 
Agents 
Human Reproductive Hazard 
Scientific Evidence 
Recommendation for MO 
Cyto-
CMV infection in pregnancy is 
Numerous studies 
MO should advise hospital personnel who 
Megalo-
associated with foetal 
are 
Virus 
hepatosplenomegaly, 
pregnant to avoid contact with known CMV 
(CMV) 
microcephaly, 
shedders 
microphthalmia, mental retardation. 
Toxoplasma  Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular 
Numerous studies 
MOs should be aware of the risk to: 
gondii 
coccidian protozoan of cats, and the 
 
cause of toxoplasmosis.  This is a 
Pregnant RAVC personnel who work in 
common infection which is frequently 
veterinary hospitals which operate on 
asymptomatic or else presents as an 
cats. 
infectious disease resembling infectious 
mononucleosis. A primary infection 
 
during early pregnancy, however, may 
Pregnant RAVC or RMP personnel 
lead to foetal infection with death of the 
who work in equine divisions 
foetus or choreoretinitis, brain damage 
(where barn cats are an essential 
with intracerebral calcification, 
part of the establishment). 
hydrocephaly, microcephaly, fever, 
 
jaundice, rash, hepatosplenomegaly and 
They should advise such personnel 
convulsions evident at birth or shortly 
accordingly, and if necessary impose a 
thereafter. 
formal restriction on any contact with cats. 
 
Maternal infection later in pregnancy results 
 
in mild or subclinical foetal disease with 
 
 
delayed manifestations, especially recurrent 
or chronic choreoretinitis. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-13 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
c.   
Occupational Hazards To Pregnant Servicewomen- Chemical Agents. 
 
Agents 
Human Reproductive Hazard 
Scientific Evidence 
Recommendation for MO 
Lead 
Reduced fertility, spontaneous 
Numerous studies. 
MO should restrict pregnant 
abortion, prematurity, stillbirth, 
servicewomen from all duties within 
neonatal death, congenital 
indoor firing ranges. 
malformations, abnormal central 
nervous system development, 
behavioural abnormalities. 
Benzene 
Vaginal bleeding, haemorrhagic 
Numerous studies. It should be 
MO should restrict pregnant 
complications of pregnancy, 
noted that petrol by law may 
servicewomen from any direct contact 
spontaneous abortion. 
contain up to 5% benzene. Diesel  with benzene or with benzene vapour, 
fuel, on the other hand, may 
even when wearing protective 
contain a variable amount of 
equipment. Pregnant women should 
benzene. Currently, the levels are  not be permitted to refuel military 
not regulated by law. 
vehicles at any time. This applies also 
to military drivers, who must not refuel 
their own vehicle if pregnant. 
Carbon 
Congenital malformations 
Carbon monoxide readily 
MO should restrict pregnant 
Monoxide 
crosses the placenta and is 
servicewomen from all duties in vehicle 
likely to cause  reduced 
parks, other than brief visits. 
foetal haemoglobin 
concentration. The potential 
for this hazard has been 
demonstrated in numerous 
studies. It should be noted 
that vehicle exhausts 
contain carbon monoxide as 
well as oxides of nitrogen 
(which are also believed to 
have an adverse effects on 
pregnancy). 
Anaesthetic  Spontaneous abortion (one and a 
Numerous retrospective studies. 
MO should restrict DMS 
Gases 
half to three fold increases). 
servicewomen who are 
 
pregnant from any exposure 
? Foetal grown retardation, 
to anaesthetic gases. This 
congenital malformation, low birth 
applies to surgeons, 
weight, stillbirth. 
anaesthetists, operating 
theatre nurses, operating 
theatre technicians, etc. 
Antimitotic 
Pregnant doctors and nurses 
Numerous studies. 
MO should restrict pregnant DMS 
(Cytotoxic) 
administering antimitotic agents 
servicewomen (including doctors, 
Drugs 
(even when doing so with extreme 
nurses, pharmacists and pharmacy 
care) have shown a significant 
technicians) from handling antimitotic 
increase in foetal loss and/or 
drugs in any form. 
congenital malformations 
Antimalarial  ?Congenital malformations 
Mefloquine is teratogenic when 
MO should not prescribe mefloquine to 
Chemoprop
administered to rats and mice 
any servicewoman 
hylaxis - 
in early gestation.  Its 
travelling to a malarious area, unless 
Mefloquine 
prophylactic use during 
there is no risk at all of pregnancy (e.g. 
human pregnancy should 
following a hysterectomy or 
therefore be avoided as a 
sterilisation). 
matter of principle. 
 
Pregnancy should also be 
avoided for 3 months after 
completing a course of 
mefloquine, on account of its long 
half- life. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-14 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Agents 
Human Reproductive Hazard 
Scientific Evidence 
Recommendation for MO 
Pesticides 
? Spontaneous abortion. 
Various studies 
Although the majority of service-
 
approved pesticides are likely 
?? Congenital malformations. 
to pose no threat at all in pregnancy, 
MO should nevertheless restrict 
pregnant servicewomen from all duties 
involving the use of pesticides. 
CS Gas 
?? Adverse outcome of 
No known studies 
As a sensible precaution, MO should 
pregnancy 
restrict pregnant servicewomen from 
any exposure to CS gas, e.g. during 
CBRN training. 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-J-15 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX K  
MUSCULOSKELETAL IN-SERVICE  
 
General 
 
1. 
Musculoskeletal (MSK) disease and injury are the most common conditions seen in Primary 
Care.  All individuals with MSK conditions whether acute or chronic are to be graded according to 
their functionality as well as bearing in mind the prognosis and the requirement for any ongoing 
medical treatment. Any surgical intervention should result in a grading of P7 MND until such time 
as the long term degree of functional impairment can be assessed. An Orthopaedic or 
Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Consultant clinical opinion may be sought to inform the 
occupational assessment. 
 
Overuse injuries 
 
2. 
These injuries are generally attributable to one of more of overuse or repetitive actions, rapid 
changes to load and/or frequency of the action. Medical grading should reflect the functional 
decrement and the need to afford protection. 
 
3. 
Appropriate modification to working practices should be implemented. The line 
management/employer should be involved in performing a risk assessment1 to consider necessary 
changes in working practices to minimise exposure to, or exclude entirely the hazard/risk. 
 
Arthropathies and collagen disorders 
 
4. 
A small minority of those with MSK conditions have inflammatory joint or collagen disorders 
(including connective tissue and vascular diseases) and these usually require referral to a 
Consultant Rheumatologist. The severity of these conditions range from mild and self-limiting to the 
immediately life threatening, and many have functional limitations. Evidence strongly suggests that 
early treatment to suppress inflammation or correct deformity retards disease progression and can 
therefore improve functional capacity, quality of life and life expectancy. Medical grade should be 
based upon treatment requirements, impact of medical treatment2 and functional restrictions. 
 
5. 
Patients on Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) will initially be graded P7 
MND and once established on treatment may be considered for upgrading to MLD by a single 
Service (single-Service) Consultant Occupational Physician.  Patients on Methotrexate, Anti-TNF 
or other novel agents with a similar side effect and/or hazard profile will usually remain P7 MND3. 
 
Amputations 
 
6. 
Whilst grading is primarily based on function when wearing a prosthesis, consideration must 
be given to the safety of the individual and others when the prosthesis is not being worn. Grading 
must also safeguard the wellbeing of the individual by avoiding further functional loss and by 
minimising degradation of the prosthesis and its points of attachment. Minor amputations with no 
functional sequellae may be graded P2 MFD; amputations normally requiring prosthetics will be 
graded no higher than P7 MLD. 
 
 
1JSP 375 ‘Management of Health and Safety in Defence’ Part 2 Volume 1 Chapter 8 Risk Assessment. Health and Safety Risk 
Assessment. 
2This includes supply and storage of medication, potential side effects, requirement for monitoring and potential to place a burden on the 
deployed medical capability. 
3Due to the complexities of drug supply, storage and administration, monitoring requirements and recurrence of the condition or 
occurrence of treatment complications in a deployed environment with the consequent load on deployed medical services. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-K-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
7. 
Generally individuals with lower limb amputations should not be considered for operational 
deployment but this should be judged on an individual basis in terms of the deployed role, their 
functional ability and the operational environment. 
 
Fractures 
 
8. 
Fractures are normally graded P7 MND whilst under treatment. Re-grading should be based 
upon functional capacity and the requirement for any ongoing treatment and rehabilitation.  
Dependant on individual functional recovery a graduated return to specific activity may be 
appropriate. Following completion of medical treatment and a period of rehabilitation, if function is 
still impaired the individual should be referred back to their treating Consultant or if available locally 
a Service Consultant. 
 
9. 
Individuals with asymptomatic metalwork in place can be graded P2 MFD. Removal of 
asymptomatic metalwork has a significant complication rate4 and should not normally be 
considered for specific occupational reasons5. 
 
10.  Stress fractures are generally caused by a sustained increased level of physical activity, 
including weight-bearing, which is greater than the pace of bone remodelling. Individuals should 
initially be graded P7 MND.  For subsequent re-grading, consideration should be given to: 
 
a. 
Evidence of a sustained return to appropriate activity. 
 
b. 
Site of the fracture. 
 
c. 
Risk of recurrence. 
 
Patients with recurrent stress fractures, particularly those affecting the femoral neck should be 
reviewed by a Service Orthopaedic Consultant. 
 
Joint replacements 
 
11.  For individuals with a joint prosthesis, functional capacity and the job demands (in terms of 
excessive stress on the prosthesis) must be considered when grading. 
 
a. 
Upper limbs.  Grading is on an individual basis. 
 
b. 
Lower limbs. 
 
(1) 
Successful hip replacement graded P3 MLD. 
 
(2) 
Hip resurfacing graded P2 MFD. 
 
(3) 
Uni-compartment knee replacement and total knee replacement should not 
normally be graded higher than P3 MLD and must have a risk assessment conducted 
by a single-Service Consultant Occupational Physician prior to operational deployment. 
 
Conditions affecting upper limb function 
 
12.  Deformities of the upper limbs including loss of part or all of a digit must be judged against 
the residual functionality and the employment of the individual. The dominance of the affected hand 
must be borne in mind, as must the ability to fire a weapon, drive and use tools as appropriate to 
the individual job. Those with osteoarthritis must be graded, on an individual basis, to minimise any 
adverse effects of their work on their condition. 
 
4Sanderson PL, Ryan W, Turner PG. Complications of metalwork removal. Injury 1992;23(1):29-30. 
5Certain specific single-Service roles my require consideration of whether the metalwork can remain e.g. clearance divers. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-K-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
Fingers and hands 
 
13.  Loss of part or all of any finger of either hand will be graded according to residual function.  
The ability to wear protective gloves, including Chemical Biological Radiation and Nuclear Personal 
Protection Equipment, and operate a weapon system is important as well as dexterity in relation to 
their Career Employment Group (CEG). Individuals may be graded P2 MFD providing they can 
maintain full function, good grip strength, and have adequate sensation to maintain safety. Partial 
loss of the thumb should be graded according to function although complete loss is normally 
graded P7 MND. 
 
Wrist 
 
14.  Significant loss of wrist function should be graded no higher than P3 MLD. A scaphoid 
fracture should remain graded P7 MND until healing is confirmed and sustained functional recovery 
demonstrated.  
 
Elbow 
 
15.  Any residual instability or loss of functional capacity is graded no higher than MLD except: 
 
a. 
Where the loss is of the last 5° - 10° of full extension which may be graded P2 MFD. 
 
b. 
Individuals with a loss of greater than 20° of pronation or supination should be graded 
no higher than MLD. 
 
c. 
Those with a varus or valgus deformity can be graded P2 MFD provided a functional 
assessment against role related and military tasks is satisfactory. 
 
Shoulder 
 
16.  Recent dislocation or symptomatic instability. Individuals with a recent dislocation or 
symptomatic instability of the shoulder should initially be graded P7 MND. Those requiring surgical 
intervention should remain P7 MND pending stabilisation and rehabilitation. If despite rehabilitation 
they have a further dislocation or functional instability, they should be P7 MND until surgery and 
rehabilitation but could be upgraded at 6 months post-surgery to P2 MFD if fully recovered. 
 
17.  First dislocation. The individual may be graded P2 MFD at 6 months provided that:  
 
a. 
Completed adequate rehabilitation. 
 
b. 
No further symptoms. 
 
c. 
Negative apprehension test. 
 
d. 
Does not require surgery. 
 
Clavicle 
 
18.  Healed clavicular fractures. Individuals may be graded P2 MFD after 3-6 months provided 
that: 
 
a. 
Full weight-bearing is possible. 
 
b. 
The pressure from load bearing and equipment such as webbing gives no pain. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-K-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3 link to page 165  
 
 
19.  Chronic non-union or painful mal-union. Individuals should be graded no higher than 
MLD. 
 
20.  Excision of the lateral end of the clavicle. Individuals following excision of the lateral end 
of the clavicle leaving the coracoid and trapezoid parts of the coraco-clavicular ligament intact may 
be graded P2 MFD after review by a Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon to confirm full function. 
 
Sterno-clavicular or acromio-clavicular dislocations 
 
21.  Sterno-clavicular or acromio-clavicular dislocation should initially be graded no higher than 
P3 MLD. Subsequent re-grading to P2 MFD may be considered depending on functional capacity 
and risk of recurrence. 
 
Other Conditions 
 
22.  Other conditions, including those of the cervical and/or thoracic spine, causing restriction of 
function or pain are graded according to treatment requirements, functional capacity and the 
demands of employment. 
 
Conditions affecting locomotion 
 
Low Back Pain (LBP) 
 
23.  Individuals should normally be graded no higher than MLD with the following conditions: 
 
a. 
Persistent or recurrent LBP. 
 
b. 
Sciatica. 
 
c. 
Connective tissue disorders. 
 
d. 
Arthropathies of the lumbo-sacral spine. 
 
24.  LBP requiring surgical or invasive pain management intervention should be graded P7 MND. 
Subsequent re-grading must consider the risk exacerbation or recurrence on return to military 
activities and should be based upon: 
 
a. 
Functional capacity.  
 
b. 
The requirement for any ongoing treatment. 
 
c. 
The requirement for any ongoing rehabilitation. 
 
d. 
The impact of medication. 
 
25.  LBP may be associated with shock loading and whole body vibration and where this is 
suspected, appropriate modification to working practices should be implemented. The line 
manager/employer should be involved in performing risk assessment to consider necessary 
changes to working practices1. 
 
Hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, hammer toes and clawed feet 
 
26.  The symptomatic development of these conditions will result in re-grading depending upon: 
 
a. 
The severity of symptoms. 
 
b. 
Ability to wear Service or protective footwear. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-K-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
c. 
Ability to undertake CEG tasks. 
 
Medical grading following treatment is dependent on the functional outcome. 
 
Loss of toes 
 
27.  Loss of the terminal phalanx of the great toe with no residual pain and full functionality can be 
graded P2 MFD. Those with total or complete loss of other toes may be P2 MFD subject to the 
outcome of: 
 
a. 
Ability to wear Service or protective footwear. 
 
b. 
Ability to undertake CEG tasks. 
 
Flat Feet 
 
28.  Flat feet do not require re-grading unless there is a history of discomfort whilst walking, 
standing or running. Those with mobile flat feet, i.e. those who can form an arch standing on tip-
toes, only require re-grading if they are symptomatic. 
 
Ankle joint 
 
29.  Those with limitation of movement are initially graded no higher than MLD in accordance with 
their remaining function. Consideration should be given to the risk of exacerbation or recurrence on 
return to military activities and subsequent re-grading should be based upon: 
 
a. 
Functional capacity. 
 
b. 
The requirement for any ongoing treatment/rehabilitation. 
 
c. 
The impact of medication. 
 
Individuals who have had surgical treatment may be graded P2 MFD post rehabilitation if: 
 
a. 
There is a good level of function. 
 
b. 
No residual pain. 
 
c. 
No need for protection from future re-injury or complications. 
 
Knee Joint 
 
30.  Knee conditions requiring surgical or invasive pain management intervention should normally 
be graded P7 MND. Consideration should be given to the risk of exacerbation, re-injury or 
recurrence on return to military activities and subsequent re-grading should be based upon: 
 
a. 
 Functional capacity. 
 
b. 
The requirement for any ongoing treatment/rehabilitation. 
 
c. 
The impact of medication. 
 
31.  Cruciate and collateral ligaments. Personnel who have symptomatic instability of their 
cruciate or collateral ligaments of the knee joint should normally be graded no higher than P3 MLD. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-K-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
a. 
Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. If the anterior cruciate ligament 
reconstruction has been successful and there is no evidence of additional intra-articular 
damage, then personnel who have returned to full function may be considered for re-grading 
to P2 MFD, following discussion with single-Service Occupation Physician. 
 
b. 
Anterior cruciate ligament repair. Those individuals who have had a successful 
anterior cruciate ligament repair should normally be graded no higher than P3 MLD. 
 
c. 
Deficient anterior cruciate ligament. Those individuals who have deficient anterior 
cruciate ligament but who have a clinically stable knee joint confirmed by a Service specialist 
in orthopaedics may be considered for a re-grading to P2 MFD. 
 
Asymptomatic incidental findings 
 
32.  Asymptomatic spina bifida occulta, failure of fusion, spondylosis and spondylolisthesis which 
is detected incidentally only on imaging does not require re-grading. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-K-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX L  
PSYCHIATRY IN-SERVICE 
 
Special conditions affecting mental capacity  
 
1. 
Mental capacity is dependent not only on the innate mental ability of a Service Person, but 
also on their capacity to use that ability. During most medical examinations, no formal clinical 
assessment of mental capacity is practicable or required. Where this area is being reviewed 
following completion of basic training, such as after physical illness or injury, full psychometric 
testing by a clinical psychologist should be undertaken. Any changes in JMES should only be 
conducted following the above and on advice from a consultant neurologist, consultant psychiatrist, 
clinical psychologist or other recognised subject matter expert in the field. 
 
Special conditions affecting psychological stability  
 
2. 
Requirements to be considered for Medically Fully Deployable (MFD) status1.  Service 
life places great psychological demands on individuals. Individuals with underlying psychiatric 
conditions may be at increased risk of exacerbating their condition during military service. 
Therefore, it is important to consider the following factors when grading individuals as MFD: 
 
a. 
Must be fit to deploy at short notice to any location world-wide, and serve as directed 
by Command. 
 
b. 
There must be a high degree of certainty that they will be able to cope with heightened 
levels of stress, and maintain sufficient psychological stability to remain functional and 
effective. 
 
c. 
They must be able to deploy away from their support network for prolonged periods, in 
a largely self-reliant capacity, without becoming an administrative burden or operational risk 
due to psychological instability. 
 
d. 
They must be able to safely operate weapon systems on operations and in training. 
 
e. 
They must be able to deploy without additional special support requirements (i.e. JMES 
E1 or E2). 
  
f. 
Relapse of symptoms must not pose a risk of high risk behaviours that may present 
significant problems in theatre, e.g. serious self-harm, violence or unpredictable behaviour 
that may endanger others.  
 
3. 
General considerations for awarding a JMES. In deciding on the JMES for a psychological 
condition the clinician should consider the following factors: 
 
a. 
The level of hardship individuals are likely to encounter (temperature, noise, nutrition, 
hydration, arduous physical activities, sleep disturbance, loss of social support etc). 
 
b. 
The level of medical support required (immediacy, availability, skill mix, resources).   
 
c. 
The duties to be performed (likelihood of exposure to traumatic events, burden of 
working hours, likelihood of new/novel tasking requiring adaptation, leadership role etc) and 
the person’s previous experience of, or training for, these duties. 
 
 
1 Further details on definition and award in JSP 950 Leaflet 6-7-7 Section 2 Annex A and sS policy. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-L-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
d. 
The current welfare of individuals and their personal support networks (current 
relationship difficulties, financial difficulties and legal problems etc) and the ability to 
communicate with that network. 
 
e. 
The degree to which the current and anticipated symptoms affect function; particularly 
how symptoms affect concentration, sleep, judgement, impulsivity, attitude, morale and 
motivation.  
 
f. 
The risk and speed of relapse, potential for incapacitation by a relapse and the 
responsiveness of the condition to treatment. 
 
g. 
The Service Person’s degree of insight about their condition and its effect on the team 
around them and the operational tasks. 
 
h. 
Clear consideration should be given to the need for performing safety critical tasks, e.g. 
in aviation-related roles, that may confer a lower tolerance of risk and require higher 
assurances of stability.  
 
4. 
Care pathways.  In mental health, care pathways can be very lengthy and in deciding a 
permanent JMES the length of the care pathway is a secondary consideration, and it may be 
appropriate to set a permanent JMES before completion of treatment. Grading decisions will take 
into account whether the patient has received an appropriate evidence-based level of care, 
requires further treatment, prognosis and the likelihood of recovery to an employable status.  
Treatment provided should be at least equivalent to the prevailing standard in the National Health 
Service. Single Service authorities dictate assessment points in this regard and final grading is the 
remit of Single Service Medical Boards.  
 
5. 
In specialist groups such as aircrew, divers, submariners and Special Forces, this policy 
does not take precedence over the specific occupational policies that govern these specialist 
areas.  
 
Common mental disorders (including adjustment disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, 
phobias, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and eating disorders) 
 
6. 
Common Mental Disorders (CMD) form the bulk of the clinical activity within the Defence 
Mental Health Services.  
 
7. 
Stepped care. Patients requiring psychological therapy are stepped through levels of care 
according to need.  
 
a. 
Initial interventions. Self-help material and resources with no formal 
psychotherapeutic intervention by the clinician, other than to provide the material and 
signpost the patient to the appropriate resources, including formal referral to mental health 
services. This is commonly the step conducted in non-specialist mental health settings like 
Primary Care.  
 
b. 
Low intensity therapy. Guided self-help where a patient is assisted by a clinician, 
usually on a weekly basis, to complete a psychotherapy programme. Low intensity therapy is 
often standardised, of shorter duration, less intensive and aimed at mild to moderate 
presentations.  
 
c. 
High intensity therapy. Individualised therapy, usually by a qualified therapist in the 
modality, using an individual approach and more intensive treatment. High intensity therapy 
is generally aimed at moderate to severe presentations or where no standardised low 
intensity therapy exists for the condition (e.g. PTSD).   
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-L-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
d. 
Complex case management and specialist psychotherapy. Severe and complex 
conditions that require long-term care from multiple professionals. Patients requiring this 
level of care are likely to be significantly functionally limited and should normally be 
considered unfit for military service.   
 
8. 
In setting this policy “NICE guidance CG123: Common mental health problems: identification 
and pathways to care” May 2011 (reviewed August 2018)” introduces the stepped care model for 
CMD. This is mirrored in the guidelines for individual disorders, and these are delivered within the 
tenets of providing lower level, least intrusive interventions first, then escalating as required 
through the steps. The specific guidelines also specify a number of sessions of intervention at each 
level of care, which differs slightly between conditions but are broadly comparable: 
 
a. 
Initial interventions.   Session limit does not apply. 
 
b. 
Low intensity therapy.   6-10 sessions. 
 
c. 
High intensity therapy.   12-30 sessions.  
 
d. 
Complex case management and specialist psychotherapy.   On-going, long-term 
care. 
 
9. 
Temporary grading for CMD. Patients undergoing stepped care for CMD should normally 
be graded MND to allow them to access treatment with appropriate occupational restrictions to 
manage access to treatment, address risks (to self and others), accommodate psychotropic 
medication and enable the care pathway as required. However, patients undergoing initial 
intervention in Primary Care may not need to be graded MND and pragmatism and an individual 
occupational assessment should guide clinicians, including consideration of any psychotropic 
medication the patient may be taking. For patient undergoing low intensity interventions and above, 
there may also be rare, individual cases where MND grading may not be appropriate, but in such 
cases a grading discussion with an occupational health physician or Service2 consultant 
psychiatrist represents best practice. On successful completion of treatment and a period of 
stability of not less than one month, Service Persons may be upgraded (please see stability 
requirements for other specific conditions below).  
 
10.  Permanent grading for CMD.  Permanent grading is the sole remit of Single Service 
Medical Boards, taking account of recommendations by specialist clinicians as required.  As a 
general rule, patients should be awarded a permanent grading if:  
 
a. 
Required by sS policy. 
 
b. 
The stepped care pathway has been completed. See Para 3 for considerations to be 
reviewed in defining a permanent grade. 
 
c. 
Patients requiring long-term treatment with psychotropic medications should be graded 
no higher than MLD with appropriate restrictions. 
 
d. 
Service Personnel should be graded permanently MND if, after treatment, one or more 
of the following criteria are met: 
 
(1) 
They have had the maximum of 12-30 high intensity sessions (if appropriate) of 
an acceptable quality and continuity (which may or may not have been preceded by 6-
10 sessions of low intensity therapy) and the condition remains unresolved.  
 
 
2 This term encompasses all consultant psychiatrists working for the MOD, uniformed or civilian.  
Return to Contents Page 
5-L-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
(2) 
They have had adequate trials of 2 psychotropic medications appropriate to their 
condition (providing the patient opted for this treatment), and has not demonstrated an 
adequate therapeutic response. This is a significant marker of treatment-resistance.  
 
(3) 
Their condition and social environment is so unstable that it prohibits meaningful 
progress or engagement with psychotherapy after 6 months of attempts at stabilisation, 
regardless of the stage they have reached in the stepped care process.   
 
(4) 
If, in the opinion of a service consultant psychiatrist, the risk of relapse on 
exposure to the operational environment is unacceptably elevated. 
 
Conditions normally incompatible with military service 
 
11.  Psychosis. Service Persons with psychotic illness, whether recurrent or not, are normally 
graded permanently MND. The only clear exception is a single, brief psychotic episode of less than 
7 days’ duration where there is a clear, definable organic aetiology (e.g. delirium, drug side effect 
etc). In these exceptional cases the patient should remain symptom free for 6 months off all 
psychotropic medications before being considered for a deployable medical category. 
 
12.  Bipolar affective disorder. Service Persons with bipolar affective disorder (Types I and II) 
are normally are normally graded permanently MND.  
 
13.  Personality disorders. Service Persons with these disorders are normally graded 
permanently MND.  
 
14.  Recurrent CMD. Patients who re-present with a CMD within 3 years of completing a stepped 
care pathway would are normally graded permanently MND if they fail to respond to maintenance 
medication and/or 6 booster sessions of high intensity therapy. Exceptions in these circumstances 
are individuals that can be offered sufficient occupational protection to minimise recurrence risks, 
whilst still being able to fulfil an employable and/or deployable function for their Service.  
 
15.  Lithium therapy. Service Persons on lithium therapy should normally be graded MND due to 
the risks associated with this medication and the conditions it is used for. However, at the 
discretion of the Single Service Medical Board, retention may be considered in a MLD category.   
 
16.  Recurrent and/or persistent self-harm. A single episode of self-harm3 in response to a 
stressful event does not in itself render an individual unfit for military service. However, Service 
persons with a history of 2 or more episodes, even with clear stressors, should normally be 
considered unfit for military service, as repetition indicates a substantial risk of further repetition 
and, of more concern, a significant increase in risk of later death by suicide. However, there are 
exceptional cases where Service persons with a second episode of self-harm may be fit for further 
military Service, for example an individual with a long period of stability in between episodes. In 
such cases, retention can be considered but this should normally be supported by a 
comprehensive risk assessment from a MOD Consultant Psychiatrist, including an assessment for 
any underlying pre-disposing conditions. If multiple attempts occur over a short period of time 
(weeks rather than months), and can clearly be ascribed to the same single stressful event or 
occur whilst the patient is still undergoing treatment or waiting for therapeutic intervention to 
commence, then for the purposes of this policy, these may be regarded as a single episode.   
 
17.  Repeated or prolonged inpatient care. Due to the likelihood of relapse and long-term 
illness, Service Persons requiring repeated (3 or more) or a single prolonged (longer than 56 days) 
inpatient admission to a mental health ward are normally graded permanently MND. 
 
 
3 Self-harm refers to an intentional act of self-poisoning or self-injury, irrespective of the motivation or apparent purpose of the act and is 
an expression of emotional distress. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-L-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
18 
Substance misuse disorders requiring detoxification. Service Persons requiring more 
than 2 episodes of inpatient detoxification or more than 4 detoxifications overall (inpatient and 
community) for dependent use of any substance are normally graded permanently MND. The 
Executive management of substance misuse is covered under the relevant single Service policies.   
Substance misuse disorders4 
 
19.  Most Service Persons considered as part of this policy will misuse alcohol, but it can be 
applied to all psycho-active substance misuse5. Service Persons who present with substance 
misuse disorders should be graded MND and offered 6-10 sessions of low intensity therapy and/or 
a maximum of 12-30 sessions of high intensity therapy (if appropriate) of an evidenced-based 
therapeutic modality depending on severity and need. Treatment is independent of any required 
disciplinary processes which may run concurrently. 
 
20.  If treatment is completed and the Service Person continues to misuse the substance but is 
not dependent on the substance, then it is a Chain of Command responsibility to manage them 
through the normal administrative routes. Grading is dependent upon functional ability to perform 
all duties6.  
 
21.  If the Service Person has a recognised dependence syndrome, they should normally be 
graded MND. 
 
22.  Clinicians may need to disclose illicit substance misuse to Command if the public interest test 
or the requirement to protect others is met, and this is incumbent on clinicians to do in cases of risk 
that needs to be mitigated by command. This same approach holds true for these risks that are 
encountered in any condition in this policy. If the clinician considers this necessary the clinician 
should seek consent to disclose, take account of GMC guidance on confidentiality and seek senior 
guidance as required. Disclosure without consent may be necessary. 
 
Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) 
 
23.  ADHD has a high association with co-morbid CMD and substance misuse, and in cases 
where a CMD or substance misuse is present, the occupational management should follow that of 
the CMD or substance misuse disorder as detailed above.  
 
24.  Service Persons with ADHD, in the absence of a CMD or substance misuse disorder, are fit 
for deployable service. Service Persons with ADHD tend not to be adversely affected by a rapidly 
changing, high-tempo and challenging working pattern or environment, such as operations. They 
usually remain on stimulant medication long-term as normally it improves functioning (from a lower 
but functional threshold); long-acting preparations are preferable in the deployed setting. However, 
a disruption in stimulant medication is unlikely to have an operational impact in individuals with a 
functional pre-medication threshold, and there is no withdrawal syndrome. If a decision is made to 
continue the medication during a deployment, which is reasonable to do, it is best practice to test 
functioning without stimulant medication on an appropriate UK-based exercise to simulate the 
disruption of stimulant supply on operations to confirm functionality. Service Persons who have 
been stable on stimulant medication for 6 months can be graded MLD. 
 
Transgender personnel7 
 
25.  The grading of all transgender Service Persons requires consideration of their mental health, 
surgical/medical treatment and follow-up requirements. 
 
 
4 Substance misuse is an over-arching term that includes both harmful use of a substance(s) and dependence on it. 
5 https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/defence-mental-health-statistics-index  
6 Reference should be made to single Service substance misuse policies. 
7 Further information can be found in JSP 889 'Policy for the Recruitment and Management of Transgender Personnel in the Armed 
Forces'. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-L-5 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
26.  Medical grading of Service Persons who do not wish to undergo hormonal or surgical 
gender confirmation
. Service Persons may remain MFD unless, as a result of physical or mental 
health issues that affect deployability, a Service psychiatrist, psychologist or occupational 
physician advises otherwise. 
 
27.  Medical grading of serving personnel wishing to undergo hormonal or surgical gender 
confirmation
. Initially, Service Persons are to be graded MND.  MLD and MFD may be considered 
once their condition is stable, taking into account their on-going medical support needs and 
compatibility with military environments.  
 
Psychiatric Reports for Medical Boards 
 
28.  There is no absolute requirement for a grading recommendation or report from a Service 
consultant psychiatrist when awarding a permanent JMES.  owever, it is best practice for such 
reports to be prepared in order for the determining clinician to have the best possible information to 
inform the JMES. Psychiatric reports submitted for Medical Boards must follow the format detailed 
at Appendix 1. A psychiatric report must be provided to a Medical Board if requested.  
 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-L-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 
 

link to page 3  
 
 
Appendix 1 
 
STANDARD PSYCHIATRIC REPORT FOR MEDICAL BOARDS 
 
 
SERVICE CONSULTANT PSYCHIATRIST REPORT FOR THE MEDICAL 
BOARD 

Patient name:  
Rank:  
Service Number:  
 
Principal psychiatric 
 
condition(s) affecting 
fitness for service 
Brief summary of the salient   
features of the case 
 
 
 
 
Does the patient have a 
Yes 
No 
Comment: 
condition that is normally 
 
incompatible with 
employment in the military 
as per JSP 950, Annex L to 
Lft 6-7-7(5)? 
If appropriate, did the 
Yes 
No 
N/A 
Comment: 
patient have access to 6-10 
 
sessions of low intensity 
therapy if they did not go 
directly to high intensity 
therapy? 
If appropriate, did the 
Yes 
No 
N/A 
Comment: 
patient have access to 12-
 
30 high intensity therapy 
sessions if appropriate? 
If appropriate, did the 
Yes 
No 
N/A 
Comment: 
patient have access to at 
 
least 2 adequate trials of 
psychotropic medications 
appropriate to their 
condition? 
Were the patient’s condition  Yes 
No 
N/A 
Comment: 
and/or social environment 
 
so unstable that they were 
unable to adequately 
engage in treatment over 6 
months or longer? If yes 
please comment.  
In your opinion, did the 
Yes 
No 
Comment: 
patient engage adequately 
 
with treatment offered? If 
no, please comment. 
In your opinion, will the 
Yes 
No 
Comment: 
patient reach deployable 
 
fitness in the next 6 
months? Please comment 
on prognosis either way. 
In your opinion, will the 
Yes 
No 
Comment: 
patient reach deployable 
 
fitness again in the 
foreseeable future? Please 
comment on prognosis and 
timeframe. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-L-A1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
What are your 
 
recommendation for the 
permanent occupational 
limitations that should apply 
to this patient? It is the role 
of the board to consider 
how these translate into a 
permanent JMES.  
Name of service 
 
psychiatrist completing 
report: 
Date of report 

 
 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-L-A2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX M  
DENTAL AND ORO-MAXILLOFACIAL IN-SERVICE 
 
General 
 
1. 
Dental Fitness is categorised using the NATO Dental Fitness Classification system1 (DF 
Cat).  Further policy direction on the United Kingdom Armed Forces interpretation of NATO DF 
Cats is available at JSP 950 2-23-1 ‘Primary Dental Care Policy’. NATO DF Cat reports on the 
dental health of the force, quantifies dental risk and aids the allocation of dental resources. There 
are circumstances when managing dental disease or other oral pathology is not possible within the 
deployed primary care environment and would adversely affect operational effectiveness.  
 
2. 
The JMES grading should be reviewed if the Service Person’s oral health status adversely 
affects their employability or overall health if deployed, or their oral care needs would be difficult to 
deliver in the deployed environment2. This will allow the Service Person to access appropriate care 
in a timely manner, be returned to optimal health and not be placed at risk of avoidable strategic 
medical evacuation. The Service Person is to be graded according the frequency of the symptoms, 
requirement for medication and medical support, and degree of functional impairment. 
 
JMES Review 
 
3. 
Defence Primary Healthcare (DPHC) Medical Officers (MO) are able to change the JMES of 
Service Personnel based on advice and referral from a Dental Officer (DO). Communication of 
Occupational Dental and Oro-Maxillofacial JMES grading advice to the MO by a DO or Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) Consultant should be undertaken by a formal FMed 7 referral letter.  
The advice should include the nature of the condition and how it can impact on deployability and 
employability as defined in Section 2 The Joint Medical Employment Standard. Primary Care 
Medical Practitioners can seek advice from DMS Dental Officers via the DPHC Directory or, if 
appropriate via military OMFS Consultants3. 
 
Dental treatment need 
 
4. 
In the majority of cases of dental disease or oral pathology military personnel will be 
classified as NATO Cat 3 and will be so for short periods only, until they receive the appropriate 
dental treatment. In these circumstances medical downgrading is not necessary. For individuals 
likely to be held at NATO Cat 3 for extended periods4 or Service Personnel held at a high state of 
readiness5, consideration must be given to changing JMES to MLD or MND. Assessment of JMES 
must consider the advice of a suitably qualified dental practitioner with regard to treatment need 
and duration. 
 
5. 
The treating dentist is to consider referral for review of JMES in the following circumstances:  
 
a. 
Complex surgical intervention. Cases referred to secondary care are likely to require 
JMES MND. 
 
b. 
Dental phobia6. Service Personnel who become reliant on conscious sedation or have 
a phobic disorder that will not allow treatment within primary dental care should be graded no 
 
1 AMedP-4.4 STANAG 2466 
2 Examples include 1: Access to care 2. Treatment tolerance 3. Complexity of treatment beyond GDP 4. Management of treatment 
morbidity. 
3 Service OMFS Consultants can be contacted by liaising with the DCA OMFS (contact details cited in the DCA list available here). 
4 Beyond single Service restricted duties timeframes. 
5 R1 to R5. 
6 Dental phobia is a complex anxiety disorder, with the dental setting acting as an identifiable stressor.  For the majority of Service 
Personnel desensitisation, behavioural strategies and pain control can facilitate effective treatment within primary dental care.  
Conscious sedation should be considered when behavioural strategies are contra-indicated due to surgical complexity or have failed. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-M-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
higher than MLD. In consultation with JSP 950 Part 1 Lft 6-7-7 Section 5 Annex L Psychiatry 
Service Personnel with an anxiety disorder should be referred to Department of Community 
Mental Health. 
 
c. 
Needle phobia. Service Personnel with an established history of needle phobia should 
be managed in accordance with JSP 950 Part 1 Lft 6-7-7 Section 5 Annex L Psychiatry. 
 
d. 
Recurring pericoronitis. Service Personnel with an established history of recurring 
pericoronitis who are awaiting surgical removal of third molars are to be graded according 
the frequency of the symptoms, requirement for medication and degree of functional 
impairment. MOD policy on JSP 950 Lft 2-23-1 Annex H Managing Third Molars should be 
consulted.  
 
e. 
Suspected malignancy. Service Personnel with an oral lesion with any suspicion of 
malignancy7 are to be graded MND until the nature of the lesion is established. 
 
f. 
Orofacial pain. Service Personnel suffering from: 
 
(1) 
Orofacial pain that does not improve or resolve within one month of provision of 
treatment must be reviewed by a specialist clinician. Grading should be checked to 
ensure that it allows attendance at this specialist review.   
 
(2) 
Diagnosed recurrent orofacial pain8 should be graded according the frequency of 
the symptoms, requirement for medication, degree of functional impairment and the 
nature of trigger factors. 
 
6. 
Specialist Employment Groups. Service Personnel in specialist employment groups (e.g. 
aviation, diving, parachutists, and submarines) and air passengers can be exposed to the risks of 
barotrauma and barodontalgia9. Special consideration should be given to these groups of Service 
Personnel when diagnosing and treating dental pathology. In the majority of cases this will be via a 
short term restriction of duties.    
 
7. 
Oro-antral communication. The healing and repair of oro-antral communications is 
significantly hampered by barotrauma. Service Personnel with suspected or confirmed oro-antral 
communication are to be protected from activities which expose them to the risk of barotrauma 
until the condition has resolved. In the majority of cases this will be via a short term restriction of 
duties and will not need a JMES change. A formal communication (Oro-Antral Fistula) will require 
grading no higher than MLD whilst awaiting repair. 
 
8. 
Medication. Guidance on medication and award of JMES for Aircrew, Military Divers and 
Operations Support personnel (Air Battlespace Managers and Air Traffic Controllers) can be found 
at: 
 
a. 
Chapter 12 Standards for diving and hyperbaric exposure - medication and drugs:  
BRd 1750A Handbook of Naval Medical Standards  
 
b. 
Leaflet 5-19 Drugs and aircrew:  
AP1269A RAF Manual of Assessment of Medical Fitness 
 
9. 
Local Anaesthetic. Local anaesthetic has the potential to mask post-operative dental pain, 
therefore Aircrew, Military Divers and Operations Support personnel (Air Battlespace Managers 
and Air Traffic Controllers) are not to control aircraft or dive, within 12 hours (see above) of 
 
7 https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/NG12/chapter/1-Recommendations-organised-by-site-of-cancer. 
8 Examples: TMJDS, Atypical Facial Pain, Trigeminal Neuralgia. 
9 Toothache caused by changes in atmospheric pressure. Contained apical pathology can cause significant barodontalgia during ascent 
when the gas of putrefaction leads to distraction of the tooth.    
Return to Contents Page 
5-M-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
receiving local anaesthetic10. If post-operative pain continues Service Personnel are to extend the 
‘no-fly/dive’ period and present to a Dental/Medical Officer for further evaluation.   
 
10.  Analgesia. Moderate or severe pain is usually associated with a limitation of physical 
function, psychological distress or cognitive distraction. For these reasons, moderate or severe 
pain is incompatible with flying / controlling, diving and other safety critical duties. Medical and 
Dental Officers should apply guidance at Paragraph 7 on paracetamol, NSAID and Opioid use. 
 
Facial fractures 
 
11.  Service Personnel with facial fractures are normally graded MND whilst under treatment. 
 
a.  Internal fixation. Service Personnel with no symptoms or signs from their in situ 
internal fixation can be graded MFD. Removal of pathology free internal fixation is 
unnecessary and should not normally be considered unless for specific occupational 
reasons11. 
 
b.  Facial fractures and sport. Service Personnel who have sustained a facial fracture 
should be placed on limited physical duties for 6 weeks12. All contact sports, e.g. boxing 
and rugby football, must be avoided for 3 months and appropriate JMES and MedLim 
awarded.   
 
Orthodontic Treatment 
 
12.  Service Personnel undergoing orthodontic treatment will not normally require a JMES change.  
Orthodontic treatment within the Services may be suspended, by making the appliance passive, to 
facilitate a change in the Service Person’s employment /deployment. 
 
Orthognathic surgery 
 
13.  Service Personnel who are undergoing orthognathic surgery need a prolonged period of pre-
surgical orthodontics13. Whilst orthodontic treatment does not normally require changing of their 
JMES, the pre-surgical orthodontic component of orthognathic treatment requires Consultant level 
support normally delivered in the UK. Extended overseas employment can challenge treatment 
progression and therefore the Service Person should be graded MLD to allow a MRA to be 
conducted. A minimum of L3 E3 MES codes and Medical Limitation “5501 to be made available for 
regular medical reviews”
, should be applied. This highlights to single-Service manning authorities 
that consideration should be given prior to overseas assignments and deployments. 
 
14.  Once the surgical plan and timings are confirmed, the Service Person is to be graded MND 
until no less than 3 months after confirmation of fracture healing. 
 
Head and neck tumours 
 
15.  Service Personnel undergoing treatment for head and neck tumours are to be graded MND.  
Service Personnel with a history of head and neck malignancy require regular review for a period 
of up to 5 years and are to be graded MND until the recall period is annual or less frequently. 
 
 
10 Except when directed by a Military Aviation/Diving Medicine Examiner.  
11 Certain specific single-Service roles may require consideration of whether the metalwork can remain e.g. clearance divers.   
12 Current practice of British Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons: advice regarding length of time to refrain from contact sports after 
treatment of zygomatic fractures S Mahmood, DJW Keith, GE Lello British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2002 Dec; Vol. 40, 
Issue 6: p488–490. 
13 This may last up to two years. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-M-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3 link to page 122  
 
 
ANNEX N  
OTHER CONDITIONS IN-SERVICE  
 
Blood disorders 
1. 
The identification of blood disorders should prompt re-grading to MND Temp. Permanent 
grading is dependent on the outcome of investigations. 
2. 
Sickle Cell Trait Sickle Cell Trait. When grading personnel with SCT, the impact of 
physiological challenges inherent in their employment and in the deployed environment must be 
considered. SCT is not a bar to ongoing Service and personnel with SCT are to be given an E2 
marker. Individuals with SCT should be advised on the risk of External Collapse Associated with 
Sickle Cell Trait [ECAST], exertional rhabdomyolysis and the increased risk of problems at high 
altitude. Hypoxia and altitude1 may influence the risk of incapacitation / ECAST. Medical assessors 
should refer to AP1269A and Aviation Medicine trained specialists where appropriate. With respect 
to diving, SME (INM) input should be sought on a case-by-case basis. Personnel with SCT who 
have had an episode of ECAST, or rhabdomyolysis should be assessed on an individual basis by a 
Consultant in Occupational Medicine. 
3. 
Anti-coagulation therapy. Personnel who require anti-coagulation therapy (including 
warfarin and direct oral anti-coagulants) are to be MND while therapy is started and stabilised. 
Once stable, where therapy is to continue for 12 months or longer (i.e. for the foreseeable future), 
Consultant Occupational Medicine input is required in order to advise on both long-term 
employability and deployability. Such personnel will normally be MND, but MLD may be awarded 
by exception. In all cases there is need to consider:  
a.  Stability of the underlying condition and medication (in terms of the need for 
monitoring/dose adjustment). 
b.  Potential for blunt/penetrating injury during the course of any future 
employment/deployment (including sporting and adventurous training activities), and 
subsequent increased risk of bleeding complications, 
c.  Access to NHS level of secondary care in the case of injury, noting the requirement for 
CT head within 8 hrs of head injury2. 
In all cases, personnel requiring anti-coagulation are UNFIT contact sports. 
Blood Borne Viruses (BBVs) 
4. 
The following disorders require re-grading in line with clinical condition, viral loads and 
treatment requirements. Service Personnel (SP) in specialist employment groups (e.g. aviation, 
diving, and submarines) should refer to the extant regulations for those groups3. Healthcare 
Workers must have standard and additional health checks and be graded in accordance with JSP 
950 Part 1 Leaflet 6-8-1 Defence Medical Services Uniformed and Civilian Healthcare Workers: 
Tuberculosis and Blood-Borne Viruses Screening and Management. 
Prior to acceptance, current 
SP wishing to undertake an internal transfer to the Defence Medical Services (DMS) should be 
screened in accordance with Section 4 Annex N Other Conditions Pre-Entry. 
5. 
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection 
a. 
SP found to be infected with HIV should be initially graded MND for investigation and 
 
1 Where participation in adventurous training (see JSP 419 ‘Adventurous training in the UK Armed Forces’) presents a particular risk to 
personnel with SCT (i.e. high altitude > 2500m or diving) they should have an individual assessment. Participants with SCT should be 
advised to seek Consultant Occupational Medicine advice from their MO in the first instance. 
2 NICE Quality Statement [QS74]: Quality statement 2: CT head scans for people taking anticoagulants (here) 
3 BRd 1750A Handbook of Naval Medical Standards AP 1269A Royal Air Force Manual of Medical Fitness.  
Return to Contents Page 
5-N-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
initiation of treatment. A period of up to 12 months may be required to assess the response 
to treatment and the stability of CD4 count and viral load on treatment. 
b. 
SP on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) who achieve a satisfactory CD4 
count4 and a viral load which is maintained consistently below 50 copies per ml for 6 months 
are to be graded by a uniformed Occupational Medicine (OM) Consultant led medical board 
taking advice from the Military Advisor in Sexual Health and HIV Medicine (MASHH)5.  SP 
are to be graded no higher than MLD. In all cases MedLims stipulating the following must be 
awarded: 
 
(1) 
The requirement for a medical review before commencing Individual Pre-
Deployment Training (IPDT) / Deployment. 
 
(2)   The requirement for approval by a uniformed OM Consultant and MASHH 
before commencing IPDT / Deployment. 
 
(3) 
The requirement to comply with medication and for 6-monthly blood tests for 
 
viral load and 6-monthly reviews by MASHH. 
c. 
SP who do not adhere to medication or follow-up requirements, have abnormal CD4 
counts, viral loads over 50 copies per ml (repeated tests 4 weeks apart) or any signs of HIV 
related illnesses or recurrent infections are to be graded no higher than MND E3 Perm. Their 
employability is to be determined by a uniformed OM Consultant led Medical Board. 
6. 
Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and other Hepatitis Viral Infections 
 
a. 
Hepatitis B 
(1) 
SP found to be infected with hepatitis B should be initially graded MND for 
investigation and assessment for treatment. SP who are inactive carriers or who are 
treated for medical reasons and successfully maintained on long-term HBV antiviral 
therapy with a hepatitis B DNA <1000 copies/ml  may be upgraded to no higher than MLD. 
They should be subject to a uniformed OM Consultant led medical review before 
commencing IPDT / Deployment and Exercises to assess the risk of ballistic injury and 
ballistic transmission to others, and their medical support requirements in relation to the 
medical support available. 
(2) 
All other SP are to be graded by a uniformed OM Consultant led medical board 
due to the requirement for on-going healthcare and the risk of infection to other SP and 
local civilians in situations where ballistic injury may cause exposure to blood and bone 
fragments from the infected person6. SP are to be graded no higher than MND E3 
Perm. 
(3) 
Commencement of anti-viral medication for occupational reasons alone is not 
justified. 
b. 
Hepatitis C 
(1) 
SP who are diagnosed with hepatitis C should be graded MND for treatment by 
a uniformed Hepatologist where possible. Those who achieve a sustained virological 
response (undetectable hepatitis C RNA at 6 months post-treatment) can be 
upgraded MFD noting any need for further follow-up. 
(2) 
SP who do not achieve a sustained virological response are to be graded by a 
 
4 The normal range can vary according to which laboratory is reporting. CD4 counts also show physiological variability.  There has also 
been some confusion when patients have had their gradings change because they did not achieve a ‘normal CD4 count’ when they 
have actually had perfectly safe and expected CD4 counts but have shown probable diurnal variability which is indeed normal for all. 
5 MASHH On-call email:  xxx.xx@xxx.xxx On-call phone: 0121 371 2000 (and request the GUM Specialist Registrar on call). 
6 Prof Mutimer (Head UBHNHSFT Hepato-Biliary Team) agrees you cannot exclude infection whatever the viral load given ballistic 
injury. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-N-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
uniformed OM Consultant led medical board due to the transmission risk in an 
Operational theatre and potential on-going medical requirements. SP are to be graded 
no higher than MND E3 Perm. 
c. 
Other Viral Hepatitis. SP diagnosed with non-A, B or C viral hepatitis should be 
initially graded MND for investigations. Thereafter, grading should be based on the advice of 
a uniformed Hepatologist and uniformed OM Consultant where appropriate, taking into 
account potential infectivity to others, treatment and follow up requirements. 
Irradiated blood products 
7. 
SP who require irradiated blood products7 should normally be graded no higher than MND, 
as such blood products are not routinely available when deployed. RN and RAF SP may be graded 
MLD (with E4 – subject to an individual risk assessment), but only deployed/employed out of the 
UK where there is access to emergency medical care at a level equivalent to that provided in the 
UK. In addition, RN SP are limited to major overseas bases only (excludes Falklands and Diego 
Garcia). For all SP, limitations on overseas exercises and assignments will also need to be 
considered as irradiated blood products will not be available in all overseas locations. Irradiated 
blood products are required to prevent potentially fatal transfusion-associated graft versus host 
disease for the following: 
 
a. 
Patients treated with the following drugs: 
(1) 
Fludarabine.  
 
 
(2) 
Cladribine. 
 
 
(3) 
Pentostatin. 
 
 
(4) 
Alemtuzumab. 
(5) 
Other novel purine analogues and related agents until evidence of safety proven. 
 
b. 
Hodgkin's lymphoma (lifelong following diagnosis). 
 
c. 
Aplastic anaemia patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy with anti-thymocyte 
 
globulin and/or Alemtuzumab. 
Medically unexplained symptoms following operational deployment 
8. 
In the aftermath of every conflict for which records exist some returning SP have complained 
of ill-health. This includes any individuals who have returned from Operational deployment, or 
who were prepared for deployment but did not actually deploy, who believe that their health has 
been adversely affected’. In many cases symptoms are vague and non-specific, which can lead to 
inappropriate and unwelcome reassurance, delays in investigation and, often, loss of confidence 
in the DMS.  All medical practitioners must be aware of ways in which health concerns can present 
following Operational deployment, the investigations which should be carried out, and the 
procedures for obtaining referral for specialist investigation. These are detailed in JSP 950 Part 1 
Lft 2-1-2 The Management of Medically Unexplained Symptoms Following Operational Deployment.
 
Confirmed COVID-19 infection 
9. 
COVID-19 infection ranges from asymptomatic to severe clinical illness requiring 
hospitalisation and ventilation for prolonged periods. As such, the sequelae of this infection will 
vary significantly between affected individuals. SP should be managed in accordance with current 
DPHC guidance and the DMRC post-COVID-19 rehabilitation pathway8. SP should be graded 
 
7 Treleaven J. et al, Guidelines on the use of irradiated blood components prepared by the British Committee for Standards in 
Haematology blood transfusion task force 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, British Journal of Haematology, 152. Irradiation_BJH_2011. 
8 JSP 950 COVID Lft 002 ‘Clinical and occupational assessment prior to return to duty and training post-COVID-19’. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-N-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
MND until such time as they have completed the appropriate rehabilitation pathway. Future grading 
will depend on level of function, demands of employment and the presence of any complications. 
These complications should be considered in accordance with the appropriate section of this JSP.  
Consideration should be given to the presence of any underlying chronic condition which could 
have resulted in increased susceptibility to COVID-19, and this may not always have been 
apparent prior to COVID infection. 
Fatigue syndrome(s) 
10.  The diagnosis of the group of conditions known as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, 
myalgic encephalomyelitis, and post-viral fatigue syndrome, is often made by exclusion of somatic 
pathology. All have similar poorly defined symptoms with variable somatic (i.e. variable and flitting 
muscle and joint pains, trigger points etc), and psychological (i.e. anxiety and, or depression etc) 
manifestations. Each should be dealt with on an individual basis, and they should be graded in 
accordance with functional capacity taking appropriate occupational medicine advice. Cognitive 
behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy have been shown to be of definite benefit, with 
pacing of possible benefit and so early referral for such interventions should be considered; 
guidance has been published by NHS Plus with the support of the Faculty of Occupational 
Medicine1. Grading should reflect the functional level during this rehabilitation phase. Final 
outcomes are variable and consideration may have to be given to medical discharge. 
Climatic injuries 
11.  Individuals who have conditions known to be aggravated by service in hot or cold climatic 
conditions should be grader no higher than MLD E2 or E3 to reduce the risk of further 
exacerbation, recurrence or harm. Examples of such conditions are chronic otitis externa, chronic 
suppurative otitis media, hyperhidrosis, severe ichthyosis, sprue, chronic blepharitis, Raynaud’s 
phenomenon and previous heat or cold injury (including freezing and non-freezing cold injury). 
12.  JSP 539 Heat Illness and Cold Injury: Prevention and Management covers Force Protection 
and the initial medical management of heat illnesses and cold injuries.  These cases should 
initially be graded MND until assessed and stabilised. Thereafter, grading is based upon the 
functional capacity, on-going treatment and the requirement to protect against further exposure 
as above. Appropriate MedLims should be used to indicate the requirement for enhanced PPE or 
limitations of exposure to cold or heat where required. A tri-Service Heat Illness Clinic (HIC) and 
Cold Injury Clinic (CIC) is offered by the Institute of Naval Medicine (INM) which can provide 
clinical assessment of and advice on SP, with grading and employability advice available from 
the ROHTs. 
Immune system disorders 
13.  Allergy and anaphylaxis. The development of severe allergic reactions and/or anaphylaxis 
during service should be dealt with on a case-by-case basis and grading should be responsive to 
risk assessment conducted with due regard to continuing employment and the specific medical and 
logistic support requirements of the individual. SP should be referred to the Lead Consultant at any 
of the British Society of Allergy and Immunology allergy clinics detailed in Table 1. SP with a 
requirement to carry a self-administered adrenaline auto-injector (confirmed by an appropriate 
medical specialist) require uniformed OM Consultant review to determine their grading, which will 
be no higher than MLD). 
14.  Desensitisation treatment is prolonged (usually >3 years) and is not guaranteed to resolve 
the allergy (most sites do not undertake post-treatment exposure tests to confirm the results). SP 
deciding to undertake desensitisation treatment should be advised of the potential employment 
consequences of long-term downgrading without a guarantee of being MFD on
 
1 Occupational Aspects of the Management of Chronic fatigue Syndrome – a national guideline. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-N-4 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 completion. 
15.  Drug allergy. Allergic reactions to drugs should be investigated and appropriately recorded in 
both the medical records and on warning tags. Downgrading to MND may be necessary to allow for 
investigations to be completed and is mandatory for anyone who is under investigation for allergy to 
key drugs on Operations (e.g. morphine in auto-injectors, CBRN prophylaxis or treatments or 
regularly used anaesthetic drugs). SP with a proven allergy must as a minimum have a E2 Perm 
medical marker. SP who have proven allergy to drugs that are required on Operations are 
permanently non-deployable. 
Table 1 – Recommended allergy and immunology clinics for military patients. 
Region 
Hospital Clinic/Service 
Bath 
Adult Allergy Clinic, Combe Park, Bath BA1 3NG  
Belfast 
Regional Immunology Clinic, Immunology Day Centre, Belfast, BT12 6BN  
Birmingham 
Allergy University Hospitals Birmingham, Mindelsohn Way, Birmingham B15 2GW 
Adult Allergy Clinic, City Hospital, SWBH NHS Trust, Dudley Road, Birmingham, B18 
Birmingham 
7QH 
Adult Allergy Clinic, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Bordesely Green East 
Birmingham 
Birmingham B9 5SS  
Cambridge 
Allergy Clinic, Addenbrookes Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ 
Cardiff 
Allergy Clinic, University Hospital Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XW  
Edinburgh 
Allergy Clinic, Royal Infimrary Edinburgh, Lauriston Place Edinburgh EH3 9HA 
Essex 
Allery Clinic, Broomfield Hospital, Court Road Chelmsford CM1 7ET 
West of Scotland Anaphylaxis Service, West Glasgow ACH, Dalnair St, Glasgow G3 
Glasgow 
8SJ  
General Adult Allergy Clinic, St James' University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds LS9 
Leeds 
7TF 
Leicester 
Allergy Clinic, Glenfield Hospital, Groby Road, Leicester LE3 9QP 
London 
Allergy Clinic, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS 
London 
Department of Allergy, Guys Hospital, Great Maze Pond, London, SE1 9RT 
London 
Asthma and Allergy Clinic, Royal Brompton Hospital, Fulham Road, London, SW3 6NP 
Frankland Allergy Clinic, St Marys Hospital, Imperial College NHS Trust, Praed Street, 
London 
London W2 1NY  
Manchester 
Allergy Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Southmoor Road, Manchester M23 9LT 
Manchester 
Allergy Clinic, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL 
Adult and Paediatric Allergy Clinic, Churchill and John Radcliffe Hospitals, Headington, 
Oxford 
Oxford OX3 7LJ  
Peninsula Allergy and Immunology Service, Derriford Hospital, Derriford Road, 
Plymouth 
Plymouth, PL6 8DH 
Clinical Immunology and Allergy Unit, Northern General Hospital, Herries Road, 
Sheffield 
Sheffield S5 7AU 
Adult Allergy Clinic, Southampton University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of 
Southampton 
Asthma, Allergy & Clinical Immunlogy (AACI), Room CG89, Mailpoint 52, Level G, 
West Wing, Tremona Road, Southampton SO16 6YD 
Clinical Immunology Clinic, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Hilton Road, 
Staffordshire 
Stoke-On-Trent ST4 6QG 
Surrey 
Adult Allergy Clinic, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Egerton Road, Guildford, GU2 7XX 
 
16.  Immune deficiency disorders will require specialist opinion from a Consultant Physician 
experienced with the management of these conditions and also require uniformed OM Consultant 
review. Grading will depend on assessed susceptibility to infection, and the requirement for on-
going treatment and follow-up, and will be no higher than MLD. 
Return to Contents Page 
5-N-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Malignant disease 
17.  SP with proven malignant disease in the first instance should be graded MND. In such 
cases, continuance of employment and medical grading should be governed by current 
functional capacity and requirement for on-going treatment and follow-up. Where malignancy has 
been successfully treated, consideration may be given to a grading of MFD. 
Malignant hyperpyrexia 
18.  The diagnosis of malignant hyperpyrexia will require permanent grading no higher than MLD 
and not fit for Operational deployments or isolated environments. Medical Warning Tags should 
record this information in accordance with single-Service instructions. 
Suxamethonium sensitivity 
19.  Individuals who are discovered to carry the atypical cholinesterase gene should be graded 
MND until they are assessed to identify whether they require special anaesthetic precautions.  
SP who require special anaesthetic precautions are to be graded no higher than MLD, and are 
not fit Operational or isolated environments, due to the risk of SP with this condition obstructing 
the critical pathways associated with casualty treatment and evacuation. If Service anaesthetic 
Return to Contents Page 
5-N-6 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
opinion is that they do not require special anaesthetic precautions they may be graded MFD with 
an E2 marker. Medical Warning Tags should record this information in accordance with single-
Service instructions. 
Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) (excluding BBVs) 
20.  These are commonly treated outside of, and may not be declared to, the DMS. Certain 
STIs for example syphilis, gonorrhoea, chancroid, chlamydia, non-specific urethritis, should not 
affect the grading unless affecting functional capacity or requiring regular hospital-based 
treatment. 
Absent or dysfunctional spleen 
21.  SP who have had a splenectomy or who have significant splenic dysfunction (hyposplenism) 
should be graded MND in the first instance. SP suffering recurrent infections should remain graded 
no higher than MND. All individuals should be encouraged to take long-term antibacterial 
chemoprophylaxis, together with appropriate vaccination in accordance with JSP 950 Part 1 Lft 7-
1-1 Immunological Protection of Entitled Personnel 
and guidance from a Consultant in Infectious 
Diseases. They must not be deployed into tropical areas, or where there is a risk of contracting 
malaria. There is a lifelong risk of Overwhelming Post Splenectomy Infection (OPSI), which may be 
caused by a wide range of pathogens, which in turn may be transmitted by a number of vectors. 
This risk must be considered when advising about fitness for duty and travel outside the UK.  
Occupational exposure to certain pathogens is a risk factor and dog handling is contraindicated for 
those SP. Other occupational exposure to pathogens should be considered on a case-by-case 
basis. 
22.  If the individuals are otherwise fit in all respects with no evidence of recurrent disease, and / 
or abdominal sequelae, or occupational exposure risk, they can be considered for grading no 
higher than MLD L3, E2 unfit malarial areas by a Medical Board with input from a uniformed OM 
Consultant. The assessment should include consideration of the following factors associated with 
an increased risk of OPSI: 
a.  Age ≥ 50 yrs. 
b.  ≤ 2 yrs since splenectomy/diagnosis of hyposplenism. 
Sleep disorders 
23.  Insomnia. Insomnia is a symptom not a diagnosis. SP with insomnia causing disability need 
a physical and mental health assessment to determine possible underlying cause. Any underlying 
cause then suspected will need to be referred to the relevant specialist as appropriate. SP with 
persistent insomnia (< 4 weeks) or that requires more than 2 weeks hypnotic medication should be 
graded MLD pending either further or specialist assessment or a return to normal sleep. 
24.  Hypersomnolence disorders. SP with hypersomnolence causing disability need a physical 
and mental health assessment to determine possible underlying cause. Any underlying cause then 
suspected will need to be referred to the relevant specialist as appropriate. Whilst symptomatic, 
awaiting assessment and evaluation of treatment, SP should be graded MND. 
25.  Narcolepsy. Suspected cases of Narcolepsy should be referred to a sleep clinic. A confirmed 
diagnosis of Narcolepsy would normally be graded MND. 
26.  Breathing related sleep disorders. Suspected cases of Sleep Apnoea should be referred to 
a sleep clinic.  SP with sleep apnoea should be graded MND until treatment response has been 
evaluated.  Successful conservative or surgical treatment with no residual disability can lead to 
MFD E2. If Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is required the person will need to be restricted in 
their fitness to allow access to this treatment and regular medical follow-up; normally graded MLD. 
27.  Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. Suspected cases of Circadian Rhythm Sleep-
Return to Contents Page 
5-N-7 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
Wake Disorders should be referred to a sleep clinic. Whilst occupational and social dysfunction is 
interfering with safe or satisfactory military role, the person should be graded MND, pending 
assessment and successful treatment. 
28.  Non-REM sleep arousal disorders. This includes Sleep Walking (Somnambulism) and 
Night Terrors.  Sleep walking considered to interrupt safe or satisfactory military role should be 
referred to a psychiatrist for exclusion of mental illness, and graded MND until satisfactory 
resolution of the sleep walking.   
29.  REM sleep behaviour disorders. This includes a variety of behavioural anomalies that 
occur only during REM sleep (Sleep Paralysis, Nightmares, Dream enactment etc).  SP with these 
symptoms should be referred to a psychiatrist to exclude mental disorder, and a sleep clinic for 
proper diagnostic assessment.  Whilst symptomatic, awaiting assessment and evaluation of 
treatment, SP should be graded MND. 
30.  Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS). This condition is common (general population prevalence is 
15%), and in majority of cases is mild and causes little dysfunction. However, it can worsen the 
prognosis of some mental disorders and be exacerbated by psychotropic medication. SP with RLS 
(or Peripheral Limb Movement Disorder – a closely related disorder – see below for details) with 
significant daytime dysfunction resulting, should be graded MND pending assessment and 
treatment. Underlying causes, including anaemia, chronic neck or spine pathology should be 
excluded. If long term medication is required, the person will need to be graded MLD to account for 
medication supply and infrequent review by a medical officer. 
31.  Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD). Diagnosis is made following polysomnography.  
If PLMS (periodic limb movements occurring during sleep) are present without clinical sleep 
disturbance or daytime impairment, the PLMS can be noted as a polysomnographic finding, but the 
criteria are not met for a diagnosis of PLMD. To establish the diagnosis of PLMD, it is essential to 
establish a reasonable cause and effect relationship between the insomnia or hypersomnia and the 
PLMS. PLMS are common but PLMD is thought to be rare in adults. It cannot be diagnosed in the 
context of RLS, narcolepsy, untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnoea or REM sleep Behaviour 
Disorder. The diagnosis of RLS takes precedence over that of PLMD when potentially sleep 
disrupting PLMS occurs in the context of RLS. In such cases, the diagnosis of RLS is made and 
the PLMS are noted.  See RLS for grading advice. 
 
 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
5-N-8 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
SECTION SIX: HARMONISATION OF MEDICAL BOARDS LEADING TO 
DISCHARGE 

Summary 
1. 
This  leaflet introduces  policy  concerning  tri-Service medical  discharge  boards for 
servicemen and women. It also introduces the FMed 23, to be used for recording the  outcome  of 
all medical  boards  leading  to  discharge. This  policy  aligns  the  single Services  (sSs)  together 
in  terms  of  procedure  and  consistency  of  process for  medical discharge boards and 
harmonises the output to other organisations. 
 
Introduction 
 
2. 
The  term  ‘medical  discharge  board’,  used  throughout  this  policy  leaflet  indicates  a medical 
board that has the authority to recommend a medical category that may lead to discharge from the 
Armed Services. Such boards are not the route by which Service personnel are actually 
discharged, for medical reasons or otherwise, from the Armed Services. The  actual  discharge  will 
involve  non-medical  processes  that  take  place  once the recommendation of the medical board 
has been made. 
 
3. 
Appearance by Service personnel at a medical discharge board is necessary when a 
medical condition renders the service person unable to achieve the functional capacity required of 
them for continued service, or when the condition increases the risk of harm to themselves or 
colleagues to an unacceptable level, should they continue to serve. Such boards are convened by 
and run according to single-Service regulations but have a common function. A common medical 
discharge policy aims to harmonise the outputs of these medical boards and ensure consistency 
of process and fairness across the three Services. 
 
Background 
 
4. 
The  momentum  for  developing  a  harmonised  policy  for medical  discharge  boards has 
come from a number of initiatives already in progress. The Defence Medical Discharge Policy 
Committee includes a common medical discharge process as one of the 3 important strands of 
work required to ensure the seamless transition of medical discharges  from service  to  civilian 
life. The  Managed  Military  Health  System  has  a requirement for common policies, processes 
and standards. The Defence Medical Information Capability  Programme  ( DMICP)  provides a 
common medical information solution for the Defence Medical Services and harmonised 
processes, particularly outputs, are inherent to  this programme. The output from medical 
discharge boards helps a number of organisations (for example, the Service Personnel and 
Veterans Agency (SPVA)1  and the Department of Work and Pensions) to facilitate the move  for 
the Service leaver to civilian life.  Common  outputs  will  lead  to  better  understanding  of  Service 
leavers’  requirements and quicker assessments of benefit. 
 
Aim 
 
5. 
The  aim  of  this leaflet  is  to  promulgate  the  policy  governing medical  discharge boards. 
 
Policy 
 
6. 
Constitution 
 
a. 
The process  for  medical  discharge  boards  is  to  involve  3  Medical Officers.  This  is 
consistent  with  other  tribunals. The  3  doctors  need  not  all  sit  together  at  the medical 
board that recommends the discharge, but the decision to discharge should involve them all. 
 
1 The Veterans Agency (VA)  merged with the Armed Forces Personnel  Administration  Agency to form the Service Personnel  and 
Veterans' Agency (SPVA) on 1 Apr 07. 
Return to Contents Page 
6-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 The constitution of specific medical boards will remain an issue for single Services and 
detailed instructions are included in the relevant regulations. 
 
b. 
The chairman or president of a medical discharge board is to be a consultant in 
occupational medicine. 
 
7. 
Medical Category and Employability 
 
a. 
Medical Category. A medical board’s primary role is to award a permanent medical 
category. Medical discharge boards are to award the highest possible medical category for 
the service person presenting to it. This will ensure consistency of application of 
PULHHEEMS profiles and ‘P’  factors  across  the  3  Services.  In  particular  P8  has  the 
universal  meaning ‘Medically Unfit for Further Service’ and is only to be awarded by a 
properly constituted medical discharge board. The consistency of application of 
PULHHEEMS  profiles  is  necessary  to  allow  common  codes,  relating  to  ‘P’  values, to be 
used within the DMICP while a variation in MES remains necessary. 
 
b. 
Employment Standards. Individual sSs have their own systems for awarding medical 
employment standards and it is not intended for this policy to influence with these. 
 
c. 
Employability. The  decision  of  the  medical discharge  board  will  inevitably provide 
some degree of opinion concerning the future functional capacity of an individual.  However, 
it is the role of an employability board1  to determine whether an individual should continue 
to be employed in the medical category awarded to them by the medical board. At any time 
an employability board may request that a medical board reviews its decision on medical 
category, but the award of a medical category,  in  particular  P8, should  only  be  made  by  a 
medical  board. The  final decision on employability rests with the employability board, or 
similar body that undertakes this function; it is not a medical board decision. 
 
d. 
Specialist Advice. Secondary  care  consultants should  be  invited  to  provide 
occupationally-orientated prognoses on their patients who are due to attend a medical board 
at which their discharge is likely to be recommended. This is in line with  current  policy2 . 
However,  whilst  consultants  might  make  recommendations based on their own experience 
and competence, it is for the medical board to make the final decision concerning medical 
category. 
 
e. 
Attributability. Decisions  on  attributability are  not  to  be made  by  medical discharge 
boards. MOD  operates  several  pensions  and  compensation  schemes with different 
criteria, aims and standards of proof, and such decisions should be made by the scheme 
administrators at the SPVA. This position has been clarified by SPPol3. 
 
f. 
The  organisation  of  continuing  clinical  or  occupational  healthcare  is  not  the 
responsibility of medical boards and therefore there are no fields on the F Med 23 
concerned with treatment, investigations or sick leave. Board presidents may however 
consider it necessary to contact medical officers in some circumstances to make 
recommendations. 
 
8. 
Timing. The timing of a discharge medical board must strike an appropriate balance 
between  the  needs  of  the  individual  Service  and  those  of  the  service person. Current 
procedures  allow for  single Service differences  (‘tolerable variation’)  between  the  time  of referral 
and attendance at a medical discharge board. Whilst this might appear anomalous, it is felt that 
the timing of medical discharge boards is likely to be appropriate to attendees’ needs  and  wishes 
 
1 An employability  board considers all aspects of employability,  including current and future Service requirement,  bearing within branch 
or trade and promotion  prospects,  in reaching  a decision  on whether  a particular  individual  should be retained  in Service in the medical 
category  recommended  by the medical board. 
2 SGPL 05/04 – Role of Secondary  Care Consultants  in Medical Board Procedures. 
3 DD SPPol (Pensions)  letter reference  ‘AFCS 75/Attributable’  dated 23 Mar 05. 
Return to Contents Page 
6-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
in  the  majority  of  cases. The  date  of  the  medical  discharge  board should always allow the 
timely provision of occupational health advice following the initial referral. Time elapsed waiting 
for further treatment may hinder this process and all cases should be carefully considered on 
their individual merits, with the interests of the potential Service leaver paramount. 
 
9. 
Resettlement. There are  acceptable  differences  in  single Service  rules  concerning  access 
to resettlement processes and briefings. Despite these differences it is vital that resettlement 
advice should be available as soon as possible once the decision  has been made to refer a 
patient  to  a  medical  board  where  discharge  is  a  possibility. Medical  of icers  are  to advise 
units  to  arrange  access  to  resettlement  advice  at  the  time  of  initial  referral to  the medical 
board. The unit must arrange an initial resettlement interview before attendance at the medical 
board. 
 
10.  Common Reporting. 
 
a. 
The most important benefit of harmonising medical discharge board processes is to 
provide a common reporting process. Reports from medical discharge boards are used by a 
variety of organisations, outside of the MOD, for the benefit of both the Service leaver and 
the wider Armed Forces. DMICP has an  inbuilt  quality  assurance  system  and  this  will 
ensure  a  consistent  standard  is applied to the medical discharge process. 
 
b. 
The adjudicative medical input to the SPVA processes, leading to consistent equitable 
decisions in pension and compensation once the Service leaver has been discharged, will be 
facilitated by the presentation of clear evidence in the form of a standard board output. 
 
c. 
The form to be used to record the decisions of medical discharge boards is the  FMed 
23.  This  has  been  completely  revised  and  is  attached  at  Annex A, with completion 
instructions at Annex B. The new form has been incorporated into a DMICP template. The 
form has already been incorporated into  single-Service  medical administrative instructions. 
 
d. 
The form  has  wide  scope  and  will  provide  a  unified  method  by  which new Armed 
Forces Compensation Scheme claims and earlier War Pensions claims can be processed by 
the SPVA. Benefits and compensation awards are determined primarily by the nature of the 
principal condition and it is important that the wording of the form is not altered locally.   
 
11.  Consent.  The consent of the Service leaver is required for the completed F Med 23 to be 
forwarded to any of the various organisations that may require it to process the leaver’s transition 
to civilian life. Single Services are to develop a form appropriate to their individual needs. The form 
used by the RN is considered to be an appropriate template for this purpose and is attached for 
information at Annex C. 
 
Annexes: 
 
A. 
FMed 23 Revised 04/07. 
B. 
FMed 23 Completion Instructions. 
C. 
Consent to Disclosure of Medical and Administrative Records and Information following 
Naval Service Board of Survey (NSMBOS) – In accordance with Data Protection and Access to 
Medical Reports Legilsation. 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
6-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX A 
 
F Med 23 (04/07) 
OFFICIAL SENSITIVE PERSONAL 
Medical in Confidence (when completed) 
 
Service number 
Rank/Rating 
Branch/Trade 
Date of Entry 
 
 
 
 
 
Surname 
 
Command 
 
Forename(s) 
 
Ship/Unit/Station 
 
Date of Birth 
 
Enlistment/Commission 
 
type 
Place of Board 
 
Expected Departure Date 
 
Authority for Board 
 
Ceased duty on 
 
Date of Board 
 
 
 
 
Principal condition(s) affecting the Medical 
Other condition(s) affecting the Medical Deployment 
Deployment Standard leading to the Medical Board 
Standard at the time of the Medical Board 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Date(s) of origin 
Places(s) of origin 
Date(s) of origin 
Places(s) of origin 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FINDINGS OF THE BOARD 
 









 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Medical Employment Standard 




 
 
 
 
Medical Limitations on employability and future plans 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Period of validity of Medical Deployment 
 
Standard 
 
OFFICIAL SENSITIVE PERSONAL 
Medical in Confidence (when completed) 
 
Return to Contents Page 
6-A-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
NARRATIVE 
(Continued on FMed 15 as necessary) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Name 
Rank 
Signature 
President 
 
 
 
Member 
 
 
 
Member 
 
 
 
 
APPROVAL (NOT RN) 
 
Discharge approved under QR 
Name 
 
paragraph 
Signature of Medical Officer 
Rank 
 
 
Appointment   
 
Date 
 
 
OFFICIAL SENSITIVE PERSONAL 
 
Return to Contents Page 
6-A-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX B 
 
COMPLETION  OF FMED 23   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. 
The FMed 23 is the form for recording the outcome of a medical board leading to medical 
discharge. It is a stand-alone document and as such should not make reference to other 
documents without summarising their contents. If loose leafed sheets are incorporated, personal 
details (minimum service number, rank and name) are to be included on each sheet. 
 
2. 
This guidance on the completion of the F Med 23 is provided in order to ensure all relevant 
information is included, consistency is achieved and that the information is presented in the most 
suitable form. 
 
Procedure 
 
3. 
The FMed 23 has been recently revised. For convenience, the front sheet of the FMed 23 has 
been annotated with numbers referred to in the notes below. The relevant boxes on the FMed 
23 should be completed in line with the guidance notes below. 
 
Guidance notes relating to annotated  FMed 23 front sheet 
 
4. 
Full Service Number. Self-explanatory. 
 
5. 
Rank/rating. Use the approved abbreviations. 
 
6. 
Branch/Trade. Use the approved abbreviations. Branch and trade names are subject to 
change, and the correct terminology should be checked with the patient at the time of the Board 
during the initial interview. 
 
7. 
Total full time Service. This information  should be taken from the documentation provided 
by the parent medical centre for prelims. It should be checked with the patient during the initial 
interview. It is not necessary to corroborate this with the personnel record as a matter of routine. 
 
8. 
Surname and forename(s). Current full names, as appear on the medical record, should be 
used. Do not include previous surnames (e.g. maiden names) and nick names, which should be 
explained in the narrative if required. 
 
9. 
Dates. To avoid any possible confusion with dates, the correct Service date format should be 
used throughout. This is in the form of numbers for the day, a 3 letter abbreviation for the month, 
and 2 numbers for the year, such as 29 Jul 93. 
 
10.  Command. Insert the appropriate abbreviation. 
 
11.  Ship/Unit/Station. The current parent unit is to be listed.  Note that some referrals will   have 
come from a different unit, which has medical parenting responsibilities, and that patients may have 
been posted between referral and the time of the board.  This information should be checked with 
the patient at the time of the Board. 
 
12.  Type of Enlistment/Commission. Use the approved abbreviations. 
 
13.  Authority of Board. Insert the appropriate authority for the board. 
 
14.  Principal condition(s) affecting the medical employment standard leading to Medical 
Board.
 This section should be completed with care, as it may have a direct impact of the later 
award of a War Pension, an Armed Forces Pension or compensation under the AFCS. This 
should normal y only list one condition. In exceptional cases where more than one condition has 
Return to Contents Page 
6-B-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
an equal effect on the award of P grades / PES, more than one condition may be listed.  The 
justification for this should be included in the text. 
 
15.  Place of Board. This will normally be listed as the Medical Centre or Standing Medical Board. 
 
16.  Date of board and signatures. All dates for the Board and date of signing are to be the 
same, and are to be the date on which the patient was seen and the PES awarded. Delays 
due to typing are to be ignored. 
 
17.  Other condition(s) affecting the medical employment standard at the time of the 
Medical Board.
  Details of other medical conditions affecting the patient and contributing to 
the PES awarded should be listed here. 
 
18.  Date (of principal and other conditions). The date listed should be as accurate as 
possible, to the day. If the exact date of onset is uncertain, such as when a patient presents late 
with a problem, then the date of presentation should be stated with the fact noted (e.g. 1 Feb 98 
(presented)), and the matter noted in the narrative. (e.g. “on 1 Feb 98, LCpl Bloggs presented with 
a history of wheeze of several months duration”). A separate date should be noted for each 
condition listed, using the same numbering system. 
 
19.  Place of origin. The Place of Origin should be confined to a broad geographical area,   (e.g. 
UK, Germany, SBA Cyprus, or USA). If the event occurred on operations, then the inclusion of the 
operation is recommended (e.g. Op Telic, Iraq). A  separate place should be noted for each 
condition listed in the Principal Disabilities box, using the same numbering system. 
 
20.  Ceased duty on. For those patients not currently at work, being non-effective or on sick 
leave (SL), the day after the individual was last fit for duty in any capacity should be recorded. 
This information should be sought from the patient during the Board. 
 
21.  PULHHEEMS. The PULHHEEMS block should be completed in accordance with Section 1. 
 
a. 
Place, type and date of next Medical Board. If the medical board wishes to 
review a PES at a set interval, the appropriate information should be entered here. 
 
b. 
Probable period of unfitness. Those awarded a PES other than ‘NONE’ are 
deemed to be fit. For those graded P0 the probable period of time before return to duty / 
next medical board should be notedIf a period of SL is granted, then the appropriate 
period should be noted here. 
 
c. 
For those graded P7 and above, any employment restrictions should be recorded here. 
 
22.  Normal date of termination. The current exit date should be entered here, as related to 
the type of enlistment/commission (see note 9). If a patient is due to leave on or some other 
mode of exit other than at the end of their normal engagement, this should be annotated here 
(e.g. 1 May 08 (PVR)), and full details noted in the narrative. 
 
23.  Narrative.  The following information must be recorded: 
 
a. 
Relevant medical history including medical treatment and medication (both past   and 
planned) 
 
b. 
Relevant medical examination details and findings. 
 
 
c. 
The board is satisfied that advice about prognosis has been obtained from   a 
relevant clinician. 
Return to Contents Page 
6-B-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
 
d. 
That the board is satisfied that on- going treatment is appropriate. 
 
 
e. 
Current Employment (including any adaptations made for medical condition).  
 
 
f. 
Rehabilitation. 
 
 
g. 
Social and Employment History. 
 
 
h. 
Other considerations (e.g. relevant information from Appendix 18 if used, patient’s 
 
wishes, Unit view etc). 
 
 
i. 
Recommendation. 
 
 
j. 
Confirmation that the patient was given an opportunity to ask questions and will be 
 
given a copy of the FMed 23. 
 
24.  President’s signature. This space is for the President’s signature. 
 
25.  Board Members’ details. These boxes should contain the rank, initials and surnames of 
the Board President and  Members. 
 
26.  Members’ signatures. These spaces are for the Members’ signatures. 
 
Return to Contents Page 
6-B-3 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
ANNEX C 
 
CONSENT TO DISCLOSURE OF MEDICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE 
RECORDS AND INFORMATION  FOLLOWING NAVAL SERVICE 
MEDICAL BOARD OF SURVEY (NSMBOS) – IN ACCORDANCE WITH 
DATA PROTECTION  AND ACCESS TO MEDICAL REPORTS 
LEGISLATION 
 
Information  to Patient 
 
1. 
Following your attendance at NSMBOS there will be various other external and internal 
departments / authorities  who will be required to assess your individual  circumstances  and case for 
the purpose of making various decisions relating to your employment  or eligibility for financial 
benefits on discharge. These other departments  will usually require the release of certain records or 
information to them in order to enable a full and proper assessment /  decision to be determined. 
 
2. 
This information  that may be requested  is confidential and cannot be disclosed without your 
specific consent. 
 
3. 
The table in this paragraph gives details of the departments  / authorities that are normally 
involved in your case after NSMBOS and also gives details of the usual information  or records that 
are required by them. Records or information  that is not usually required but  may be requested by 
them dependent upon the circumstances  of the case are marked with an asterisk (*). 
 
Agency / Authority 
Records that may be required 
Usual purpose of disclosure 
to be disclosed 
Naval Service Employability 
NSMBOS  Forms 1,2,3 and 5 
To enable a full and proper 
Board (NSMEB) 
FMed 24. 
assessment  of your employability 
to be determined. 
Naval Resettlement  Information 
DP1 E,H or U as appropriate. 
For forwarding  to the Disability 
Officer (Medical)  (NRIO(M)) 
* FMed 24 
Employment  Advisor / Careers 
Advisor and providing  adequate 
resettlement  advice 
Armed Forces Pension Authority  FMed 23, FMed 24 
To enable a full and proper 
(AFPAA(G)) 
* All Personal Medical  Records 
assessment  of your eligibility  for 
(FMed 4) and  any NSMBOS 
AFPS invaliding  and Service 
Records Held. 
Attributable  benefits to be 
determined. 
Armed Forces Pay Authority 
FMed 23 
To enable assessment  of any 
(AFPAA  (C)) 
* Any medical Information 
LSAP waiver to be determined. 
related to your boarding 
condition  only. 
Veterans Agency (VA) 
All Personal  Medical  Records 
To enable a full and proper 
(FMed 4) and  any NSMBOS 
assessment  of your eligibility  for 
Records Held. 
War Pension / Armed Forces 
Compensation  Scheme benefits to 
be determined. 
Discretionary  Awards  Panel 
All Personal  Medical  Records 
To enable a full and proper 
(DAP) 
(FMed 4) and  any NSMBOS 
assessment  of your eligibility for 
Records Held. 
AFPS invaliding  and Service 
 
Attributable  benefits to be 
 
determined  if further  scrutiny  is 
 
required in the case of an appeal 
 
against AFPAA(G)  decision. 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
6-C-1 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21) 

link to page 3  
 
 
MDG(N) Med Legal 
All Personal  Medical  Records 
To deal effectively  with any legal 
(FMed 4) and  any NSMBOS 
claim that you may have. 
Records Held. 
Defence  Analytical  Statistics 
FMed 23 
For statistical recording and 
Agency  (DASA) 
analysis. 
 
4. 
In some instances this information  may be requested again at a later date following initial 
disclosure at the time of the NSMBOS (for example your condition changes and your pension / 
benefits needs to be re-assessed,  your case reviewed etc). If you are not invalided this 
information  may be required by some departments  / authorities  after you leave the service if you 
make a subsequent  or further claim. In these circumstances  the departments  / authorities 
involved will need to obtain further consent from you before we will release the information  / 
records to them, since the consent that you are giving on this form is not continuous,  it will only 
last and be used for the purpose of concluding  your attendance  at this particular NSMBOS. 
 
5. 
There is no requirement  for you to view any documents  or reports prior to us forwarding 
them (under the Access to Medical Reports Act 1988) since there is no information  or reports 
being forwarded that have not already been sighted by you prior to the NSMBOS taking place, for 
which your separate consent was obtained. 
 
6. 
You do not have to consent to the release of this information or records if you do not 
wish to and NSMBOS will not disclose it / them if you have not done so. You must obviously 
bear in mind the implications  that this may have on any decision that those departments  / 
authorities are required to make. 
 
Consent 
 
Name 
 
Rank/Rate 
 
   
 
  Service No     
Date of 
 
NSMBOS 
 
 
a. 
I have read and understand the ‘Information to Patient’ notes 1 – 6 overleaf. 
 
 
b. 
I consent / do not consent * to the disclosure of the medical and administrative 
records / information  that is, or may be required following NSMBOS, only to those 
departments / authorities and only for those purposes, as detailed overleaf at paragraph 3 
of this form, until expiry of this consent. 
 
 
c. 
I understand  that if any other records / information  is / are required by any other 
department  / authority, or for any other purposes, other than those detailed at paragraph 3 
of this form my separate consent will be required to be obtained. 
 
 
d. 
I understand  that this consent is not continuous and will automatically  expire 
after 12 calendar months from the date of the NSMBOS attended. 
 
* Delete as required
 
Signed  
Date 
 
 
 
 
e. 
I have explained the contents of and requirements  for this consent form and have 
witnessed his / her signature. 
 
Signed  
Date 
 
 
 
Return to Contents Page 
6-C-2 
JSP 950 Lft 6-7-7 (V1.9 Mar 21)