This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Preparedness in the event of a catastrophic cyber attack'.


DIRECTORATE FOR ORGANISATIONAL READINESS
DOR : Resilience Division
abcd
 
 
 
 
David Grant
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Our Reference: 202100184164
Your Reference: Preparedness in the event of a catastrophic cyber attack
 
23 April 2021
 
Dear David Grant,
 
REQUEST UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION (SCOTLAND) ACT 2002 (FOISA)
Thank you for your request dated 24 March 2021 under the Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act
2002 (FOISA).
Your request
You asked
1. Does the Government have a plan for coping with the consequences of a major cyber-
attack?
2. To put the question more brutally does the Government have a plan to feed people if there
is no electricity, no water and no means of communication?
3. If you do not have such a plan do you intend to create one? 
4. If you do not intend to create one please say why not? 
5. If you do have a plan is it accessible to the public? 
6. If it is not accessible to the public, why not?
7. Have any bunkers been prepared for the aftermath and have any key Government officials
been designated as meriting a place in the bunker? If so, which ones? 

Response to your request
Scottish Ministers, special advisers and the Permanent Secretary are covered by the terms of the Lobbying (Scotland) Act 2016. See
www.lobbying.scot
St Andrew's House, Regent Road, Edinburgh EH1 3DG
www.gov.scot


1. Does the Government have a plan for coping with the consequences of a major cyber-
attack?

The Scottish Government does not have a plan specifical y for coping with the consequences of a
major cyber attack due to an ‘al -risks’ approach as in the answer to question 2 below.
2. To put the question more brutally does the Government have a plan to feed people if there
is no electricity, no water and no means of communication?
 
The preparation and response to emergencies is underpinned by The Civil Contingencies Act 2004
("the Act") and the Civil Contingencies Act 2004 (Contingency Planning) (Scotland) Regulations 2005
("the Regulations"). These regulations form the legal basis for emergency preparedness in Scotland.
The Act seeks to minimise disruption in the event of an emergency and to ensure that the UK is better
prepared to deal with a range of emergencies and their consequences.
This legislation outlines the key organisations responsible for ensuring the effective management of
emergencies in Scotland. These are category 1 responders (including local authorities, police, fire,
ambulance and health boards) and category 2 responders (including electricity operators, gas
suppliers, Scottish Water and Health and Safety Executive).
The Act and the Regulations place a number of legal duties upon Category 1 responders. For more
information on responders and their legislative duties please see the fol owing chapter of Preparing
Scotland - Preparing Scotland - Chapter 2 - Legislation
Resilience in Scotland takes an ‘al -risks’ approach and is based on the doctrine of Integrated
Emergency Management (IEM). Whilst emergencies can be caused by a wide range of factors, the
effects wil  often share identical or similar consequences.
The aim of IEM is to develop flexible and adaptable arrangements for dealing with emergencies,
whether foreseen or unforeseen and regardless of cause. It is based on a multi-agency approach and
the effective co-ordination of those agencies. It involves Category 1 and Category 2 responders (as
defined in the Act) and also the voluntary sector, commerce and a wide range of communities.
More information on Scotland’s approach to preparing for and responding to civil emergencies can be
found at Preparing Scotland: Philosophy, Principles, Structure and Regulatory Duties
3. If you do not have such a plan do you intend to create one? 
 
Please refer to question two.
4. If you do not intend to create one please say why not? 
 
Please refer to question two.
5. If you do have a plan is it accessible to the public? 
Scottish Ministers, special advisers and the Permanent Secretary are covered by the terms of the Lobbying (Scotland) Act 2016. See
www.lobbying.scot
St Andrew's House, Regent Road, Edinburgh EH1 3DG
www.gov.scot


 
Please refer to question two.
6. If it is not accessible to the public, why not?
 
Please refer to question two.
7. Have any bunkers been prepared for the aftermath and have any key Government officials
been designated as meriting a place in the bunker? If so, which ones? 

No.
Your right to request a review
If you are unhappy with this response to your FOI request, you may ask us to carry out an internal
review of the response, by writing to Shirley Rogers - Director of Organisational Readiness, St
Andrew's House, Regent Road, Edinburgh, EH1 3DG - xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxxx. Your
review request should explain why you are dissatisfied with this response, and should be made within
40 working days from the date when you received this letter. We wil  complete the review in
accordance with FOISA as soon as possible, and not later than 20 working days from the day
fol owing the date we receive your review request.
If you are not satisfied with the result of the review, you then have the right to appeal to the Scottish
Information Commissioner. More detailed information on your appeal rights is available on the
Commissioner's website at: http://www.itspublicknowledge.info/YourRights/Unhappywiththeresponse
/AppealingtoCommissioner.aspx.
 
Yours sincerely
 
 
 
 
Robbie Harrison
RES : Risk and Essential Services
Scottish Ministers, special advisers and the Permanent Secretary are covered by the terms of the Lobbying (Scotland) Act 2016. See
www.lobbying.scot
St Andrew's House, Regent Road, Edinburgh EH1 3DG
www.gov.scot