This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Reading lists, course syllabus and set texts for MSt and Mphil English Literature'.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FACULTY OF  
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
 
 
M.St. & M.Phil.  
Course Details  
2020-21

link to page 3 link to page 5 link to page 5 link to page 5 link to page 5 link to page 6 link to page 6 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 12 link to page 18 link to page 19 link to page 25 link to page 28 link to page 31 link to page 35 link to page 35 link to page 36 link to page 39 link to page 46 link to page 54 link to page 60 link to page 66 link to page 71 link to page 77 link to page 77 link to page 77 link to page 86 link to page 93 link to page 96 link to page 100 link to page 109 link to page 112 link to page 116 link to page 121 link to page 123 link to page 126 link to page 132 link to page 136 link to page 138 link to page 142 Contents 
Note on teaching with Covid-19 ....................................................................................................................... 3
 
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................... 5 
Course convenors ....................................................................................................................................... 5 
Post-doc mentors ....................................................................................................................................... 5 
Course-outline ............................................................................................................................................ 5 
A-Course: Literature, Contexts and Approaches ......................................................................................... 6 
B-Course: Research Skills ............................................................................................................................ 6 
C-Course: Special Options ........................................................................................................................... 7 
Dissertation ................................................................................................................................................ 7 
M.Phil. in English Studies (Medieval Period)............................................................................................... 8 
 
A-COURSES ...................................................................................................................................................... 9 
M.St. in English (650-1550) A-Course .......................................................................................................... 9 
M.St. in English (1550-1700) A-Course ...................................................................................................... 12 
M.St. in English (1700-1830) A-Course ...................................................................................................... 18 
M.St. in English (1830-1914) A-Course ...................................................................................................... 19 
M.St. in English Literature (1900-Present) A-Course ................................................................................. 25 
M.St. in World Literatures in English A-Course ......................................................................................... 28 
M.St. in English & American Studies A-Course .......................................................................................... 31 
 
B-COURSES .................................................................................................................................................... 35 
Overview .................................................................................................................................................. 35 
M.St. in English (650-1550) and the M.Phil. in English (Medieval Period) B-Course .................................. 36 
M.St. in English (1550-1700) B-Course ...................................................................................................... 39 
M.St. in English (1700–1830) B-Course ..................................................................................................... 46 
M.St. in English (1830–1914) B-Course ..................................................................................................... 54 
M.St. in English (1900-present) B-Course .................................................................................................. 60 
M.St. in World Literatures in English B-Course ......................................................................................... 66 
M.St. in English and American Studies B-Course ....................................................................................... 71 
 
C-COURSES..................................................................................................................................................... 77 
Michaelmas Term C-Courses 
After the Conquest: Reinventing fiction and history ................................................................................. 77 
Devotional Texts and Material Culture c. 1200-1500 ................................................................................ 86 
Old English poetry: Cynewulf and the Cynewulf canon ............................................................................. 93 
Andrewes & Donne: Performing Religious Discourse................................................................................ 96 
Travel, Belonging, Identity: 1550-1700 ................................................................................................... 100 
Slow Reading Spenser ............................................................................................................................ 109 
Pope’s Dunces: Literary Mythology and its Victims ................................................................................ 112 
Women and the Theatre, 1660-1820 ...................................................................................................... 116 
The Romantic & Victorian Sonnet ........................................................................................................... 121 
Literary London, 1820-1920 .................................................................................................................... 123 
Victorian & Edwardian Drama, 1850-1914 .............................................................................................. 126 
Citizens of Nowhere: Literary Cosmopolitanism and the Fin de Siècle .................................................... 132 
Virginia Woolf: Literary and Cultural Contexts........................................................................................ 136 
Modernism and Philosophy .................................................................................................................... 138 
Sea Voyages, Literature and Modernity.................................................................................................. 142 

link to page 2 link to page 147 link to page 149 link to page 153 link to page 154 link to page 158 link to page 160 link to page 160 link to page 161 link to page 163 link to page 163 link to page 174 link to page 178 link to page 184 link to page 188 link to page 190 link to page 193 link to page 197 link to page 201 link to page 203 link to page 209 link to page 210 link to page 214 link to page 220 link to page 223 link to page 226 link to page 227 link to page 230 link to page 230 link to page 230 Introduction 
 
Page 3 of 230 
Prison Writing & The Literary World ....................................................................................................... 147 
Literatures of Empire and Nation 1880-1935 .......................................................................................... 149 
American Fiction Now ............................................................................................................................ 153 
Modern Irish-American Writing and the Transatlantic ........................................................................... 154 
Political Histories of Modern Reading, 1780-Present .............................................................................. 158 
 
Hilary Term C-Courses
 
Old Norse ............................................................................................................................................... 160 
The Age of Alfred.................................................................................................................................... 161 
Wycliffite and Related Literatures: Dissidence, Literary Theory and Intellectual History in Late-Medieval 
England .................................................................................................................................................. 163
 
Ideas of Literature in the Fifteenth Century ............................................................................................ 174 
Milton and the Philosophers .................................................................................................................. 178 
Imagining Early Modern Lives ................................................................................................................. 184 
Utopian Writing from More to Hume ..................................................................................................... 188 
Place and Nature Writing 1750-Present Day ........................................................................................... 190 
The Spectacular Enlightenment .............................................................................................................. 193 
Wordsworth and Coleridge 1797-1817 ................................................................................................... 197 
Victorian Futures .................................................................................................................................... 201 
Henry James and his Literary Legacies .................................................................................................... 203 
The New T. S. Eliot Studies ..................................................................................................................... 209 
20th and 21st Century Theatre ................................................................................................................. 210 
Fiction in Britain Since 1945: History, time and memory ........................................................................ 214 
Humanitarian Fictions ............................................................................................................................ 220 
African Literature ................................................................................................................................... 223 
Kin and Strangers in the American Novel ............................................................................................... 226 
Fiction and/or Nonfiction in Postwar US Literature ................................................................................ 227 
 
OPTIONAL MODULES ................................................................................................................................... 230 
Practical printing workshop for postgraduate students .......................................................................... 230 
Latin for beginners (Medievalists and Early Modernists): optional course .............................................. 230 

 
 
 
Version 
Details 
Date 
1.0 
Course details book published 
02/07/2020 
1.1 
World Literatures convenor names updated on p.28 
03/07/2020 
1.2 
Additional course detail for ‘Modern Irish-American Writing and the 
09/07/2020 
Transatlantic’ C-Course, p.154 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 Introduction 
 
Page 4 of 230 
Note on teaching with Covid-19 
 
While nobody can be entirely sure what the next few months will bring, I want to reassure you that we are 
putting a range of measures in place that will make the next academic year as close to normal as possible. 
 
The contents of this book are based on teaching taking place in an ‘as normal’ situation, though we recognise 
that some elements may need to be supported with an online component. Some aspects of the course might 
change over the summer, depending upon the evolving situation.  
 
You will be updated on arrangements for access to the special collections at the Bodleian library as we learn 
more. Currently we have been advised that students will have quick access to a range of dedicated specialist 
staff in the Bodleian’s Special Collections, so as to enable research involving primary resources, book history 
and material culture. While access to collections is likely to be mediated next term (e.g. by curators, archivists, 
and reading-room staff), work on our rich collection of archival materials – for the B course, or for your 
Dissertation – will be able to go ahead. We will resume actual physical access to the special collections as 
quickly as possible.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Patrick Hayes  
Director of Taught Graduate Studies 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1st July, 2020 
 
 
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 Introduction 
 
Page 5 of 230 
INTRODUCTION 
 
Course convenors 
 
  650-1550 / M.Phil. (Medieval): Dr Annie Sutherland, Professor Vincent Gillespie 
  1550-1700: Professor Lorna Hutson, Dr Joseph Moshenska 
  1700-1830: Professor Christine Gerrard, Professor Nicholas Halmi 
  1830-1914: Dr Michèle Mendelssohn, Professor Helen Small 
  1900-Present:  Dr Marina Mackay, Dr David Dwan 
  English and American Studies: Dr Nicholas Gaskill, Dr Erica McAlpine  
  World Literatures in English: Dr Graham Riach, Professor Ankhi Mukherjee 
 
Post-doc mentors 
 
In addition to the programme-convenors, each M.St. strand will also have a dedicated postdoctoral (academic) 
mentor, who will support the formal work of the convenors. The role of the mentor is to help foster a sense of 
group identity and cohesion; to establish an informal space for group interaction; to contribute to the 
academic mentoring and professional development of the students during the course; to help trouble-shoot 
and generally to help students navigate sources of information etc. Students are encouraged to approach the 
mentors over the academic year for advice and guidance. You will meet the postdoctoral mentor for your 
strand at the Graduate Induction at the beginning of Michaelmas Term.  
 
Course-outline 
 
The course consists of four components, outlined briefly below; for further detail, you should consult the 
strand-specific descriptions. The M.St./M.Phil. Handbook will be circulated before the beginning of term and 
will provide further important information needed once you begin your course. 
 
In every strand, attendance is compulsory. If you are unable to attend a class or seminar because of illness 
or other emergency, please let your course convenors know. Non-attendance without good cause may 
trigger formal procedures.  
 
 
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 link to page 34 link to page 34 link to page 35 link to page 35 Introduction 
 
Page 6 of 230 
A-Course: Literature, Contexts and Approaches  
 
This course is taught in 6 to 8 weeks of seminars in Michaelmas term, though students in 650-1550 will 
continue with further seminars in Hilary term.  
 
The precise format of the A-course will vary across strands, but in general, the course is meant to stimulate 
open-ended but guided exploration of key primary and secondary texts, of critical and theoretical debates, and 
of literary historiography. The A-course therefore is not assessed formally. However, the pedagogic formation 
fostered by the A-course will be vital for the M.St. as a whole, and will inform, support and enrich the research 
you undertake for your B- and C-essays and the dissertation.  For details of individual A-courses, please see 
below. You are strongly recommended to begin reading for the A-course before you commence the M.St. The 
reading-lists included in this document may be quite comprehensive, and you can expect further on-course 
guidance from your course-convenors and tutors according to your specific intellectual interests. 
 
There is no formal assessment for the A-course, but written work and/or oral presentations may be required. 
Convenors will enter their informal assessment of performance on GSR, the Graduate Supervision Report 
system at the end of Michaelmas Term, and will provide feedback on class-presentations. 
 
 
B-Course: Research Skills  
 
The B-Course is a compulsory component of the course.  It provides a thorough foundation in some of the key 
skills needed to undertake research. 
 
Michaelmas Term 
Strand-specific classes on manuscript transcription, palaeography, material texts and primary source research 
skills are taught in Michaelmas Term. Students on the 650-1550 and 1550-1700 strands will sit a transcription 
test on a pass/fail basis. While students on these strands must pass in order to proceed with the course, scores 
on the test will not affect their final degree result.  Further details about the examination of the B-Course are 
provided later in this booklet and in the M.St./M.Phil. Handbook. 
 
Hilary Term 
In Hilary, students take their strand’s specific B-Course, which is described in the ‘Strand Specific Course 
Descriptions’ 
section of this booklet.   
 
 
Assessment 
In Hilary Term, candidates will be required to submit an essay of 5,000-6,000 words on a topic related to the B-
Course. 
 
Further details about the structure of the B-Course for all strands can be found here. 
 

 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 link to page 77 link to page 112 Introduction 
 
Page 7 of 230 
C-Course: Special Options 
 
These will be taught as classes in weeks 1-6 of Michaelmas and Hilary Terms.  Students must choose one of 
these options in each term. All C-course options are open to students in all strands – you do not have to 
choose an option which sits neatly within your strand boundaries. However, it is recommended that you 
consult with the option convenors if you are choosing an option outside of your area(s) of expertise.  
 
You must register your preferred options online at https://oxford.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/mst-c-course-
options-2020-21 
for both terms by no later than 5pm on Monday 27th July. You will need to list three 
preferences for each term, in case courses are oversubscribed. 
 
Please note:
 If you wish to change any of your options, you must first contact the Graduate Studies Office who 
will seek approval from your convenor and the tutor for the course you wish to take. Requests for option 
changes for Hilary Term must be submitted by the end of week 4 of Michaelmas Term. We do not accept any 
changes after this time. Please note that undersubscribed Hilary term courses may be withdrawn before the 
start of Michaelmas term. 
 
Remember that you can request any C-Course(s), depending on your interests and research plans. 
 
Assessment 
  In Michaelmas Term, candidates will be required to submit an essay of 5,000-6,000 words on a topic 
related to the C-Course studied in that term.   
  In Hilary Term, candidates will be required to submit an essay of 5,000-6,000 words on a topic related to 
the C-Course studied in that term. 
 
Details on approval of topics and on the timing of submission for all components are found in the M.St. 
/M.Phil. Handbook

 
The Faculty reserves the right not to run a Special Options C-Course if there are insufficient numbers enrolled or 
should a tutor become unavailable due to unforeseen circumstances; please bear this in mind when selecting 
your options.  Students cannot assume that they will be enrolled in their first choice of option; please also bear 
this in mind when planning your reading before the course begins.  We strongly recommend that you start with 
your A- and B-Course reading, and do not invest too much time in preparing for C-Course options until these 
have been confirmed.
 
 
 

Dissertation 
 
Each student will write a 10,000-11,000-word dissertation on a subject to be defined in consultation with the 
strand convenors, written under the supervision of a specialist in the Faculty, and submitted for examination 
at the end of Trinity Term.  
 
Please note that you will be asked to submit a short (max. 500 words) description of your dissertation topic 
to your convenors at the Graduate Induction Event on Tuesday of 0th week of Michaelmas term. The purpose 
of this is simply to help your convenors to identify an appropriate supervisor for your dissertation at the start 
of term: it is expected that your topic will evolve in the course of supervision. 
 
A student-led all-day conference will be held in Trinity Term (usually in the fourth week) at which all students 
will give brief papers on topics arising from their dissertation work, and will receive feedback from the course 
convenor(s). 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 Introduction 
 
Page 8 of 230 
M.Phil. in English Studies (Medieval Period) 
 
In their first year candidates for the M.Phil. in English Studies (Medieval Period) follow the same course as the 
M.St. in English (650-1550) students.  Provided they achieve a pass mark in the first-year assessments, 
students may proceed to the second year. 
 
The second year of the M.Phil. offers great freedom of specialisation. Candidates choose three further courses 
to be studied during the year, and write a longer dissertation as the culmination of the degree. The three 
courses may include up to two of the M.St. C courses offered in that year (provided the candidate has not 
done the same course the year before); or they may choose to submit coursework essays in any medieval topic 
agreed with the convenors for which a supervisor is available. These courses are entered under the following 
titles (each of which may only be entered once, to ensure breadth as well as specialization). Candidates are 
strongly encouraged to consult with their course convenors in Trinity Term or early in the Long Vacation of 
the first year in order to make an informed and feasible choice of options. 
 
1.  The History of the Book in Britain before 1550 (Candidates will also be required to transcribe from, 
and comment on specimens written in English in a 1-hour examination)  
2.  Old English 
3.  The Literature of England after the Norman Conquest 
4.  Medieval Drama 
5.  Religious Writing in the Later Middle Ages 
6.  Medieval Romance  
7.  Old Norse sagas 
8.  Old Norse poetry 
9.   Old Norse special topic (only to be taken by candidates offering either option 7 or 8, or both) 
10./11. One or two of the C-Course Special Options as on offer in any strand, as specified by the M.St. 
English for the year concerned; candidates may not re-take any option for which they have 
been examined as part of their first year.  
12./13./14./15. 
Relevant options offered by other Faculties as agreed with the M.Phil. Convenors. 
The teaching and assessment of these options will follow the provisions and requirements as 
set by the Faculty offering the option. 
 
Second Year Assessment 
Students will be required to submit three essays of 5,000-6,000 words each in either Michaelmas Term or 
Hilary Term (depending on the term in which the course was offered).  
Students will write a dissertation of 13,000-15,000 words on a subject related to their subject of study.  
 
Each candidate’s choice of subjects shall require the approval the Chair of the M.St./M.Phil. Examiners, care of 
the Graduate Studies Office. Details on approval of topics and timing of submission for all components are 
found in the M.St. /M.Phil. Handbook
 
Candidates are warned that they must avoid duplicating in their answers to one part of the examination 
material that they have used in another part of the examination. However, it is recognised that the 
dissertation may build on and develop work submitted for the first-year dissertation.
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 9 of 230 
A-COURSES 
M.St. in English (650-1550) A-Course 
Course convenors: Professor Vincent Gillespie & Dr Annie Sutherland 

This M.St. ‘A’ course is designed to give you an introduction to key works, textual witnesses, concepts and 
critical debates in the 650-1550 period. It is deliberately wide in range in order to equip you with the best 
possible knowledge of this period and to provide a historical, cultural and critical context for the specialist 
interests that you will develop in the ‘C’ courses and in your dissertation. Topics will be covered in two-week 
sessions, with a primary focus each week on the pre- or post-Conquest period, as set out below. Each week, 
we will ask you to read in advance a few key primary texts and/or extracts and some secondary works. It is 
important that you participate in every session regardless of whether your interests in the medieval period are 
early or late, as the questions and debates have been chosen for their relevance to the period as a whole. The 
class will take the form of presentations from students with discussion to follow, and/or roundtable debate 
about key texts and ideas. Although you are not expected to read everything on the reading list, it is important 
that you engage with the topics to be discussed: this course is the main forum in which you can discuss your 
ideas with one another, make connections between texts and across the period, hone skills such as close 
reading, and get valuable feedback on oral presentations. In preparation for these seminars, we suggest that 
you familiarize yourself with some of the most influential works for the period as a whole, if you have not 
encountered them already. Introductory reading is provided below, and we encourage you to get started with 
this as soon as possible. You may find it useful to purchase one of the readers listed below to get started with 
reading Old and Middle English texts in the original language. 
 
Introductory Reading 
  Virgil, Aeneid (available in multiple translations) 
  The Anglo-Saxon World, trans. Kevin Crossley-Holland (Woodbridge, 2002) 
  The Vulgate Bible: Douay-Rheims Translation (online) – read Genesis, Exodus, The Psalms, Jonah, The 
Gospels, Acts, Revelation  
  Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People, ed. and trans. Colgrave and Mynors (1969) - also in 
Oxford World’s Classics and Penguin Classics 
  Beowulf – multiple translations by Michael Alexander, Michael Swanton, Kevin Crossley-Holland, 
Seamus Heaney, Howard Chickering, J. R. R. Tolkien.  
  Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy, trans. V. E. Watts (Harmondsworth, 1976) 
  Chrétien de Troyes, Arthurian Romances, trans. William Kibler – read Yvain.  
  The Riverside Chaucer, ed. Larry Benson and F. A. Robinson – read Troilus and Criseyde and The 
Canterbury Tales 
  Egil’s saga, trans. Bernard Scudder (Penguin, 2004) 
  Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Cleanness, Patience, ed. J. J. Andersson (London, 1996) 
  The Saga of Grettir the Strong, trans. Bernard Scudder (Penguin, 2005) 
  Robert Henryson, The Complete Works, ed. David John Parkinson (Kalamazoo, 2008) – read Orpheus 
and Eurydice and Testament of Cresseid  
  The Lais of Marie de France, trans. Glyn Burgess and Keith Busby (London, 1999) 
  The Book of Margery Kempe, ed. Barry Windeatt (Woodbridge, 2004) 
  Thomas More, Utopia 
  Tyndale’s New Testament, ed. David Daniell 
  Sir Thomas Wyatt, The Complete Poems (Penguin Classics, 1997) 
  York Mystery Plays: A Selection in Modern Spelling, ed. Richard Beadle and Pamela King (Oxford, 2009) 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 10 of 230 
Language Readers 
  A Guide to Old English, ed. Bruce Mitchell and Fred Robinson (Chichester, 2012) 
  Old and Middle English c. 890-c. 1400, ed. Elaine Treharne (Oxford, 2004) 
  The Cambridge Old English Reader, ed. Richard Marsden (Cambridge, 2015) 
  A Book of Middle English, ed. J. A. Burrow and Thorlac Turville-Petre (Oxford, 1996) 
Many ME texts can be found online at http://www.lib.rochester.edu 
 
Introductions and Companions 
  Marc Amodio, The Anglo-Saxon Literature Handbook (Chichester, 2014) 
  Daniel Donohue, Old English Literature: A Short Introduction (Oxford, 2004) 
  The Cambridge Companion to Old English Literature, ed. Malcolm Godden and Michael Lapidge 
(Cambridge, 2013) 
  The Cambridge History of Early Medieval English Literature, ed. Clare Lees (Cambridge, 2012) 
  A Companion to Anglo-Saxon Literature, ed. Philip Pulsiano and Elaine Traherne (Oxford, 2001) 
  R. D. Fulk and Christopher Cain, A History of Old English Literature (Chichester, 2013) 
  Hugh Magennis, The Cambridge Introduction to Anglo-Saxon Literature (2011) 
  A New Critical History of Old English Literature, ed. Stanley Greenfield and Daniel Caulder (London, 
1986) 
  Old English Literature: Critical Essays, ed. R. M. Liuzza (London, 2002) 
  Laura Ashe, The Oxford English Literary History, Volume 1, 1000-1350, conquest and transformation 
(2017) 
  Jeremy Burrow, Medieval Writers and their Work: Middle English Literature 1100-1500  (Oxford, 
1992) 
  Christopher Cannon, The Grounds of English Literature (Oxford, 2004) 
  Douglas Gray, Later Medieval English Literature (Oxford, 2008) 
  The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Literature, 1100-1500, ed. Larry Scanlon (2009) 
  A Companion to Medieval English Literature and Culture, c. 1350-c. 1500, ed. Peter Brown (Oxford, 
2007) 
  The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Literature in English, ed. Elaine Traherne and Greg Walker (2010) 
  Middle English, ed. Paul Strohm (Oxford, 2009) 
 
Michaelmas Term 
Weeks 1-2: Anthology, Miscellany & Meaning 
Week 1: The Exeter Book of Old English Poetry and the Franks Casket 
 
Week 2: The Auchinleck Manuscript and Flateyjarbók 
Weeks 3-4: Tradition and Transmission 
Week 3: Bede and Cædmon; Beowulf and Andreas 
 
Week 4: Biblical Translations and Adaptations 
(Texts to include PatienceCleanness, Cycle Drama, Picture Bibles, Tyndale) 
Weeks 5-6: Authors, Texts and Audiences 
Week 5: Authorship and Revising the Text: Wulfstan’s Sermo Lupi ad Anglos and Cynewulf’s signed poems 
 
Week 6: Women’s Writing and Writing for Women 
(Texts to include: Christina of Markyate, Katherine-Group, Margery Kempe) 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 11 of 230 
Hilary Term 
Weeks 1-2 Literary Form and Genre 
Week 1: Wulf & EadwacerWife’s LamentRiddles 
 
Week 2: Breton lay, romance, Malory 
(Texts to include Marie de France, Chrétien de Troyes, Malory) 
Weeks 3-4 The Politics of Medieval History and Historicisms 
Week 3: Widsith, Orosius, Ælfric, Life of St EdmundAnglo-Saxon Chronicle 
 
Week 4: History and Saint’s Life 
(Texts to include: South English LegendaryThe Golden LegendBook of Martyrs
Weeks 5-6: Multiculturalism and Cultural Context 
Week 5: Latin and the Vernaculars 
(Texts to include: Gesta Herwardi and Grettis saga; Celtic lyric and Latin elegiac) 
 
Week 6: Classical Myth and Legend 
(Texts to include: Chaucer, Henryson, Sir Orfeo
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 12 of 230 
M.St. in English (1550-1700) A-Course 
Critical Questions in Early Modern Literature  

Course convenors: Professor Joe Moshenska, Professor Lorna Hutson and others  
 
This course is designed to introduce you to major critical debates over the interpretation of Renaissance/early 
modern literary texts and to help you start to frame your own research questions in relation to a possible 
dissertation topic.  
Classes weeks 1-6 will focus on a key primary text or texts, situating these within a framework of critical 
debate. These classes will be led by the convenors joined, in week 3, by Prof Bart Van Es. In the final two 
classes, weeks 7-8, you will have a chance to apply some of what you’ve learned about existing debates to the 
framing of your own research questions. 
The first part of the course is an opportunity to engage with the contemporary critical reception of early 
modern literature and to think about the questions that define it as an object of study. This part will give you a 
sense of the shifts in critical, editorial, and cultural-historical frameworks through which writings of the period 
have been interpreted. It will also introduce you to, or re-acquaint you with, some exciting literary texts – 
famous and less well known -- of the period.  
You should expect to read, at a minimum, one longer or two shorter primary texts for each week, along with 
two critical articles. These will be marked ‘essential’ in the reading list. You can get ahead by reading the 
primary texts during the vacation, freeing up time for the articles.  
The A course as a whole will contribute to your preparation for the dissertation which you will write in Trinity 
Term. There is no formal assessment, but there will be feedback on your participation in the course in the 
convenors’ reports on the Graduate Supervision System (GSS).  
 
Topics and Texts at-a-glance:  
  Week 1. Introduction: ‘Renaissance Subjects’ [handout]  
  Week 2. ‘Meddling with Allegory’ [Spenser, Faerie Queene, book 1]  
  Week 3. ‘New Ways of Looking at Theatrical Texts’  [Marlowe, Doctor Faustus, A Text] 
  Week 4. ‘The Mind’s Eye: Theatre and Rhetoric’ [King Lear]  
  Week 5. ‘The Female Signature: Gender and Style’ [Mary Queen of Scots; K. Philips] 
  Week 6. ‘Tragedy and Political Theology’ [Milton, Samson Agonistes]  
  Week 7. Exploring dissertation questions   
  Week 8. Exploring dissertation questions  
 
Week 1: Renaissance Subjects (Joe Moshenska and Lorna Hutson) 
A handout of short critical extracts will be distributed at the pre-course meeting for this introductory seminar.  
 
Week 2: Meddling with Allegory (Joe Moshenska & Lorna Hutson) 
William Hazlitt, writing about readers of Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene, famously wrote: “If they do not 
meddle with the allegory, the allegory will not meddle with them.”  As modern readers of Spenser we can 
hardly help meddling with his allegorical fictions, but, this seminar will suggest, the question of how best to do 
so remains an open one.  Should we look backwards, towards Spenser’s classical and medieval predecessors? 
Or forwards, towards theoretical meddlers like Walter Benjmain and Paul de Man?  Focusing on Book I, the 
Book of Holiness, we will consider the interpretative questions that Spenser’s allegory seems both to pose and 
elude, and how these can inflect our wider approaches to early modern texts. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 13 of 230 
 
Essential:  
  The Faerie Queene, Book 1 and proem; dedicatory sonnets; ‘Letter to Raleigh.’  Please read this in the 
Longman edition of The Faerie Queene, second revised edition, ed. A.C. Hamilton, with Hiroshi 
Yamashita, Toshiyuki Suzuki & Shohachi Fukuda. 
  Gordon Teskey, entry on ‘Allegory,’ in The Spenser Encyclopedia, ed. A.C. Hamilton. 
  Rita Felski, The Limits of Critique, ch.2: ‘Digging Down and Standing Back.’ 
Closer to the seminar I will circulate a document of short extracts on allegory from Quintilian, Puttenham and 
others. 
 
Recommended Reading: 
  Maureen Quilligan, The Language of Allegory, esp. ch.1: ‘The Text.’ 
  Gordon Teskey, Allegory and Violence 
 
Further Reading:  
  Judith Anderson, Reading the Allegorical Intertext 
  Walter Benjamin, ‘Allegory and Trauerspiel,’ from The Origins of German Tragic Drama, trans. John 
Osborne. 
  Bill Brown, ‘The Dark Wood of Postmodernity (Space, Faith, Allegory),’ PMLA 120.3 (2005), 734–50. 
  The Cambridge Companion to Allegory, ed. Rita Copeland & Peter T. Struck (especially the chapters by 
Zeeman, Cummings, Murrin and Caygill)   
  Paul de Man; ‘The Rhetoric of Temporality,’ from Blindness and Insight 
  Angus Fletcher, Allegory: The Theory of a Symbolic Mode 
  C.S. Lewis, The Allegory of Love 
  Jon Whitman, Allegory: The Dynamics of an Ancient and Medieval Technique 
 
Week 3: New Ways of Looking at Theatrical Texts (Bart van Es & convenors)  
This is an exciting time for Theatre History.  Many orthodoxies in the story of British drama are currently being 
challenged and the compositional dates and authorial attributions of specific plays are no longer fixed in the 
way they were once thought to be. Arden of Faversham, Edward III, and The History of Cardenio, for example, 
are all included in the 2016 Oxford Complete Works of Shakespeare, while Macbeth and Measure for Measure 
are featured, as ‘genetic texts’, in the Oxford Thomas Middleton: the Collected Works.  Previously monolithic 
entities such as ‘the playtext’ or ‘dramatic character’ are now claimed by many scholars to be much less fixed 
as categories.  There is, however, also resistance to the new approaches, above all to the claims made for the 
reliability of algorithm-based attribution software or ‘Stylometrics’.  This week we will look at the case of 
Doctor Faustus, written sometime between 1589 and 1592, with recorded performances at the Rose 
Playhouse in 1594.  Philip Henslowe, who was financially responsible for the Admiral’s Men at the Rose 
theatre, and whose son-in-law Edward Alleyn played Faustus, has left telling contextual documents about this 
playtext. Using a play for which Henslowe paid for writing, props and revisions, we will consider what 
contextual documents can reveal about the authorship, dating, and textual integrity of plays. 
Essential
  The ‘A text’ and ‘Introduction’ in Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus Aand B-texts (1604, 1616) 
ed. David Bevington and Eric Rasmussen (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1993) 
  ‘Introduction’ to R. A. Foakes, ed., Henslowe’s Diary, 2nd edition (Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press, 2002) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 14 of 230 
Closer to the seminar we will circulate handouts with facsimile sections from the ‘B Text’, a map of theatrical 
London, and extracts from Henslowe’s ‘Diary’ 
 
Recommended
  Tiffany Stern, Documents of Performance in Early Modern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press, 2009) 
  Andrew Gurr, The Shakespearean Stage, 1574-1642, 4th edition (Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press, 2009) 
 
Further Reading
  Henslowe-Alleyn Digitisation Project: http://www.henslowe-alleyn.org.uk/index.html 
  W. W. Greg, ed., Henslowe Papers: being Documents Supplementary to Henslowe's Diary (London: A. 
H. Bullen, 1907) 
  S. P. Cerasano, ‘Henslowe’s “Curious” Diary’, Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England 17, (2005), 
72-85 
  S. P. Cerasano, ‘Philip Henslowe, Simon Forman, and the Theatrical Community of the 1590s’, 
Shakespeare Quarterly,  44 (1993), 145-158 
  Natasha Korda, ‘Household Property/Stage Property: Henslowe as Pawnbroker’, Theatre Journal, 48 
(1996), 185-195 
  Gerard Eades Bentley, The Profession of Dramatist in Shakespeare’s Time (Princeton UP, 1986) 
  Gerard Eades Bentley, The Profession of Player in Shakespeare’s Time (Princeton UP, 1986) 
 
Week 4: The Mind’s Eye: Theatre and Rhetoric (Lorna Hutson & Joe Moshenska)  
We follow week 3’s ‘New Ways of Looking at Theatrical Texts’ with a class exploring the extramimetic 
dimension of Renaissance theatre – that is, theatre’s rhetorical appeal to our ‘mind’s eye’. In this class, we will 
explore how Renaissance dramatists began, in both comic and tragic writing, to see the restrictions imposed 
by neo-Aristotelian ‘rules’ of temporal and spatial unity as opportunities to relegate certain aspects of the 
drama to the conjectural space of ‘report’. (Someone comes on from offstage and tells you what happened 
‘elsewhere’ or ‘between the scenes’) These ‘reports’, however, are not objective: they offer vivid rhetorical 
illusions of presence, using a technique known as enargeia to appeal to our mind’s eye. Enargeia translates 
into Latin as evidentia, English ‘evidence’. How does the evidence of our mind’s eye, or imagination, relate to 
that of our eyes? How does this relation work within Renaissance plays? To find out, we will look at Quintilian 
on modes of artificial proof and Erasmus on enargeia. Bring your own examples of an ‘unscene’ or offstage-
report scene in a Renaissance play; a handout of examples from plays ranging from c.1450 to 1610 will be 
distributed for discussion.    
Essential:  
  Shakespeare, King Lear (any edition) 
o  (Handout of offstage ‘scenes’ in a variety of plays will be distributed in week 3.)  
  Quintilian, Institutio oratoria, trans. Donald Russell (Harvard University Press, 2001),book 4, ch.2-ch.5 
(on narrative); book 5 (on proofs) [electronic version available via SOLO]  
  Erasmus, On Copia of Words and Things tr. D. B. King and H. David Rix (Milwaulkee, 1999) Book II, 
‘Fifth Method’, 47-55 and ‘Eighth Method’, 57. 
  Lorna Hutson, Circumstantial Shakespeare (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015), 1-35 OR  
  Lorna Hutson, ‘The Play in the Mind’s Eye’, Places of Criticism ed. Gavin Alexander, Emma Gilby and 
Alex Marr (Cambridge University Press, 2020) (forthcoming)  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 15 of 230 
  Peter Womack, ‘Off-stage’ in Early Modern Theatricality, ed. Henry S. Turner, Early Modern 
Theatricality (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013) 71-93.  
 
Recommended:  
  Kathy Eden, Legal Proof and Tragic Recognition: The Aristotelian Grounds for DiscoveryPoetic and 
Legal Fiction in the Aristotelian Tradition (Princeton University Press, 1986)  
  Philip Sidney, ‘The Defence of Poesy’ (c.1580) in Sidney’s ‘Defence of Poesy’ and Selected Renaissance 
Literary Criticism ed. G. Alexander (Penguin, 2004) 1-54.  
  William Scott, The Model of Poesy ed. G. Alexander (Cambridge University Press, 2013)  
  Charles Whitworth, ‘Reporting Offstage Events in Early Tudor Drama’ in Andre Lascombes ed. Tudor 
Theatre: ‘Let There be Covenants’ (1977), 45-66  
Further Reading:  
  Kathy Eden, ‘Forensic Rhetoric and Humanist Education’, The Oxford Handbook of English Law and 
Literature, 1500-1700 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017), 23-40  
  Joel Altman, The Tudor Play of Mind: Rhetorical Inquiry and the Development of Elizabethan Drama 
(Berkeley: University of California Press, 1978), 148-165. 
  Marjorie Garber, ‘“The Rest is Silence”: Ineffability and the “Unscene” in Shakespeare’s Plays’, in 
Ineffability: Naming the Unnameable from Dante to Beckett, ed. by Peter S. Hawkins and Anne 
Howland Schotter (New York: AMS Press, 1984), 35-50.  
  Alan Nelson, ‘The Universities: Early Staging in Cambridge’, in John D. Cox and David Scott Kastan eds., 
A New History of English Drama (New York: Columbia University Press, 1997).  
  Walker, Jonathan. Site Unseen: The Offstage in Renaissance Drama. Northwestern, Illinois: 
Northwestern University Press, 2017.  
  Womack, Peter.  ‘ “Another part of the forest”: editors and locations in Shakespeare’, Shakespeare 
Survey (2016) vol. 69, 243-52. 
 
Week 5: The Female Signature (Lorna Hutson & Joe Moshenska)  
This class is not about adding women into the canon; rather, it asks students to think about how we gender 
literary utterance, assigning it ‘feminine’ or ‘masculine’ characteristics. For many people, the most compelling 
‘feminine’ voices of the period are those of Shakespeare’s women characters and criticism often treats these 
as ‘women’s voices’. Boys were taught at grammar school to imitate the ‘women’s’ voices created by Ovid’s 
Heroides or Letters of Heroines; Sidney and Donne imitate Sappho. At the same time, good style is linked to 
masculinity, as we see in Jonson’s Discoveries (1641). Can women themselves produce a ‘woman’s voice’? Can 
they be said to achieve their own ‘style’? For this class, we will consider Elizabeth Harvey’s theorization of the 
‘ventriloquized voice’ and will focus on two case studies: first, the so-called ‘Casket Sonnets’, attributed to 
Mary Queen of Scots (1542-1587), and second, selected poems by the royalist Katherine Philips (1632-1664). 
For Mary Stewart, compare the sonnets as they appear in Ane detectioun of the doingis of Marie Quene of 
Scottis
 (1572 – you can consult this on EEBO, or in the Weston Library) with one modern edition, such as that 
by Clifford Bax or Antonia Fraser. What generic characteristics and paratextual framings encourage the Casket 
Sonnets to read these as ‘a woman’s voice’? For Katherine Philips, please read a selection of poems, some of 
which turn on the questions of permission, authority and liability for writing and circulating poetry, as well as 
questions of judgement in reading and listening to it. How do these poems constitute the femininity of the 
writer and of the scene of poetic judgement?  
Essential: (*will be distributed before class) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 16 of 230 
  Mary Stuart, Casket Sonnets in Ane detectioun of the doingis of Marie Quene of Scottis : tuiching the 
murther of hir husband, and hir conspiracie, adulterie, and pretensit mariage with the Erle Bothwell. 
And ane defence of the trew Lordis, M.G.B. (St Andrews: Robert Lekprevik, 1572 or London, John Day, 
1571) [On EEBO, and in the Weston Library]*  
  Katherine Philips, from The Collected Works of Katherine Phillips: the Matchless Orinda ed. Patrick 
Thomas (Stump Cross Books, 1990), read the following: 1. ‘Upon the double murther of K. Charles, in 
answer to a libellous rime made by V. P.’; 33. ‘To Antenor, on a paper of mine wch J. Jones threatened 
to publish to his prejudice’; 36. ‘To my excellent Lucasia, on our friendship. 17th July 1651’; 38. ‘Injuria 
amici’; 54. ‘To my dearest Antenor on his parting.’; 59. ‘To my Lucasia, in defence of declared 
friendship’; 69. ‘To my Lady Elizabeth Boyle, Singing --- Since affairs of the State &co.’ * 
o  [You can also find these in Poems by the most deservedly Admired Katherine Philips: The 
matchless Orinda (London: 1667) which you can find on EEBO]  
   Elizabeth Harvey, ‘Travesties of Voice: Cross-Dressing the Tongue’ and ‘Ventriloquizing Sappho, or the 
Lesbian Muse’ in Ventriloquized Voices: Feminist Theory and English Renaissance Texts (Routledge, 
1992), pp. 15-53, 116-139. 
  Rosalind Smith, ‘Generating Absence: The Sonnets of Mary Stuart’ in Sonnets and the English Woman 
Writer: The Politics of Absence, 1561-1621 (Palgrave, 2005) 39-60, 132-139. 
   
Recommended:  
  Patricia Parker, ‘Virile Style’, in Premodern Sexualities ed. Louise Fradenburg and 
Carla Freccero (Routledge,1996) 199-222.  
  Carol Barash, 'Women's Community and the Exiled King: Katherine Philips's Society of Friendship', in 
English Women's Poetry 1649-1714 (Oxford, 1996).  
 
Further Reading:  
  James Emerson Philips, Images of a Queen: Mary Stuart in Sixteenth Century Literature (University of 
California Press, 1964) ch. 3 pp. 52-84. 
  Sarah Dunningan, Eros and Poetry at the Court of Mary Queen of Scots and James VI (Palgrave, 2002) 
  Valerie Traub, ‘“Friendship so curst”: amor impossibilis, the homoerotic lament, and the nature of 
lesbian desire’, The Renaissance of Lesbianism in Early Modern 
  England (Cambridge, 2002) 276-325.  
  Lorna Hutson, ‘The Body of the Friend and the Woman Writer: Katherine Philips’s Absence from Alan 
Bray’s The Friend (2003)’, Women’s Writing, 14:2 (August, 2007) 196-214.  
  Kate Lilley, ‘Fruits of Sodom: The Critical Erotics of Early Modern Women's Writing’, Parergon  29.2 
(2012)  175-192. 
  Patricia Pender and Rosalind Smith, eds., Material Cultures of Early Modern Women’s Writing 
(Palgrave, 2014) [NB: chapters on Mary Stuart and Katherine Philips]  
 
 
Week 6: Tragedy and Political Theology (Lorna Hutson & Joe Moshenska) 
This class will focus on John Milton’s Samson Agonistes (1671).  We will explore the ways in which this work 
stages what looks to modern eyes like a collision between religious and political modes of understanding, but 
then use this apparent collision to question the extent to which the political and the theological can and 
should be separated in our critical approaches to early modern texts.  This will proceed via an exploration of 
the category of ‘Political Theology,’ which has been must discussed by critics in recent years, especially those 
wrestling with the legacies of Carl Schmitt and Ernst Kantorowicz.  We will first have encountered this critical 
and theoretical category in our first seminar, and will now have the chance to return to it in more detail, and 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 17 of 230 
to ask why the stakes of interpreting Samson Agonistes, a work that looks backward towards the imaginative 
universe of the Old Testament, have proven so high for modern critics. 
Essential Reading:  
  John Milton, Samson Agonistes. Read this either in Laura Knoppers, ed., The 1671 Poems (2008), vol.2 
of The Complete Works of John Milton (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008-) or John Carey, Milton: 
Complete Shorter Poems (2nd edition, 1997: Longman).   
  Victoria Kahn Wayward Contracts: the crisis of political obligation in England, 1640-1674 (Princeton: 
Princeton UP, 2004), chp 10 ‘Critique’, 252-78. 
  Julia R. Lupton ‘Samson Dagonistes’ in Citizen Saints: Shakespeare and Political Theology’ (Chicago: 
Chicago UP, 2005), 181-204. 
Recommended Reading: 
  John Carey ‘A Work in Praise of Terrorism’ TLS, Sept 6 2002, 16-17 
  Alan Rudrum ‘Milton Scholarship and the Agon over Samson Agonistes’ HLQ 65 3-4 (2002), 465-88.  
  Feisal Mohamed ‘Confronting Religious Violence in Milton’s Samson Agonistes’ PMLA 120.2 (2005), 
327-40. 
  Abraham Stoll, Conscience in Early Modern English Literature (Cambridge: CUP, 2017), ch.6: ‘Milton’s 
Expansive Conscience.’ 
 
Further Reading: 
  Sharon Achinstein ‘Samson Agonistes and the Drama of Dissent’ MS 33 (1996), 133-58. 
  Russ Leo, Tragedy as Philosophy in the Reformation World (Oxford: OUP, 2019), ch.5 and Conclusion. 
  Janel Mueller ‘The Figure and the Ground: Samson as Hero of London Nonconformity, 1662-1667’ in 
Grahan Parry and Joad Raymond, eds Milton and the Terms of Liberty (Cambridge: D.S. Brewer, 2002) 
137-62. 
  John Rogers, ‘The Secret of Samson Agonistes,’ MS 33 (1996). 111-32. 
  Gordon Teskey, Delirious Milton: The Fate of the Poet in Modernity (Cambridge, MA: 
Harvard UP, 2006), ch. 9: ‘Samson and the Heap of the Dead.’  
 
 
 
Weeks 7 & 8  
 
In weeks 7 & 8 there will be no more set reading for the A course, while you are working on your C course 
essays. Instead, we would like each of you to prepare a short, very informal presentation based on the ‘scoping 
document’ for the dissertation which you will have handed into your supervisor at the end of 6th week. You can 
handle this presentation in any way you like: notes, power point, questions for the class. It’s an opportunity to 
share thoughts about questions you might ask and approaches you might take to your topic. You might want 
to relate your thinking to one or more of the texts read in earlier classes, but there is no requirement to do so. 
This is a free space in which to brainstorm and try out ideas.  
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 18 of 230 
M.St. in English (1700-1830) A-Course 
 
The A-course is designed to introduce some of the key genres, ideas, and critical debates that characterize 
literature written between 1700 and 1830. It is organized chronologically and thematically. Week by week, 
students will be asked to read in advance several primary texts and secondary works (details of the latter will 
be provided in the seminars). We will consider in various ways the emergence of a literary canon in the course 
of the long eighteenth century, and how such a canon has fared since then. 
The A-Course is not formally assessed, but offers a chance for the whole M.St. group to read, explore, and 
discuss the period both widely and closely: it should therefore stimulate and support work for the B-Course, C-
Course, and dissertation. All students will give one presentation in the course of the term. 
Week 1  
  Alexander Pope, The Rape of the Lock (1714) 
  John Gay, Trivia, or the Art of Walking the Streets of London (1716) 
  Jonathan Swift, A Beautiful Young Nymph Going to Bed (1734). 
Week 2 
  Thomas Gray, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard (1751) 
  Oliver Goldsmith, The Vicar of Wakefield (1766) 
  Laurence Sterne, A Sentimental Journey (1768). 
Week 3  
  William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lyrical Ballads (1798) 
  Dorothy Wordsworth, Alfoxden Journal (1797-8) 
  William Hazlitt, ‘My First Acquaintance with Poets’ (1823). 
Week 4  
  Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility: A Novel (1811) 
  Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Eighteen Hundred and Eleven, A Poem (1812). 
Week 5  
  George Gordon, Lord Byron, Don Juan (1818-24) 
  Percy Bysshe Shelley, Julian and Maddalo: A Conversation (1818-19). 
Week 6  
  John Keats, ‘Ode to a Nightingale’, ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’, ‘The Eve of St Agnes’, ‘Hyperion’ (1820), 
‘Epistle to Reynolds’, Letter to George and Tom Keats, Dec 21/27 1817, Letter to Reynolds, 3 May, 
1818, Journal Letter to George and Georgiana Keats, April-May 1819 
  John Clare, ‘Bird’s Nest Poems’, The Shepherd’s Calendar (1827). 
Weeks 7 and 8 
In weeks 7 and 8 there will be no set reading for the A course, while you are working on your C course essays. 
Instead, we would like each of you to prepare a short, very informal presentation based on the ‘scoping 
document’ for the dissertation which you will have handed into your supervisor at the end of week 6. 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 19 of 230 
M.St. in English (1830-1914) A-Course  
Course convenors: Dr Michèle Mendelssohn & Professor Helen Small  

Michaelmas Term 2020 
This A-course aims to further students’ knowledge of the literature in the period 1830-1914, and to deepen 
their sense of established and emerging critical debates in the field. The course ranges across genres and 
modes, engaging with theatrical works, poetry, and prose writing. Each class will open with one or two 
presentations by students, who are asked to engage critically with the material, not just to summarize it.  
“Primary Reading” is what you need to prepare for each seminar. “Further Reading” is entirely optional; you 
are not expected to read these materials unless you are interested in pursuing the topics further on your own. 
Students are welcome to bring their own copies of the primary texts to class, but the editions listed below are 
highly recommended.  
Access to most materials will be provided via two routes: either via the URLs below, or on the ORLO page for 
this course: https://oxford.rl.talis.com/index.html (search using the course name) 
Week 1 – Competing forms of Victorian studies (HS leading) 
Primary Reading: 
  V21 Manifesto: http://v21col ective.org/manifesto-of-the-v21-col ective-ten-theses/  
  Bruce Robbins, ‘On the Non-Representation of Atrocity’ [and responses]: 
https://www.boundary2.org/2016/10/bruce-robbins-on-the-non-representation-of-atrocity/  
  John Plotz, Semi-Detached: The Aesthetics of Virtual Experience since Dickens (2017): Conclusion—
Apparitional Criticism 
  Susan Zieger, The Mediated Mind: Affect, Ephemera, and Consumerism in the Nineteenth Century 
(2018): Intro. 
  Regenia Gagnier, Literatures of Liberalization: Global Circulation and the Long Nineteenth Century 
(2018), pp. 1-36 
 
Further Reading: 
  Christopher Ricks, selections from The New Oxford Book of Victorian Verse (1987)  
  Kate Flint (ed.), selections from The Cambridge History of Victorian Literature (2012) 
  Caroline Levine, Forms: Whole, Rhythm, Hierarchy, Network (2015), Ch. 1 
Week 2 – National, transnational and global literatures. (MM leading) 
Primary reading: 
  Pascale Casanova. The World Republic of Letters. Trans. M. B. DeBevoise. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 
2004.   
o  Introduction. The Figure in the Carpet (1-6) 
o  Chapter 1. Principles of a World History of Literature (7-44) 
  George Eliot, Daniel Deronda.  
o  Chapters 16, 42, 51  
o  http://solo.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/primo-
explore/fulldisplay?docid=oxfaleph019750570&context=L&vid=SOLO&search_scope=LSCOP_
ALL&isFrbr=true&tab=local&lang=en_US 
  Lauren Goodlad, "Introduction: Worlding Realisms Now." Novel 49 2 (2016): 183-201.  
  Josephine McDonagh, “Hospitality in Silas Marner and Daniel Deronda”, 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in 
the Long Nineteenth Century 29 (2020). 10.16995/ntn.1991 
Further reading: 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 20 of 230 
  David Finkelstein, "The Globalization of the Book 1800–1970." A Companion to the History of the 
Book (2007): 329-340. 
  Jonathan Freedman, from The Temple of Culture: Assimilation and Anti-Semitism in Literary Anglo-
America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.  
o  Excerpt from Chapter 1: The Jew in the Museum, pp15-29 [Available as ebook via SOLO] 
  Julia Sun-Joo Lee, The American Slave Narrative and the Victorian Novel. New York: Oxford UP, 2010.  
o  Chapter 1. “The Slave Narrative in Jane Eyre” [Available as ebook via SOLO] 
 
Week 3 – Culture and Its Critics (HS leading) 
Primary Reading 
  Matthew Arnold, Culture and Anarchy, and Other Writings, ed. Stefan Collini (Cambridge: CUP, 1993) 
  Amanda Anderson, The Powers of Distance: Cosmopolitanism and the Cultivation of Detachment 
(Princeton, NJ: PUP, 2001), Ch. 3 
  Nicholas Dames, ‘Why Bother?’, n + 1, issue 11, Dual Power (Spring 2011), 
http://nplusonemag.com/why-bother 
  Francis Mulhern, Figures of Catastrophe: The Condition of Culture Novel (2015), 'Introduction to a 
Genre’ 
 
Further Reading 
  The series of exchanges between Stefan Collini and Francis Mulhern in New Left Review, starting with 
Collini, ‘Culture Talk’, NLR 7 (Jan-Feb 2001). Online at http://newleftreview.org/II/7/stefan-col ini-
culture-talk 

 
Week 4 – The private and the public sphere. (MM leading) 
Primary reading: 
  Thomas Carlyle. From Past and Present (1843):  
o  Extract from Book 3, chap. 13: Democracy  
o  Extract from Book 4, chap. 4: Captains of Industry 
  Audrey Jaffe, “Class.” Victorian Literature and Culture, vol. 46, no. 3-4, 2018, pp. 629–632. 
  Tricia Lootens, The Political Poetess: Victorian Femininity, Race, and the Legacy of  
  Separate Spheres. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 2016. 
o  Extract from “Introduction: Slaves, Spheres, Poetess Poetics” pp. 1-20 
  John Stuart Mill. From On Liberty (1859): 
o  Chapter 3. Of Individuality as One of the Elements of Well-Being  
  Deborah Epstein Nord, “Class.” Victorian Literature and Culture, vol. 46, no. 3-4, 2018, pp. 625–629 
  Kathy Peiss, ‘Going Public? Women in Nineteenth-Century Cultural History’, American Literary History 
3.4 (1991), 817-28  
 
Further reading: 
  Catherine Gallagher, The Body Economic: Life, Death, and Sensation in Political Economy and the 
Victorian Novel. Princeton, Princeton UP, 2006. 
o  Chapter 5. Daniel Deronda and the Too Much of Literature pp.118-155. 
  John Ruskin, ‘Of Queens’ Gardens’, Sesame and Lilies (1894) 
o  Lecture 2: OF QUEENS' GARDENS in E. Cook & A. Wedderburn (Eds.), The Works of John 
Ruskin. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 109-144    
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 21 of 230 
o  http://solo.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/primo-
explore/fulldisplay?docid=oxfaleph020611358&context=L&vid=SOLO&search_scope=LSCOP_
ONLINEDIG&tab=local&lang=en_US 
  Helen Small, The Value of the Humanities. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. 
o  Chapter 2. Use and Usefulness pp. 59-89  
  Amanda Vickery, ‘Golden Age to Separate Spheres?: A Review of the Categories and Chronology of 
English Women's History', The Historical Journal 36.2 (1993), 383-414  
 
Week 5 – Slave Narratives and Diasporic Modernity (HS leading) 
Primary Reading: 
  Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass (1845) 
  W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk (1904) 
  Brent Edwards, The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black 
Internationalism (2009), chapter 1 
  Yogita Goyal, Romance, Diaspora, and Black Atlantic Literature (2010), chapter 2  
Further Reading: 
  Daniel Hack, Reaping Something New: African American Transformations of Victorian Literature 
(2017), Chapter 2, (Re-) Racializing “The Charge of the Light Brigade” 45-75 
  Juliana Spahr, Du Bois’s Telegram: Literary Resistance and State Containment (2018), Introduction and 
Chapter 1.  
  Lloyd Pratt, The Strangers Book: The Human of African American Literature (2016), Chapter 2.  
 
Week 6 – Performance and Melodrama (MM leading)  
Primary reading: 
  "C. Bell" [Charlotte Brontë] to G. H. Lewes regarding Jane Eyre etc. 11 January 1848, 
o  pp. 233-238 in in Elizabeth Gaskell, The Life of Charlotte Bronte (1857) 
o  https://archive.org/details/dli.bengal.10689.11177/page/n281/mode/2up 
  Dion Boucicault, Jessie Brown; or, The Relief of Lucknow (1858)  
o  Available here: https://archive.org/details/adj0994.0001.001.umich.edu/page/n0  
  Caroline Bressey, "The Next Chapter: The Black Presence in the Nineteenth Century." Britain's Black 
Past. Ed. Gerzina, Gretchen. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2020. 315-330. 
  Peter Brooks, The Melodramatic Imagination: Balzac, Henry James, Melodrama and the Mode of 
Excess. New York: Columbia University Press, 1985. 
o  Chapter 1. The Melodramatic Imagination  
  Marty Gould, Nineteenth-Century Theatre and the Imperial Encounter. New York: Routledge, 2011.  
o  section on “THEATRICAL ECHOES: THE THREE JESSIES BROWN” pp. 202-211 in Chapter 10. 
Forging a Greater Britain: the Highland Soldier and the Renegotiation of Ethnic Alterities  
o  http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/oxford/detail.action?docID=692318. 
 
Further reading: 
  Rebecca Beasley and Philip Ross Bullock, eds. Russia in Britain, 1880-1940: From Melodrama to 
Modernism. Oxford: Oxford UP 2013. 
  Sos Eltis and Kirsten E. Shepherd-Barr, ‘What Was the New Drama?’ in Late Victorian into Modern 
(2016) 
  Sos Eltis, Acts of Desire: Women and Sex on Stage 1800-1930. Oxford: Oxford UP,  
  2013. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 22 of 230 
  Gretchen Gerzina, Black Victorians/Black Victoriana. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers UP, 2003. 
  Neil Hultgren, Melodramatic Imperial Writing: From the Sepoy Rebellion to Cecil Rhodes. Athens, 
Ohio, 2014. 
  Ankhi Mukherjee, Aesthetic Hysteria: The Great Neurosis in Victorian Melodrama and 
Contemporary FictionRoutledge, 2007. 
  Matthew Wilson Smith. The Nervous Stage: Nineteenth-century Neuroscience and the Birth of Modern 
Theatre. New York: Oxford UP, 2017. 
o  Chapter 3. The Nervous System: Melodrama, Railway Trauma, and Systemic Risk 
 
 
Week 7 – Gender and sexualities (HS leading) 
Primary reading:  
  George Eliot, from “Silly Novels by Lady Novelists” Westminster Review(Oct 1856): 442-461.  
o  https://www.dropbox.com/s/0avh8nrjq7oyjvd/Eliot%2C%20Silly%20Novels.pdf?dl=0   
  John Stuart Mill, from The Subjection of Women (1860): 
o  Chapter 1  http://ol .libertyfund.org/titles/mil -on-liberty-and-the-subjection-of-women-1879-
ed 
  Browning, Elizabeth Barrett. From Aurora Leigh (1857)  
o  Book 1. lines 251-500 + 730-1145 
o  Preferred edition: Margaret Reynolds (ed.), Aurora Leigh: Authoritative Text, Backgrounds 
and Contexts, Criticism Norton Critical Edition. New York: Norton, 1996 (via SOLO) 
  Mona Caird, from ‘Marriage’, Westminster Review 130 (August 1880) 
o  https://www.dropbox.com/s/zowt5zjqv8mpim1/Caird%2C%20Marriage%2C%20excerpts.pdf
?dl=0 
  Ouida, ‘The New Woman’, North American Review 159 (May 1894) [print] 
o  https://www.dropbox.com/s/fvjexpy1j69z5s9/Ouida%2C%20The%20New%20Woman.pdf?dl
=0 
  Flint, Kate. "Revisiting A Literature of Their Own." Journal of Victorian Culture 10.2 (2005): 289-96. 
  Joyce, Simon, “Two Women Walk into a Theatre Bathroom: The Fanny and Stella Trials as Trans 
Narrative,” Victorian Review 44/1 (2018), 83-98 
o  = special issue on Trans Victorians 
 
Further reading: 
  Booth, Alison. “Feminism.” Victorian Literature and Culture, vol. 46, no. 3-4, 2018, pp. 691–697.  
  Ehnenn, Jill R. “From ‘We Other Victorians’ to ‘Pussy Grabs Back’: Thinking Gender, Thinking Sex, and 
Feminist Methodological Futures in Victorian Studies Today.” Victorian Literature and Culture, vol. 47, 
no. 1, 2019, pp. 35–62 
 
Week 8 – Aestheticism, Material Culture and Thing Theory (MM leading) 
Primary reading:  
  Elaine Freedgood, The Ideas in Things: Fugitive Meaning in the Victorian Novel. Chicago: U of Chicago 
P, 2006.  
  Coda: Victorian Thing Culture and the Way We Read Now pp. 139-158 
  Michèle Mendelssohn, Making Oscar Wilde. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2018. 
  Chapter 11. Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing pp.150-165 
  Walter Pater, ‘Leonardo da Vinci’, in Studies in the History of the Renaissance (1873)  
  John Plotz, ‘Can the Sofa Speak?’: A Look at Thing Theory’, Criticism 47/1 (2005), 109-18 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 23 of 230 
  Tara Puri, "Indian Objects, English Body: Utopian Yearnings in Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South." 
Journal of Victorian Culture 22 1 (2017): 1-23. 
  John Ruskin, From The Stones of Venice (1851-3)  
o  Vol. 2, chap. 6: The Savageness of Gothic Architecture  
o  Eds. E. T. Cook and  Alexander Wedderburn. Lodon: George Allen, 1903-1912.  
o  https://www.dropbox.com/s/0ied64e6p0g321w/Ruskin%2C%20The%20Stones%20of%20Ve
nice.pdf?dl=0 
  Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890-91), ch. 11. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/174 
 
Further reading: 
  Vanessa Schwarz, ed., The Nineteenth Century Visual Culture Reader (London: Routledge, 2004) 
  Christopher Wood, Victorian Painting (London: Bulfinch, 1999) 
  Hilary Fraser, Beauty and Belief: Aesthetics and Religion in Victorian Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 1986) 
  Kate Flint, The Victorians and the Visual Imagination (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000) 
  Bill Brown, ‘Thing Theory’, Critical Inquiry 28/1 (2001), 1-22 [print] 
  Mukherjee, Ankhi. Aesthetic Hysteria: The Great Neurosis in Victorian Melodrama and Contemporary 
Fiction. New York; London: Routledge, 2007 
  Plotz, John. Portable Property: Victorian Culture on the Move. Princeton; Oxford: Princeton UP, 2008.  
  Hilary Fraser, Women Reading Art History in the Nineteenth Century: Looking Like A Woman 
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014) 
 
 
General information: 
You might also prepare for the A-course by reading the edited collections below: 
  Collins and Rundle, eds., The Broadview Anthology of Victorian Poetry and Poetic Theory (1999) 
  Josephine Guy, ed., The Victorian Age: An Anthology of Sources and Documents (1998) 
  Bristow, Joseph, ed., The Victorian Poet: Politics and Persona (1987)  
  Isobel Armstrong, Victorian Scrutinies: Reviews of Poetry 1830-1870 (1972) 
  Edwin Eigner and George Worth, eds., Victorian Criticism of the Novel (1985) 
  Edmund Jones, ed., English Critical Essays: The Nineteenth Century (1971) 
  Carol Hares-Stryker, ed., Anthology of Pre-Raphaelite Writings (1997) 
  Jenny Bourne-Taylor and Sally Shuttleworth, eds., Embodied Selves: An Anthology of Psychological 
Texts 1830-1890 (1998) 
  Laura Otis, ed., Literature and Science in the Nineteenth Century: An Anthology (2002) 
  Sally Ledger and Roger Luckhurst, eds, The Fin de Siècle: A Reader in Cultural History (2000) 
  Laura Marcus, Michèle Mendelssohn, and Kirsten E. Shepherd-Barr, eds. Twenty-First Century 
Approaches to Literature: Late Victorian into Modern (2016) 
 
Three particularly useful general studies:  
  Walter Houghton, The Victorian Frame of Mind, 1830-70 – highly recommended  
  Philip Davis, The Victorians 1830-1880 (2004) – highly recommended 
  Robin Gilmour, The Victorian Period (1993) 
 
Other ‘companions’, handbooks, etc. – useful for initial orientation: 
  Herbert Tucker, ed., A Companion to Victorian Literature and Culture (1999) 
  Patrick Brantlinger and William B. Thesing, eds., A Companion to the Victorian Novel (2002) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 24 of 230 
  Richard Cronin, Alison Chapman and Anthony Harrison, eds., A Companion to Victorian Poetry (2002) 
  Matthew Bevis, ed., The Oxford Handbook of Victorian Poetry (2013) 
  Lisa Rodensky, ed., The Oxford Handbook of the Victorian Novel (2013) 
 
See also the Cambridge Companions Online archive (available through SOLO). It contains all the Cambridge 
Companions to Literature
, including volumes on Victorian Culture, Victorian Poetry, Victorian and Edwardian 
Theatre
, and the Victorian Novel, as well as volumes on individual authors (Dickens, Wilde, Brontes, Eliot, 
Hardy, etc).  
 
The Oxford Bibliographies Online: Victorian Literature is an excellent resource, accessed via SOLO and covering 
key authors and topics. 
 
Also have a look at The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: The Victorian Era – useful sections on 
Darwin, Photography, The Aesthetic Movement, and much else besides. 
 
Finally, two other superb sources of material: 
  The Norton Critical and Broadview editions of particular texts.  
  The Critical Heritage series on particular authors – highly recommended. A really good way to get a 
sense of how contemporaries responded to the work of writers. See, for example, volumes on 
Tennyson (ed. Jump), George Eliot (ed. Carroll), Browning (ed. Litzinger), Hopkins (ed. Roberts), 
Dickens (ed. Collins), and Ibsen (ed. Egan.  
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 25 of 230 
M.St. in English Literature (1900-Present) A-Course 
Literature, Contexts, and Approaches 

Dr David Dwan (xxxxx.xxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx) and Dr Marina MacKay (xxxxxx.xxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx)  
  
This course will explore significant texts, themes, and critical approaches in our period, in order to open up a 
wide, though by no means exclusive, sense of some possibilities for dissertation research. You should read as 
much in the bibliography over the summer as you can—certainly the primary literary texts listed in the seminar 
reading for each week and those others that you can access easily. Weeks 7 & 8 have no reading attached: in 
these sessions, students will present on their proposed dissertation in relation to one of the topics discussed in 
Weeks 1-6. 
 
Week 1: Models of Modernity 
How can we tell the story of literature from 1900 to the present?  The nature of the overview will vary 
according to which authors, which literatures, and which modes of writing. This seminar, without pretending 
to offer a complete picture, will consider a range of influential and emergent accounts of the modern. 
Seminar reading 
  Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse (1927); ‘Modern Fiction’ (1921) 
  Jürgen Habermas, ‘Modernity an Incomplete Project’ in M. B. d’Entréves & S. Benhabib eds., 
Habermas and the Unfinished Project of Modernity (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1997). 
  Douglas Mao and Rebecca Walkowitz, ‘The New Modernist Studies’, PMLA 123, 3 (May 2008): 737-48. 
  Michael H Whitworth, ‘When Was Modernism’, in Laura Marcus et al. Late Victorian into Modern 
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016), 119-32. 
  Amy Hungerford, ‘On the Period Formerly Known as Contemporary’, American Literary History 20, 1-2 
(Spring/Summer 2008): 410-19. 
 
 
Week 2:  Theories of the Avant-Garde 
How is modernism informed by the ideas of the avant-garde or how does the avant-garde distinguish itself 
from modernism?  What kind of avant-garde might succeed modernism and what challenges does it face?  This 
class treats these questions alongside some of the more influential theories of the avant-garde.  We will 
consider how literary magazines like Blast might embody or test certain conceptions of the avant-garde.  We 
will also look at Mina Loy’s poetry – often self-consciously affiliated to continental avant-garde movements.   
Seminar reading 
  Blast, No. 1, ed. Wyndham Lewis (London: John Lane, Bodley Head, 1915) [available on modjourn.org] 
  Mina Loy, ‘Human Cylinders’, ‘Lions’ Jaws’, ‘Brancusi’s Golden Bird’ in The Lost Lunar Baedeker (1923).   
  Clement Greenberg, ‘Avant-Garde and Kitsch’, Partisan Review, 1.5 (Fall, 1939) 
  Peter Bürger, Theory of the Avant-Garde, trans. Michael Shaw (1974; Minneapolis: University of 
Minnesota Press, 1984), 15-55 
  Matei Calinescu, ‘The Idea of the Avant-Garde’ in Five Faces of Modernity (1977; Durham: Duke 
University Press, 1987), 95-143 
 
Week 3: Formalism and Historicism 
In this seminar, we shall be thinking about the relatively new designation of ‘late modernism’—ambiguously 
both a period designation and a marker of formal difficulties—as a way of exploring the critical 
presuppositions of older and newer modes of formalist and historicist approach. If a ‘modern’ literature 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 26 of 230 
receding into the past seems increasingly to require historical contextualization, how far might historicization 
annihilate rather than foreground what was modern about, say, modernism?  
Seminar reading 
  Elizabeth Bowen, The Heat of the Day (1949)  
  Rita Felski, ‘Context Stinks!’, New Literary History, 42.4 (Autumn 2011): 573-91 [This whole special 
issue of NLH is on ‘context’ and its limits.]  
  Marjorie Levinson, ‘What is New Formalism?’, PMLA 122, 2 (March 2007): 558-69 
  Claire Seiler, ‘At Mid-Century: Elizabeth Bowen’s The Heat of the Day’, Modernism/modernity 21. 1 
(January 2014): 125-45.  
Week 4: The Transnational Turn 
The conventional notion of modern, and especially modernist, literature as the work of ‘exiles and émigrés’ 
has taken on a different critical meaning in recent years. In this seminar, we will be using West Indian writers 
in the mid-century metropolis as a case study for thinking about the intersections between modernist 
migrations, post-coloniality, and the transnational turn in modern literary studies.  
Seminar reading 
  Jean Rhys, Voyage in the Dark (1934) 
  Samuel Selvon, The Lonely Londoners (1956) 
  J Dillon Brown, ‘Textual Entanglement: Jean Rhys’s Critical Discourse’, Modern Fiction Studies 56, 3 
(Fall 2010): 568-591 
  Peter Kalliney, ‘Metropolitan Modernism and Its West Indian Interlocutors: 1950s London and the 
Emergence of Postcolonial Literature’, PMLA 122, 1 (January 2007): 89-104 
  Jahan Ramazani, ‘A Transnational Poetics’, American Literary History 18, 2 (2006): 332-359 
  Raymond Williams, ‘When Was Modernism? New Left Review I/175 (May-June 1989): 48-52 
 
Week 5: Limits of the Human 
The twentieth century generated a big debate on the value and limits of humanism – Sartre famously gave it 
the thumbs up, Heidegger gave it a thumbs down.  In this class we will see how literature and its criticism 
might contribute to these debates, focussing on what the human – and attendant ideas of reason, freedom 
and dignity – might mean in writers like Beckett and Coetzee.  To what extent may they be regarded as critics 
of humanism and advocates of some posthumanist dispensation?  How serviceable are terms like humanism, 
anti-humanism, post-humanism for criticism in general? 
Seminar reading 
  Samuel Beckett, The Unnamable (1953) 
  J. M. Coetzee, Disgrace (1999) 
  Bernard Williams, ‘The Human Prejudice’ in Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline (Princeton: 
Princeton University Press, 2006), Chap. 13, 135-152 
  Jean Michel Rabaté, Think Pig! Beckett at the Limit of the Human (New York: Fordham University 
Press, 2016), Chap. 3, 37-48 
 
Week 6: Late Styles 
This seminar aims to explore different and sometimes rival conceptions of ‘lateness’ in contemporary poetry – 
the poet’s reflections on his/her own aging; the maturity of his/her own voice or style; the lateness of a 
cultural movement or what we might call mannerism; the cultural practices of an epoch defined by a sense of 
its own lateness - or what we used to call postmodernism.  How do these issues bear upon poetic form and our 
broader understanding of the function of poetry? 
Seminar reading 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 27 of 230 
  Seamus Heaney, District and Circle (2006) 
  Paul Muldoon, Songs and Sonnets (2012) 
  Theodor Adorno, ‘Late Style in Beethoven’, Essays on Music, trans. Susan Gillespie (Berkeley: 
University of California Press, 2002). 
  Edward Said, On Late Style (London: Bloomsbury, 2006), 3-24 
  Ben Hutchinson, Lateness and Modern European Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016), 
Introduction, 1-28 
 
Weeks 7 & 8: Presentations 
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 28 of 230 
M.St. in World Literatures in English A-Course 
Professor Ankhi Mukherjee xxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx a
nd Dr Graham Riach xxxxxx.xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
The Colonial, the Postcolonial, the World: Literature, Contexts and Approaches (A/Core 
Course) 
The A course begins with 6 seminars that are intended to provide a range of perspectives on some of the core 
debates, themes and issues shaping the study of world and postcolonial literatures in English. In each case the 
seminar will be led by a member of the Faculty of English, in dialogue with one or more short presentations 
from students on the week’s topic. There is no assessed A course work, but students give at least one 
presentation on the course, attend all the seminars, and give a presentation on their developing dissertation 
research in Week 7. You should read as much as possible of the bibliography over the summer – certainly the 
primary literary texts listed in the seminar reading for each week. The allocation of presenters will be made in 
a meeting in week 0. 
 
Week 1 - Theories of World Literature I: What Is World Literature?...What Isn’t World 
Literature? (Graham Riach) 
This seminar will consider what we mean when we say ‘world literature’, looking at models proposed by critics 
as Emily Apter, David Damrosch, the WReC collective, and others. The category of ‘world literature’ has been 
in constant evolution since Johan Wolfgang von Goethe popularised the term in the early 19th Century, and in 
this session we will explore some of the key debates in the field. 
Seminar Reading 
  David Damrosch, What is World Literature? (2003) 
  ––– ‘What Isn’t World Literature’, lecture available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfOuOJ6b-
qY 
  WReC (Warwick Research Collective), Combined and Uneven Development: Towards a New Theory of 
World-Literature (Liverpool University Press, 2015) 
  Extracts from Johan Wolfgang von Goethe, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, Franco Moretti, Pascale 
Cassanova, Emily Apter and others. 
 
Optional Reading 
  David Damrosch, ‘World Literature in a Postcanonical, Hypercanonical Age’ in Haun Saussay ed., 
Comparative Literature in an Age of Globalization (2006), pp. 43-53. 
  Franco Moretti, ‘Conjectures on World Literature’, New Left Review 1 (2000) 54-68. 
  Mariano Siskind, ‘The Globalization of the Novel and The Novelization of the Global: A Critique of 
World Literature’, Comparative Literature 62 (2010) 4: 336-60 
 
Week 2 - Theories of World Literature II: Value (Ankhi Mukherjee) 
In this seminar we will examine questions and contestations of literary value, as these have shaped debates in 
and outside the academy and situated the field of World literature in relation to its cognates in Comparative 
Literature, Postcolonial Studies, and Translation Studies.  
 
Seminar Reading 
  Emily Apter, “Introduction,” Against World Literature, pp. 1-30. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 29 of 230 
  Vilashini Cooppan, “World Literature Between History and Theory,” The Routledge Companion to 
World Literature, pp. 194-203.  
  B. Venkat Mani, “Borrowing Privileges: Libraries and the Institutionalization of World Literature,” MLQ 
74.2 (2013), pp. 239-260. 
  Bruce Robbins, “Not So Well Attached,” PMLA 132.2 (2017), pp. 371-376.  
  Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, “Scattered Speculations on the Question of Value,” The Spivak Reader
pp. 107-140. 
 
Week 3 - Theories of World Literature III: Ecologies and Scriptworlds (Graham Riach) 
This seminar expands the theoretical perspectives introduced in Week 1, with a particular focus on ecological 
models of world literature, and on the written medium. 
 
Seminar Reading 
  Alexander Beecroft, An Ecology of World Literature: From Antiquity to the Present Day (London: 
Verso, 2015) 
  Sarah Howe, Loop of Jade (London: Chatto and Windus, 2015) 
  David Damrosch, ‘Scriptworlds: Writing Systems and the Formation of World Literature’, MLQ, 68, 2 
(2007), pp. 195–219 
  Pheng Cheah, ‘What Is a World? On World Literature as World-Making Activity’, Daedalus, 137.3 
(2008), pp. 26–38. 
 
Week 4 - Theories of World Literature IV: Scope (Ankhi Mukherjee) 
In this seminar we will examine questions of scope in World literary studies, engaging conceptual frameworks 
such as global capitalism and late liberalism, globalism, planetarity, translatability, and remote and distance 
reading.  
Seminar Reading 
  Jonathan Arac, “Anglo-Globalism?” NLR 16 (2002), pp. 35-45. 
  Pheng Cheah, “World Against the Globe: Toward a Normative Conception of World Literature,” NLH 
45 (2014), pp. 303-329.  
  Ursula Heise, “Introduction,” Sense of Place and Sense of Planet, pp. 3-16.  
  Aamir Mufti, “Where is the World in World Literature?” Forget English, pp. 56-98. 
  Shu-mei Shih, “Global Literature and the Technologies of Recognition,” PMLA 119.1 (2004), pp. 16-30.  
 
Week 5 - Decolonizing the Archive: Worlds, War and the ‘Literary’ (Santanu Das)  
How do we understand – and frame - ‘world literature’ in a context where a significant portion of the world’s 
population may be non-literate but is often robustly literary? Is there a tension between the textual bias of the 
‘archive’ (both historical and literary) and the incorrigible plurality of forms through which both historical 
experience and the literary impulse articulate themselves around the world? In this session, we will focus on a 
specific ‘world’ event - the First World War, with a focus on South Asia – and will try to think through the 
‘archive’ and its relationship with cultural and literary memory through an engagement with objects, images 
and sound-recordings as well as with testimonial and literary writings. A good starting point for some of our 
larger questions may be a quick comparison between Peter Jackson’s much-acclaimed blockbuster They Shall 
Not Grow Old
 and John Akomfrah’s low-budget and avant-garde Mimesis: African Soldier, both produced in 
2018 and dealing with the same event. In the process, we will also investigate the singularity of the ‘literary’, 
both as source-material for filling in the gaps of history and as a critical practice of reading.    
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 30 of 230 
Primary:  
  Clip from Peter Jackson, They Shall Not Grow Old - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrabKK9Bhds 
  Interview with Jackson - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdY-1u-rk_M 
  Akomfrah, Mimesis: African Soldier 
https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/John%20Akomfrah%20on%20Mimesis%3A%20African%20Soldier 
  Interview with Akomfrah  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OeSkGO914k 
  Censored letters from Indian soldiers (to be provided) 
  Literary: Extracts from Mulk Raj Anand, Across the Black Waters (1940) (Chapters 1, 2, 4); Extract from 
Kamila Shamsie, A God in Every Stone (2014) (pp.44 - 62) 
  Sofia Ahmed, https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/no-i-wont-wear-the-poppy-hijab-to-prove-im-
not-an-extremist-a6720901.html 
Secondary 
  Santanu Das, ‘Colours of the Past: Archive, Art and Amnesia in Digital Age’, American Historical 
Review, Volume 124, Issue 5, December 2019, Pages 1771–
1781, https://doi.org/10.1093/ahr/rhz1021 
  Maya Jaggi, ‘Decolonizing Commemoration: New War Art’, New York Review of Books, November 14, 
2018. https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/11/14/decolonizing-commemoration-new-war-art/ 
 
Optional Reading 
  Rabindranath Tagore, Nationalism (1917) 
  Rudyard Kipling, ‘The Fumes of the Heart’ from Eyes of Asia (1918).  
  Santanu Das, ‘Reframing Life/War ‘Writing’, Textual Practice, 2015, Vol. 29, pp. 1265-1287, 
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0950236X.2015.1095446 
  David Omissi, ‘Europe Through Indian Eyes: Indian Soldiers Encounter England and France, 1914-
1918’, The English Historical Review 122.496 (2007). 
  Claire Buck, Introduction and Chapter 1 in Conceiving Strangeness in British First World War Writing 
(London: Palgrave, 2015) 
 
Week 6 - Contemporary, World (Graham Riach) 
Seminar Reading 
  Teju Cole, Open City (London: Faber&Faber, 2011) 
  Jia Zhangke, The World (2004) – Screening Organised in the Faculty 
  Robert Eaglestone, ‘Contemporary Fiction in the Academy: Towards a Manifesto’, Textual Practice
27.7 (2013), pp. 1089–1101  
  Pedro Erber, ‘Contemporaneity and its Discontents’, diacritics, 41.1 (2013), pp. 28–48  
  Terry Smith, ‘The Contemporary Condition’ (2016), available at: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=durNqyZPx-g 
Optional Reading 
  Pieter Vermeulen, ‘Flights of Memory: Teju Cole’s Open City and the Limits of Aesthetic 
Cosmopolitanism’, Journal of Modern Literature, 37.1 (2013), pp. 40–57. 
 
Week 7 - Dissertation Presentations 
 Week 8 - Research Week 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 31 of 230 
M.St. in English & American Studies A-Course 
Dr Nicholas Gaskill, Dr Erica McAlpine 

This course will introduce students to some of the major topics and texts in the study of American literature. 
We will begin with Melville’s Moby-Dick, which we will read alongside critical readings selected give us a rough 
sense of how American literary studies has developed since its institutionalization in the mid-twentieth 
century. We will then look at texts from a range of genres and forms, each of which will provide an 
opportunity to engage with a particular sub-field or critical debate.  
One of our goals will be to gain a sense of how the field of American literary studies has been constructed—
and of how fields are constituted and contested more generally. What motivated the embrace of American 
Studies at mid-century? How were the initial assumptions of its practitioners challenged by later generations 
of scholars? And how do we think that the study of American literature should proceed today? What are our 
objects of study? What geographical, national, institutional, or cultural frames are best suited to analyze those 
objects? How do these questions change depending on if we’re talking about novels, essays, or poetry?  
Each week we will expect you to have read the full primary text and selections from the secondary texts as 
listed below the bibliographic entry. If you do not have access to a library with the secondary materials before 
arriving in Oxford, you should concentrate on reading (or re-reading) the primary texts, all of which should be 
readily available. If you do have access to the secondary materials, we would recommend you start your 
reading of them as soon as possible.  
In advance of Week 1, we will distribute a list of four questions we’ll use to guide our discussion of that week’s 
readings. We will provide a brief introduction to the readings at the beginning of each meeting. In Weeks 3-7, 
two or three students will work together to produce and distribute four discussion questions in advance, along 
with a relevant critical or primary text that they have chosen to accompany the week’s readings (preferably an 
excerpt around 25 pages, though longer readings can be recommended). They will also lead the discussion 
after our brief introduction.  
In the final week of the course, each of you will present a report on a recent scholarly text. The list of texts you 
may choose from and the format of the reports are found at the end of this reading schedule. In addition to 
your A, B, and C Courses and Dissertation, you are expected to attend the American Literature Research 
Seminar. Any conflicts with attending the ALRS should be cleared in advance with us.  
 
WEEK 1: Moby-Dick and the Institution of American Literary Studies  
 
  Melville, Herman. Moby-Dick (1851): Norton Critical Edition (3rd ed.), ed. Hershel Parker (New York: 
Norton, 2018).  
 
  A Brief History of American Literary Studies I:  
o  Matthiessen, F.O. American Renaissance: Art and Expression in the Age of Emerson and 
Whitman (New York: Oxford UP, 1941), Book 3, Ch. X, sections 2-6 (pp. 402-59) 
o  Charles Olson, Call Me Ishmael (San Francisco: City Lights, 1947); also in Collected Prose, ed. 
Donald Allen and Benjamin Friedlander (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1997), 
Parts I, II, and IV.  
o  Miller, Perry. Errand into the Wilderness (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1956), ch. 1, ‘Errand 
into the Wilderness’ 
o  Leslie Fiedler, ‘Come Back to the Raft Ag’in, Huck Honey,’ in The New Fiedler Reader 
(Prometheus Books, 1999), originally published in Partisan Review (June 1948) and expanded 
in Love and Death in the American Novel (1960, revised 1966).  
o  Chase, Richard. The American Novel and Its Tradition (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1957), 
ch. 1, ‘The Broken Circuit’ 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 32 of 230 
o  Toni Morrison, Unspeakable Things Unspoken: The Afro-American Presence in American 
Literature (1989), sections I and II (pp. 123-46, especially 135-46). Available at 
https://tannerlectures.utah.edu/_documents/a-to-z/m/morrison90.pdf.  
o  Samuel Otter, Melville’s Anatomies (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1999), 
introduction and ch. 3.  
   
  Recommended: Wise, Gene. ‘“Paradigm Dramas” in American Studies: A Cultural and Institutional 
History of the Movement,’ American Quarterly 31.3 (1979): 293-337.  
 
WEEK 2: Moby-Dick and the Reconfiguration of American Literary Studies 
 

  Melville, Herman. Moby-Dick (1851): Norton Critical Edition (3rd ed.), ed. Hershel Parker (New York: 
Norton, 2018).  
  Melville, Herman, Benito Cereno (1855), available in Melville’s Short Novels (Norton Critical Edition), 
ed. Dan McCall (New York: Norton, 2002).  
 
  A Brief History of American Literary Studies II: 
o  C.L.R. James, Mariners, Renegades, and Castaways: The Story of Herman Melville and the 
World We Live In [1953] (Hanover, NH: UP of New England, 2001), chs. 1-3. We also 
recommend the introduction by Donald Pease.  
o  Jeannine Marie DeLombard, ‘Salvaging Legal Personhood: Melville’s Benito Cereno,’ 
American Literature 81.1 (March 2009): 35-64.  
o  Birgit Brander Rasmussen, Queequeg’s Coffin: Indigenous Literacies and Early American 
Literature (Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2012), introduction and ch. 4.  
o  Edward Sugden, Emergent Worlds: Alternative States in Nineteenth-Century American 
Culture (NY: NYU Press, 2018), introduction, ch. 1 (esp. pp. 71-85), and coda.  
o  Meredith Farmer, introduction to Rethinking Ahab: Melville and the Materialist Turn, eds. 
Meredith Farmer and Jonathon Schroeder (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 
forthcoming).  
 
 
WEEK 3: Dickinson and Whitman: Versions of American Lyric 
 

  Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, ed. Thomas H. Johnson (Boston: Little, 
Brown and Company, 1960).  
o  Get to know at least thirty Dickinson poems very well; make sure to include among them 
'Essential Oils - are wrung,' 'After great pain, a formal feeling comes -', 'They shut me up in 
Prose -,' 'A Spider sewed at Night,' 'Safe in their Alabaster Chambers,' and 'A Route of 
Evanescence.'  Discover the ones that best speak to you.  
 
  Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass and Other Writings: Norton Critical Edition, ed. Michael Moon (New 
York: Norton, 2002)  
o  Please read closely the following: ‘Preface to Leaves of Grass (1855),’ ‘Song of Myself,’ ‘When 
Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d,’ ‘Crossing Brooklyn Ferry,’ ‘I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak 
Growing,’ ‘A Noiseless Patient Spider,’ ‘Letter to Ralph Waldo Emerson’ 
 
  Criticism on Dickinson and Whitman: 
o  Virginia Jackson, Dickinson’s Misery: A Theory of Lyric Reading (Princeton UP, 2005), 
“Beforehand” and chs. 1-2.  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 33 of 230 
o  Angus Fletcher, A New Theory for American Poetry (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2004), 
introduction and ch. 6.  
o  The essays by Randall Jarrell and Allen Grossman in the Norton edition of LoG
 
 
WEEK 4: Stevens and Modern Poetry 
 
  Wallace Stevens, The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens [1954] (London: Vintage, 2015). Please read 
at least the following: all the poems in Harmonium, plus “The Idea of Order at Key West,’ ‘The Man 
with the Blue Guitar,’ ‘The Poems of Our Climate,’ ‘Of Modern Poetry,’ ‘Arrival at the Waldorf,’ ‘The 
Motive for Metaphor,’ ‘Man Carrying Thing,’ ‘The House was Quiet and the World was Calm,’ at least 
the first section of ‘Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction,’ ‘Large Red Man Reading,’ ‘To an Old 
Philosopher in Rome,’ ‘The Planet on the Table,’ ‘The Plain Sense of Things,’ ‘Not Ideas about the 
Thing but the Thing Itself,’ and ‘Of Mere Being.’ 
 
  Helen Vendler, Words Chosen out of Desire (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1986), introduction and ch. 
1 plus excerpts from the rest as you like. 
  Charles Altieri, ‘Valuing Stevens’s Acts of Imagination,’ Wallace Stevens Journal, 41.2 (fall 2017): 162-
69.  
 
WEEK 5: Baldwin in Black and White 
 
  James Baldwin, Giovanni’s Room (1956) and ‘Stranger in the Village’ (1953/1955) 
 
  Mae G. Henderson, ‘James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room: Expatriation, ‘Racial Drag,’ and Homosexual 
Panic,’ in Black Queer Studies, eds. E. Patrick Johnson and Mae G. Henderson (Durham, NC: Duke UP, 
2005) 
  Stephanie Li, Playing in the White: Black Writers, White Subjects (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2015) 
 
WEEK 6: Silko and Social Movements 
 
  Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony (1977) 
 
  Robert M. Nelson, ‘Place and Vision: The Function of Landscape in Ceremony,’ Journal of the 
Southwest 30.3 (autumn 1988): 281-16.  
  Paula Gunn Allen, ‘Special Problems in Teaching Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony,’ American Indian 
Quarterly 14.4 (autumn 1990): 379-86.  
  Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom through Radical 
Resistance (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017), introduction and ch. 1.  
 
WEEK 7: The Futures of Queer Theory 
  

  Maggie Nelson, The Argonauts (Graywolf Press, 2015; Melville House, 2016) 
 
  Lee Edelman, No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive (Duke UP, 2004), ch. 1, “The Future is Kid 
Stuff” 
  José Esteban Muñoz, Cruising Utopia: The Then and There of Queer Futurity (NYU Press, 2009), 
introduction 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 A-Courses 
 
Page 34 of 230 
WEEK 8: Presentations on Secondary Texts 
 
FORMAT OF PRESENTATIONS 
Select three texts from the following list, keeping in mind what would be most useful for your dissertation 
work later in the year. You will be asked to submit your selections in rank order at the end of Week 3, and we 
will assign texts by Week 4. If there’s a book from the last five years that you would like to present on that’s 
not included below but that will be important to your dissertation work, let us know when you submit your 
ranked list. In Week 8 you will present a ten-minute summary and analysis of your assigned text.  
  Arsić, Branka. Bird Relics: Grief and Vitalism in Thoreau (Harvard UP, 2015).  
  Berlant, Lauren. Cruel Optimism (Duke 2011) 
  Brickhouse, Anna. The Unsettlement of America: Translation, Interpretation, and the Story of Don Luis 
De Velasco, 1560-1945 (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2015).  
  Dolven, Jeff. Senses of Style: Poetry before Interpretation (Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2017).  
  Grief, Mark. The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933-1973 (Princeton, 
2015).  
  Konstantinou, Lee. Cool Characters: Irony and American Fiction (Harvard, 2016) 
  LaFleur, Greta. The Natural History of Sexuality: Race, Environmentalism, and the Human Sciences in 
British Colonial North America (Johns Hopkins, 2018) 
  Lawrence, Jeffrey. Anxieties of Experience: The Literatures of the Americas from Whitman to Bolaño 
(Oxford UP, 2018).  
  Lowe, Lisa. The Intimacies of Four Continents (Duke, 2015) 
  McGurl, Mark. The Program Era: Postwar Fiction and the Rise of Creative Writing  
  (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2009). 
  Moi, Toril. Revolution of the Ordinary: Literary Studies after Wittgenstein, Austin, and Cavell (Chicago, 
2017). 
  Moten, Fred. consent not to be a single being (Duke 2018): either vol. 2, Stolen Life, or vol. 3, The 
Universal Machine.  
  Ngai, Sianne. Our Aesthetic Categories: Zany, Cute, Interesting (Harvard UP, 2012).  
  North, Joseph. Literary Criticism: A Concise Political History (Harvard UP, 2017) 
  Rusert, Britt. Fugitive Science: Empiricism and Freedom in Early African American Culture (NYU, 2017) 
  Schuller, Kyla. The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century (Duke, 
2018).  
  Wang, Dorothy J. Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American 
Poetry (Stanford: Stanford UP, 2013) 
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 35 of 230 
B-COURSES 
Overview 

Students will usually take the B-Course classes in Michaelmas and Hilary that cover the M.St. period-strand on 
which they are registered, but (subject to the strand and course convenors’ permission) they may choose to 
join another course if it is in the best interests of their research.  Students should contact their convenors and 
the Graduate Studies Office (xxxxxxxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx) if they wish to do so. Class times and locations are 
given in the Lecture List. 
  
Further research skills courses that are relevant for B-Course work are run by the Bodleian Library, the English 
Faculty Library and Oxford University Computer Services throughout the year. Masterclasses on manuscripts 
and rare books are normally run by the Bodleian Centre for the Study of the Book in Michaelmas term. 
 
Strand  
Michaelmas Term  
Hilary Term 
 
 

 
650-1550 
Palaeography, Transcription, Codicology and the 

Palaeography, Transcription, Codicology and the 
History of the Book  

History of the Book  
   (Prof Daniel Wakelin, wks 1-5) 

   (Prof Daniel Wakelin, wks 1-4) 
 

 
 

 
1550-1700 
Material Texts 1550-1750  

Early Modern Textual Cultures  
 
   (Prof Adam Smyth, wks 1-5) 

   (Prof Adam Smyth, wks 1-4) 
 
Early Modern Hands (Philip West, wks 1-8) 
 
 

 
 

 
1700-1830 
Material Texts 1700-1830  

Material Texts 1700-1830  
 
   (Prof Abigail Williams, wks 1-5) 

   (Prof Abigail Williams and Dr Oliver Clarkson, wks 
Handwriting 1700-1830 

1-4) 
   (Dr Freya Johnston, wks 1-8) 
 
 
 
 

 

1830-1914 
Material Texts 1830-1914  
Material Texts 1830-1914  
 
   (Prof Dirk Van Hulle, wks 1-5) 

   (Prof Dirk Van Hulle, wks 1-4) 
Primary source research skills  

   (Prof Dirk Van Hulle, wks 1-6) 
 

 
 
 

1900-present 
Material Texts 1900-present  
Material Texts 1900-present  

   (Prof Dirk Van Hulle, wks 1-5) 
   (Prof Dirk Van Hulle, wks 1-4) 

Primary source research skills  
 
   (Prof Dirk Van Hulle, wks 1-6) 
wk 
English & 
 
 

American 
Material Texts in English and American Studies  
Material Texts in English and American Studies  
 
   (Prof Dirk Van Hulle, wks 1-5) 
   (Prof Dirk Van Hulle, wks 1-4) 
Primary source research skills  
 
   (Prof Dirk Van Hulle, wks 1-6) 
World Lit. 
 
 
Material Texts in World Literatures in English 
Material Texts in World Literatures in English 
   (Dr Michelle Kelly, Prof P. McDonald, wks 1-5)  
   (Dr Michelle Kelly, Prof P. McDonald, wks 1-4) 
Primary source research skills (wks 1-6) 
 
All (optional) 
Practical printing workshop (Richard Lawrence) 
Practical printing workshop (Richard Lawrence) 
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2
B-Courses 
 
Page 36 of 230 
M.St. in English (650-1550) and the M.Phil. in English 
(Medieval Period) B-Course 
Professor Daniel Wakelin - xxxxxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
- @DanielWakelin1 
 
‘The B Course’: Transcription, Palaeography, Codicology, the History of the 
Book and Editing 
 
This course in transcription, palaeography, codicology, the history of the book and editing will develop the 
scholarly skills essential for work in the medieval period and will introduce ways of thinking about the material 
form and transmission of texts in your research. The course assumes no prior knowledge. 
 
Teaching 
There will be classes over weeks 1-6 of Michaelmas term 2020 and weeks 1-4 of Hilary term 2021. There will 
also be informal visits to see manuscripts in the Bodleian Library (subject to any access restrictions). In the 
middle of each term, there will be short one-to-one meetings to discuss your plans for the coursework. 
Assessment 
(1) You will sit a short test in transcribing and describing handwriting in week 5 of Hilary term 2021 (likely 17 
February 2021). The test will have passages in Old English, earlier Middle English and later Middle English; you 
will have to transcribe and describe any two of the three. The test will be assessed as simply as pass or fail. (2) 
You will submit an essay or editing project soon after the end of Hilary term 2021 (date TBC). The coursework 
should be a piece of research which draws on any of your skills acquired in this course. While the classes will 
primarily focus on sources in English, it will be permissible to focus your coursework on materials in any 
language from, or brought to, the medieval British Isles. 
 
Preparing for transcription 
The most useful preliminary work for the whole course (indeed any Master’s in Old English and Middle English) 
is to practise reading Old English and Middle English in the original languages and spelling. If you have not read 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 37 of 230 
widely in the original languages, you might begin for convenience and variety of sources with anthologies, such 
as: 
  Bruce Mitchell and Fred C. Robinson, ed., A Guide to Old English, 8th edn (Wiley-Blackwell, 2011) 
  J.A. Burrow and Thorlac Turville-Petre, ed., A Book of Middle English, 3rd edn (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013) 
  R.D. Fulk, ed., An Introduction to Middle English (Broadview, 2012) 
You need familiarity with the ‘look’ of older varieties of English – likely spelling, likely words, likely content – as 
a preliminary to transcribing. Understanding the language is crucial in understanding the handwriting. 
Many students find Jane Roberts, A Guide to Scripts Used in English Writings up to 1500 (2005; Liverpool UP, 
2011), useful for practising transcription and description before the test. Our classes will, however, cover the 
topics that this textbook does. For an imaginative if challenging survey of palaeography, something to read at 
leisure is M.B. Parkes, Their Hands before Our Eyes: A Closer Look at Scribes (Scolar, 2008). 
 
Preparing for the classes and coursework 
Before the course begins, please read three or four – whichever prove accessible – of the following preliminary 
overviews and theoretical reflections, to familiarize yourself with what the course will cover. There is no need 
to read all of the items listed.
 A more specialist reading list will be provided in class. 
 
Theoretical reflections on the rationale of this course: 
  Jessica Brantley, ‘The Prehistory of the Book’, PMLA, 124 (2009), 632-39 
  Arthur Bahr and Alexandra Gillespie, ed., ‘Medieval English Manuscripts: Form, Aesthetics and the 
Literary Text’, Chaucer Review, 47 (2013), 346-360 
  Michael Johnston and Michael Van Dussen, ed., The Medieval Manuscript: Cultural Approaches 
(Cambridge UP, 2015) 
  Ralph Hanna, Pursuing History: Middle English Manuscripts and Their Texts (Stanford UP, 1996), intro. 
   
Theoretical reflections on the study of material texts in general: 
  D.F. McKenzie, Bibliography and the Sociology of Texts (1986; Cambridge UP, 1999), esp. chap. 1 
  Adam Smyth, Material Texts in Early Modern England (Cambridge UP, 2018), esp. intro., chap. 4 and 
conc. 
 
Historical overviews of the making and use of medieval manuscripts in general: 
  Christopher de Hamel, Making Medieval Manuscripts (1992; Bodleian Library, 2017) 
  Raymond Clemens and Timothy Graham, An Introduction to Manuscript Studies (Cornell UP, 2007), 
esp. chaps 1-9 
 
Historical overviews of the making and use of books in English, with consideration of the implications for 
literary and cultural history: 
  Daniel Wakelin, Designing English: Early Literature on the Page (Bodleian Library, 2017): an exhibition 
catalogue most useful for its illustrations 
  Michelle Brown, The Book and the Transformation of Britain, c. 550–1050: A Study in Written and 
Visual Literacy and Orality (British Library, 2011) 
  Gale R. Owen-Crocker, ed., Working with Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts (Exeter UP, 2009), esp. Donald 
Scragg, ‘Manuscript sources of Old English prose’, and Elaine Treharne, ‘Manuscript sources of Old 
English poetry’, 60-111 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 38 of 230 
  Elaine Treharne, Living Through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, 1020–1220 (Oxford UP, 2012) 
  Christopher de Hamel, ‘Books and society’, and Rodney M. Thomson, ‘Language and literacy’, in Nigel 
Morgan and Rodney M. Thomson, ed., The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain: Vol. II 
(Cambridge UP, 2008), 3-38 
  Jeremy Griffiths and Derek Pearsall, ed., Book Production and Publishing in Britain 1375-1475 
(Cambridge UP, 1989), 257-78 
  Alexandra Gillespie and Daniel Wakelin, ed., The Production of Books in Britain 1350-1500 (Cambridge 
UP, 2011) 
  Lotte Hellinga, William Caxton and Early Printing in England (British Library, 2011) 
   
Textual editing and transmission: 
  Vincent Gillespie and Anne Hudson, ed., Probable Truth: Editing Texts from Medieval Britain (Brepols, 
2013) 
  Sarah Larratt Keefer and Katherine O’Brien O'Keeffe, ed., New Approaches to Editing Old English Verse 
(Brewer, 1998) 
  Michael Lapidge, ‘Textual Criticism and the Literature of Anglo-Saxon England’, in Donald Scragg, ed., 
Textual and Material Culture in Anglo-Saxon England (Brewer, 2003), 107-36 
  Tim William Machan, Textual Criticism and Middle English Texts (UP of Virginia, 1994) 
  Bernard Cerquiglini, In Praise of the Variant: A Critical History of Philology, trans. Betsy Wing (1989; 
Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins UP, 1999) 
   
Our research is often shaped by reading ‘off topic’. None of these books is at all essential or even relevant to 
the course, but each has influenced my approach to it: 
  Ann Blair, Too Much to Know 
  Nicole Boivin, Material Cultures, Material Minds 
  Johanna Drucker, Graphesis 
  Juliet Fleming, Cultural Graphology 
  Alfred Gell, Art and Agency 
  Lisa Gitelman, Paper Knowledge 
  Heather Jackson, Marginalia 
  Bonnie Mak, How the Page Matters 
  Stanley Morison, Politics and Script 
  David Pye, The Nature and Art of Workmanship and The Nature and Aesthetics of Design 
  Richard Sennett, The Craftsman 
  Sebastiano Timpanaro, The Freudian Slip 
I’d be curious to know what would be on your list of wider influences. 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 39 of 230 
M.St. in English (1550-1700) B-Course 
Material Texts 
Professor Adam Smyth – xxxx.xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx  
 
Some of the most exciting work in early modern studies in recent years has involved the study and 
interpretation of the material text. The B-Course explores bibliography, book history and textual criticism for 
the study of literature. The first term in general examines broader approaches and theories, while the second 
(Hilary) term zooms in to work through a series of case studies. 
Weekly readings (below) are offered as general or theoretical introductions and as jumping-off points for your 
own explorations: the list is neither prescriptive nor exhaustive and will often be supplemented by further 
reading lists provided during the course. 
Readings marked with an asterisk are particularly recommended. Articles in periodicals are generally available 
online through SOLO, as are an increasing number of books.  
As preparation for the course, please read at least one of the following: 
  John Barnard, D.F. McKenzie and Maureen Bell (eds.), The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain
vol. 5: 1557-1695, (Cambridge University Press, 2002) 
  Heidi Brayman, Jesse M. Lander and Zachary Lesser (eds), The Book in History, The Book as History: 
New Intersections of the Material Text (Yale University Press, 2016) 
  Dennis Duncan and Adam Smyth (eds.), Book Parts (Oxford University Press, 2019) 
  Elizabeth Eisenstein, The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge University Press, 
1983) – an abridged version of Eisenstein’s The Printing Press as an Agent of Change (2 vols., 
Cambridge University Press, 1979). Note that this founding narrative is generally now critiqued: see, 
for example, Adrian Johns, The Nature of the Book (Chicago University Press, 1998) 
  Leslie Howsam, Old Books and New Histories: An Orientation to Studies in Book and Print Culture 
(University of Toronto Press, 2006) 
  D. F. McKenzie, Bibliography and the Sociology of Text (Cambridge University Press, 1999) 
  D.F. McKenzie, Making Meaning: ‘Printers of the Mind’ and Other Essays, ed. Peter D. McDonald and 
Michael F. Suarez, S.J., (University of Massachusetts Press, 2002) 
  Adam Smyth, Material Texts in Early Modern England (Cambridge University Press, 2018) 
  Sarah Werner, Studying Early Printed Books 1450-1800 (Wily Blackwell, 2019) 
 
Also: acquaint yourself with the standard process of printing a book in the hand-press era (acquiring 
manuscript copy; casting off; composing; printing; proofing and correcting; binding). For this, the most recent 
guide (which is short, very clear and engaging) Sarah Werner’s Studying Early Printed Books 1450-1800 (Wily 
Blackell, 2019). For more detail, you can look at Philip Gaskell, A New Introduction to Bibliography (Oxford 
University Press, 1972), or R.B. McKerrow, An Introduction to Bibliography for Literary Students (Oxford 
University Press, 1927; reprinted by St. Paul's Bibliographies and Oak Knoll Press, 1994). You might supplement 
this by looking at Joseph Moxon, Mechanick exercises on the whole art of printing (1683–4), edited by Herbert 
Davis and Harry Carter, 
2nd ed. (Oxford University Press, 1962; reprinted Dover Publications, 1978.) 
 
Throughout the course, keep in mind the following questions: 
1.  How do we read materiality? Which features of a book do we notice and describe? What significances 
do we attach to particular material features? Are there material features we tend to overlook? What 
kinds of literacies are required to read material texts? Why do these features matter? 
2.  To what degree is the process of book production legible in the material text – or is the labour of 
making concealed beneath the finished book? If we can ‘see’ how a book is made, what changes? 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 40 of 230 
3.  What relationships might we propose between material and literary form? What new questions can 
we as literary scholars ask in the light of the topics we cover on this B course? 
4.  What does it mean to study the history of the book in the digital age? 
 
Weekly readings 
 
1. What is the history of the material text?  
In addition to the set reading, please survey recent editions of The Library, or Papers of the Bibliographical 
Society of America
, and identify three strands, or tendencies, of recent published research: what kinds of 
questions are scholars asking today? We’ll discuss this in class. 
 
  *D.F. McKenzie, ‘The Book as an Expressive Form,’ in Bibliography and the Sociology of Texts 
(Cambridge University Press, 1999), 9-30 
  * Paul Eggert, ‘Brought to Book: Bibliography, Book History and the Study of Literature’, The Library
13:1 (2012), 3-32 
  * Robert Darnton, ‘What Is the History of Books?,’ in Daedalus, 111:3, (1982), 65-83  
  * Robert Darnton, ‘“What Is the History of Books” Revisited,’ in Modern Intellectual History 4.3 (2007), 
495-508 
  Heidi Brayman, Jesse M. Lander and Zachary Lesser (eds), The Book in History, The Book as History: 
New Intersections of the Material Text. Essays in Honor of David Scott Kastan (Yale University Press: 
New Haven and London, 2016), esp. Introduction. 
  Allison Deutermann and András Kiséry (eds), Formal matters: Reading the materials of English 
Renaissance literature (Manchester University Press, 2013), ‘Introduction’, on the relationships 
between material and literary form. 
  David Pearson, Books as History (The British Library/Oak Knoll Press, 2008) 
  Jessica Brantley, ‘The Prehistory of the Book,’ in PMLA 124:2 (2009), 632-39 
 
2. How do we read materiality?: format, paper, type 
  * Joseph A. Dane, What Is a Book? The Study of Early Printed Books (University of Notre Dame, 2012), 
chapters 3 (ink, paper), 5 (page format), 6 (typography) 
  * Philip Gaskell, A New Introduction to Bibliography, (Oxford University Press 1972), pp. 9-39 (type), 
57-77 (paper), 78-117 (format)  
  * D. F. McKenzie, ‘Typography and Meaning: the Case of William Congreve,’ in Making Meaning: 
Printers of the Mind and Other Essays (University of Massachusetts Press, 2002), 199-200 
  Pauline Kewes, ‘“Give me the sociable Pocket-books”: Humphrey Moseley’s Serial Publication of 
Octavo Play Collections,’ in Publishing History, 38, (1995), 5-21  
  Joseph A. Dane and Alexandra Gillespie, ‘The Myth of the Cheap Quarto,’ in Tudor Books and the 
Material Construction of Meaning, ed. John N. King (Cambridge University Press, 2010), pp. 25-45 
  Stephen Galbraith, ‘English Literary Folios 1593-1623: Studying Shifts in Format,’ in Tudor Books and 
the Material Construction of Meaning, ed. John N. King (Cambridge University Press, 2010), pp. 46-67 
  Mark Bland, ‘The Appearance of the Text in Early Modern England,’ in TEXT, 11, (1998), 91-154  
  Zachary Lesser, ‘Typographic Nostalgia: Playreading, Popularity and the Meanings of Black Letter,’ in 
The Book of the Play: Playwrights, Stationers, and Readers in Early Modern England, ed. 
Marta Straznicky (University of Massachusetts Press, 2006), pp. 99-126. Available at 
http://works.bepress.com/zacharylesser/4 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 41 of 230 
3. Theories of editing 
  * Claire Loffman and Harriet Phillips, A Handbook of Early Modern Editing (Routledge, 2016) – lots of 
short chapters exploring the range of editorial projects and theories alive today. Sample as much as 
you can. 
  * W. W. Greg, ‘Rationale of Copy-Text,’ in Studies in Bibliography 3 (1950-1), 19-36 
  * Randall McLeod, ‘Un-Editing Shakespeare’, in Sub-Stance 33/34 (1982): 26-55 
  * Colin Burrow, 'Conflationism', in London Review of Books, 29.12 (21 June 2007), pp. 16-18 – review 
and discussion on Arden 3 treatment of Hamlet
  Goldberg, Jonathan. “‘What? in a names that which we call a Rose’: The Desired Texts of Romeo and 
Juliet,’ in Crisis in Editing: Texts of the English Renaissance, ed. Randall McLeod (AMS Press, 1988), pp. 
173-202 
  Random Cloud, ‘FIAT fLUX,’ in Crisis in Editing: Texts of the English Renaissance, ed. Randall 
McLeod (AMS, 1988), pp. 61-172 
  Leah S. Marcus, Unediting the Renaissance: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Milton (Routledge, 1996), esp. pp. 
1-38 
  Michael Hunter, ‘How to Edit a Seventeenth-Century Manuscript: Principles and Practice,’ in The 
Seventeenth Century, 10, 277-310 
  Random Cloud, ‘“The Very Names of the Persons”: Editing and the Invention of Dramatick Character,’ 
in Staging the Renaissance: Reinterpretations of Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama, ed. by David Scott 
Kastan and Peter Stallybrass (Routledge, 1991), pp. 88-96 
  A.E. Housman, ‘The Application of Thought to Textual Criticism,’ in The Classical Papers of A.E. 
Housman, 3 vols, ed. J. Diggle and F.R.D. Goodyear (Cambridge, 1972), 3: 1058-69, reprinted in his 
Selected Prose, ed. John Carter (1961), pp. 131-50, and Collected Poems and Selected Prose, ed. 
Christopher Ricks (1988), pp. 325-39 
  Jerome J. McGann, The Textual Condition (Princeton University Press, 1991), esp. ‘The Socialization 
of the Text,’ pp. 69-83 
 
4. The history of reading and of book use 
 
  * Anthony Grafton and Lisa Jardine, ‘How Gabriel Harvey Read His Livy,’ Past and Present, 129, (1990), 
30–78. A paradigmatic article. Is it time to shift paradigms? 
  * Katherine Acheson (ed.), Early Modern English Marginalia (Routledge, 2018) – the most recent 
collection of essays on the subject. Read as much as you can. 
  * William H. Sherman, Used Books: Marking Readers in Renaissance England (University of 
Pennsylvania Press, 2008), esp. pp 3-52 
  * Peter Stallybrass, ‘Books and Scrolls: Navigating the Bible,’ in Jennifer Andersen and Elizabeth Sauer 
(eds), Books and Readers in Early Modern England (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002), 42-79 
  Peter Beal, ‘Notions in Garrison: The Seventeenth-Century Commonplace Book,’ in New Ways of 
Looking at Old Texts: Papers of the Renaissance English Text Society, 1985-1991, ed. W. Speed Hill 
(RETS, 1993), pp. 131-47 
  Michel de Certeau, ‘Reading as Poaching,’ in The Practice of Everyday Life, tr. Steven Rendall (3rd 
edition, University of California Press, 2011), pp. 165-176 
  Bradin Cormack and Carla Mazzio, Book Use, Book Theory 1500-1700 (University of Chicago Library, 
2005) 
  Adam Smyth, Material Texts in Early Modern England (Cambridge University Press, 2018), esp. 
chapter 1, ‘Cutting texts: “prune and lop away”’ 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 42 of 230 
  Jennifer Richards and Fred Schurink (eds), The Textuality and Materiality of Reading in Early Modern 
England [Special Issue], in Huntington Library Quarterly 73.3 (2010), 345-552: several compelling 
articles giving a good sense on the variety of approaches to the subject. 
  Roger Chartier, ‘Popular Appropriation: The Readers and their Books,’ in Forms and Meanings: 
Texts, Performances, and Audiences from Codex to Computer (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995), 
pp. 83-98 
  Ann Blair, ‘Reading Strategies for Coping with Information Overload ca. 1550-1700,’ in Journal of the 
History of Ideas 64, (2003), 11-28  
 
5. Collections in College Libraries: the case of Nicholas Crouch 
We will base this week’s discussion around the printed and manuscript collections of Nicholas Crouch, held at 
Balliol College. We’ll explore particular bibliographical resources, including the College Library’s donor register, 
and the various lists Crouch made, including a list of books he lent, from 1653 to 1689. We will consider 
Crouch’s own organisation of his books in lists he made and through shelf marks he added to volumes, and we 
will also think about issues of conservation and cataloguing. Are collections expressive of personality? Is there 
a legible ideological consistency to Crouch’s manuscripts and books? How do modern curators strike a balance 
between preserving Crouch’s collection as it was, and organising it for readers today? How does Crouch’s 
collection open up new perspectives on bibliographical culture? 
 
Familiarise yourself in advance with Nicholas Crouch, his library, and Balliol’s holdings, by looking at 
‘Reconstructing Nicholas Crouch’ at https://balliollibrary.wordpress.com/2016/09/29/reconstructing-nicholas-
crouch.
 
  * Jeffrey Todd Knight, Bound to Read: Compilations, Collections, and the Making of Renaissance 
Literature (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013) 
  * Andrew Pettegree, ‘Building a Library,’ in The Book in the Renaissance (Yale University Press, 2010), 
pp. 319-32 
  Jennifer Summit, Memory’s Library: Medieval Books in Early Modern England (University of Chicago 
Press, 2008) 
  Clare Sargent, ‘The Physical Setting: The Early Modern Library (to c. 1640),’ in The Cambridge History 
of Libraries in Britain and Ireland, Volume 1 to 1640, eds Elisabeth Leedham-Green and Teresa 
Webber (Cambridge University Press, 2006), pp. 51-65 
  Paul Morgan, Oxford Libraries Outside the Bodleian: A Guide (Bodleian, 1980) 
  Roger Chartier and Lydia G Cochrane, The Order of Books: Readers, Authors, and Libraries in Europe 
Between the Fourteenth and Eighteenth centuries (Polity, 1994) 
 
6. Material texts over time: a diachronic approach (co-taught discussion with Prof. Daniel Wakelin and Prof. 
Dirk Van Hulle). 

 
Hilary Term: Current Issues in the Study of Early Modern Material Texts 
 

Outline of term (weekly readings to follow): 
 
Week 1 
  The temporality of book history: copy, edition, and the longue durée 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 43 of 230 
Week 2 
  Annotation and ownership: John Milton’s copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio 
Week 3 
  Space, circulation, networks 
Week 4 
  Mediation, access, the digital 
 
This course continues the work begun in Michaelmas Term by focussing on particular case studies that show 
some of the challenges and opportunities of the broader fields introduced last term. This means most weeks 
this term will be based around a particular text, figure, institution, or body of work. 
The B-Course will be assessed by a written piece of work, due in 10th week of Hilary Term, on a topic 
expressive of the thinking and research conducted on the B-Course. Although there is no necessity to submit 
your title until 6th week of Hilary Term, the earlier you clarify your ideas, the more time you will have to 
develop them, and it is worth thinking about this during Michaelmas Term. Your course tutors will help you 
develop your essay topic in the early weeks of Hilary Term. 
You will be expected to read about 150 pages of specified material for each class, which will form the basis of 
discussion in the first section. Each student will be expected to deliver a short presentation, on the subject of 
their own B-course essay, during the course of the term; these presentations, and a Q&A session following 
them, will take up the second section. 
 
Early modern hands (Philip West) 
Summary 
This is a course on reading and transcribing early modern handwriting, especially documents written in English 
forms of secretary hand, and in mixed and italic hands. The focus is on the practical skills of reading and 
transcribing texts accurately and fluently, but in order to accomplish this we will learn about how information 
such as numerals, dates, and currency was represented in manuscript writing, as well as other features of early 
modern manuscript culture. The course also provides an introduction to locating and working with 
manuscripts in the Bodleian’s Weston Library. 
Teaching 
There will be eight classes, usually lasting a little under two hours, once a week throughout Michaelmas Term. 
Some classes involve the whole group looking at a set of documents together, while in other classes we will 
split into groups to look closely at examples of related texts. 
In Weeks 1–5 homework transcription assignments will be set. These involve producing a semi-diplomatic 
transcription (usually from a digital image) and should take around 1–2 hours to complete each week. 
Transcriptions will be returned in the following class, with written and oral feedback, so that you can check 
your understanding, and identify areas for continued improvement. 
Assessment 
In 7th Week of Michaelmas Term you will sit a test in which you will be tasked with producing semi-diplomatic 
transcriptions of two short texts written in secretary or mixed hands. The test will be assessed as pass or fail.   
Preparation 
The course assumes no prior knowledge, but there are a few practical ways to get ready to learn to read 
manuscripts. In particular, it is very useful to start adjusting to features of Early Modern English such as its 
non-standardized orthography, and the way punctuation commonly followed breath or rhetorical patterning 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 44 of 230 
rather than grammatical syntax. Probably the best way to build familiarity is to read early modern literary 
works in original spelling texts, but some linguistic reading may be helpful too; for instance, any of the 
following: 
 
  Barber, Charles, Early Modern English (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1997)  
  Nevalainen, Terttu, An Introduction to Early Modern English (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 
2006) 
  Salmon, Vivian, ‘Orthography and Punctuation’, in Roger Lass, ed., The Cambridge History of the 
English Language Volume 3, 1476–1776 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000), ch. 2 
 
To start to get a feel for secretary hand, the most useful book is the now sadly out-of-print Elizabethan 
Handwriting, 1500–1650: A Manual
, by Giles E. Dawson and Laetitia Kennedy-Skipton (later Yeandle), which 
has images and transcriptions. Second-hand copies can often be found online, and many university libraries 
hold copies. By comparison Hilary Marshall’s Palaeography for Family and Local Historians (Chichester: 
Phillimore, 2004) is only partially concerned with early modern texts, though it has some similar features for 
beginning to work on documents. The web, though, offers resources to rival Dawson and Kennedy-Skipton. In 
particular the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Early Modern Manuscripts Online (https://emmo.folger.edu/) and 
Practical Paleography (http://folgerpedia.folger.edu/Practical_Paleography) are very informative, and also 
show some of the directions in which manuscript transcription is currently developing via digital resources and 
such online events as the infamous ‘transcribathon’! Students have also enjoyed the Rediscovering Rycote 
project hosted by the Bodleian Library, and found it a good place to read more about secretary hand and 
forms of transcription (http://rycote.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/Palaeography-Guide-alphabet./) and there is also 
useful quick tutorial on the National Archives website (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/Palaeography/)
Finally, although it is not directly related to palaeography, everyone can benefit from consulting the online 
Catalogue of English Literary Manuscripts (CELM), a really invaluable resource for finding out more about 
poetry, drama, and prose in manuscript (https://celm-ms.org.uk/). 
Further reading 
Palaeography and transcription 
  Brown, Michelle P., A Guide to Western Historical Scripts from Antiquity to 1600, revised edn (London: 
British Library 1999) 
  Buck, W. S. B., Examples of Handwriting, 1550–1650 (London: Society of Genealogists, 1965) 
  Davis, Tom, ‘The Practice of Handwriting Identification’, The Library, 8 (2007), 251–76 
  Dawson, Giles E. and Laetitia Kennedy-Skipton (later Yeandle), Elizabethan Handwriting, 1500–1650: 
A Manual (New York: W. W. Norton, 1966; several reprints) 
  Greg, W. W., ed., English Literary Autographs 1550–1650 (London: 1932) 
  Marshall, Hilary, Palaeography for Family and Local Historians (Chichester: Phillimore, 2004) 
  Petti, Anthony G., English Literary Hands from Chaucer to Dryden (London: 1977) 
  Preston, Jean F. and Laetitia Yeandle, English Handwriting, 1400–1650: An Introductory Manual 
(Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1992) 
  Wardrop, James, The Script of Humanism: Some Aspects of Humanistic Script 1460–1560 (Oxford: 
Clarendon Press, 1963) 
  Whalley, Joyce Irene, English Handwriting, 1540–1853: An Illustrated Survey Based on Material in the 
National Art Library, Victoria and Albert Museum (London: HMSO, 1969) 
  Wolfe, Heather, ‘Women’s Handwriting’, in The Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Women’s 
Writing, ed. by Laura Knoppers (Cambridge: CUP, 2009), pp. 21–39 
Manuscript culture 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 45 of 230 
  Beal, Peter, ed., Discovering, Identifying and Editing Early Modern Manuscripts, English Manuscript 
Studies, 1100–1700, Vol. 18 (London: British Library, 2013) 
  Bland, Mark, A Guide to Early Printed Books and Manuscripts, revised edn (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 
2013) 
  Cerasano, S. P. and Steven W. May, eds., In the Prayse of Writing: Early Modern Manuscript Studies: 
Essays in Honour of Peter Beal (London: British Library, 2012) 
  Eckhardt, Joshua and Daniel Starza-Smith, eds., Manuscript Miscellanies in Early Modern England 
(Farnham: Ashgate, 2014) 
  Hobbs, Mary, Early Seventeenth-Century Verse Miscellany Manuscripts (Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1992) 
  Ioppolo, Grace and Peter Beal, eds., Elizabeth I and the Culture of Writing (London: British Library, 
2007) 
  Ioppolo, Grace, Dramatists and their Manuscripts in the Age of Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton and 
Heywood: Authorship, Authority and the Playhouse (London: Routledge, 2006) 
  Love, Harold, ‘Oral and Scribal Texts in Early Modern England’, in John Barnard and D. F. McKenzie, 
The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, IV: 1557–1697 (Cambridge: CUP, 2002), ch. 3 
  ———, Scribal Publication in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993) 
  North, Marcy L., ‘Household Scribes and the Production of Literary Manuscripts in Early Modern 
England’, Journal of Early Modern Studies, 4 (2015), 133–57 
  Pebworth, Ted-Larry, ‘Manuscript Transmission and the Selection of Copy-Text in Renaissance Coterie 
Poetry’, Text, 7 (1994), 243–61 
  Purkis, James, Shakespeare and Manuscript Drama: Canon, Collaboration and Text (Cambridge: CUP, 
2016) 
  Stewart, Alan, and Heather R. Wolfe, eds., Letterwriting in Renaissance England (Washington DC: 
Folger Shakespeare Library, 2004) 
  Woudhuysen, H. R., Sir Philip Sidney and the Circulation of Manuscripts, 1558–1640 (Oxford: 
Clarendon Press, 1996) 
  Zarnowiecki, Matthew, Fair Copies: Reproducing English Lyric from Tottel to Shakespeare (Toronto: 
University of Toronto Press, 2014) 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 46 of 230 
M.St. in English (1700–1830) B-Course 
Material Texts, 1700–1830 
 
Prof Abigail Williams – xxxxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx  
 
The B-Course explores bibliography, book history and textual criticism for the study of literature. We will 
explore the ways in which the material history of the book and the nature of textual criticism are intrinsically 
related to the kinds of theoretical or interpretive questions that feature elsewhere in the MSt course.  
Weekly readings are offered as general or theoretical introductions and as jumping-off points for your own 
explorations: the list is neither prescriptive nor exhaustive and will often be supplemented by further reading 
lists provided during the course. 
Articles in periodicals are generally available online through SOLO, as are an increasing number of books.  
 
Course Details 
Teaching pattern 
The course is taught in classes over six weeks in Michaelmas Term, and four weeks in Hilary Term. It is taught 
alongside the 8 sessions on handwriting (no formal assessment) provided in Michaelmas Term. The required 
reading for each class is detailed below.  
Assessment 
The B-Course will be assessed by a written piece of work, due in 10th week of Hilary Term, on a topic arising 
from your thinking and research over the span of the B course. Although you don’t need to submit your title 
until 6th week of Hilary Term, the earlier you clarify your ideas, the more time you will have to develop them, 
and it is worth thinking about this during Michaelmas Term. Your course tutors will help you develop your 
essay topic in the early weeks of Hilary Term. 
 
Reading requirement 
You will be expected to read about 150 pages of specified material for each class, which will form the basis of 
discussion in the first part of the session, along with some group discussion of case studies. Each student will 
be expected to deliver a short presentation, on the subject of their own B-course essay, during the course of 
two terms. 
 
 
As preparation for the course, please read at least one of the following: 
  Tom Mole and Michelle Levy, The Broadview Introduction to Book History (Broadview, 2017) 
alongside Tom Mole and Michelle Levy, The Broadview Reader in Book History (Broadview, 2014) 
  Dennis Duncan and Adam Smyth (eds.), Book Parts (Oxford University Press, 2019) 
  Leslie Howsam, Old Books and New Histories: An Orientation to Studies in Book and Print 
Culture (University of Toronto Press, 2006) 
 
It will really help to get familiar with the standard process of printing a book in the hand-press era. For this, the 
most recent short accessible guide, try Sarah Werner’s Studying Early Printed Books 1450-1800 (Wiley 
Blackwell, 2019). For more detail, you can look at Philip Gaskell, A New Introduction to Bibliography (Oxford 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 47 of 230 
University Press, 1972), or R.B. McKerrow, An Introduction to Bibliography for Literary Students (Oxford 
University Press, 1927; reprinted by St. Paul's Bibliographies and Oak Knoll Press, 1994).  
 
Throughout the course, keep in mind the following questions: 
1.  How do we read the material features of a book or manuscript? Which features do we notice and 
describe, and which don’t we consider? How does understanding the history and evolution of those 
features affect the books we see now? 
2.  How does methodology relate to interpretation? So, for example, what kinds of theoretical 
assumptions about intention, readership, authorship are built into the ways we edit and consume 
texts? 
3.  What does it mean to study the history of the book in the digital age? 
 
General collections and overviews of the History of the Book 
Useful Collections 
  Eliot, Simon and Rose, Jonathan. A Companion to the History of the Book (Blackwell Companions to 
Literature and Culture). Oxford: Blackwell, 2009. 
  Howsam, Leslie, ed. The Cambridge Companion to the History of the Book. Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 2014. 
  Levy, Michelle and Mole, Tom. The Broadview Reader in Book History. Peterborough, ON: Broadview, 
2014. 
  Michael F. Suarez, and H. R. Woudhuysen (editors), The Book: A Global History.  Oxford: Oxford 
University Press, 2013. 
General Introductions 
  Robert Darnton, The Case for Books: Past, Present, and Future. New York: Public Affairs, 2009. 
  Leslie. Howsam, Old Books and New Histories: An Orientation to Studies in Book and Print Culture
Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006. 
  Michelle Levy, and Tom. Mole, The Broadview Introduction to Book History. Peterborough, ON: 
Broadview, 2017. 
  Keith. Houston, The Book: A Cover-to-Cover Exploration of the Most Powerful Object of our Time.  New 
York: Norton, 2016. 
  Amaranth Borsuk The Book. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2018. 
  Alison Cullingford, The Special Collections Handbook, 2nd ed. London: Facet, 2017.   
 
Weekly readings 
Week 1. What is the history of the material text?  
In this first session we will step back and consider a long view of the history of the book as a discipline.   
  *D.F. McKenzie, ‘The Book as an Expressive Form,’ in Bibliography and the Sociology of Texts 
(Cambridge University Press, 1999), 9-30 
  * Paul Eggert, ‘Brought to Book: Bibliography, Book History and the Study of Literature’, The Library
13:1 (2012), 3-32 
  * Robert Darnton, ‘What Is the History of Books?,’ in Daedalus, 111:3, (1982), 65-83  
  * Robert Darnton, ‘“What Is the History of Books” Revisited,’ in Modern Intellectual History 4.3 (2007), 
495-508 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 48 of 230 
  Lerer, Seth. ‘Epilogue: Falling Asleep Over the History of the Book.’ PMLA 121.1 (2006): 229-34.  
  Michelle Levy, “Do Women Have a Book History?”, Studies in Romanticism 53.3 (2014) 
 
 
Week 2 Book Parts 
In this class we will look at the component parts of books and manuscripts and ask how they have changed, 
and why they matter. This period covers a shift from manuscript, through to commercial print, and eventually, 
steam press printing. Each of those revised the key elements of the texts it produced.  
  Peter Stallybrass, ‘Books and Scrolls: Navigating the Bible,’ in Jennifer Andersen and Elizabeth Sauer 
(eds), Books and Readers in Early Modern England (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002), 42-79 
  Selected chapters from Book Parts, ed. Adam Smyth and Dennis Duncan. 
 
Week 3. Manuscript, print, and meaning 
In our period, texts destined for print publication were handwritten before being reproduced in print. Can the 
same text have different meanings in manuscript and print? How might the transition from one medium to 
another have influenced how authors thought about and revised their works? How might the emulation of 
manuscript features in print shape meaning? 
Required reading 
  Walter J. Ong, ‘Writing Restructures Consciousness’ and ‘Print, Space, and Closure’, in Orality and 
Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word (London: Routledge, 2002), pp. 77–135 [available online via 
SOLO] 
  William Wordsworth, ‘Ode to Duty’, in Poems, in Two Volumes (London: Longman and others, 1807), 
I, 70–74 [available online via SOLO] 
  ————————   , ‘Ode to Duty’, in Poems, in Two Volumes, and Other Poems, 1800–1807, ed. by 
Jared Curtis (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1983), pp. 302–9 [supplied] 
  ————————   , ‘General directions for the Printer’, in Poems, in Two Volumes, and Other Poems, 
1800–1807, ed. by Jared Curtis (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1983), p. 56 [supplied] 
  Betty A. Schellenberg, Literary Coteries and the Making of Modern Print Culture, 1740–1790 
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016) [available online via SOLO] 
 
Week 4 Textual criticism and theories of editing 
The materiality of texts—their existence in multiple copies, which can differ in a wide variety of ways—poses a 
challenge for editors. In this class we will examine some of the theories that editors have developed to deal 
with the problems of material texts. We will also look the role of annotation in a literary text and the issues it 
raises about authority and readership; and at the role of gender in thinking through editorial choices.   
Required reading 
  W. W. Greg, ‘The Rationale of Copy-Text’, Studies in Bibliography, 3 (1950–1), 19–36 [available online 
via OxLIP and JSTOR] 
  Jack Stillinger, ‘A Practical Theory of Versions’, in Coleridge and Textual Instability: The Multiple 
Versions of the Major Poems (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994), pp. 118–40 [available online via 
SOLO] 
  Jerome J. McGann, The Textual Condition (Princeton University Press, 1991), esp. ‘The 
Socialization of the Text,’ pp. 69-83 
  Ian Small, "The Editor as Annotator as Ideal Reader, " The Theory and Practice of Text-Editing, ed. 
Marcus Walsh and Ian Small (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 49 of 230 
Gender and editing 
  Laurie E Maguire ‘Feminist Editing and the Body of the Text’, Feminist Companion to Shakespeare 
(2000), 75-97 
  B.T. Bennett, : “Feminism and Editing Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley: The Editor And?/Or? the Text.” In 
George Bornstein and Ralph G. Williams (eds.), Palimpsest: Editorial Theory in the Humanities. Ann 
Arbor: University of Michigan Press. (1993), 67–96.  
  Alexander Pettit, ‘Terrible Texts, “Marginal” Works, and the Mandate of the Moment: The Case of 
Eliza Haywood’, Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, 22/2 (2003), 293–314.  
 
5. The history of reading and of book use 
In this session we will explore the developing history of reading and its methodologies, We will think about 
different forms of reading, and about the challenges of evidence, and the ways we use the evidence we have.  
  Anthony Grafton and Lisa Jardine, ‘How Gabriel Harvey Read His Livy,’ Past and Present, 129, (1990), 
30–78.  
  Stephen Colclough, Consuming Texts: Readers and Reading Communities, 1695-1870 (Palgrave, 2007) 
  Heather Jackson, Marginalia: Readers Writing in Books (Yale, 2002) 
  Michel de Certeau, ‘Reading as Poaching,’ in The Practice of Everyday Life, tr. Steven Rendall (3rd 
edition, University of California Press, 2011), pp. 165-176 
  Abigail Williams, The Social Life of Books: Reading Together in the Eighteenth-Century Home (Yale 
2017) 
 
6. Material texts over time: a diachronic approach (co-taught discussion with Prof. Daniel Wakelin and Prof. 
Dirk Van Hulle) 

Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 50 of 230 
Hilary Term B-Course 
 
Outline of term (weekly readings to follow): 
 
Week 1 - Archives and collections  
How are texts collected, categorised, and preserved in libraries, archives, and museums? What categories of 
definition are deployed to organise these archives? What kinds of texts are excluded? How do archives shape, 
enable and limits our research questions?  
  Richard Harvey Brown and Beth Davis Brown, ‘The Making of Memory: the politics of archives, 
libraries and museums in the making of national consciousness’, History of the Human Sciences, 11 
(1998) 
  Wayne A Wiegand, ‘Libraries and the Invention of Information’, Blackwell’s Companion to the History 
of the Book, eds. Jonathan Rose and Simon Eliot (Blackwell, 2007) 
 
Week 2 - Digital remediation. 
What difference does it make when we encounter a text in a digital form? Do the kinds of critical and 
methodological questions we have been looking at in earlier sessions apply? What new issues emerge? 
  Jon Bath and Scott Schofield, ‘The Digital Book’ in The Cambridge Companion to the History of the 
Book, ed. Leslie Howsam (2014) 
  Peter Stallybrass and Roger Chartier, ‘What is a Book?,’ in The Cambridge Companion to Textual 
Scholarship, ed. Neil Fraistat and Julia Flanders (Cambridge University Press, 2013), pp. 188-204  
o  There’s a useful discussion at the end of this chapter of the potential differences between 
digital and paper archives 
  Matthew Kirschenbaum, 2013. ‘The .txtual Condition: Digital Humanities, Born-Digital Archives, and 
the Future Literary’. Digital Humanities Quarterly 7.1. (2013)  
  Peter Shillingsburg, From Gutenberg to Google: Electronic Representations of Literary Texts
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006 
  Andrew Piper, Book Was There: Reading in Electronic Times. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 
2012. 
 
Week 3 - A case study in editing private correspondence: Shelley’s letters 
In this class we will explore the particular methodological and editorial challenges presented by texts never 
intended for publication (specifically, for our purpose, 741 of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s letters). How should 
private correspondence be published? Should it be published at all? How might an editor respond to damaged 
manuscripts, undated letters, and utterly indecipherable handwriting? To what extent, and by what means, 
should letters be annotated? Should false starts, cancellations, misspellings, and redraftings be represented in 
a scholarly edition? 
  Melanie Bigold, Women of Letters, Manuscript Circulation, and Print Afterlives in the Eighteenth 
Century. Palgrave, 2013 
  Daisy Hay, ‘Shelley’s Letters’, The Oxford Handbook of Percy Bysshe Shelley ed. Michael O’Neill and 
Anthony Howe. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012 
  Daniel Karlin, ‘Editing Poems in Letters’, Letter Writing Among Poets, ed. Jonathan Ellis. Edinburgh 
University Press, 2015 
Week 4 - Revisiting revision 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 51 of 230 
The period 1700-1830 is home to some obsessive revisers. Building on questions raised in Week 3 of 
Michaelmas, this class will consider how modern editors have sought to deal with texts that were changed and 
then changed again, and again and again, in manuscript form and across multiple printed versions. How does 
an editor decide which text is best? Is the best text always the right one to publish? What sort of ideologies 
underpin such decision-making (e.g. textual primitivism, considerations of intentionality)? And what on earth is 
an editor supposed to do when seventeen versions of a single text exist? 
  Stephen Gill, ‘Introduction’, Wordsworth’s Revisitings. Oxford University Press, 2011. 
  Zachary Leader, Revision and Romantic Authorship. Oxford University Press, 1999 
  Hannah Sullivan, ‘Textual Criticism, the History of Revision, and Genetic Reading’ [Chapter 1], The 
Work of Revision. Harvard University Press, 2013 
 

Handwriting 1700-1830 
Freya Johnston - xxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
This course of eight classes in Michaelmas Term teaches you how to read, transcribe, and interpret eighteenth- 
and early nineteenth-century manuscripts. The focus is on acquiring the practical skills of reading and 
transcribing texts accurately, but attention will also be paid to literacy and pedagogy (who learnt to read and 
write in this period, and how); the theory and practice of handwriting; gender and class; copying and original 
composition (and how to tell the difference between them); standards of correctness and perceptions of error; 
the relationship of manuscript to print; marginalia and annotations; epistolary culture; and conceptions of 
authorship, especially as those relate to handwriting and to the preservation and reproduction of manuscripts.  
Classes take place once a week throughout Michaelmas Term. Transcription exercises will be regularly set for 
completion and marking.  
This course ties in with and supplements other aspects of B-course teaching in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms, 
including classes on editing and on manuscripts. It is also designed to help you develop the research skills you 
will need for your B- and C-course essays and dissertations.  
No prior knowledge of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century handwriting is assumed, but before Michaelmas 
Term starts you should aim to read as many literary manuscripts from this period in facsimile as you can: see 
e.g. Jane Austen’s Fiction Manuscripts, 5 vols., ed. Kathryn Sutherland (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018), 
and the related digital edition that is free to access at https://janeausten.ac.uk/index.html; John Keats, Poetry 
Manuscripts at Harvard
, ed. Jack Stillinger (Cambridge, MA, and London: Belknap Press of Harvard University 
Press, 1990); Maynard Mack, The Last and Greatest Art: Some Unpublished Poetical Manuscripts of Alexander 
Pope
 (Newark: University of Delaware Press; London: Associated University Presses, 1984). 
 
Useful reading 
Primary Works 
  Astle, Thomas, The Origins and Progress of Writing (London, 1784) 
  Anon., ‘Authoresses and Autographs’, The New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal 8 (1824), 217-
24; 317-22 
  Austen, Jane, Jane Austen’s Manuscript Letters in Facsimile, ed. Jo Modert (Carbondale and 
Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 1990) 
  Bickham, George, Penmanship in its Utmost Beauty and Extent. A New Copybook (London, 1731) 
  Blake, William, The Notebook of William Blake: A Photographic and Typographic Facsimile, ed. David 
V. Erdman with Donald K. Moore (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1973) 
  Browne, Samuel, General Rules to be Observ’d in Writing the Round-hands (London, 1778) 
  Byerley, Thomas [Stephen Collet], ‘Characteristic Signatures’, in Relics of Literature (London, 1823), 
pp. 369-74 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 52 of 230 
  Carstairs, J., Lectures on the Art of Writing, 3rd edn (London, 1816) 
  Champion, Joseph, The Parallel: or Comparative Penmanship Exemplified (London, 1750) 
  Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, Coleridge’s Dejection: the Earliest Manuscripts and the Earliest Printings, ed. 
Stephen Maxfield Parrish (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1988) 
  [Cooke, William], The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. with occasional Remarks on his Writings; an 
Authentic Copy of his Will … and a Fac Simile of his Handwriting, 2nd edn (London, 1785) 
  Dove, William, A Treatise on Penmanship; or, The Lady’s Self-Instructor in the Most Fashionable and 
Admired Styles of Writing (London, 1836) 
  Hawkins, George, An Essay on Female Education (London, 1781) 
  Leekey, William, Discourse on the Use of the Pen (London, 1744) 
  Loughton, William, A Practical Grammar of the English Tongue … to which is annexed An Introduction 
to the Art of Writing, 5th edn (London, 1744) 
  More, Robert, Of the First Invention of Writing: An Essay (London, 1716?) 
  Pope, Alexander, and David L. Vander Meulen, Pope’s Dunciad of 1728: A History and Facsimile 
(Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1991) 
  Serle, Ambrose, A Treatise on the Art of Writing (London, 1766) 
  Shelley, George, Natural Writing in All the Hands ([London], [1709]) 
  Thane, John, British Autography. A Collection of the Fac-Similes of the Handwriting of Royal and 
Illustrious Personages, with their authentic portraits (London, 1788-93?) 
  Tomkins, Thomas, Beauties of Writing Exemplifed in a Variety of Plain and Ornamental Penmanship 
(London, 1777)   
   
Secondary Works 
  Barchas, Janine, Graphic Design, Print Culture, and the Eighteenth-Century Novel (Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press, 2003) 
  Bray, Joe, Miriam Handley, Anne C. Henry, eds., Ma(r)king the Text: The Presentation of Meaning 
on the Literary Page (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000) 
  Douglas, Aileen, Work in Hand: Script, Print, and Writing, 1690-1840 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 
2017) 
  Justice, George, and Nathan Tinker, eds., Women’s Writing and the Circulation of Ideas: Manuscript 
Publication in England, 1500-1800 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002) 
  Karian, Stephen, Jonathan Swift in Print and Manuscript (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 
2010) 
  Kroll, Richard W. F., The Material World: Literate Culture in the Restoration and Early Eighteenth 
Century (Baltimore, MD and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991) 
  Levy, Michelle, Family Authorship and Romantic Print Culture (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008) 
  ------, ‘Austen’s Manuscripts and the Publicity of Print’, ELH 77 (2010), 1015-50 
  Munby, A. N. L., The Cult of the Autograph Letter in England (London: Athlone Press, 1962) 
  Owen, David, ‘The Failed Text that Wasn’t: Jane Austen’s Lady Susan’, in The Failed Text: Literature 
and Failure, ed. José Luis Martínez-Duenãs Espejo and Rocío G. Sumerilla (Newcastle Upon Tyne: 
Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013), pp. 81-96 
  Parrish, Stephen M., ‘The Whig Interpretation of Literature’, Text, 4 (1988), 343-50 
  Price, Stephen R., ‘The Autography Manuscript in Print: Samuel Richardson’s Type Font Manipulations 
in Clarissa’, in Illuminating Letters: Typography and Literary Interpretation, eds. Paul C. Gutjahr and 
Megan L. Benton (Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, 2001), pp. 117-35 
  Reiman, Donald H., Romantic Texts and Contexts (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1988)  
  ------, The Study of Modern Manuscripts: Public, Confidential, and Private (Baltimore and London: 
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993)  
  Slobada, Stacey, ‘Between the Mind and the Hand: Gender, Art and Skill in Eighteenth-Century 
Copybooks’, Women’s Writing 21 (2014), 337-56 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 53 of 230 
  Toner, Anne, Ellipsis in English Literature: Signs of Omission (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 
  Whalley, Joyce Irene, English Handwriting, 1540-1853: An Illustrated Survey (London: H. M. S. O., 
1969) 
  Whyman, Susan, The Pen and the People: English Letter Writers, 1660-1800 (Oxford: Oxford University 
Press, 2009) 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 54 of 230 
M.St. in English (1830–1914) B-Course 
 
This course for the MSt 1830-1914 strand has two components: 
i. 
Material Texts 1830-1914 (Michaelmas Term, weeks 1-6; Hilary Term, weeks 1-4) 
ii. 
Primary source research skills (Michaelmas Term, weeks 1-6) 
 
Material Texts 1830-1914  
Professor Dirk Van Hulle – xxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx  

The starting point of this introduction to bibliography, book history, textual scholarship, digital scholarly 
editing and genetic criticism is that these areas of study are interconnected, rather than compartmentalised, 
fields of research. Together, they can inform your study of literature in innovative ways. But in order to 
appreciate how they interconnect, it is necessary to zoom in on each of them separately first. The aim of the 
course is to show students of literature from 1830 to 1914 how these fields may be usefully deployed for 
literary criticism.  
 
Teaching 
The course is taught in classes over 6 weeks in Michaelmas Term and 4 weeks in Hilary Term, consisting of 
short lectures and seminars, exploring the following topics, applied to texts from ca. 1830 to 1914. The class in 
week 6 of Michaelmas Term is co-taught with Prof. Wakelin and Prof. Smyth:   
Michaelmas Term: 
Week 1 
  Bibliography (literature from 1830 to 1914) 
Week 2 
  History of the book: ‘The Book Unbound’ (Weston Visiting Scholars Centre)  
Week 3 
  Textual criticism (literature from 1830 to 1914) 
Week 4  
  Digital scholarly editing (literature from 1830 to 1914) 
Week 5  
  Genetic criticism (literature from 1830 to 1914) 
Week 6  
  Material texts over time: a diachronic approach  
 
 
Weeks 7/8 
  Initial essay consultations (one on one) 
 
Hilary Term: 
Week 1 
  Paratexts, periodicals, and publishers’ archives (literature from 1830 to 1914) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 55 of 230 
Week 2 
  Approaches to research: ‘Off the shelf’ (Weston Visiting Scholars Centre) 
Week 3 
  Student presentations 
Week 4 
  Student presentations, recap and Q&A 
Weeks 5/6 
  Final essay consultations (one on one) 
 
The exploration of these fields of study relating to Material Texts includes classes introducing various 
approaches to research by means of original documents from the Bodleian’s collections of modern 
manuscripts, archives, printed ephemera and ‘born-digital’ material (MT week 2 and HT week 2; at the Weston 
Visiting Scholars Centre). The course is geared towards two milestone moments:  
  the penultimate session in MT (week 5), in which you (all students) submit a preliminary abstract 
about the topic you would like to investigate and develop for your essay. This gives you the 
opportunity to get feedback before the Christmas break and start your archive exploration, possibly 
with the support of the Maxwell and Meyerstein fund or other funding bodies (for more information, 
see https://ego.english.ox.ac.uk/resources).  
  the last two sessions in HT (weeks 3 and 4), when you (all students) make a very short presentation 
about the topic of your B-course essay.  
 
Preparing for the coursework  
The course assumes no prior knowledge of manuscript studies. Before the course begins, please read two of 
the suggested works on Bibliography (the first section on the reading list below). During the course, the list will 
be referred to and supplemented by further suggestions. There is no required reading; instead, you are 
expected to undertake research to find a topic for your essay by exploring primary materials and reading 
relevant secondary literature. The following, non-exhaustive list of suggested reading is not prescriptive and is 
offered as a starting point for your own research, discovery and exploration: 
 
Bibliography 
  Abbott Craig S., and William Proctor Williams. 2009 [1985]. An Introduction to Bibliographical and 
Textual Studies. 4th edition. New York: Modern Language Association.  
 
  Eggert, Paul. 2012. ‘Brought to Book: Bibliography, Book History and the Study of Literature’. The 
Library 13.1: 3-32. 
  Gaskell, Philip. 1972. A New Introduction to Bibliography. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  Greg, W. W. 1913. ‘What Is Bibliography?’ The Library 12.1 (1913): 39–54.  
  McKenzie, D. F. 1999. Bibliography and the Sociology of Text. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
  Tanselle, G. Thomas. 2009. Bibliographical Analysis: A Historical Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press. 
   
History of the Book 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 56 of 230 
  Bishop, Edward. 1996. ‘Re:Covering Modernism--Format and Function in the Little Magazines’, 
Modernist Writers and the Marketplace, ed. Ian Willison, Warwick Gould and Warren Chernaik. 
Basingstoke: Macmillan: 287-319. 
  Brooker, Peter, and Andrew Thacker, eds. 2009-2013. The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of 
Modernist Magazines, 3 vols. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  Collier, Patrick. 2015. ‘What is Modern Periodical Studies?’ The Journal of Modern Periodical Studies
6, no. 2: 92-111. 
  Darnton, Robert. 1982. ‘What Is the History of Books?’ Daedalus 111: 65–83.  
  Darnton, Robert. 2007. ‘“What Is the History of Books?” Revisited’. Modern Intellectual History 4: 
495–508.  
  Duncan, Dennis, and Adam Smyth, eds. 2019. Book Parts. Oxford: OUP. 
  Eliot, Simon and Jonathan Rose. 2019. ‘A Companion to the History of the Book’. 2nd edition. 2 vols. 
Wiley-Blackwell.  
  Finkelstein, David, and Alistair McCleery, eds. 2006. The Book History Reader. 2nd edition. London: 
Routledge. 
  Genette, Gerard. 1997. Paratexts. Tr. Jane E. Lewin. Cambridge: CUP. 
  Greg, W. W. 1951. The Editorial Problem in Shakespeare: A Survey of the Foundations of the Text
Oxford: Clarendon Press. 
  Latham, Sean, and Robert Scholes. 2006. ‘The Rise of Periodical Studies’, PMLA, 121 no.2: 517-31.  
  Levy, Michelle, and Tom Mole. 2017. The Broadview Introduction to Book History. Peterborough: 
Broadview.
  
  Matthews, Nicole, and Nickianne Moody, eds. 2007. Judging a book by its cover: fans, publishers, 
designers, and the marketing of fiction. Aldershot: Ashgate. 
  McDonald, Peter D. and Michael F. Suarez, S.J. 2002. ‘Editorial Introduction’. In: D. F. McKenzie, 
Making Meaning: ‘Printers of the Mind’ and Other Essays. Amherst: University of Massachusetts 
Press: 3–10.  
  McGann, Jerome J. 1988. ‘The Monks and the Giants: Textual Bibliographical Studies and the 
Interpretation of Literary Works’. In: The Beauty of Inflections. Ed. Jerome McGann. Oxford: 
Clarendon Press: 69-89. 
 
  McGann, Jerome J. 1991. The Textual Condition. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. 
  McKenzie, D. F. 2002. Making Meaning: ‘Printers of the Mind’ and Other Essays. Ed. Peter D. 
McDonald and Michael F. Suarez, S.J. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press. 
 
  Nash, Andrew, ed. 2003. The Culture of Collected Editions. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.  
  Parker, Stephen, and Matthew Philpotts. 2009. Sinn und Form: The Anatomy of a Literary Journal. 
Berlin & New York: Walter de Gruyter. 
  Philpotts, Matthew. 2012. ‘The Role of the Periodical Editor: Literary Journals and Editorial Habitus.’ 
Modern Language Review 107, no. 1: 39-64. 
  Rogers, Shef. 2019. ‘Imprints, Imprimaturs, and Copyright Pages’. In: Book Parts, ed. Duncan and 
Smyth: 51-64. 
  Shattock, Joanne, and Michael Wolff, eds. 1982. The Victorian Periodical Press: Samplings and 
Soundings. Leicester: University of Leicester Press. 
  Spoo, Robert. 2013. Without Copyrights: Piracy, Publishing, and the Public Domain. Oxford: Oxford 
University Press. 
  Sullivan, Alvin, ed. 1983-86. British Literary Magazines, 4 vols. New York: Greenwood. 
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2016. James Joyce’s ‘Work in Progress’: Pre-Book Publications of ‘Finnegans Wake’
New York: Routledge.  
  West III, James L. W. 2006. ‘The Magazine Market’. The Book History Reader, ed. Finkelstein and 
McCleery, 2nd edition: 369-76. 
 
Textual Scholarship 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 57 of 230 
  Bornstein, George and Ralph G. Williams, eds. 1993. Palimpsest: Editorial Theory in the Humanities
Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.  
  Bowers, Fredson. 1970. ‘Textual Criticism’. In: The Aims and Methods of Scholarship in Modern 
Languages and Literatures. Ed. James Thorpe. New York: Modern Language Association: 23–42. 
  Bryant, John. 2002. The Fluid Text: A Theory of Revision and Editing for Book and Screen. Ann Arbor: 
The University of Michigan Press. 
  Fraistat, Neil, and Julia Flanders, eds. 2013. The Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
  Greetham, D. C. 1992. Textual Scholarship: An Introduction. New York: Garland. 
 
  Greg, W. W. 1950-1. ‘The Rationale of Copy-Text.’ Studies in Bibliography 3: 19–36. 
  Shillingsburg, Peter. 2017. Textuality and Knowledge. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press.  
  Stillinger, Jack. 1994. ‘A Practical Theory of Versions’. In: Coleridge and Textual Instability: The 
Multiple Versions of the Major Poems. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 118–40. 
  Tanselle, G. Thomas. 1978. ‘The Editing of Historical Documents’. Studies in Bibliography 31: 1–56. 
 
  Tanselle, G. Thomas. 1976. ‘The Editorial Problem of Final Authorial Intention’. Studies in Bibliography 
29: 167–211. 
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2004. Textual Awareness: A Genetic Study of Late Manuscripts by Joyce, Proust, and 
Mann. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.  
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2019. ‘Textual Scholarship’. In: A Companion to the History of the Book, 2nd edition, 
vol. 1. Ed. Simon Eliot and Jonathan Rose. ISBN: 9781119018179. Wiley-Blackwell: 19-30. 
  Zeller, Hans. 1975. ‘A New Approach to the Critical Constitution of Literary Texts’. Studies in 
Bibliography 28: 231–264. 
  Zeller, Hans. 1995. ‘Structure and Genesis in Editing: On German and Anglo-American Textual Editing’. 
In: Contemporary German Editorial Theory. Ed. Hans Walter Gabler, George Bornstein and Gillian 
Borland Pierce. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press: 95–123. 
   
(see also the ‘Annotated Bibliography: Key Works in the Theory of Textual Editing’ of the MLA’s Committee on 
Scholarly Editions, https://www.mla.org/Resources/Research/Surveys-Reports-and-Other-
Documents/Publishing-and-Scholarship/Reports-from-the-MLA-Committee-on-Scholarly-Editions/Annotated-
Bibliography-Key-Works-in-the-Theory-of-Textual-Editing)
 
 
(Digital) Scholarly Editing 
  Burnard, Lou, Katherine O’Brien O’Keeffe, and John Unsworth, eds. 2006. Electronic Textual Editing. 
New York: Modern Language Association. 
  Cohen, Philip, ed. 1991. Devils and Angels: Textual Editing and Literary Theory. Charlottesville: 
University of Virginia Press.  
  Eggert, Paul. 2013. ‘Apparatus, Text, Interface: How to Read a Printed Critical Edition’. In: The 
Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship. Ed. Neil Fraistat and Julia Flanders. Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press: 97–118. 
  Eggert, Paul. 2016. ‘The reader-oriented scholarly edition’. Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 31.4: 
797–810, https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqw043. 
  Greetham, D. C., ed. 1995. Scholarly Editing: A Guide to Research. New York: Modern Language 
Association. 
  Keleman, Erick. 2009. Textual Editing and Criticism: An Introduction. New York: Norton. 
  Kirschenbaum, Matthew. 2013. ‘The .txtual Condition: Digital Humanities, Born-Digital Archives, and 
the Future Literary’. In: Digital Humanities Quarterly 7.1. 
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000151/000151.html. 
  Pierazzo, Elena. 2015. Digital Scholarly Editing: Theories, Models and Methods. London: Routledge.  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 58 of 230 
  Shillingsburg, Peter. 1996. Scholarly Editing in the Computer Age. 3rd edition. Ann Arbor: University of 
Michigan Press. 
  Shillingsburg, Peter. 2006. From Gutenberg to Google: Electronic Representations of Literary Texts
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
  Van Hulle, Dirk, and Peter Shillingsburg. 2015. ‘Orientations to Text, Revisited’. Studies in 
Bibliography, 59: 27–44. 
   
Genetic Criticism 
  Bushell, Sally. 2009. Text as Process: Creative Composition in Wordsworth, Tennyson, and Dickinson
Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. 
  Crispi, Luca. 2015. Joyce’s Creative Process and the Construction of Character in ‘Ulysses’: Becoming 
the Blooms. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  De Biasi, Pierre-Marc. 1996. ‘What Is a Literary Draft? Toward a Functional Typology of Genetic 
Documentation’. Yale French Studies 89: 26–58. 
  De Biasi, Pierre-Marc. 2000. La Génétique des textes. Paris: Nathan. 
  De Biasi, Pierre-Marc and Anne Herschberg Pierrot, eds. 2017. L’œuvre comme processus. Paris: CNRS 
Editions. 
  Debray Genette, Raymonde. 1977. ‘Génétique et poétique: Esquisse de méthode’. Littérature 28: 19–
39. 
  Deppman, Jed, Daniel Ferrer, and Michael Groden, eds. 2004. Genetic Criticism: Texts and Avant-
Textes. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 
  Ferrer, Daniel. 2002. ‘Production, Invention, and Reproduction: Genetic vs. Textual Criticism’. In: 
Reimagining Textuality: Textual Studies in the Late Age of Print. Ed. Elizabeth Bergmann Loizeaux and 
Neil Fraistat. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press. 
 
  Ferrer, Daniel. 2011. Logiques du brouillon: Modèles pour une critique génétique. Paris: Seuil. 
  Ferrer, Daniel. 2016. ‘Genetic Criticism with Textual Criticism: From Variant to Variation’. In: Variants: 
The Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship 12–13 (2016), 57–64.  
  Fordham, Finn. 2010. I Do I Undo I Redo: The Textual Genesis of Modernist Selves. Oxford: Oxford 
University Press.  
  Gabler, Hans Walter. 2018. Text Genetics in Literary Modernism and Other Essays. Cambridge: Open 
Book Publishers. 
  Grésillon, Almuth. 1994. Eléments de critique génétique: Lire les manuscrits modernes. Paris: Presses 
Universitaires de Paris. 
  Hay, Louis. 2002. La littérature des écrivains. Paris: José Corti.  
  Ries, Thorsten. ‘The rationale of the born-digital dossier génétique: Digital forensics and the writing 
process: With examples from the Thomas Kling Archive’. Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 33.2: 
391–424.  
  Stillinger, Jack. 1991. Multiple Authorship and the Myth of Solitary Genius. Oxford: Oxford University 
Press. 
  Sullivan, Hannah. 2013. The Work of Revision. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.  
  Van Hulle, Dirk, and Wim Van Mierlo, eds. 2004. Reading Notes. Amsterdam: Rodopi.  
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2014. Modern Manuscripts: The Extended Mind and Creative Undoing from Darwin to 
Beckett and Beyond. London: Bloomsbury.  
 
Primary source research skills (Michaelmas Term, weeks 1-6) 
 
The purpose of this part of the M.St. course is to introduce students to primary sources, particularly 
manuscripts and archives. The point of this practical course is to learn some of the techniques and 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 59 of 230 
methodologies involved in working with primary sources, and to explore what is researchable beyond the 
published canon. This includes deciphering and transcribing manuscripts and making them accessible to other 
scholars and interested readers, either in a printed or in a digital format.  
 
Teaching 
The course is taught in classes over 6 weeks in Michaelmas Term.  
 
Michaelmas Term: 
Week 1 
  Transcription of modern manuscripts (manuscripts from ca. 1830 to 1914) 
Week 2 
  Topographic / linearized transcription (manuscripts from ca. 1830 to 1914) 
Week 3 
  Digital transcription (XML-TEI) (manuscripts from ca. 1830 to 1914) 
Week 4  
  Introduction to digital edition development (manuscripts from ca. 1830 to 1914) 
Week 5  
  Reconstructing the writing sequence (manuscripts from ca. 1830 to 1914) 
Week 6  
  Working with digital archives; integrating transcriptions in critical writing 
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 60 of 230 
M.St. in English (1900-present) B-Course   
 
This course for the MSt 1900-Present strand has two components: 
1.  Material Texts 1900-Present (Michaelmas Term, weeks 1-6; Hilary Term, weeks 1-4) 
2.  Primary source research skills (Michaelmas Term, weeks 1-6) 
 
Material Texts 1900-Present  
In literary studies, it is often obvious that a particular work somehow seems to hit a nerve, but it is more 
challenging to pinpoint exactly why it ‘works’. The rationale behind the Material Texts course, therefore, is 
that knowing how something was made can help us understand how and why it works. In that sense, the study 
of the materiality of manuscripts and books can serve as a reading strategy, also for students who are not 
primarily interested in doing bibliographical research. Together, we will explore how bibliography, book 
history, genetic criticism, textual scholarship and digital scholarly editing are interconnected, rather than 
compartmentalised, fields; how they can interact in innovative ways; and how they can inform your research 
into literature of the period 1900 to the present day. 
 
Teaching 
The course is taught in classes over 6 weeks in Michaelmas Term and 4 weeks in Hilary Term, consisting of 
short lectures and seminars, exploring the following topics, applied to texts from 1900 to the present. The 
class in week 6 of Michaelmas Term is co-taught with Prof. Wakelin and Prof. Smyth:   
 
Michaelmas Term: 
Week 1 
  Bibliography (literature from 1900 to the present) 
Week 2 
  History of the book: ‘The Book Unbound’ (Weston Visiting Scholars Centre) 
Week 3 
  Textual criticism (literature from 1900 – present) 
Week 4 
  Digital scholarly editing (literature from 1900 to the present) 
Week 5 
  Genetic criticism (literature from 1900 to the present) 
Week 6  
  Material texts over time: a diachronic approach  
Weeks 7/8 
  Initial essay consultations (one on one) 
 
Hilary Term: 
Week 1 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 61 of 230 
  Paratexts and publishers’ archives (guest lecture by Michael Whitworth) 
Week 2 
  Approaches to research: ‘Off the shelf’ (Weston Visiting Scholars Centre) 
Week 3 
  Student presentations 
Week 4 
  Student presentations, recap and Q&A  
Weeks 5/6 
  Final essay consultations (one on one) 
 
The exploration of these fields of study relating to Material Texts includes classes introducing various 
approaches to research by means of original documents from the Bodleian’s collections of modern 
manuscripts, archives, printed ephemera and ‘born-digital’ material (MT week 2 and HT week 2; at the Weston 
Visiting Scholars Centre, subject to any access restrictions). The course is geared towards two milestone 
moments:  
1.  the penultimate session in MT (week 5), in which you (all students) submit a preliminary abstract 
about the topic you would like to investigate and develop for your essay. This gives you the 
opportunity to get feedback before the Christmas break and start your archive exploration, possibly 
with the support of the Maxwell and Meyerstein fund or other funding bodies (for more information, 
see https://ego.english.ox.ac.uk/resources).  
2.  the last two sessions in HT (weeks 3 and 4), when you (all students) make a very short presentation 
about the topic of your B-course essay.  
 
Preparing for the coursework  
The course assumes no prior knowledge of manuscript studies. Before the course begins, please read two of 
the suggested works on Bibliography (the first section on the reading list below). During the course, the list will 
be referred to and supplemented by further suggestions. There is no required reading; instead, you are 
expected to undertake research to find a topic for your essay by exploring primary materials and reading 
relevant secondary literature. The following, non-exhaustive list of suggested reading is not prescriptive and is 
offered as a starting point for your own research, discovery and exploration: 
 
Bibliography 
  Abbott Craig S., and William Proctor Williams. 2009 [1985]. An Introduction to Bibliographical and 
Textual Studies. 4th edition. New York: Modern Language Association.  
 
  Eggert, Paul. 2012. ‘Brought to Book: Bibliography, Book History and the Study of Literature’. The 
Library 13.1: 3-32. 
  Gaskell, Philip. 1972. A New Introduction to Bibliography. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  Greg, W. W. 1913. ‘What Is Bibliography?’ The Library 12.1 (1913): 39–54.  
  McKenzie, D. F. 1999. Bibliography and the Sociology of Text. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
  Tanselle, G. Thomas. 2009. Bibliographical Analysis: A Historical Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press. 
 
History of the Book 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 62 of 230 
  Bishop, Edward. 1996. ‘Re:Covering Modernism--Format and Function in the Little Magazines’, 
Modernist Writers and the Marketplace, ed. Ian Willison, Warwick Gould and Warren Chernaik. 
Basingstoke: Macmillan: 287-319. 
  Brooker, Peter, and Andrew Thacker, eds. 2009-2013. The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of 
Modernist Magazines, 3 vols. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  Collier, Patrick. 2015. ‘What is Modern Periodical Studies?’ The Journal of Modern Periodical Studies
6, no. 2: 92-111. 
  Darnton, Robert. 1982. ‘What Is the History of Books?’ Daedalus 111: 65–83.  
  Darnton, Robert. 2007. ‘“What Is the History of Books?” Revisited’. Modern Intellectual History 4: 
495–508.  
  Duncan, Dennis, and Adam Smyth, eds. 2019. Book Parts. Oxford: OUP. 
  Eliot, Simon and Jonathan Rose. 2019. ‘A Companion to the History of the Book’. 2nd edition. 2 vols. 
Wiley-Blackwell.  
  Finkelstein, David, and Alistair McCleery, eds. 2006. The Book History Reader. 2nd edition. London: 
Routledge. 
  Genette, Gerard. 1997. Paratexts. Tr. Jane E. Lewin. Cambridge: CUP. 
  Greg, W. W. 1951. The Editorial Problem in Shakespeare: A Survey of the Foundations of the Text
Oxford: Clarendon Press. 
  Latham, Sean, and Robert Scholes. 2006. ‘The Rise of Periodical Studies’, PMLA, 121 no.2: 517-31.  
  Levy, Michelle, and Tom Mole. 2017. The Broadview Introduction to Book History. Peterborough: 
Broadview.
  
  Matthews, Nicole, and Nickianne Moody, eds. 2007. Judging a book by its cover: fans, publishers, 
designers, and the marketing of fiction. Aldershot: Ashgate. 
  McDonald, Peter D. and Michael F. Suarez, S.J. 2002. ‘Editorial Introduction’. In: D. F. McKenzie, 
Making Meaning: ‘Printers of the Mind’ and Other Essays. Amherst: University of Massachusetts 
Press: 3–10.  
  McGann, Jerome J. 1988. ‘The Monks and the Giants: Textual Bibliographical Studies and the 
Interpretation of Literary Works’. In: The Beauty of Inflections. Ed. Jerome McGann. Oxford: 
Clarendon Press: 69-89. 
 
  McGann, Jerome J. 1991. The Textual Condition. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. 
  McKenzie, D. F. 2002. Making Meaning: ‘Printers of the Mind’ and Other Essays. Ed. Peter D. 
McDonald and Michael F. Suarez, S.J. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press. 
 
  Nash, Andrew, ed. 2003. The Culture of Collected Editions. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.  
  Parker, Stephen, and Matthew Philpotts. 2009. Sinn und Form: The Anatomy of a Literary Journal. 
Berlin & New York: Walter de Gruyter. 
  Philpotts, Matthew. 2012. ‘The Role of the Periodical Editor: Literary Journals and Editorial Habitus.’ 
Modern Language Review 107, no. 1: 39-64. 
  Rogers, Shef. 2019. ‘Imprints, Imprimaturs, and Copyright Pages’. In: Book Parts, ed. Duncan and 
Smyth: 51-64. 
  Shattock, Joanne, and Michael Wolff, eds. 1982. The Victorian Periodical Press: Samplings and 
Soundings. Leicester: University of Leicester Press. 
  Spoo, Robert. 2013. Without Copyrights: Piracy, Publishing, and the Public Domain. Oxford: Oxford 
University Press. 
  Sullivan, Alvin, ed. 1983-86. British Literary Magazines, 4 vols. New York: Greenwood. 
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2016. James Joyce’s ‘Work in Progress’: Pre-Book Publications of ‘Finnegans Wake’
New York: Routledge.  
  West III, James L. W. 2006. ‘The Magazine Market’. The Book History Reader, ed. Finkelstein and 
McCleery, 2nd edition: 369-76. 
 
Textual Scholarship 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 63 of 230 
  Bornstein, George and Ralph G. Williams, eds. 1993. Palimpsest: Editorial Theory in the Humanities
Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.  
  Bowers, Fredson. 1970. ‘Textual Criticism’. In: The Aims and Methods of Scholarship in Modern 
Languages and Literatures. Ed. James Thorpe. New York: Modern Language Association: 23–42. 
  Bryant, John. 2002. The Fluid Text: A Theory of Revision and Editing for Book and Screen. Ann Arbor: 
The University of Michigan Press. 
  Fraistat, Neil, and Julia Flanders, eds. 2013. The Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
  Greetham, D. C. 1992. Textual Scholarship: An Introduction. New York: Garland. 
 
  Greg, W. W. 1950-1. ‘The Rationale of Copy-Text.’ Studies in Bibliography 3: 19–36. 
  Shillingsburg, Peter. 2017. Textuality and Knowledge. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press.  
  Stillinger, Jack. 1994. ‘A Practical Theory of Versions’. In: Coleridge and Textual Instability: The 
Multiple Versions of the Major Poems. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 118–40. 
  Tanselle, G. Thomas. 1978. ‘The Editing of Historical Documents’. Studies in Bibliography 31: 1–56. 
 
  Tanselle, G. Thomas. 1976. ‘The Editorial Problem of Final Authorial Intention’. Studies in Bibliography 
29: 167–211. 
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2004. Textual Awareness: A Genetic Study of Late Manuscripts by Joyce, Proust, and 
Mann. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.  
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2019. ‘Textual Scholarship’. In: A Companion to the History of the Book, 2nd edition, 
vol. 1. Ed. Simon Eliot and Jonathan Rose. ISBN: 9781119018179. Wiley-Blackwell: 19-30. 
  Zeller, Hans. 1975. ‘A New Approach to the Critical Constitution of Literary Texts’. Studies in 
Bibliography 28: 231–264. 
  Zeller, Hans. 1995. ‘Structure and Genesis in Editing: On German and Anglo-American Textual Editing’. 
In: Contemporary German Editorial Theory. Ed. Hans Walter Gabler, George Bornstein and Gillian 
Borland Pierce. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press: 95–123. 
(see also the ‘Annotated Bibliography: Key Works in the Theory of Textual Editing’ of the MLA’s Committee on 
Scholarly Editions, https://www.mla.org/Resources/Research/Surveys-Reports-and-Other-
Documents/Publishing-and-Scholarship/Reports-from-the-MLA-Committee-on-Scholarly-Editions/Annotated-
Bibliography-Key-Works-in-the-Theory-of-Textual-Editing)
 
 
(Digital) Scholarly Editing 
  Burnard, Lou, Katherine O’Brien O’Keeffe, and John Unsworth, eds. 2006. Electronic Textual Editing. 
New York: Modern Language Association. 
  Cohen, Philip, ed. 1991. Devils and Angels: Textual Editing and Literary Theory. Charlottesville: 
University of Virginia Press.  
  Eggert, Paul. 2013. ‘Apparatus, Text, Interface: How to Read a Printed Critical Edition’. In: The 
Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship. Ed. Neil Fraistat and Julia Flanders. Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press: 97–118. 
  Eggert, Paul. 2016. ‘The reader-oriented scholarly edition’. Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 31.4: 
797–810, https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqw043. 
  Greetham, D. C., ed. 1995. Scholarly Editing: A Guide to Research. New York: Modern Language 
Association. 
  Keleman, Erick. 2009. Textual Editing and Criticism: An Introduction. New York: Norton. 
  Kirschenbaum, Matthew. 2013. ‘The .txtual Condition: Digital Humanities, Born-Digital Archives, and 
the Future Literary’. In: Digital Humanities Quarterly 7.1. 
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000151/000151.html. 
  Pierazzo, Elena. 2015. Digital Scholarly Editing: Theories, Models and Methods. London: Routledge.  
  Shillingsburg, Peter. 1996. Scholarly Editing in the Computer Age. 3rd edition. Ann Arbor: University of 
Michigan Press. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 64 of 230 
  Shillingsburg, Peter. 2006. From Gutenberg to Google: Electronic Representations of Literary Texts
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
  Van Hulle, Dirk, and Peter Shillingsburg. 2015. ‘Orientations to Text, Revisited’. Studies in 
Bibliography, 59: 27–44. 
 
Genetic Criticism 
  Bushell, Sally. 2009. Text as Process: Creative Composition in Wordsworth, Tennyson, and Dickinson. 
Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. 
  Crispi, Luca. 2015. Joyce’s Creative Process and the Construction of Character in ‘Ulysses’: Becoming 
the Blooms. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  De Biasi, Pierre-Marc. 1996. ‘What Is a Literary Draft? Toward a Functional Typology of Genetic 
Documentation’. Yale French Studies 89: 26–58. 
  De Biasi, Pierre-Marc. 2000. La Génétique des textes. Paris: Nathan. 
  De Biasi, Pierre-Marc and Anne Herschberg Pierrot, eds. 2017. L’œuvre comme processus. Paris: CNRS 
Editions. 
  Debray Genette, Raymonde. 1977. ‘Génétique et poétique: Esquisse de méthode’. Littérature 28: 19–
39. 
  Deppman, Jed, Daniel Ferrer, and Michael Groden, eds. 2004. Genetic Criticism: Texts and Avant-
Textes. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 
  Ferrer, Daniel. 2002. ‘Production, Invention, and Reproduction: Genetic vs. Textual Criticism’. In: 
Reimagining Textuality: Textual Studies in the Late Age of Print. Ed. Elizabeth Bergmann Loizeaux and 
Neil Fraistat. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press. 
 
  Ferrer, Daniel. 2011. Logiques du brouillon: Modèles pour une critique génétique. Paris: Seuil. 
  Ferrer, Daniel. 2016. ‘Genetic Criticism with Textual Criticism: From Variant to Variation’. In: Variants: 
The Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship 12–13 (2016), 57–64.  
  Fordham, Finn. 2010. I Do I Undo I Redo: The Textual Genesis of Modernist Selves. Oxford: Oxford 
University Press.  
  Gabler, Hans Walter. 2018. Text Genetics in Literary Modernism and Other Essays. Cambridge: Open 
Book Publishers. 
  Grésillon, Almuth. 1994. Eléments de critique génétique: Lire les manuscrits modernes. Paris: Presses 
Universitaires de Paris. 
  Hay, Louis. 2002. La littérature des écrivains. Paris: José Corti.  
  Ries, Thorsten. ‘The rationale of the born-digital dossier génétique: Digital forensics and the writing 
process: With examples from the Thomas Kling Archive’. Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 33.2: 
391–424.  
  Stillinger, Jack. 1991. Multiple Authorship and the Myth of Solitary Genius. Oxford: Oxford University 
Press. 
  Sullivan, Hannah. 2013. The Work of Revision. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.  
  Van Hulle, Dirk, and Wim Van Mierlo, eds. 2004. Reading Notes. Amsterdam: Rodopi.  
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2014. Modern Manuscripts: The Extended Mind and Creative Undoing from Darwin to 
Beckett and Beyond. London: Bloomsbury. 
 
Primary source research skills (Michaelmas Term, weeks 1-6) 
The purpose of this part of the M.St. course is to introduce students to primary sources, particularly 
manuscripts and archives. The point of this practical course is to learn some of the techniques and 
methodologies involved in working with primary sources, and to explore what is researchable beyond the 
published canon. This includes deciphering and transcribing manuscripts and making them accessible to other 
scholars and interested readers, either in a printed or in a digital format.  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 65 of 230 
 
Teaching 
The course is taught in classes over 6 weeks in Michaelmas Term.  
 
Michaelmas Term: 
Week 1 
  Transcription of modern manuscripts (manuscripts from 1900 – present) 
Week 2 
  Topographic / linearized transcription (manuscripts from 1900 – present) 
Week 3 
  Digital transcription (XML-TEI) (manuscripts from 1900 – present) 
Week 4  
  Introduction to digital edition development (manuscripts from 1900 – present) 
Week 5  
  Reconstructing the writing sequence (manuscripts from 1900 – present) 
Week 6 
  Working with digital archives; integrating transcriptions in critical writing 
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 66 of 230 
M.St. in World Literatures in English B-Course   
Dr Michelle Kelly and Professor Peter D. McDonald 

The B-course for the MSt in World Literature strand introduces students to the methodologies and theories of 
bibliography, manuscript studies, textual scholarship, and book history. These are framed specifically within 
the broad concerns and methodologies of world book history and the emergence and institutionalisation of 
the categories of world and postcolonial literature within global and local literary spaces and the publishing 
industry.  
The course has two different components: 
  Material Texts (Michaelmas and Hilary Term) 
  Primary Source Research Skills (Michaelmas Term) 
 
Material Texts will be taught in weekly seminars taught over ten weeks in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms 
introducing a range of debates and methods in material approaches to literary culture relevant to world book 
history. Primary Source Research Skills will be taught over six weeks in Michaelmas Term and will focus 
specifically on working with literary archives, modern literary manuscripts, digital archival materials and 
institutional archives, and will include a visit to Oxford University Press and a session working with the Booker 
Prize Archive at Oxford Brookes Special Collections. Please note in the schedule below that seminars do not 
take place each week for both courses in Michaelmas Term; the seminars in each course have been 
coordinated to speak to one another and there is a rationale for the order of the seminars.  
The course assumes no prior knowledge of material approaches to literary culture. The Bibliography below 
offers suggestions for reading in different areas of the field. Please read at least two works from the 
Introductory Reading before the course begins. Seminars will introduce a range of theories and debates in the 
field, and provide further reading suggestions. You may be asked to prepare particular tasks for seminars, but 
there will not normally be a list of required reading. Instead you are encouraged to read further in line with 
your developing research projects, which should draw on the skills and methods that the course introduces. 
There will be opportunities to discuss your project in one to one consultations in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms, 
and the course will culminate with presentations and feedback on your essay projects in Hilary Term.  
 
Michaelmas Term 
(i) Material Texts  
Week 1  Instituting World Literature I 
Week 2  Introduction to Bibliography 
Week 3  Introduction to Book History  
Week 4  The Industry of World/Postcolonial Literature 
Week 5  Orality and Literacy 
Week 6  Cross-strand Material Texts Over Time  
Week 7  No class this week 
Week 8  Initial essay consultations (one to one) 
 
(ii) Primary Source Research Skills  
Week 1  Reading Modern Literary Manuscripts 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 67 of 230 
Week 2  The Writer’s Archive 
Week 3  Making Meaning in the Archive  
Week 4  No class this week 
Week 5  Working with Digital Archives 
 
Week 6  No class this week 
Week 7  Institutional Archives I: Publishers OUP  
Week 8  Institutional Archives II: Prizes Booker Prize Archive  
 
Hilary Term  
Material Texts in World Literature in English  
Week 1  Instituting World Literature II  
Week 2  Student presentations  
Week 3  Student presentations  
Week 4  Student presentations 
Week 6/7 
Final essay consultations (one to one) 
 
Course Reading List 
To begin to familiarise yourself with the field, please try to read *at least two texts* from the Introductory 
Reading listed. Suggestions for further reading are organised loosely into categories below. Seminars will 
introduce you to some of these materials, but unlike other seminar courses, there will not normally be ‘set 
reading’ ahead of B Course seminars; rather, you are encouraged to read further in line with your research 
interests. 
 
Introductory Reading  
  Bourdieu, Pierre. The Field of Cultural Production: Essays on Art and Literature. Edited by Randal 
Johnson. Cambridge: Polity, 1993.  
  Casanova, Pascale. The World Republic of Letters. Trans. M.B. DeBevoise. Cambridge, MS: Harvard 
University Press, 2007. Trans. Teresa Lavender Fagan.  
  Chartier, Roger. “Language, Books, and Reading from the Printed Word to the Digital Text,” Critical 
Inquiry 31.1 (Autumn 2004): 133-152. 
  Darnton, Robert. ‘What Is the History of Books?’ Daedalus 111 (1982): 65–83.  
  Eggert, Paul. ‘Brought to Book: Bibliography, Book History and the Study of Literature’. The Library 
13.1 (2012): 3-32. 
  Finkelstein, David, and Alistair McCleery, eds. The Book History Reader. London: Routledge, 2002. 
  McDonald, Peter D. “Ideas of the Book and Histories of Literature: after Theory?” PMLA 121.1 (2006): 
214-228. 
  McKenzie, D. F. Bibliography and the Sociology of Text. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.  
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 68 of 230 
Bibliography, Book History and Textual Scholarship 
  Abbott, Craig S., and William Proctor Williams. An Introduction to Bibliographical and Textual Studies
4th edition. New York: Modern Language Association, 2009 [1985]. 
  Darnton, Robert. ‘What Is the History of Books?’ Daedalus 111 (1982): 65–83.  
  Darnton, Robert. ‘“What Is the History of Books?” Revisited’. Modern Intellectual History 4 (2007): 
495–508. 
  De Biasi, Pierre-Marc. ‘What Is a Literary Draft? Toward a Functional Typology of Genetic 
Documentation’. Yale French Studies 89 (1996): 26–58. 
  Deppman, Jed, Daniel Ferrer, and Michael Groden, eds. Genetic Criticism: Texts and Avant-Textes. 
Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004. 
  Duncan, Dennis and Adam Smyth. Book Parts. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. 
  Eggert, Paul. ‘Brought to Book: Bibliography, Book History and the Study of Literature’. The Library 
13.1 (2012): 3-32. 
  Eggert, Paul. ‘The reader-oriented scholarly edition’. Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 31.4 (2016): 
797–810, https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqw043. 
  Ferrer, Daniel. ‘Production, Invention, and Reproduction: Genetic vs. Textual Criticism’. In: 
Reimagining Textuality: Textual Studies in the Late Age of Print. Ed. Elizabeth Bergmann Loizeaux and 
Neil Fraistat. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 2002. 
  Finkelstein, David, and Alistair McCleery, eds. The Book History Reader. London: Routledge, 2002. 
  ---- An Introduction to Book History. London: Routledge, 2013.  
  Fraistat, Neil, and Julia Flanders, eds. The Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship. Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press, 2013.  
  Greetham, D. C., ed. Scholarly Editing: A Guide to Research. New York: Modern Language Association, 
1995. 
  Gaskell, Philip. A New Introduction to Bibliography. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1972. 
  Greg, W. W. ‘What Is Bibliography?’ The Library 12.1 (1913): 39–54.  
  McDonald, Peter D. ‘Ideas of the Book and Histories of Literature: After Theory?’ PMLA 121.1 (Jan. 
2006): 214–228.  
  McGann, Jerome J. 1991. The Textual Condition. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. 
  ---. ‘The Monks and the Giants: Textual Bibliographical Studies and the Interpretation of Literary 
Works’, in The Beauty of Inflections, ed. by Jerome McGann, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1988, 69-89. 
  McKenzie, D. F. Bibliography and the Sociology of Text. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. 
  McKenzie, D. F. Making Meaning: ‘Printers of the Mind’ and Other Essays. Ed. Peter D. McDonald and 
Michael F. Suarez, S.J. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2002. 
  Shillingsburg, Peter. From Gutenberg to Google: Electronic Representations of Literary Texts
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. 
  Suarez, Michael F. SJ, and H. R. Woudhuysen, eds, The Book: A Global History. Oxford: Oxford 
University Press, 2013. 
  Tanselle, G. Thomas. Bibliographical Analysis: A Historical Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 2009. 
  Van Hulle, Dirk, and Peter Shillingsburg. 2015. ‘Orientations to Text, Revisited’. Studies in Bibliography 
59: 27–44. 
  Van Hulle, Dirk, and Wim Van Mierlo, eds. 2004. Reading Notes. Amsterdam: Rodopi. 
 
Archives, Materiality and Medium 
  Jacques Derrida, Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression. Trans. by Eric Prenowitz. Chicago: Chicago 
University Press, 1996. 
  Johanna Drucker, The Visible Word: Experimental Typography and Modern Art, 1909–1923. Chicago: 
University of Chicago Press, 1994. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 69 of 230 
  ---. Graphesis: Visual Forms of Knowledge Production. Harvard University Press, 2014.  
  Goody, Jack. The Logic of Writing and the Organization of Society. Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press, 1986.  
  Kirschenbaum, Matthew. ‘The .txtual Condition: Digital Humanities, Born-Digital Archives, and the 
Future Literary’. Digital Humanities Quarterly 7.1 (2013). 
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000151/000151.html. 
  ---. Track Changes: A Literary History of Word-Processing. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard 
University Press, 2016. 
  McLuhan, Marshall. The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man. Toronto: University of 
Toronto Press, 2011 [1962].  
  Ong, Walter. Orality and Literacy. London: Routledge: 2012 [1982]. 
  Carolyn Steedman, Dust. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001. 
  Ann Laura Stoler, Along the Archival Grain: Epistemic Anxieties and Colonial Common Sense
Princeton; Oxford: Princeton UP, 2009  
 
World Book History 
  Sarah Brouillette, Postcolonial Writers and the Global Literary Marketplace. Basingstoke: Palgrave 
Macmillan, 2011. 
  ---. Literature and the Creative Economy. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2014.  
  ---. UNESCO and the Fate of the Literary. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2019. 
  Ruth Bush, Publishing Africa in French: Literary Institutions and Decolonization 1945-1967. Liverpool: 
Liverpool University Press, 2016.  
  Raphael Dalleo ed., Bourdieu and Postcolonial Studies. Liverpool: Liverool University Press, 2016. 
  Robert Fraser, Book History Through Postcolonial Eyes: Rewriting the Script. London: Routledge, 2008.  
  Stefan Helgesson and Pieter Vermeulen, ed., Institutions of World Literature: Writing, Translation, 
Markets. London: Routledge, 2016. 
  Isabel Hofmeyr, The Portable Bunyan: A Transnational History of the Pilgrim’s ProgressPrinceton: 
Princeton University Press, 2000.  
  ---. Ghandi’s Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 
2013. 
  Graham Huggan, The Postcolonial Exotic: Marketing the Margins. London: Routledge, 2001.  
  Peter J. Kalliney, Commonwealth of Letters: British Literary Culture and the Emergence of Postcolonial 
Aesthetics. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013.  
  Peter McDonald, The Literature Police: Apartheid Censorship and its Cultural Consequences. Oxford: 
Oxford University Press, 2009. 
  ---. Artefacts of Writing: Ideas of the State and Communities of Letters from Matthew Arnold to Xu 
Bing. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017.  
  Lydie Moudileno, “The Troubling Popularity of West African Romance Novels.” Research in African 
Literatures, 39.4, 2008: 120-32. 
  Nicole Moore, The Censor’s Library. St Lucia, Qld: University of Queensland Press, 2012. 
  Andrew Nash, Claire Squires, and I. R. Willison, ed. The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain 
Volume 7: The Twentieth Century and Beyond. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019.  
  Daniele Nunziata, ‘The Scramble for African Orature: The Transcription, Compilation, and Marketing 
of African Oral Narratives in the Oxford Library of African Literature, 1964 to 1979.’ Journal of 
Postcolonial Writing
 53.4 (2017): 469-481. 
  Ruth B. Phillips and Christopher Burghard Steiner, Unpacking Culture: Art and Commodity in Colonial 
and Postcolonial Worlds. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1999. 
  Asha Rogers, State-Sponsored Literature: Literature and Cultural Diversity After 1945. Oxford: Oxford 
University Press, 2020. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 70 of 230 
  Andrew W. Rubin, Archives of Authority: Empire, Culture and the Cold War. Princeton: Princeton 
University Press, 2012. 
  Claire Squires, Marketing Literature: The Making of Contemporary Writing in Britain. Basingstoke: 
Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. 
  Nathan Suhr-Sytsma, Poetry, Print, and the Making of Postcolonial Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 2017.  
  Aarthi Vadde, ‘Amateur Creativity: Contemporary Literature and the Digital Publishing Scene.’ New 
Literary History 48.1 (2017): 27-51. 
  Andrew van der Vlies, South African Textual Cultures: White, Black, Read All Over. Manchester: 
Manchester University Press, 2007.  
  --- ed. Print, Text and Book Cultures in South Africa. Johannesburg: Witwatersrand University Press, 
2012.  
 
Reading and Reception 
  Price, Leah. What We Talk About When We Talk About Books: The History and Future of Reading. New 
York: Basic Books, 2019. 
  Lizzy Attree, “The Caine Prize and Contemporary African Writing”. Research in African Literatures 
44.2, 2013: 35-47. 
  Anna Auguscik, Prizing Debate: The Fourth Decade of the Booker Prize and the Contemporary Novel in 
the UK. Transcript Verlag, 2017. 
  Bethan Benwell, James Proctor and Gemma Robinson, eds. Postcolonial Audiences: Readers, Viewers 
and Reception. New York and Abingdon: Routledge, 2012.  
  James F. English, The Economy of Prestige: Prizes, Awards, and the Circulation of Cultural Value
Cambridge, Mass.; London: Harvard University Press, 2005. 
  Bernth Lindfors, “Africa and the Nobel Prize.” World Literature Today 62.2, 1988: 222-24. 
  Dobrota Pucherová, “‘A Continent Learns to Tell its Story at Last’: Notes on the Caine Prize.” Journal of 
Postcolonial Writing 48.1, 2012: 13-25. 
  Janice Radway, A Feeling for Books: The Book-of-the-Month Club, Literary Taste, and Middle-Class 
Desire. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.  
 
Publishing 
  John B. Thompson, Merchants of Culture: the Publishing Business in the Twenty-First Century
Cambridge: Polity, 2012. 
  James Currey, Africa Writes Back : The African Writers Series & the Launch of African Literature
Oxford: James Currey, 2008.  
  Caroline Davis, Creating Postcolonial Literature: African Writers and British Publishers. London: 
Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. 
  Gail Low, Publishing the Postcolonial. London: Routledge, 2011. 
  Angus Phillips and Michael Bhaskar, ed. The Oxford Handbook of Publishing. Oxford: Oxford University 
Press, 2019.  
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 71 of 230 
M.St. in English and American Studies B-Course 
 
This course for the MSt in English and American Studies has two different components: 
1.  Material Texts 1900-Present (Michaelmas Term, weeks 1-6; Hilary Term, weeks 1-4) 
2.  Primary source research skills (Michaelmas Term, weeks 1-6) 
 
Material Texts in English and American Studies 
This is an introduction to bibliography, book history, genetic criticism, textual scholarship and digital scholarly 
editing for students of literature focusing on English and American Studies. The aim of the course is to discover 
how these interrelated fields can inform your reading of literary texts and more specifically your research into 
English and American Studies.  
 
Teaching 
The course is taught in classes over 6 weeks in Michaelmas Term and 4 weeks in Hilary Term, consisting of 
short lectures and seminars, exploring the following topics, applied to texts from 1900 to the present. The 
class in week 6 of Michaelmas Term is co-taught with Prof. Wakelin and Prof. Smyth:   
 
Michaelmas Term: 
Week 1   
  Bibliography (English & American Studies) 
Week 2   
  History of the book: ‘The Book Unbound’ (Weston Visiting Scholars Centre) 
Week 3   
  Textual criticism (English & American Studies) 
Week 4  
  Digital scholarly editing (English & American Studies) 
Week 5  
  Genetic criticism (English & American Studies) 
Week 6  
  Material texts over time: a diachronic approach  
Weeks 7/8 
  Initial essay consultations (one on one)  
 
Hilary Term: 
Week 1 
  Paratexts, periodicals, and publishers’ archives (English & American Studies) 
Week 2 
  Approaches to research: ‘Off the shelf’ (Weston Visiting Scholars Centre) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 72 of 230 
Week 3 
  Student presentations 
Week 4   
  Student presentations, recap and Q&A  
Weeks 5/6 
  Final essay consultations (one on one) 
 
The exploration of these fields of study relating to Material Texts includes classes introducing various 
approaches to research by means of original documents from the Bodleian’s collections of modern 
manuscripts, archives, printed ephemera and ‘born-digital’ material (MT week 2 and HT week 2; at the Weston 
Visiting Scholars Centre, subject to any access restrictions). The course is geared towards two milestone 
moments:  
1.  the penultimate session in MT (week 5), in which you (all students) submit a preliminary abstract 
about the topic you would like to investigate and develop for your essay. This gives you the 
opportunity to get feedback before the Christmas break and start your archive exploration, possibly 
with the support of the Maxwell and Meyerstein fund or other funding bodies (for more information, 
see https://ego.english.ox.ac.uk/resources).  
2.  the last two sessions in HT (weeks 3 and 4), when you (all students) make a very short presentation 
about the topic of your B-course essay.  
 
Preparing for the coursework  
The course assumes no prior knowledge of manuscript studies. Before the course begins, please read two of 
the suggested works on Bibliography (the first section on the reading list below). During the course, the list will 
be referred to and supplemented by further suggestions. There is no required reading; instead, you are 
expected to undertake research to find a topic for your essay by exploring primary materials and reading 
relevant secondary literature. The following, non-exhaustive list of suggested reading is not prescriptive and is 
offered as a starting point for your own research, discovery and exploration: 
 
 
Bibliography 
  Abbott Craig S., and William Proctor Williams. 2009 [1985]. An Introduction to Bibliographical and 
Textual Studies. 4th edition. New York: Modern Language Association.  
 
  Eggert, Paul. 2012. ‘Brought to Book: Bibliography, Book History and the Study of Literature’. The 
Library 13.1: 3-32. 
  Gaskell, Philip. 1972. A New Introduction to Bibliography. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  Greg, W. W. 1913. ‘What Is Bibliography?’ The Library 12.1 (1913): 39–54.  
  McKenzie, D. F. 1999. Bibliography and the Sociology of Text. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
  Tanselle, G. Thomas. 2009. Bibliographical Analysis: A Historical Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press. 
 
History of the Book 
  Bishop, Edward. 1996. ‘Re:Covering Modernism--Format and Function in the Little Magazines’, 
Modernist Writers and the Marketplace, ed. Ian Willison, Warwick Gould and Warren Chernaik. 
Basingstoke: Macmillan: 287-319. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 73 of 230 
  Brooker, Peter, and Andrew Thacker, eds. 2009-2013. The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of 
Modernist Magazines, 3 vols. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  Collier, Patrick. 2015. ‘What is Modern Periodical Studies?’ The Journal of Modern Periodical Studies
6, no. 2: 92-111. 
  Darnton, Robert. 1982. ‘What Is the History of Books?’ Daedalus 111: 65–83.  
  Darnton, Robert. 2007. ‘“What Is the History of Books?” Revisited’. Modern Intellectual History 4: 
495–508.  
  Duncan, Dennis, and Adam Smyth, eds. 2019. Book Parts. Oxford: OUP. 
  Eliot, Simon and Jonathan Rose. 2019. ‘A Companion to the History of the Book’. 2nd edition. 2 vols. 
Wiley-Blackwell.  
  Finkelstein, David, and Alistair McCleery, eds. 2006. The Book History Reader. 2nd edition. London: 
Routledge. 
  Genette, Gerard. 1997. Paratexts. Tr. Jane E. Lewin. Cambridge: CUP. 
  Greg, W. W. 1951. The Editorial Problem in Shakespeare: A Survey of the Foundations of the Text
Oxford: Clarendon Press. 
  Latham, Sean, and Robert Scholes. 2006. ‘The Rise of Periodical Studies’, PMLA, 121 no.2: 517-31.  
  Levy, Michelle, and Tom Mole. 2017. The Broadview Introduction to Book History. Peterborough: 
Broadview.
  
  Matthews, Nicole, and Nickianne Moody, eds. 2007. Judging a book by its cover: fans, publishers, 
designers, and the marketing of fiction. Aldershot: Ashgate. 
  McDonald, Peter D. and Michael F. Suarez, S.J. 2002. ‘Editorial Introduction’. In: D. F. McKenzie, 
Making Meaning: ‘Printers of the Mind’ and Other Essays. Amherst: University of Massachusetts 
Press: 3–10.  
  McGann, Jerome J. 1988. ‘The Monks and the Giants: Textual Bibliographical Studies and the 
Interpretation of Literary Works’. In: The Beauty of Inflections. Ed. Jerome McGann. Oxford: 
Clarendon Press: 69-89. 
 
  McGann, Jerome J. 1991. The Textual Condition. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. 
  McKenzie, D. F. 2002. Making Meaning: ‘Printers of the Mind’ and Other Essays. Ed. Peter D. 
McDonald and Michael F. Suarez, S.J. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press. 
 
  Nash, Andrew, ed. 2003. The Culture of Collected Editions. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.  
  Parker, Stephen, and Matthew Philpotts. 2009. Sinn und Form: The Anatomy of a Literary Journal. 
Berlin & New York: Walter de Gruyter. 
  Philpotts, Matthew. 2012. ‘The Role of the Periodical Editor: Literary Journals and Editorial Habitus.’ 
Modern Language Review 107, no. 1: 39-64. 
  Rogers, Shef. 2019. ‘Imprints, Imprimaturs, and Copyright Pages’. In: Book Parts, ed. Duncan and 
Smyth: 51-64. 
  Shattock, Joanne, and Michael Wolff, eds. 1982. The Victorian Periodical Press: Samplings and 
Soundings. Leicester: University of Leicester Press. 
  Spoo, Robert. 2013. Without Copyrights: Piracy, Publishing, and the Public Domain. Oxford: Oxford 
University Press. 
  Sullivan, Alvin, ed. 1983-86. British Literary Magazines, 4 vols. New York: Greenwood. 
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2016. James Joyce’s ‘Work in Progress’: Pre-Book Publications of ‘Finnegans Wake’
New York: Routledge.  
  West III, James L. W. 2006. ‘The Magazine Market’. The Book History Reader, ed. Finkelstein and 
McCleery, 2nd edition: 369-76. 
 
Textual Scholarship 
  Bornstein, George and Ralph G. Williams, eds. 1993. Palimpsest: Editorial Theory in the Humanities
Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 74 of 230 
  Bowers, Fredson. 1970. ‘Textual Criticism’. In: The Aims and Methods of Scholarship in Modern 
Languages and Literatures. Ed. James Thorpe. New York: Modern Language Association: 23–42.  
  Bryant, John. 2002. The Fluid Text: A Theory of Revision and Editing for Book and Screen. Ann Arbor: 
The University of Michigan Press.  
  Fraistat, Neil, and Julia Flanders, eds. 2013. The Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
  Greetham, D. C. 1992. Textual Scholarship: An Introduction. New York: Garland. 
 
  Greg, W. W. 1950-1. ‘The Rationale of Copy-Text.’ Studies in Bibliography 3: 19–36. 
  Shillingsburg, Peter. 2017. Textuality and Knowledge. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press.  
  Stillinger, Jack. 1994. ‘A Practical Theory of Versions’. In: Coleridge and Textual Instability: The 
Multiple Versions of the Major Poems. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 118–40. 
  Tanselle, G. Thomas. 1978. ‘The Editing of Historical Documents’. Studies in Bibliography 31: 1–56. 
 
  Tanselle, G. Thomas. 1976. ‘The Editorial Problem of Final Authorial Intention’. Studies in Bibliography 
29: 167–211. 
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2004. Textual Awareness: A Genetic Study of Late Manuscripts by Joyce, Proust, and 
Mann. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.  
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2019. ‘Textual Scholarship’. In: A Companion to the History of the Book, 2nd edition, 
vol. 1. Ed. Simon Eliot and Jonathan Rose. ISBN: 9781119018179. Wiley-Blackwell: 19-30. 
  Zeller, Hans. 1975. ‘A New Approach to the Critical Constitution of Literary Texts’. Studies in 
Bibliography 28: 231–264. 
  Zeller, Hans. 1995. ‘Structure and Genesis in Editing: On German and Anglo-American Textual Editing’. 
In: Contemporary German Editorial Theory. Ed. Hans Walter Gabler, George Bornstein and Gillian 
Borland Pierce. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press: 95–123. 
(see also the ‘Annotated Bibliography: Key Works in the Theory of Textual Editing’ of the MLA’s Committee on 
Scholarly Editions
, https://www.mla.org/Resources/Research/Surveys-Reports-and-Other-
Documents/Publishing-and-Scholarship/Reports-from-the-MLA-Committee-on-Scholarly-Editions/Annotated-
Bibliography-Key-Works-in-the-Theory-of-Textual-Editing)
 
 
(Digital) Scholarly Editing 
  Burnard, Lou, Katherine O’Brien O’Keeffe, and John Unsworth, eds. 2006. Electronic Textual Editing
New York: Modern Language Association. 
  Cohen, Philip, ed. 1991. Devils and Angels: Textual Editing and Literary Theory. Charlottesville: 
University of Virginia Press.  
  Eggert, Paul. 2013. ‘Apparatus, Text, Interface: How to Read a Printed Critical Edition’. In: The 
Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship. Ed. Neil Fraistat and Julia Flanders. Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press: 97–118. 
  Eggert, Paul. 2016. ‘The reader-oriented scholarly edition’. Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 31.4: 
797–810, https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqw043. 
  Greetham, D. C., ed. 1995. Scholarly Editing: A Guide to Research. New York: Modern Language 
Association. 
  Keleman, Erick. 2009. Textual Editing and Criticism: An Introduction. New York: Norton. 
  Kirschenbaum, Matthew. 2013. ‘The .txtual Condition: Digital Humanities, Born-Digital Archives, and 
the Future Literary’. In: Digital Humanities Quarterly 7.1. 
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000151/000151.html. 
  Pierazzo, Elena. 2015. Digital Scholarly Editing: Theories, Models and Methods. London: Routledge.  
  Shillingsburg, Peter. 1996. Scholarly Editing in the Computer Age. 3rd edition. Ann Arbor: University of 
Michigan Press. 
  Shillingsburg, Peter. 2006. From Gutenberg to Google: Electronic Representations of Literary Texts
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 75 of 230 
  Van Hulle, Dirk, and Peter Shillingsburg. 2015. ‘Orientations to Text, Revisited’. Studies in 
Bibliography, 59: 27–44. 
 
Genetic Criticism 
  Bushell, Sally. 2009. Text as Process: Creative Composition in Wordsworth, Tennyson, and Dickinson
Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. 
  Crispi, Luca. 2015. Joyce’s Creative Process and the Construction of Character in ‘Ulysses’: Becoming 
the Blooms. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  De Biasi, Pierre-Marc. 1996. ‘What Is a Literary Draft? Toward a Functional Typology of Genetic 
Documentation’. Yale French Studies 89: 26–58. 
  De Biasi, Pierre-Marc. 2000. La Génétique des textes. Paris: Nathan. 
  De Biasi, Pierre-Marc and Anne Herschberg Pierrot, eds. 2017. L’œuvre comme processus. Paris: CNRS 
Editions. 
  Debray Genette, Raymonde. 1977. ‘Génétique et poétique: Esquisse de méthode’. Littérature 28: 19–
39. 
  Deppman, Jed, Daniel Ferrer, and Michael Groden, eds. 2004. Genetic Criticism: Texts and Avant-
Textes. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 
  Ferrer, Daniel. 2002. ‘Production, Invention, and Reproduction: Genetic vs. Textual Criticism’. In: 
Reimagining Textuality: Textual Studies in the Late Age of Print. Ed. Elizabeth Bergmann Loizeaux and 
Neil Fraistat. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press. 
 
  Ferrer, Daniel. 2011. Logiques du brouillon: Modèles pour une critique génétique. Paris: Seuil. 
  Ferrer, Daniel. 2016. ‘Genetic Criticism with Textual Criticism: From Variant to Variation’. In: Variants: 
The Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship 12–13 (2016), 57–64.  
  Fordham, Finn. 2010. I Do I Undo I Redo: The Textual Genesis of Modernist Selves. Oxford: Oxford 
University Press.  
  Gabler, Hans Walter. 2018. Text Genetics in Literary Modernism and Other Essays. Cambridge: Open 
Book Publishers. 
  Grésillon, Almuth. 1994. Eléments de critique génétique: Lire les manuscrits modernes. Paris: Presses 
Universitaires de Paris. 
  Hay, Louis. 2002. La littérature des écrivains. Paris: José Corti.  
  Ries, Thorsten. ‘The rationale of the born-digital dossier génétique: Digital forensics and the writing 
process: With examples from the Thomas Kling Archive’. Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 33.2: 
391–424.  
  Stillinger, Jack. 1991. Multiple Authorship and the Myth of Solitary Genius. Oxford: Oxford University 
Press. 
  Sullivan, Hannah. 2013. The Work of Revision. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.  
  Van Hulle, Dirk, and Wim Van Mierlo, eds. 2004. Reading Notes. Amsterdam: Rodopi.  
  Van Hulle, Dirk. 2014. Modern Manuscripts: The Extended Mind and Creative Undoing from Darwin to 
Beckett and Beyond. London: Bloomsbury. 
 
Primary source research skills (Michaelmas Term, weeks 1-6) 
The purpose of this part of the M.St. course is to introduce students to primary sources, particularly 
manuscripts and archives. The point of this practical course is to learn some of the techniques and 
methodologies involved in working with primary sources, and to explore what is researchable beyond the 
published canon. This includes deciphering and transcribing manuscripts and making them accessible to other 
scholars and interested readers, either in a printed or in a digital format.  
Teaching 
The course is taught in classes over 6 weeks in Michaelmas Term.  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 B-Courses 
 
Page 76 of 230 
Michaelmas Term: 
  Week 1 
o  Transcription of modern manuscripts (English & American Studies) 
  Week 2 
o  Topographic / linearized transcription (English & American Studies) 
  Week 3 
o  Digital transcription (XML-TEI) (English & American Studies) 
  Week 4   
o  Introduction to digital edition development (English & American Studies) 
  Week 5  
o  Reconstructing the writing sequence (English & American Studies) 
  Week 6 
o  Working with digital archives; integrating transcriptions in critical writing 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 77 of 230 
C-COURSES 
 
Michaelmas Term C-Courses 
 
After the Conquest: Reinventing fiction and history 
Dr Laura Ashe – xxxxx.xxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
 
This course will consider the dramatic literary developments of the post-Conquest period, in terms of the 
cultural, political, and ideological transformations of the high middle ages, both Europe-wide, and in ways 
distinctive to England. It will include the birth of the romance genre, and the development of fictional 
narrative; the new focus on subjectivity and the individual; the emergence of social phenomena such as 
chivalry, the culture of confession, affective piety, and the elevation of heterosexual love. Texts considered will 
include many written in Latin and French (which can be studied in parallel text and translation), as well as 
Middle English; genres include foundation myths and pseudo-histories; chronicles and epics; lives of saints, 
knights, and kings; insular and continental romances and lais, such as the various versions of the Tristan 
legend, the Arthurian romance, and the romances of ‘English’ history; and devotional and didactic prose. 
Texts are to be chosen for primary focus by agreement from amongst those listed; the secondary reading lists 
are inclusive, not prescriptive, and intended to aid in the process of writing the final course essay. 
1.  Historiography, foundation, and translatioThe Song of Roland; Geoffrey of Monmouth, 
Historia regum Britanniae; Geffrei Gaimar, Estoire des Engleis; Wace, Brut. 
2.  The discovery of the soul: Life of Christina of Markyate; Richard of St Victor, The Four Degrees 
of Violent Love; Ancrene Wisse
3.  Chivalry and fiction, a new romance: Chrétien de Troyes, Erec, Yvain, Lancelot, CligèsLe Roman 
des eles and Ordene de chevalerie
4.  Life writing and myth-making: Lives of Thomas Becket; Gui de Warewic; The History of William 
MarshalVita Haroldi
5.  Love and the individual: Marie de France, Lais; Thomas of Britain, Tristran; Sir Orfeo. 
6.  The romance of England: Romance of Horn; Layamon, BrutHavelok the Dane; King Horn; Sir 
Gawain and the Green Knight. 
 
1.  Historiography, foundation, and translatio 
Texts 
  The Song of Roland, parallel OldF/ModE ed./trans. Gerard J. Brault (University Park PA: University of 
Pennsylvania Press, 1984); or ModE trans. Glyn Burgess (London: Penguin, 2015) 
  Geoffrey of Monmouth, Historia regum Britanniae, parallel text ed. Michael A. Reeve, trans. Neil 
Wright (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2007); or ModE trans. Lewis Thorpe, The History of the Kings of Britain 
(Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1966)  
  Geffrei Gaimar, Estoire des Engleis, parallel text ed./trans. Ian Short (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 
2009) 
  Wace, Roman de Brut, parallel text ed./trans. Judith Weiss, 2nd edn (Exeter: Exeter University Press, 
2002) 
 
Criticism 

  Ashe, Laura, The Oxford English Literary History, vol. 1: 1000-1350. Conquest and Transformation 
(Oxford, 2017) 
  ———, Fiction and History in England, 1066-1200 (Cambridge, 2007) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 78 of 230 
  ———, ‘‘Exile-and-return’ and English Law: The Anglo-Saxon Inheritance of Insular Romance’, 
Literature Compass 3 (2006), 300-17 
  ———, ‘A Prayer and a Warcry: The creation of a secular religion in the Song of Roland’, Cambridge 
Quarterly 28 (1999), 349-67 
  Blacker, Jean, ‘Transformations of a theme: The depoliticization of the Arthurian World in the Roman 
de Brut’, in The Arthurian Tradition: Essays in Convergence, ed. Mary Flowers Braswell and John 
Bugge (Tuscaloosa, 1988), 54–74, 204–9 
  ———,‘“Ne vuil sun livre translater”: Wace’s Omission of Merlin’s Prophecies from the Roman de 
Brut’, in Anglo-Norman Anniversary Essays ANTS OPS 2, ed. Ian Short (London, 1993), 49–59 
  ———, ‘Will the Real Brut Please Stand Up? Wace’s Roman de Brut in Anglo-Norman and Continental 
Manuscripts’, Text 9 (1996), 175–86 
  ———, ‘Where Wace Feared to Tread: Latin Commentaries on Merlin’s Prophecies in the Reign of 
Henry II’, Arthuriana 6.1 (1996), 36–52 
  Bono, Barbara J., Literary Transvaluation: From Vergilian Epic to Shakespearean Tragicomedy 
(Berkeley, 1984) 
  Caldwell, Robert A., ‘Wace’s Roman de Brut and the Variant Version of Geoffrey of Monmouth’s 
Historia Regum Britanniae’, Speculum 31 (1956), 675–82 
  Crick, Julia, ‘The British Past and the Welsh Future: Gerald of Wales, Geoffrey of Monmouth and 
Arthur of Britain’, Celtica 23 (1999), 60–75 
  Dalton, Paul, ‘The Topical Concerns of Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britannie: History, 
Prophecy, Peacemaking, and English Identity in the Twelfth Century’, Journal of British Studies 44 
(2005), 688-712 
  Damian-Grint, Peter, The New Historians of the Twelfth-Century Renaissance: Inventing Vernacular 
Authority (Woodbridge, 1999) 
  Echard, Siân, Arthurian Narrative in the Latin Tradition (Cambridge, 1998) 
  Flint, Valerie I. J., ‘The Historia Regum Britanniae of Geoffrey of Monmouth: Parody and its Purpose. A 
Suggestion’, Speculum 54 (1979), 447–68 
  Gillingham, John, ‘The context and purposes of Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History of the Kings of 
Britain’, in The English in the Twelfth Century: Imperialism, National Identity and Political Values 
(Woodbridge, 2000), 19–39 
  ———, ‘Gaimar, the Prose Brut and the making of English history’, in L’Histoire et les nouveaux 
publics dans l’Europe médiévale (XIIIe–XVe siècles). Histoire ancienne et médiévale 41, ed. Jean-
Philippe Genet (Paris, 1997), 165–76 (repr. in John Gillingham, The English in the Twelfth Century: 
Imperialism, National Identity and Political Values (Woodbridge, 2000), 113–22) 
  Haidu, Peter, The Subject of Violence: The Song of Roland and the Birth of the State (Bloomington IN, 
1993) 
  Hanning, Robert W., The Vision of History in Early Britain: From Gildas to Geoffrey of Monmouth (New 
York, 1966) 
  Ingham, Patricia Clare, Sovereign Fantasies: Arthurian Romance and the Making of Britain 
(Philadelphia, 2001), chapter one 
  Ingledew, Francis, ‘The Book of Troy and the Genealogical Construction of History: The Case of 
Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Historia regum Britanniae’, Speculum 69 (1994), 665–704 
  Leckie, R. William, The Passage of Dominion: Geoffrey of Monmouth and the periodization of insular 
history in the twelfth century (Toronto, 1981) 
  Le Saux, Françoise H. M., A Companion to Wace (Cambridge, 2005) 
  Noble, James, ‘Patronage, Politics, and the Figure of Arthur in Geoffrey of Monmouth, Wace, and 
Laȝamon’, in The Arthurian Yearbook II, ed. Keith Busby (New York, 1992), 159–78 
  Otter, Monika, Inventiones: Fiction and Referentiality in Twelfth-Century English Historical Writing 
(Chapel Hill, 1996) 
  Schichtman, Martin, and Laurie Finke, ‘Profiting from the Past: History as Symbolic Culture in the 
Historia regum Britanniae’, Arthurian Literature 12 (1993), 1–35 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 79 of 230 
  Southern, R.W, ‘Aspects of the European Tradition of Historical Writing: 1. The Classical Tradition, 
from Einhard to Geoffrey of Monmouth’, TRHS 5th ser., 20 (1970), 173–96 
  Warren, Michelle R., History on the Edge: Excalibur and the Borders of Britain 1100–1300 
(Minneapolis, 2000) 
 
 
 
2.  The discovery of the soul 
Texts 
  The Life of Christina of Markyate, parallel Latin/ModE ed./trans. C. H. Talbot (Oxford: Oxford University 
Press, 1959); ModE trans. C. H. Talbot, intr. Samuel Fanous and Henrietta Leyser (Oxford World’s Classics, 
2003) 
  Richard of Saint-Victor, De IV gradibus violentae caritatis, ed. Gervais Dumeige (Librairie Philosophique J. 
Vrin, 1955), trans. Clare Kirchberger, ‘Of the Four Degrees of Passionate Charity’, in Richard of Saint- 
Victor: Selected Writirgs on Contemplation (New York, 1957), 213-33. 
  Ancrene Wisse: A Corrected Edition of the text in Cambridge, Corpus Christi College, MS 402, with variants 
from other manuscripts, ed. Bella Millett, 2 vols. (Oxford: Oxford University Press for the Early English Text 
Society, 2005), trans. Bella Millett (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2009); or trans. Hugh White 
(Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1993) 
Supplementary reading 
  Abelard, Peter, Scito te ipsum, in Peter Abelard’s Ethics, ed./trans. D. E. Luscombe (Oxford: Clarendon 
Press, 1971). 
  Abelard, Peter, Commentaria in epistulam Pauli ad Romanos, ed. E. M. Buytaert, Corpus 
Christianorum Continuatio Mediaeualis, 11 (Brepols, 1969), 41–340, trans. Steven R. Cartwright, 
Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (Catholic University of America Press, 2011). 
 
Criticism 

  Ashe, Laura, The Oxford English Literary History, vol. 1: 1000-1350. Conquest and Transformation 
(Oxford, 2017) 
  Bynum, Caroline Walker, ‘Did the Twelfth Century Discover the Individual?’ in Jesus as Mother: 
Studies in the Spirituality of the High Middle Ages (Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1982), 82–109 
(rev. from Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 31 [1980], 1–17) 
  Dyas, Dee, Valerie Edden, and Roger Ellis, eds, Approaching Medieval English Anchoritic and Mystical 
Texts (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2005) 
 
  Fanous, Samuel, and Henrietta Leyser, eds, Christina of Markyate: a twelfth-century holy woman 
(London, 2005) 
  Georgianna, Linda, The Solitary Self: Individuality in the ‘Ancrene Wisse’ (Cambridge, Massachusetts: 
Harvard University Press, 1981)  
  Godman, Peter, Paradoxes of Conscience in the High Middle Ages: Abelard, Eloise and the Archpoet 
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009) 
  Innes-Parker, Catherine, ‘Fragmentation and Reconstruction: Images of the Female Body in Ancrene 
Wisse and the Katherine Group’, Comitatus 26 (1995), 27-52 
  Koopmans, Rachel, ‘The Conclusion of Christina of Markyate’s Vita’, Journal of Ecclesiastical History 51 
(2000), 663-98 
  Licence, Tom, Hermits and Recluses in English Society, 950-1200 (Oxford University Press, 2011) 
  Mayr-Harting, Henry, ‘Functions of a Twelfth-Century Recluse’, History 60 (1975), 337–52 
  McAvoy, Liz Herbert, Medieval Anchoritisms: Gender, Space and the Solitary Life (Cambridge: D. S. 
Brewer, 2011) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 80 of 230 
  Millett, Bella, ‘The Origins of the Ancrene Wisse: New Answers, New Questions’, Medium Aevum 61 
(1992), 206-28 
  Morris, Colin, The Discovery of the Individual 1050 – 1200 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 
1987)  
  Renevey, Denis, Language, Self and Love: Hermeneutics in the Writings of Richard Rolle and the 
Commentaries on the Song of Songs (University of Wales Press, 2001), early chapters 
  Rubin, Miri, and Walter Simons, eds, The Cambridge History of Christianity, vol. 4: Christianity in 
Western Europe c.1100-c.1500 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009): Henrietta Leyser, 
‘Clerical Purity and the Re-ordered World’, 11–21; Beverly Mayne Kienzle, ‘Religious Poverty and the 
Search for Perfection’, 39–53; Walter Simons, ‘On the Margins of Religious Life: Hermits and Recluses, 
Penitents and Tertiaries, Beguines and Beghards’, 311–23 
  Smith, Lesley, and Jane H. M. Taylor, eds, Women, the Book and the Godly (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 
1995) 
  Verderber, Suzanne, The Medieval Fold: Power, Repression, and the Emergence of the Individual 
(New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) 
 
 
 
 
3.  Chivalry and fiction: a new romance 
Texts 
  Chrétien de Troyes, Erec & Enide; Cligès; Lancelot, or Le chevalier de la charrette; Yvain, or Le 
chevalier au Lion. Various editions: parallel OF/ModF text in Livre de Poche (Paris, 1994); ModE 
Arthurian Romances, trans. W. W. Kibler and Carleton Carroll (London: Penguin, 2004) 
  Raoul de Houdenc, Le Roman des eles; The Anonymous Ordene de chevalerie, ed./trans. Keith Busby 
(J. Benjamins, 1983) 
Criticism 
  Ashe, Laura, The Oxford English Literary History, vol. 1: 1000-1350. Conquest and Transformation 
(Oxford, 2017) 
  Auerbach, Erich, ‘The Knight sets forth’, in Mimesis, trans. Willard R. Trask (Princeton, 1953), 123–42 
  Burgess, Glyn S., Chrétien de Troyes: Erec et Enide, Critical Guides to French Texts 32 (London, 1984) 
  Busby, Keith, Chrétien de Troyes: Perceval (Le Conte du Graal) Critical Guides to French Texts 98 
(London, 1993) 
  Duggan, Joseph J., The Romances of Chrétien de Troyes (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001) 
  Frappier, Jean, Chrétien de Troyes (1968); trans. R. J. Cormier (Athens, OH, 1984) 
  Green, D. H., The Beginnings of Medieval Romance: Fact and Fiction, 1150–1220 (Cambridge, 2002) 
  Gaunt, Simon, Gender and Genre in Medieval French Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press, 1995) 
  Haidu, Peter, Aesthetic Distance in Chrétien de Troyes: Irony and Comedy in Cligès and Perceval 
(Geneva: Droz, 1968) 
  Hunt, Tony, Chrétien de Troyes: Yvain Critical Guides to French Texts 55 (London, 1986)  
  Maddox, D. L. The Arthurian Romances of Chrétien de Troyes: Once and Future Fictions (Cambridge, 
1991) 
  Jackson, W. T. H., ‘The Nature of Romance’, Yale French Studies 51 (1974), 12–25 
  Jaeger, C. Stephen, The Origins of Courtliness: civilizing trends and the formation of courtly ideals, 
939-1210 (Philadelphia, 1985) 
  Kaeuper, Richard W., Chivalry and Violence in Medieval Europe (Oxford, 1999) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 81 of 230 
  ———, Holy Warriors: The Religious Ideology of Chivalry (Philadelphia, 2009) 
  Keen, Maurice, Chivalry (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1984) 
  Kelly, D., ed., The Romances of Chrétien de Troyes: A Symposium (Lexington KY, 1985) 
  Lacy, Norris J., and Joan Tasker Grimbert, eds, A Companion to Chrétien de Troyes (Cambridge: 
D.S.Brewer, 2005) 
  Nolan, E. Peter, ‘Mythopoetic Evolution: Chrétien de Troyes’s Erec et Enide, Cligès and Yvain’, 
Symposium 25 (1971), 139–61 
  Patterson, Lee, Negotiating the Past (Madison, 1987) 
  Shirt, David J., ‘Cligès: Realism in Romance’, Forum for Modern Language Studies 13 (1977), 368–80 
  Topsfield, Leslie, Chrétien de Troyes: A Study of the Arthurian Romances (Cambridge, 1981) 
 
 
4.  Life writing and myth-making 
Texts 
  Guernes de Pont-Sainte Maxence, La Vie de Saint Thomas le Martyr, ed. E. Walberg (Lund, Denmark, 
1922); trans. Ian Short, A Life of Thomas Becket in Verse (Toronto: Toronto University Press, 2013) 
  Edward Grim, William FitzStephen, and Herbert of Bosham, in James Craigie Robertson, ed., Materials 
for the History of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury: Rolls Series 67, 7 vols (London, 1965), 
II.353-450; III.1-154; III.155-464. Lengthy excerpts trans. Michael Staunton, The lives of Thomas 
Becket (Manchester, 2001) and George Greenaway, The life and death of Thomas Becket (London, 
1961) 
  Gui de Warewic, ed. Alfred Ewert, 2 vols (Librairie Ancienne Edouard Champion, 1933), trans. Judith 
Weiss, in Boeve de Haumtone and Gui de Warewic: Two Anglo-Norman Romances (Tempe, AZ: 
Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2008). 
  History of William Marshal, parallel OldF/ModE text ed. A. J. Holden, trans. S. Gregory, with notes by 
D. Crouch, 3 vols (London: Anglo-Norman Text Society, 2002-6) 
  Vita Haroldi, ed./trans. Walter de Gray Birch (London: Elliot Stock, 1885); available to be downloaded 
in pdf at www.archive.org 
 
Criticism 

  Ashe, Laura, ‘William Marshal, Lancelot, and Arthur: chivalry and kingship’, Anglo-Norman Studies 30 
(2007), 19-40 
  ———, ‘Mutatio dexteræ Excelsi: Narratives of Transformation after the Conquest’, Journal of English 
and Germanic Philology 110 (2011), 141-72 
  ———, ‘Harold Godwineson’, in Heroes and Anti-Heroes in Medieval Romance, ed. Neil Cartlidge 
(Cambridge, 2012), 59-80 
  ———, The Oxford English Literary History, vol. 1: 1000-1350. Conquest and Transformation (Oxford, 
2017) 
  Barlow, Frank, Thomas Becket (London, 1986) 
  Bates, David, Julia Crick and Sarah Hamilton, eds, Writing Medieval Biography, 750-1250: Essays in 
Honour of Professor Frank Barlow (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2006) 
  Crouch, David, William Marshal: Knighthood, War and Chivalry, 1147–1219 (Harlow, 2002) 
  ———, ‘Strategies of Lordship in Angevin England and the Career of William Marshal’, in The Ideals 
and Practice of Medieval Knighthood II, ed. Christopher Harper-Bill and Ruth Harvey (Woodbridge, 
1988), 1–25 
  ———, ‘The Hidden History of the Twelfth Century’, Haskins Society Journal 5 (1993), 111-30 
  Gillingham, John, ‘War and Chivalry in the History of William Marshal’, Thirteenth Century England 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 82 of 230 
  2 (1988), 1–13 
  Heffernan, Thomas J., Sacred Biography: Saints and Their Biographers in the Middle Ages (Oxford: 
Oxford University Press, 1988) 
  Keefe, Thomas K., ‘Shrine time: King Henry II's visits to Thomas Becket's tomb’, Haskins Society 
Journal 11 (2003), 115-122 
  Matthews, Stephen, ‘The Content and Construction of the Vita Haroldi’, in King Harold II and the 
Bayeux Tapestry, ed. Gale R. Owen-Crocker (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2005), 65–73  
  Morrison, Karl F., Understanding Conversion (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1992) 
  O’Reilly, Jennifer L.,  ‘The Double Martyrdom of Thomas Becket: Hagiography or History?’, Studies in 
Medieval and Renaissance History 7 (1985), 183-247 
  Perrot, Jean-Pierre, ‘Violence et sacré: du meutre au sacrifice dans la Vie de Saint Thomas Becket de 
Guernes de Pont-Sainte-Maxence’, in La violence dans le monde médiéval: Sénéfiance 36 (1994), 399-
412 
  Peters, Timothy, ‘An ecclesiastical epic: Garnier de Pont-Ste-Maxence’s Vie de Saint Thomas le 
Martyr’, Mediaevistik 7 (1996), 181-202 
  Staunton, Michael, ‘Thomas Becket’s Conversion’, Anglo-Norman Studies 21 (1998), 193-211 
  ———, Thomas Becket and his Biographers (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2006) 
  Stein, Robert M., ‘The Trouble with Harold: The Ideological Context of the Vita Haroldi’, New Medieval 
Literatures 2 (1998), 181–204 
  Thacker, Alan, ‘The cult of King Harold at Chester’, in The Middle Ages in the North-West, ed. Tom 
Scott and Pat Starkey (Oxford: Leopard’s Head Press, 1995), 155–76 
  Vollrath, Hanna, ‘Was Thomas Becket Chaste? Understanding Episodes in the Becket Lives’, Anglo-
Norman Studies 27 (2004) 
  Webster, Paul, and Marie-Pierre Gélin, eds, The cult of St Thomas Becket in the Plantagenet world, 
c.1170-c.1220 (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2016) 
  Wiggins, Alison, and Rosalind Field, eds, Guy of Warwick: Icon and Ancestor (Cambridge: D.S. Brewer, 
2007) 
 
 
 
5.  Love and the individual 
Texts 
  Marie de France, Lais, ed. A. Ewert (Oxford: Blackwell, 1965), trans. Glyn S. Burgess (London: Penguin, 
2003) 
  Thomas of Britain, Tristran, parallel text ed./trans. Stewart Gregory (New York: Garland, 1991); also 
printed in Early French Tristan Poems, ed. Norris J. Lacy, 2 vols (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1998), vol. 2 
[Contains all the OF Tristan poems in parallel text/translation: Thomas of Britain, Béroul, Marie de 
France, the Folies, etc]; or trans. Laura Ashe, Early Fiction in England: From Geoffrey of Monmouth to 
Chaucer (London, 2015), 89-144 
  Sir Orfeo, ed. Laura Ashe, Early Fiction in England: From Geoffrey of Monmouth to Chaucer (London, 
2015), 311-35; or online at <d.lib.rochester.edu/teams/text/laskaya-and-salisbury-middle-english-
breton-lays-sir-orfeo> 
Criticism 
  Adams, Tracy, “ ‘Pur vostre cor su jo em paine’: The Augustinian Subtext of Thomas’s Tristan,” 
Medium Aevum 68 (1999), 278–91 
  ———, ‘“Arte regendus amor”: suffering and sexuality in Marie de France’s Lai de Guigemar’, 
Exemplaria 17 (2005), 285-315 
  Ashe, Laura, The Oxford English Literary History, vol. 1: 1000-1350. Conquest and Transformation 
(Oxford, 2017) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 83 of 230 
  ———, ‘The Meaning of Suffering: Symbolism and anti-symbolism in the death of Tristan’, in Writers 
of the reign of Henry II: Twelve Essays, ed. Ruth Kennedy and Simon Meecham-Jones (Basingstoke: 
Palgrave Macmillan, 2006), 221-38 
  Blakeslee, Merrit R., Love’s Masks: Identity, Intertextuality, and Meaning in Old French Tristan Poems 
(Woodbridge, 1989)  
  Bromily, Geoffrey N., Thomas's Tristan and the Folie Tristan d’Oxford. Critical Guides to French Texts 
61 (London, 1986)  
  Bruckner, Matilda Tomaryn, Shaping Romance: Interpretation, Truth, and Closure in Twelfth-Century 
French Fictions (Philadelphia, 1993) 
  ———, ‘The Representation of the Lovers’ Death: Thomas’s Tristan as Open Text’, in Tristan and 
Isolde: A Casebook, ed. Joan Tasker Grimbert (New York: Garland, 1995), 95–109 
  Burgess, Glyn S., The ‘Lais’ of Marie de France - Text and Context (Manchester, 1987) 
  Clifford, Paula M., Marie de France: Lais. Critical Guides to French Texts 16 (London, 1982) 
  Cooper, Helen, ‘Love before Troilus’, in Writings on Love in the English Middle Ages, ed. Helen Cooney 
(Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2006), 25-43 
  Ferrante, Joan M., The Conflict of Love and Honor: The Medieval Tristan Legend in France, Germany 
and Italy (The Hague, Paris: Mouton, 1973) 
  Griffin, Miranda, ‘Gender and authority in the medieval French lai’, Forum for Modern Language 
Studies 35 (1999), 42-56 
  Kendall, Elliot, ‘Family, Familia, and the Uncanny in Sir Orfeo’, Studies in the Age of Chaucer 35 (2013), 
289-327 
  Hunt, Tony, “The Significance of Thomas’s Tristan,” in Reading Medieval Studies 7 (1981), 41–61 
  Ramm, Ben, ‘“Cest cunte est mult divers”: knowledge, difference and authority in Thomas's Tristan’, 
Modern Language Review 101 (2006), 360-374 
  Spence, Sarah, Texts and the Self in the Twelfth Century (Cambridge, 1996) 
 
 
 
6.  The romance of England 
Texts 
  Thomas, The Romance of Horn, ed. Mildred K. Pope, 2 vols (Oxford: Blackwell, for the Anglo-Norman 
Text Society, 1955–64); trans. Judith Weiss, The Birth of Romance: An Anthology (London: Everyman, 
1992; rev. edn Tempe AZ: FRETS, 2009), 1-120. 
  Laȝamon, Layamon’s Arthur: The Arthurian Section of Layamon’s Brut, ed./trans. W. R. J. Barron and 
S. C. Weinberg (Exeter, 2001)  
  Havelok the Dane, ed. G. V. Smithers (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987); or online at 
<d.lib.rochester.edu/teams/text/salisbury-four-romances-of-england-havelok-the-dane>.  
  King Horn: An Edition Based on Cambridge University Library MS Gg.4.27 (2), ed. Rosamund Allen 
(London: Garland Publishing, 1984); or online at <d.lib.rochester.edu/teams/text/salisbury-king-
horn>. 
  Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, in The Poems of the Pearl Manuscript, ed. Malcolm Andrew and 
Ronald Waldron, rev. edn (Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 1996), 207–300; or in The works of the 
Gawain poet: Pearl, Cleanness, Patience, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, ed. Ad Putter and Myra 
Stokes (London: Penguin, 2014) 
Criticism 
  Allen, Rosamund, Jane Roberts and Carole Weinberg, eds, Reading Laȝamon’s Brut: Approaches and 
Explorations (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2013) 
  Ashe, Laura, Fiction and History in England, 1066-1200 (Cambridge, 2007) 
  The Oxford English Literary History, vol. 1: 1000-1350. Conquest and Transformation (Oxford, 2017) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 84 of 230 
  ‘The Anomalous King of Conquered England’, in Every Inch a King: Comparative Studies on Kings and 
Kingship in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds, ed. Charles Melville and Lynette Mitchell (Leiden, 2012), 
173-93 
  ‘Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and the Limits of Chivalry’, in Laura Ashe, Ivana Djordjević, and 
Judith Weiss, eds, The Exploitations of Medieval Romance (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2010), 159–72 
  ‘The Hero and his Realm in Medieval English Romance’, in Boundaries in Medieval Romance. Studies 
in Medieval Romance 6, ed. Neil Cartlidge (Cambridge, 2008), 129-47. 
  ‘‘Exile-and-return’ and English Law: The Anglo-Saxon Inheritance of Insular Romance’, Literature 
Compass 3 (2006), 300-17 
  Barron, W. R. J., Trawthe and Treason: The Sin of Gawain Reconsidered (Manchester: Manchester 
University Press, 1980) 
  Becker, Alexis Kellner, ‘Sustainability Romance: Havelok the Dane’s Political Ecology’, New Medieval 
Literatures 16 (2016), 83-108 
  Brewer, Derek, A Companion to the Gawain-Poet (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1997) 
  Brewer, Elisabeth, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: Sources and Analogues (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 
1992) 
  Burnley, J. D., ‘The “Roman de Horn”: its Hero and its Ethos’, French Studies 32 (1978), 385–97 
  Burrow, J. A., A Reading of ‘Sir Gawain and the Green Knight’ (London: Routledge, 1965) 
  Crane, Susan, Insular Romance: Politics, Faith, and Culture in Anglo-Norman and Middle English 
Literature (Berkeley, 1986) 
  Donoghue, Daniel, ‘Layamon’s Ambivalence’, Speculum 65 (1990), 537-563 
  Field, Rosalind, ‘Romance as History, History as Romance’, in Romance in Medieval England, ed. 
Maldwyn Mills, Jennifer Fellows and Carol M. Meale (Cambridge, 1991), 163–73 
  ———, ‘Romance in England, 1066–1400’, in The Cambridge History of Medieval English Literature
ed. David Wallace (Cambridge, 1999), 152–76  
  ———, ‘The King Over the Water: Exile-and-Return Revisited’, in Cultural Encounters in the Romance 
of Medieval England, ed. Corinne Saunders (Cambridge, 2005), 41–53 
  Galloway, Andrew, ‘Layamon’s Gift’, PMLA 121 (2006), 717-734 
  Hanning, Robert W., ‘Havelok the Dane: Structure, Symbols, Meaning’, Studies in Philology 64 (1967), 
586-605 
  Le Saux, Françoise H.M., Layamon’s Brut: The Poem and its Sources (Cambridge, 1989) 
  ———, ed., The Text and Tradition of Layamon’s Brut (Cambridge, 1994) 
  Pearsall, Derek, ‘Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: An Essay in Enigma’, Chaucer Review 46 (2011), 
248-60 
  Rouse, Robert, ‘English Identity and the Law in Havelok the Dane, Horn Childe and Maiden Rimnild 
and Beues of Hamtoun’, in Cultural Encounters in the Romance of Medieval England, ed. Corinne 
Saunders (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2005) 
  ———, The Idea of Anglo-Saxon England in Middle English Romance (Cambridge: D.S. Brewer, 2005) 
  Sheppard, Alice, ‘Of this is a king’s body made: lordship and succession in Lawman’s Arthur and Leir’, 
Arthuriana 10:2 (2000), 50-65 
  Smithers, G. V., ‘The Style of Havelok’, Medium Aevum 57 (1988), 190-218  
  Speed, Diane, ‘The Saracens of King Horn’, Speculum 65 (1990), 564–95 
  Staines, David, ‘Havelok the Dane: A Thirteenth-Century Handbook for Princes’, Speculum 51 (1976), 
602-23 
  Stein, Robert M., ‘Making History English: Cultural Identity and Historical Explanation in William of 
Malmesbury and Layamon’s Brut’, in Text and Territory: Geographical Imagination in the European 
Middle Ages
, ed. Sylvia Tomasch and Sealy Gilles (Philadelphia, 1998), 97–115 
  Tiller, Kenneth J., ‘The truth “bi Arðure þan kinge”: Arthur’s role in shaping Lawman’s vision of 
history’, Arthuriana 10:2 (2000), 27-49 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 85 of 230 
  Turville-Petre, Thorlac, ‘Havelok and the History of the Nation’, in Readings in Medieval English 
Romance, ed. Carol M. Meale (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1994), 121–34 
  ———, England the Nation: Language, Literature, and National Identity, 1290–1340 (Oxford, 1996) 
  Weiss, Judith, 'The Wooing Woman in Anglo-Norman Romance', in Romance in Medieval England, ed. 
Maldwyn Mills, Jennifer Fellows and Carol M. Meale (Cambridge, 1991), 149-61 
  ---, ‘Thomas and the Earl: Literary and Historical Contexts for the Romance of Horn’, in Tradition and 
Transformation in Medieval Romance, ed. Rosalind Field (Cambridge, 1999), 1–13 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 86 of 230 
Devotional Texts and Material Culture c. 1200-1500 
Dr Annie Sutherland
 (Somerville) and Jim Harris (Ashmolean Museum) - xxxxx.xxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx  
This C course is intended to function as an innovative exploration of the devotional culture of the Middle Ages, 
co-taught throughout by Drs. Sutherland and Harris. The considerable and varied literature of the period 1200-
1500 will be its primary focus. We will cover a range of texts, from the 13th century Ancrene Wisse to the 15th 
century Mirror of the Blessed Life of Christ (given the length of many of the proposed texts, in certain weeks 
we will recommend that students read selected extracts rather than works in their entirety). However, by 
combining literary work with the examining of relevant physical objects, we hope to encourage students 
towards a meaningful appreciation of the materiality of medieval devotional practice. We aim to equip 
students to read both texts and objects, and to recognise the affinities and disparities between textual and 
material literacies. Subject to any access restrictions, seminars will take place in the Ashmolean’s teaching 
rooms, so as to facilitate access to the objects and images under consideration.   
COURSE OUTLINE  
Week 1 - TRAVELLING AND STAYING PUT 
This week, we explore texts and objects associated with personal devotional practice. The materials selected 
encourage students to think about the itinerant devotion of the pilgrim alongside the stationary devotion of 
the enclosed religious.  
Primary Texts  
  ANCRENE WISSE  
o  [Millett, B. (ed.), Ancrene Wisse: A Corrected Edition of the Text in Cambridge, Corpus 
Christi College, MS 402, with variants from other manuscripts 2 volumes, EETS os 325 & 
326 (2005, 2006)] 

  PIERS PLOWMAN  
o  [Schmidt, A.V.C. (ed.), The Vision of Piers Plowman: B Text (1995)] 
  Margery Kempe’s BOOK 
o  [Windeatt, B. (ed.), The Book of Margery Kempe (2000)] 
  MANDEVILLE’S TRAVELS  
o  [Kohanski, T. and Benson, C.D. (eds.), Mandeville’s Travels (2007)] 
Ashmolean Objects  
  AN1997.3 Pilgrim badge of John Schorne 
  AN1997.12 Pilgrim badge of John Schorne 
  AN1927.6410 Holy water ampulla 
  Woodcut of St Anthony Abbot with votive offerings 
  Israel van Meckenem, Mass of St Gregory (Indulgenced prints with and without the indulgence) 
 
Week 2  - WOMEN AND MEN  
This week, we explore the role played by gender in medieval devotional culture. We will consider men as 
makers of objects and as authors of texts intended for women, as well as considering women as patrons and 
authors. The texts and objects selected will also enable us to think about the gendered relationship between 
Christ and his mother, between Christ and the devotee, and between the devotee and Mary.   
Primary Texts  
  Richard Rolle’s ENGLISH EPISTLES 
o  [Ogilvie-Thomson, S.J. (ed.), Richard Rolle: Prose and Verse EETS os 293 (1988)] 
  Julian of Norwich’s REVELATIONS 
o  [Windeatt, B. (ed.), Julian of Norwich: Revelations of Divine Love (2016)] 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 87 of 230 
  Margery Kempe (ed. Windeatt, as above) 
 
Ashmolean Objects  
  WA2013.1.8 Virgin and Child reliquary, parcel gilt silver, enamel, rock crystal 
  WA1908.220 Lamentation over the Dead Christ, enamel on copper, c.1480 
  AN2008.10 Ivory triptych panel of the Crucifixion and the Virgin and Child Enthroned 
 
Week 3 - SAINTS AND NARRATIVE  
This week, we explore the pervasive role played by hagiography in the devotional culture of the period. 
Considering relevant texts and objects alongside each other, we will encourage students to think about the 
ways in which literary and material depictions of saintly lives and deaths complement (and sometimes 
contradict) each other.   
 
Primary Texts  
  The saints’ lives of THE KATHERINE GROUP 
o  [Huber, E.R. and Robertson, E. (eds.), The Katherine Group (MS Bodley 34) (2016)] 
  Selected lives from THE SOUTH ENGLISH LEGENDARY  
o  [D’Evelyn, C. and Mill, A.J. (eds.), The South English Legendary 3 volumes, EETS os 235, 236, 
244 (1956-9)] 
  Selected lives from THE GILTE LEGENDE   
o  [Hamer, R.F.S. and Russell, V. (eds.), Gilte Legende 3 volumes, EETS os 327, 328, 339 (2006-
2012)] 
 
Ashmolean Objects 
  AN1836 p.146.488, Alabaster relief of the Martyrdom of St Bartholomew, c.1400-1450 
  Alabaster relief of the Martyrdom of St Erasmus 
  WA1933.22, St Sebastian, oil on panel, Southern Germany c.1450 
 
Week 4 - BODIES AND WOUNDS  
This week, we consider the iconography of Christ’s body in (and as) text and object. The literary and material 
witnesses selected will encourage students to reflect on the ways in which each contributes to the meditative 
experience of the user. The rich symbolism of Christ’s wounds will be a particular focus of attention.       
Primary Texts 
  The prayers of the WOOING GROUP  
o  [Thompson, W.M. (ed.), þe Wohunge of ure Lauerd EETS os 241 (1958)] 
  Passion Lyrics and Charters of Christ  
o  Gray, D. (ed.), English Medieval Religious Lyrics (rev. ed. 1992)]   
  Richard Rolle’s Passion Meditations (ed. Ogilvie-Thomson, as above)  
  Selected chapters from Julian of Norwich (ed. Windeatt, as above) and Margery Kempe (ed. 
Windeatt, as above) 
 
Ashmolean Objects  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 88 of 230 
  Woodcut of the Wounded Sacred Heart with the Arma Christi 
  AN1927.6371 Pilgrim token mould with the head of John the Baptist  
  Woodcuts of St Bridget of Sweden Adoring the Man of Sorrows 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Week 5 - ORDERS AND INSTITUTIONS  
This week, we consider the role played by monastic and fraternal orders in the circulation of devotional texts 
and objects. The selected texts, with Franciscan and Carthusian affiliations respectively, will be viewed 
alongside objects which illuminate the part played by the Franciscans and Dominicans, among others.   
Primary Texts  
  Pseudo-Bonaventuran Passion Meditations  
o  [Bartlett, A.C. and Bestul, T.H. (eds.), Cultures of Piety (1999)] 
  Nicholas Love’s MIRROR OF THE BLESSED LIFE OF CHRIST 
o  [Sargent, M.G. (ed.), The Mirror of the Blessed Life of Jesus Christ: a reading text (2004)]  
Ashmolean Objects  
  AN2009.69, The seal of the Carmelite Prior of Oxford 
  WA1949.104, Limoges pyx, copper alloy, gilding, enamel 
  Crucifixion woodcuts in Franciscan and Dominican traditions 
 
Week 6 – RECAP AND PRESENTATIONS  
This week, we will ask all students to prepare brief presentations on their chosen texts / objects. In a 
collaborative session, we will encourage student feedback and reflection on individual presentations. 
 
GENERAL LITERARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 
Introductory  
  Brown, P. (ed.), A Companion to Medieval English Literature and Culture 1350-1500 (2007) [this is a 
particularly good place to start – a very accessible introduction to themes and preoccupations in the 
literature of the period] 
  Scanlon, L., Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Literature 1100-1500 (2009) (available at 
http://universitypublishingonline.org/cambridge/companions/) [I would also recommend this as a 
starting point] 
  Turner, M. (ed.), A Handbook of Middle English Studies (2013) [this contains a lot of useful material] 
  Wallace, D. (ed.), The Cambridge History of Medieval English Literature (1999) 
 
Ancrene Wisse, Wooing Group, 13th C texts and traditions   
  Cannon, C., 'The Form of the Self: Ancrene Wisse and Romance' Medium Aevum 70 (2001), 47-65  
  Cannon, C., ‘The Place of the Self: Ancrene Wisse and the Katherine-Group’ in The Grounds of English 
Literature (2004)  
  Chewning, S.M. (ed.), The Milieu and Context of the Wooing Group (2009) 
  Fulton, R., From Judgement to Passion: Devotion to Christ and the Virgin Mary, 800-1200 (2002) 
  Fulton, R., ‘Praying with Anselm at Admont: A Meditation on Practice’ Speculum 81 (2006), 700-33 
  Herbert McAvoy, L. and Hughes-Edwards, M. (eds.) AnchoritesWombs and Tombs: Intersections of 
Gender and Enclosure in the Middle Ages (2005)  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 89 of 230 
  Herbert McAvoy, L. (ed.), Rhetoric of the Anchorhold: Space, Place and Body within the Discourses of 
Enclosure (2008) 
  Licence, T., Hermits and Recluses in English Society 950-1200 (2011) 
  Lipton, S., ‘‘The Sweet Lean of his Head’: Writing about Looking at the Crucifix in the High Middle 
Ages’ Speculum 80 (2005), 1172-1208 
  Millett, B., ‘The Ancrene Wisse Group’, in Edwards, A.S.G. (ed.), A Companion to Middle English Prose 
(2004) 
  Newman, B., ‘What Did It Mean To Say ‘I Saw’? The Clash between Theory and Practice in Medieval 
Visionary Culture’ Speculum 80 (2005), 1-43  
  Price, J., ‘“Inner” and “Outer”: Conceptualising the Body in Ancrene Wisse and Aelred’s De Institutione 
Inclusarum’ in Kratzmann, G. and Simpson, J. (eds.), Medieaval English Religious and Ethical 
Literature: Essays in Honour of G.H. Russell
 (1986) 
  Renevey, D., 'Enclosed Desires: a Study of the Wooing Group', in Pollard, W.F. and Boenig, R. (eds) 
Mysticism and Spirituality in Medieval England (1997), pp. 39-62. 
  Wada, Y. (ed.), A Companion to Ancrene Wisse (2003) 
  Warren, A., Anchorites and their Patrons in Medieval England (1985) 
  Watson, N., ‘The Methods and Objectives of Thirteenth-Century Anchoritic Devotion’ in M. Glasscoe 
(ed.), The Medieval Mystical Tradition in England Exeter Symposium 4 (1987), 132-53  
 
Hagiography  
  Bernau, A., Evans, R. and Salih, S. (eds.), Medieval Virginities (2003) 
  Blumenfeld-Kosinski, R. and Szell, T., (eds.) Images of Sainthood in Medieval Europe (1991) 
  __________, ed. The South English Legendary: A Critical Assessment (1992) 
  Cullum, P.H. and Lewis, K.J., Holiness and Masculinity in the Middle Ages (2004) 
  Delany, S.,  Impolitic Bodies: Poetry, Saints, and Society in Fifteenth-Century England: The Work of 
Osbern Bokenham (1988) 
  Dyas, D. , Pilgrimage in Medieval English Literature, 700-1500 (2001) 
  Head, T., "Hagiography." In K.M. Wilson and N. Margolis (ed.) Women in the Middle Ages: An 
Encyclopedia 
  Heffernan, T. J., Sacred Biography: Saints and Their Biographers in the Middle Ages (1988) 
  Johnson, I., "Auctricitas? Holy Women and their Middle English Texts." In R. Voaden (ed.), Prophets 
Abroad: The Reception of Continental Holy Women in Late-Medieval England (1996) 
  Kieckhefer, R., Unquiet Souls: Fourteenth-Century Saints and Their Religious Milieu (1984) 
  Lees, C.A., Medieval Masculinities: Regarding Men in the Middle Ages (1994) 
  Lewis, Katherine J. The Cult of St. Katherine of Alexandria in Late Medieval England (1999) 
  ---. "Model Girls? Virgin-Martyrs and the Training of Young Women in Late Medieval England." in K. 
Lewis, N.J. Menuge and K. M. Phillips (eds.), Young Medieval Women (1999) 
  Lewis, K.J., ‘Male Saints and Devotional Masculinity in Late Medieval England’ Gender and History 24 
(2012), 112-33 
  Mulder-Bakker, A.B. (ed.), Sanctity and Motherhood: Essays on Holy Mothers in the Middle Ages 
(1995) 
  Newman, B.,  From Virile Woman to WomanChrist: Studies in Medieval Religion and Literature (1995) 
  Salih, S. Versions of Virginity in late Medieval England (2001) 
  Salih, S. (ed.), A Companion to Middle English Hagiography (2006) 
  Winstead, K. Virgin Martyrs: Legends of Sainthood in Late Medieval England (1997) 
  Wogan-Browne, J., Saints’ Lives and the Literary Culture of Women, c. 1150-1300: Virginity and its 
Authorisations (2001) 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 90 of 230 
Rolle, Julian, Margery, 14th C Lyrics and Passion Meditations 
  Arnold, J.H. and Lewis, K.J. (eds.), A Companion to the Book of Margery Kempe (2004) 
  Baker, D.N., Julian of Norwich’s Showings: From Vision to Book (1994) 
  Bale, A., Feeling Persecuted: Christians, Jews and Images of Violence in the Middle Ages (2010), esp. 
chapters 5 & 6 [accessible online via SOLO] 
  Beckwith, S., Christ's Body: Identity, Culture and Society in Late Medieval Writings (1996) 
  Bennett, J.A.W., The Poetry of the Passion: Studies in Twelve Centuries of English Verse (Oxford, 1982) 
  Boffey, J., ‘“Loke on þis wrytyng, man, for þi devocion”: Focal Texts in Some Late Middle English 
Religious Lyrics’, in Individuality and Achievement in Middle English Poetry, ed. O. S. Pickering (1997), 
pp. 129-46. 
  Brantley, J., Reading in the Wilderness – Private Devotion and Public Performance in Late Medieval 
England (2007)  
  Butterfield, A., ‘Lyric’, in Larry Scanlon (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Literature 
1100–1500 (2009), pp. 95–110 
  Camille, M., ‘Sensations of the Page: Imaging Technologies and Medieval Illuminated Manuscripts’ in 
Bornstein and Tinkle (eds.), The Iconic Page in Manuscript, Print and Digital Culture (1998) 
  Dinshaw, C and Wallace, D (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Women’s Writing (2003)  
  Dronke, P., The Medieval Lyric (1996) 
  Duncan, T.G. (ed.), A Companion to the Middle English Lyric (2005) 
  Gillespie, V., Looking in Holy Books. Essays on Late Medieval Religious Writing in England (2011), pp. 
113–45 
  Gillespie, V. and Fanous, S. (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Mysticism (2011)  
  Gray, D., Themes and Images in the Medieval English Religious Lyric (1972) 
  Karnes, M., ‘Julian of Norwich’s Art of Interpretation’ Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 
(2012), 333-63 
  Jager, E., ‘The Book of the Heart: Reading and Writing the Medieval Subject’ Speculum 71 (1996), 1-26 
  Macdonald, A.A. et al (eds), The Broken Body: Passion Devotion in Late-Medieval Culture (1998) 
  McAvoy, L. (ed.), A Companion to Julian of Norwich (2008) 
  McNamer, S., ‘The Exploratory Image: God as Mother in Julian of Norwich’s Revelations of Divine 
Love’ Mystics Quarterly 15 (1989), 21-8 
  Renevey, D., Language, Self and Love: Hermeneutics in the Writings of Richard Rolle and the 
Commentaries on the Song of Songs (2001) 
  Ross, Ellen M., The Grief of God: Images of the Suffering Jesus in Late Medieval England (1997) 
  Rubin, M. Corpus Christi: the Eucharist in Late Medieval Culture (1991) 
  Rubin, M. And Kay, S. (eds.), Framing Medieval Bodies (1994) 
  Stanbury, S., ‘The Virgin's Gaze: Spectacle and Transgression in Middle English Lyrics of the Passion’, 
PMLA, 106 (1991), 1083-93 
  Walker-Bynum, C., Fragmentation and Redemption: Essays on Gender and the Human Body in 
Medieval Religion (1991) 
  Walker-Bynum, C., Christian Materiality: An Essay on Religion in Late Medieval Europe (2011) 
  Watson, N., Richard Rolle and the Invention of Authority (1991) 
  Woolf, R., The English Religious Lyric in the Middle Ages (1968) 
 
Mandeville, Langland and Pilgrimage  
  Aers, D., Piers Plowman and Christian Allegory (1975) 
  Aers, D., Chaucer, Langland and the Creative Imagination (1980) 
  Alford, J., A Companion to Piers Plowman (1988) 
  Baldwin, A., A Guidebook to Piers Plowman (2007) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 91 of 230 
  Heng, G., Empire of Magic: Medieval Romance and the Politics of Cultural Fantasy (2004) 
  Heng, G., The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages (2018) 
  Salter, E., An Introduction to Piers Plowman (1969) 
  Simpson, J., An Introduction to Piers Plowman (1990. Recently reissued) 
  Tomasch, S., and Seally, G., Text and Territory: Geographical Imagination in the European Middle Ages 
(1997) 
  Zacher, C., Curiosity and Pilgrimage: The Literature of Discovery in Fourteenth-Century England (1976) 
  Zeeman, N., Piers Plowman and the Medieval Discourse of Desire (2006) 
 
Preparation for Week 1 Class  
The more primary reading that you can do, the better! But please ensure that you have read the following: 
  Ancrene Wisse, Preface, Part 2, Part 6, Part 8  
o  Millett, B. (ed.), Ancrene Wisse: A Corrected Edition of the Text in Cambridge, Corpus Christi 
College, MS 402, with variants from other manuscripts 2 volumes, EETS os 325 & 326 (2005, 
2006) 
o  OR  
o  Hasenfratz, R. (ed), Ancrene Wisse (TEAMS 2000) (digitised on the TEAMS website - 
http://d.lib.rochester.edu/teams/publication/hasenfratz-ancrene-wisse) 
o  [Millett has also produced a fantastic translation of the text, which corresponds page by page 
with her EETS edition – Millett, B., Ancrene WisseGuide for Anchoresses. A Translation 
(2009)]  
  Piers Plowman, Prologue, Passus V, Passus VI  
o  Schmidt, A.V.C. (ed.), The Vision of Piers Plowman: B Text (1995) 
o  [Again, there is an excellent translation – Schmidt, A.V.C., Piers Plowman – A New Translation 
of the B Text (2009)] 
  Margery Kempe’s Book, chapters 26, 27, 28, 29 
o  Windeatt, B. (ed.), The Book of Margery Kempe (2000) 
o  OR  
o  Staley, L. (ed.), The Book of Margery Kempe (1996) (digitised on the TEAMS website - 
http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/staley.htm) 
o  OR 
o  Staley, L. (ed.), The Book of Margery Kempe – Norton Critical Editions (2001) (This one is 
useful as it also contains a range of secondary reading)  
o  [There are also two good translations – Windeatt, B. (trans.), The Book of Margery Kempe 
(2000) and Bale, A. (trans.), The Book of Margery Kempe (2015)] 
  Mandeville’s Travels, chapters 1, 2, 24  
o  Hamelius, P (ed.), Mandeville’s Travels EETS 153-4 (1919-23) (digitised in the Middle English 
Compendium – http://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/cme/browse.html) 
o  OR  
o  Kohanski, T. And Benson, C.D. (eds), The Book of John Mandeville (2007) (digitised on the 
TEAMS website - http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/kohanski.htm) 
o  [There’s also an excellent translation - Bale, A. (trans.), John Mandeville – the Book of 
Marvels and Travels (2012)] 
 
We are not requiring you to read all of the primary texts in full, simply because they are so big. Having said 
that, it’s really important that you have a sense of their broad contents, structure etc. So please do use the 
preceding bibliography to read about and around all 4 of the texts. As you are reading, please bear in mind the 
following questions: 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 92 of 230 
  What do the texts tell us about the realities of / attitudes towards pilgrimage / travel in the Middle 
Ages?  
  What do they tell us about the realities of / attitudes towards enclosure / solitude?  
  How and why do the texts use pilgrimage and/or enclosure metaphorically?  
 
We would also like to ask for four volunteers to each present briefly on these issues in relation to each of the 
texts (one volunteer per text). By *briefly*, we really do mean *briefly* - no more than five minutes. We will 
aim to hear all participants presenting at least twice over the course of the term but on this occasion, we will 
simply select those who reply to this email most promptly!   
 
NB – in general, we are very happy for you to read the primary texts in translation if you are short of time or 
struggling with the language (Ancrene Wisse 
and Piers Plowman are particularly demanding, while Margery 
and Mandeville are a bit easier). But when you are presenting, please include the Middle English as well as 
the translation. And remember that when you come to write your essays for this course, you will be 
expected to quote from and analyse the Middle English – so it is important to begin to become familiar with 
it.   

 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 93 of 230 
Old English poetry: Cynewulf and the Cynewulf canon 
Dr Daniel Thomas – xxxxxx.xxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 

In the generally anonymous corpus of Anglo-Saxon vernacular (‘Old English’) poetry, one name stands out: 
Cynewulf. Four surviving Old English poems bear the ‘signature’ of Cynewulf (or ‘Cynwulf’) in the form of runic 
characters embedded more-or-less seamlessly into apparently autobiographical ‘epilogues’. These poems are 
Christ II or The Ascension (a poetic account of Christ’s Ascension that draws significantly upon a homily of 
Gregory the Great), Juliana (an adaptation of the Latin passio of the virgin martyr St Juliana), Elene (an account 
of St Helena’s discovery of the true Cross based upon a Latin inventio narrative), and The Fates of the Apostles 
(which recounts the missionary activity, and death, of Christ’s Apostles). The precise purpose(s) of the 
autobiographical epilogues and their relationship with the preceding poetic narratives are still matters for 
scholarly debate, as is the identity of ‘Cynewulf’ himself, but almost all scholars would admit that the four 
poems in question stand as a (perhaps partial) record of the career of one particular Anglo-Saxon author.  
The survival of this small but impressive body of work provides modern scholars with a unique opportunity to 
assess in some detail the interests, literary techniques, and poetic style of an individual Old English poet. 
Cynewulf was clearly not, however, a poet working in isolation. His work stands not only as part of the wider 
tradition of Old English verse, but also, more specifically, at the heart of a group of surviving poems apparently 
linked by shared thematic and rhetorical concerns and by the use of a discernibly similar poetic vocabulary and 
style. Moreover, recent scholarship has increasingly uncovered what look like deliberate echoes (both of 
theme and lexis) not only within the so-called ‘Cynewulf group’, but also between these poems and other Old 
English texts such as Beowulf and Christ I and II.  
This course will provide you with critical and analytical ways of approaching the signed works of Cynewulf, 
assessing their relationship to the ‘Cynewulf group’ and other poems, and considering the implications of 
recent scholarship relating to the literary relationships between these text for our understanding of the Old 
English poetic tradition. Texts will be studied in Old English, so some prior study of the language is required. If 
you need to refresh your knowledge of Old English, you might want to look at an introductory guide such as 
Mark Atherton’s Complete Old English (London: Hodder Education, 2010) or Peter Baker’s Introduction to Old 
English
 (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012). For a more detailed (but still user-friendly) look at how the 
language works, see Jeremy J. Smith’s Old English: A Linguistic Introduction (Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press, 2009).  
The Old English poetic corpus is small, so it is possible to know it in some detail. Alongside the ‘signed’ works 
of Cynewulf, you should try to familiarize yourself with other ‘Cynewulfian’ poems such as Guthlac BAndreas, 
The Dream of the Rood
, and The Phoenix, as well as BeowulfJudith, and Christ I (Advent) and Christ III (Christ in 
Judgement
)Parallel text editions such as those produced for the ‘Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library’ will be 
particularly useful for this:  
  The Beowulf Manuscript, ed. and trans. R. D. Fulk (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2010). 
  Old Testament Narratives, ed. and trans. Daniel Anlezark (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 
2011). 
  The Old English Poems of Cynewulf, ed. and trans. Robert E. Bjork (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University 
Press, 2013). 
  Old English Poems of Christ and His Saints, ed. and trans. Mary Clayton (Cambridge, MA: Harvard 
University Press, 2013).   
  Old English Shorter Poems Vol. I Religious and Didactic, ed. and trans. Christopher A. Jones 
(Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2012). 
  Old English Shorter Poems Vol. II Wisdom and Lyric, ed. and trans. Robert E. Bjork (Cambridge, MA: 
Harvard University Press, 2014). 
Full course details will be provided in due course, but please feel free to email me with any questions at the 
address given above.  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 94 of 230 
Introductory Bibliography 
On the Old English poetic tradition
  BRODEUR, Arthur: The Art of Beowulf (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1959). 
  BREDEHOFT, Thomas A.: Authors, Audiences, and Old English Verse (Toronto: University of Toronto 
Press, 2009), 
  FOLEY, John Miles: ‘Texts That Speak to Reader Who Hear: Old English Poetry and the Languages of 
Oral Tradition’, in Speaking Two Languages: Traditional Disciplines and Contemporary Theory in 
Medieval Studies
, ed. Allen J. Frantzen (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1991), 141–56. 
  GREENFIELD, Stanley: The Interpretation of Old English Poetry (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1972). 
  MOMMA, Haruko: ‘Old English Poetic Form: Genre, Style, Prosody’, in The Cambridge History of Early 
Medieval English Literature, ed. Clare Lees (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012), 278‒308. 
  ORCHARD, Andy: ‘Old English and Anglo-Latin: The Odd Couple’, in A Companion to British Literature: 
Volume I: Medieval Literature 700‒1450, eds. Robert DeMaria, Jr., Heesok Chang, and Samantha 
Zacher (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2014), 273‒92. 
  SHIPPEY, T. A.: Old English Verse (London: Hutchinson, 1972). 
  THORNBURY, Emily: Becoming a Poet in Anglo-Saxon England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 
2014). 
Editions of Cynewulf’s poetry
In addition to the Dumbarton Oaks volume edited by Robert E. Bjork (see above), the four signed poems all 
appear in the relevant volumes of The Anglo-Saxon Poetic Record
  The Vercelli Book, ed. George Philip Krapp, The Anglo-Saxon Poetic Records vol. II, (New York: 
Columbia University Press, 1932) [for Elene and The Fates of the Apostles]. 
  The Exeter Book, ed. George Philip Krapp and Elliott van Kirk Dobbie, The Anglo-Saxon Poetic Records 
vol. III (New York: Columbia University Press, 1936) [for Christ II and Juliana]. 
The Exeter Book poems can also be found in The Exeter Anthology of Old English Poetry: An Edition of Exeter 
Dean and Chapter MS 3501
, ed. Bernard Muir, 2nd rev. ed. (Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2000). 
Cynewulf has not always been well-served by modern editors. The most recent full critical editions of the 
individual poems are:  
  Christ II 
o  The Christ of Cynewulf, ed. Albert S. Cook (Boston: Ginn & Co., 1900). 
  Juliana 
o  Juliana, ed. Rosemary Woolf (Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 1977). 
  Elene 
o  Cynewulf’s Elene, ed. P. O. A. Gradon (Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 1977). 
  Fates of the Apostles 
o  Andreas and The Fates of the Apostles, ed. Kenneth R. Brooks (Oxford: Oxford University 
Press, 1961) 
For the Latin sources of Cynewulf’s poems, see Sources and Analogues of Old English Poetry I: the major Latin 
texts
 in translation, ed. and trans. Michael J. B. Allen and Daniel G. Calder (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1976). 
Selected reading on Cynewulf and the Cynewulf canon
  The Cynewulf Reader, ed. Robert E. Bjork (Routledge: New York and London, 2001). 
  ANDERSON, Earl R., Cynewulf: Structure, Style and Theme in his Poetry (Rutherford, NJ: Fairleigh 
Dickinson University Press, 1983). 
  BIRKETT, Tom, ‘Runes and Revelatio: Cynewulf’s Signatures Reconsidered’, Review of English Studies 65 
(2014), 771–89. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 95 of 230 
  BJORK, Robert E., The Old English Verse Saints’ Lives: a Study in Direct Discourse and the Iconography of 
Style, McMaster Old English Studies and Texts 4 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1985). 
  BRIDGES, Margaret E., Generic Contrast in Old English Hagiographical Poetry, Anglistica 22 
(Copenhagen: Rosenkilde and Bagger, 1984). 
  CALDER, Daniel G., Cynewulf, Twayne’s English Authors Series 327 (Boston, MA: Twayne Publishers, 
1981). 
  CLEMENTS, Jill Hamilton, ‘Reading, writing and resurrection: Cynewulf’s runes as a figure of the body’, 
Anglo-Saxon England 43 (2014), 133–54. 
  DAS, S. K., Cynewulf and the Cynewulf Canon (Calcutta: University of Calcutta, 1942). 
  DIAMOND, Robert E., ‘The Diction of the Signed Poems of Cynewulf’, Philological Quarterly 38 (1959), 
228–41. 
  OLSEN, A. H.Speech, Song, and Poetic Craft: the Artistry of the Cynewulf Canon (New York: Peter Lang, 
1984). 
  ORCHARD, Andy, ‘Both Style and Substance: the Case for Cynewulf’, in Anglo-Saxon Styles, ed. 
Catherine Karkov and George H. Brown (Binghamton, NY: SUNY Press, 2003), 271–305. 
  ———, ‘Computing Cynewulf: the Judith-Connection’, in The Text in the Community: Essays on 
Medieval Works, Manuscripts, and Readers, ed. Jill Mann and Maura Nolan (Notre Dame: University 
of Notre Dame Press, 2005), 75–106. 
  PUSKAR, Jason R., ‘Hwa þas fitte fegde? Questioning Cynewulf’s Claim of Authorship’, English Studies 
92 (2011), 1–19. 
  RICE, R. C., ‘The Penitential Motif in Cynewulf’s Fates of the Apostles and in his Epilogues’, Anglo-Saxon 
England 6 (1977), 105–19. 
  SCHAAR, Claes, Critical Studies in the Cynewulf Group, Lund Studies in English 17 (Lund: C. W. K. 
Cleerup, 1949). 
  STODNICK, Jacqueline A., ‘Cynewulf as Author: Medieval Reality or Modern Myth?’ Bulletin of the John 
Rylands Library 79 (1997), 25–39. 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 96 of 230 
Andrewes & Donne: Performing Religious Discourse 
Professor Peter McCullough -  xxxxx.xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
This course will attend to one of the most prominent, but now often neglected, literary genres of the early 
modern period, the sermon.  Its first aim will be to provide a detailed understanding of the sermon as a 
particular, even peculiar, genre which combines the forms and methods of Classical rhetoric with uniquely 
Christian motives and methods of discourse and interpretation. We will then pay particular attention not just 
to sermons as 'occasional' texts - written for very specific occasions and auditories - but also as texts intended 
to be performed, creating a unique economy of bodily as well as intellectual engagement, even cooperation, 
between preacher, auditory, place, and time.  Each seminar will pair a specimen sermon by each of the two 
great contemporaries Lancelot Andrewes (1555-1626) and John Donne (1572 – 1631) - preachers with 
fundamentally different religious sensibilities, views of preaching, and of language itself.  In an effort to 
capture something of their sermons as they originally intended them – as what contemporaries called 'lively 
preaching', and we might call 'performance art' – at least three set texts discussed in seminar will be given full 
performance reconstructions in the historically accurate setting of Lincoln College chapel (1629-31).  
Students will be encouraged to apply to sermons the interrelated aspects of authorship, performance, and 
textual history which may be more familiar from studying early modern theatrical forms such as plays and 
masques. The course will also be a good way to learn about some of the many contested aspects of the 
religious and political culture of the period.  Although the course will challenge the tradition of treating 
sermons as a footnote to literary history, or as a convenient mine for glosses on works in more familiar genres 
like poetry, it will also - precisely by asserting the centrality of the sermon to the period's literary culture - 
encourage the exploration of how this culturally pervasive genre influenced others.  
Extensive reading in Andrewes, Donne, and their contemporaries, as well as a wide-ranging body of secondary 
critical and historical sources, will inform each week’s seminar.  These will move from matters of genre and 
rhetoric to wider, more contextualized readings, and end with a look at the sermon’s presence in other 
contemporary works.  
Professor McCullough has written widely on Andrewes, Donne, and early modern preaching, edited Lancelot 
Andrewes: Selected Sermons and Lectures
 (Oxford, 2005), and is General Editor of The Oxford Edition of the 
Sermons of John Donne 
(Oxford, 2010 - ). He is also working on two large biographical projects on early 
modern religious subjects: Lancelot Andrewes: A Life (Oxford), and a study of the intersections of locality, 
literature, patronage, and religion in the life of Edward Kirke, sometimes said to be the 'E.K.' of Spenser's 
Shepheardes Calendar.   
Students considering taking the course but who may not be familiar with the authors or the field are 
encouraged to sample any of the texts set for the term-time seminars (below). A good summary of the field is 
found in McCullough, Rhatigan, and Adlington, eds., The Oxford Handbook of the Early Modern Sermon 
(Oxford, 2011). If sampling Donne's sermons, be sure not to rely only on anthologised excerpts; an affordable 
selection of complete texts, still in print and easily available, is Evelyn Simpson, ed., John Donne: Sermons on 
the Psalms and Gospels
 (California). There is unfortunately no paperback equivalent for Andrewes. Feel free to 
contact xxxxx.xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xx.xx.xx for further guidance if access to anything you would like to sample 
is a problem. 
Below is an indicative term plan, with readings and assignments. (The following abbreviations have been used, 
with references given to volume and sermon number: OESJDThe Oxford Edition of the Sermons of John 
Donne
, 16 vols. (2010 - ); PS: George Potter and Evelyn Simpson, eds., The Sermons of John Donne, 10 vols. 
(Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1953-62).) 
Week 1: Genre & Structure 
Class Texts:  
Donne, ‘A Lent-Sermon Preached at Whitehall, February 12, 1618’, PS ii.8; Andrewes, 'A 
Sermon Preached before the King's Majestie . . . XXIV. of May, A.D. MDCXVIII. being Whit-
Sunday', in Andrewes, ed. McCullough, Selected Sermons, pp. 207-24. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 97 of 230 
Reading
McCullough, 'Donne as Preacher', in Guibbory, The Cambridge Companion to John Donne
Mary Morrissey, 'Scripture, Style and Persuasion in Seventeenth-Century English Theories of 
Preaching'. Journal of Ecclesiastical History 53.4: 686-706; Peter Lake  , 'Lancelot Andrewes, 
John Buckeridge, and avant-garde conformity at the court of James I', in Linda Levy Peck, ed., 
The Mental World of the Jacobean Court (CUP, 1991): 113-33; Arnold Hunt, The Art of 
Hearing: English Preachers and their Audiences, 1590-1640
 (Oxford, 2010) 
Background:  
Hyperius, trans. John Ludham, The Practise of Preaching; Perkins,  
The Arte of 
Prophecying (both EEBO); Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, Book IV 
Preparation: 
Understand the fundamental structural parts of an early modern sermon - text, ‘sum’ and/or 
‘exordium’, divisio[n] – as well as the five basic stages of composing a classical/humanist 
oration (inventio, dispositio, elocutio, memoria, actio).  Prepare a careful outline (following 
the preacher’s announced division through the sermon itself) of each of the two sermons.  
What kinds of choices do you see the two preachers making about the structure of their two 
sermons (for whatever variety of reasons), and with what results?  How are the (competing?) 
claims of eloquence and edification negotiated in each?  How do you understand each 
preacher’s declared view of the role of the preacher, the role of preaching in church, nation, 
and individual?  
 
Week 2: Words & Things 
Class Texts
Donne, ‘Preached at Pauls, upon Christmas Day, in the Evening. 1624’, PS vi.8; Andrewes, ‘A 
Sermon Preached . . . MDCXIIII. being CHRIST-MASSE day.’, XCVI Sermons (1629), G6v-H5v (= EEBO 
STC
 606, image sets 42-47). 
Reading
T S Eliot, ‘Lancelot Andrewes’, Selected Essays, 299-310; Debora Shuger, Habits of Thought in 
the English Renaissance
, ch. 1.; McCullough, Sermons at Court (Cambridge, 1998), chs. 1 & 3. 
Background
Other Christmas (Nativity) sermons by Andrewes:  nb particularly those on texts central to 
the doctrine of the incarnation (God/Word made man/flesh), e.g. John 1.14 (‘And the Word 
was made flesh’; 1611); or sign theory, e.g. Luke 2.12-13 (‘And this shall be a sign unto you’; 
1618).  Other Christmas sermons by Donne (all St Paul’s, from 1621, thus in PS iii, iv, vi-ix).   
Preparation
Read these Christmas sermons alert to the implications of each preacher’s understanding of 
the Incarnation's relevance for signification as applied to texts; i.e., if Christ is ‘the Word 
made flesh’, how does each preacher understand the signifying capacity of ‘word(s)’ with a 
small ‘w’?  What does each suggest about how people (whether preacher or congregation) 
should or can make ‘words’ into ‘things’?  Do you see manifestations of each preacher’s 
views about these issues in any way reflected in his prose style? 
Presentations
1. on Donne vs. Andrewes’s handling the same text. 
 
2.  on importance of place, auditory, and liturgical context for these two sermons. 
 
Week 3: 
Figures, Psalms, Devotion 
Class Texts
Donne, ‘The Second of my Prebend Sermons upon my five Psalms.  Preached at S. Pauls, 
Ianuary 29. 1625. [1625/6]
, in Simpson, ed., Sermons on the Psalms and Gospels, no. 4, or PS 
vii.1.  Andrewes, ‘Preached . . . X. of February, A.D. MDCXIX. being ASHWEDNESDAY.’ (on Joel 
2: 12-13), XCVI Sermons, S6r- T5r (= EEBO, STC 606, image sets 107-12). 
Background
Adamson et al., eds., Renaissance Figures of Speech; Mack, Elizabethan Rhetoric, esp. ch. 8; 
Vickers, In Defence of Rhetoric; Raphael Lyne, Shakespeare, Rhetoric and Cognition (2011), 
ch. 3.; Rivkah Zim, The English Metrical Psalms; Hannibal Hamlin, Psalm Culture and Early 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 98 of 230 
Modern English Literature; David Marno, Death Be Not Proud: the Art of Holy Attention 
(Chicago, 2016) 
Preparation
Study the exemplary essays in Adamson et al, informed by other surveys of the topic like 
Mack and Vickers, and then the two set sermons for the ways Donne & Andrewes deploy 
figures of speech and rhetorical tropes (a handy list of these is at the back of Vickers’ book; 
don’t forget Peacham and Wilson's rhetorics, and include larger structures of syntactical 
patterning in you thinking).  Are they decorative, or signifying in their own right?  How?  Do 
they relate more to the work of explication (i.e. argument) or to raising emotion?  Do you see 
any strategic logic to when they are deployed?  
Presentations
1. should the study of sermon rhetoric take a ‘cognitive turn’? 
 
2. how do metaphors appeal differently to Donne / Andrewes? 
 
Week 4: 
Preachers Using Sources  
Class Texts
Donne, ‘Preached at St Paul’s upon Christmasse day, 1621’ (no. 6 in Simpson, ed., Sermons 
on the Psalms and Gospels
; = PS iii.17); Andrewes, ‘Preached on Easter day . . . 1620’ (in 
McCullough, ed., Selected Sermons, no. 13). 
Background
Colclough on Donne’s sources in OESJD vol. iii, pp. xli-xlv, and ‘Sources’ section of the 
commentaries on the sermons therein. Headnote and annotations to the Andrewes sermon 
in McCullough, ed., focussing on sources; essays on patristics, biblical commentators, and 
classical sources in Handbook of the Early Modern Sermon. Further, Jean-Louis Quantin, The 
Church of England and Christian Antiquity
 (Oxford, 2009), Katrin Ettenhuber, Donne's 
Augustine
 (Oxford, 2010), Alison Knight, 'Audience and Error: Translation, Philology, and 
Rhetoric in the Preaching of Lancelot Andrewes', in M Feingold, ed., Labourers in the 
Vineyard
 (Leiden, 2018), 372-95. 
Presentations
Everyone take ll. 1-266 of the Donne sermon (‘It is an . . . flesh without him.’) and imagine 
yourself an annotating editor of the text for a scholarly edition. Using OESJD as an exemplar, 
highlight what you think you would need to annotate. And then have a go at finding 
documentary sources for those things, and come prepared to share your findings, 
frustrations, and hunches about the kinds of places this exercise leads you. 
 
Week 5: Preaching Politics 
Donne, 'A Sermon upon the fift of November 1622.' (PS, iv.9); Andrewes, 'A Sermon . . . on 
the V. of NOVEMBER. A.D. MDCXIIII.', XCVI Sermons (2nd ed., 1631), 4N5r-4O5r (= EEBO STC 607, 
image sets 482-8) 
Background
any other Gowry or Gunpowder Treason sermons; Mary Morrissey, Politics and the Paul's 
Cross Sermons 1558-1642
 (OUP, 2011); Jeanne Shami, John Donne and Conformity in Crisis
Headnote and commentary for McCullough, ed. no. 9; Joe Moshenska, Feeling Pleasures: the 
Sense of Touch in Renaissance England
, ch. 2.; Jonathan McGovern, 'The Political Sermons of 
Lancelot Andrewes', Seventeenth Century 34.1 (2019), 3-25 
Presentations
1.-2. on any aspect of D’s and A’s treatment rebellion / obedience 
 
Week 6:  Sermons In . . .  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 99 of 230 
Presentations
Everyone to present on any early modern non-sermon text that you find profitable to 
consider in light of early modern sermon culture (whether formally, thematically or 
otherwise) 
Written Work: I will give written feedback and meet with you about a sample piece of draft work, on any topic 
related to the course, if received by 5 pm, Friday Week 5. I will also comment on a draft final 
essay outline if received by 5 pm, Wednesday Week 6
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 100 of 230 
Travel, Belonging, Identity: 1550-1700 
Professor Nandini Das – xxxxxxx.xxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx  

How did mobility in the great age of travel and discovery shape English perceptions of human identity based 
on cultural identification and difference, and how did literature facilitate and resist such categorisations? 
Throughout this period, Britain was as much a destination as it was a point of departure. Religious refugees 
from Continental Europe arrived in their thousands, transforming the nature of English everyday life and 
industry, even as the English geographer Richard Hakluyt was advocating the establishment of colonies in the 
New World because ‘throughe our longe peace and seldome sickness (two singular blessinges of almightie 
god) wee are growen more populous than ever heretofore’ (‘Discourse of Western Planting’, 1584). The role of 
those marked by transcultural mobility was central to this period. Trade and politics, religious schisms, shifts in 
legal systems, all attempted to control and formalise the identity of such figures. Our current world is all too 
familiar with the concepts that surfaced or evolved as a result: ‘foreigners’, ‘strangers,’ and ‘aliens’, ‘converts’, 
‘exiles’, and ‘traitors,’ or even ‘translators’, ‘ambassadors’ and ‘go-betweens’.  
Graduate students undertaking this option will join Nandini Das and the research team of the European 
Research Council funded TIDE (‘Travel, Transculturality, and Identity, c.1550-1700’) project. Together, we will 
(1) explore the different ways in which travel and human mobility influenced the conceptual frameworks used 
to define and control issues of identity, race, and belonging, (2) examine how English cross-cultural contact 
with different geographical regions shaped economic, political, and cultural strategies to engage with 
difference, and (3) interrogate both literature’s complicity in, and ability to question, the collective perception 
and collective memory of such engagements. You will have the opportunity to participate in other TIDE 
seminars and events during the term, with contributions from TIDE visiting scholars and writers. 
Assessment:  
An essay (maximum 6000 words including footnotes but excluding bibliography) on a topic of your choice. 
There will be opportunities to discuss the choice of essay topics. 
Optional extra:  
You may contribute to the TIDE blog (www.tideproject.uk/blog) on texts/issues of your choice if you wish to do 
so. A selection of the edited pieces from Purchas will be featured in an open access online edition (subject to 
Faculty approval). 
Term plan:  
See below for the session topics and core reading.  
For ease of reference, we will use two anthologies to access core textual extracts: 
  Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630, ed. by Andrew 
Hadfield (OUP, 2001). [Page references given below from this volume are indicated by the prefix 
ASM’.] 
  Travel Knowledge, ed. by Ivo Kamps and Jyotsna Singh (2001). [Page references from this volume are 
indicated by the prefix ‘TK’.] 
However, you will be expected to access full versions of the recommended texts from scholarly editions and 
EEBO (Early English Books Online) in all cases. 
Familiarity with the core reading and any other asterisked texts will be required for each seminar – please 
bring physical or electronic copies of these so that you can refer to them easily during discussions.  
 
Seminar 1: Terms of Engagement 

In this first session we will chart the history of some of the terms and concepts that either emerged, or 
evolved, as a product of human mobility and travel in this period, and were used variously to define, describe, 
and control the identity of individuals and communities.  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 101 of 230 
 
Core reading: 

  TIDE: Keywords (http://www.tideproject.uk/keywords-home/): alien/stranger, citizen, denizen, 
native, subject, pirate, traitor.  
  Robert Wilson, Three Ladies of London (1584). 
Task: Use your reading to reflect on one English literary text of the period that you have studied previously, 
and come prepared to talk about the ways in which your reading for this seminar could illuminate your chosen 
text’s engagement with difference and belonging. 
 
Further primary reading: 
  Robert Wilson, The Three Lords and Three Ladies of London (1590). 
  William Haughton, Englishmen for my Money (1598). 
  Anthony Munday and others, Sir Thomas More . 
Secondary historiography: 
 
  Archer, Ian, The Pursuit of Stability: Social Relations in Elizabethan London (Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 1991) 
  Goose, Nigel, and Lien Luu, eds., Immigrants in Tudor and Early Stuart England (Brighton: Sussex 
Academic Press, 2005) 
  Pettegree, Andrew, Foreign Protestant Communities in Sixteenth-Century London (Oxford: Clarendon 
Press, 1986). 
  Selwood, Jacob, Diversity and Difference in Early Modern London (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010) 
  Yungblut, Laura Hunt, Strangers Settled Here Amongst Us (London: Routledge, 1996) 
 
Secondary literature: 
 
  Jowitt, Claire, ‘Robert Wilson’s The Three Ladies of London and its Theatrical and Cultural Contexts,’ in 
The Oxford Handbook of Tudor Drama, eds. Thomas Betteridge and Greg Walker (Oxford: Oxford 
University Press, 2012), pp.309-322. 
  Kermode, Lloyd E., Aliens and Englishness in Elizabethan Drama (Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press, 2009).  
  Levine, Nina, Practicing the City: Early Modern London on Stage (New York: Fordham University Press, 
2016) 
  McCluskey, Peter Matthew, Representations of Flemish Immigrants on the Early Modern Stage 
(Oxford and New York: Routledge, 2019) 
  Oldenburg, Scott, Alien Albion: Literature and Immigration in Early Modern England (Toronto: 
University of Toronto Press, 2014) 
  Smith, Emma, ‘“So much English by the Mother”: Gender, Foreigners, and the Mother Tongue in 
William Haughton’s Englishmen for My Money’, Medieval & Renaissance Drama in England, Vol. 13 
(2001), pp. 165-181. 
 
Seminar 2: Culture, Race and Ethnography: Britain and the Americas 
Core reading: 
  Walter Raleigh (ASM 279); John Smith (ASM 303); Richard Hakluyt, ‘A Discourse of Western Planting’ 
(1584); James I, A Counterblaste to Tobacco (1604) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 102 of 230 
  Touchstone texts: Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Book 6; George Chapman, The Memorable 
Masque (1613). 
 
Further primary reading: 
  Chapman, George, ‘De Guiana, Carmen Epicum’ prefatory poem in Lawrence Kemys, A relation of the 
second voyage to Guiana (1596; STC 14947) 
  English and Irish Settlement on the River Amazon, 1550 -- 1646, ed. Joyce Lorimer (London: Hakluyt 
Society, 1989)  
  Jonson, Ben, George Chapman, and John Marston, Eastward Ho! (London: Bloomsbury, 2015) 
  Knivet, Anthony, ‘The admirable adventures and strange fortunes of Master Anthony Knivet, which 
went with Master Thomas Candish [Cavendish] in his second voyage to the South Sea (1591)’, in 
Samuel Purchas, Purchas his pilgrimes (1625), vol. 4, pp. 1212-33 
  Linwood ‘Little Bear’ Custalow and Angela Daniel ‘Silver Star’, The True Story of Pocahontas: The Other 
Side of History (Golden, CO: Fulcrum, 2007) [oral history account of Pocahontas’ life] 
  ‘An alphabeticall table of the principall things contained in the five Bookes of the fourth Part of 
Purchas his Pilgrimes’, in Samuel Purchas, Purchas his pilgrimes (1625; STC 20509) [index] 
  Ralegh, Walter, The discoverie of the large, rich, and bewtiful empire of Guiana (1596; STC 20634)  
  Sylvester, Josuah, Tobacco battered, & the pipes shattered (1621; STC 23582a) 
  Roger Williams, A key into the language of America (1643; Wing W2766) 
  
Secondary historiography: 
  America in European Consciousness, 1493 -- 1750, ed. Karen Ordahl Kupperman (Chapel Hill, NC: 
University of North Carolina Press, 1995) 
  Axtell, James, The Invasion Within: The Contest of Cultures in Colonial North America (New York: 
Oxford University Press, 1985) 
  Eacott, Jonathan, Selling Empire: India in the Making of Britain and America, 1600 – 1830 (Chapel Hill, 
NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2016) 
  Early Modern Visual Culture: Representation, Race, and Empire in Renaissance England, eds. Peter 
Erickson and Clark Hulse (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000) 
  Guasco, Michael, Slaves and Englishmen: Human Bondage in the Early Modern Atlantic World 
(Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011) 
  *Hall, Kim F., Things of Darkness: Economies of Race and Gender in Early Modern England (Ithaca, NY: 
Cornell University Press, 1995) 
  Horning, Audrey, Ireland in the Virginian Sea: Colonialism in the British Atlantic (Chapel Hill, NC: 
University of North Carolina Press, 2013) 
  Kidd, Colin, British Identities before Nationalism: Ethnicity and Nationhood in the Atlantic World, 1600 
– 1800 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999) 
  Kupperman, Karen Ordahl, Indians and English: Facing Off in Early America (Ithaca, NY: Cornell 
University Press, 2000) 
  Lemire, Beverly, Global Trade and the Transformation of Consumer Cultures: The Material World 
Remade, 1500 – 1820 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018) 
  Norton, Marcy, Sacred Gifts, Profane Pleasures: A History of Tobacco and Chocolate in the Atlantic 
World (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2008) 
  Oh, Elisa, ‘Advance and Retreat: Reading English Colonial Choreographies of Pocahontas’, in Travel 
and Travail: Early Modern Women, English Drama, and the Wider World, eds. Patricia Akhimie and 
Bernadette Andrea (Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2019), pp. 139-175 
  Pagden, Anthony, Lords of all the World: Ideologies of Empire in Spain, Britain, and France, 1500 – 
1800 (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1995) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 103 of 230 
  Pratt, Stephanie, ‘Capturing Captivity: Visual Imaginings of the English and Powhatan Encounter 
Accompanying the Virginia Narratives of John Smith and Ralph Hamor, 1612 – 1634’, in Native 
American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts
, eds. Max Carocci and Stephanie Pratt 
(Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2012), pp. 97-115 
  Race in Early Modern England: A Documentary Companion, eds. Jonathan Burton and Ania Loomba 
(Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2007) 
  Sloan, Kim, A New World: England’s First View of America (London: British Museum Press, 2007) 
  Thrush, Coll, Indigenous London: Native Travelers at the Heart of Empire (New Haven, CT: Yale 
University Press, 2016) 
  Tremblay, Gail, ‘Reflecting on Pocahontas’, Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies, 23 (2002), pp. 
121-6 
  Virginia 1619: Slavery and Freedom in the Making of English America, eds. Paul Musselwhite, Peter C. 
Mancall and James Horn (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2019) 
  Walvin, James, Slavery in Small Things: Slavery and Modern Cultural Habits (Chichester: John Wiley & 
Sons, 2017) 
  Warsh, Molly, American Baroque: Pearls and the Nature of Empire, 1492 – 1700 (Williamsburg, VA: 
University of North Carolina Press, 2018) 
  Working, Lauren, ‘Locating Colonization at the Jacobean Inns of Court’, The Historical Journal, 61 
(2018), pp. 29-51. 
 
Secondary literature: 
  *Hollis, Gavin, The Absence of America: the London Stage, 1576 – 1642 (Oxford: Oxford University 
Press, 2015) 
  *Jowitt, Claire, Voyage Drama and Gender Politics, 1589 – 1642: Real and Imagined Worlds 
(Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003) 
  *Knapp, Jeffrey, An Empire Nowhere: England, America, and Literature from Utopia to the Tempest 
(Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1992) 
 
Session 3: Diplomacy and Trade: Africa, the Middle East, and the Indies 
Core reading: 
  John Leo Africanus (ASM 139 and TK 249); George Sandys (TK 23); Thomas Dallam (TK 53); Edward 
Terry, Voyage to East India (1655) 
  Touchstone texts: William Painter, ‘Sophonisba’, the seventh novel in The second tome of the Palace 
of Pleasure (1567); John Fletcher, The Island Princess (1621), ed. Clare McManus (2012) 
  
Further primary reading: 

  ‘The Ambassage of M. Edmund Hogan, one of the sworne Esquires of her Majesties person, from her 
Highnesse to Mully Abdelmelech Emperour of Marocco, and king of Fes and Sus: in the yeere 1577, 
written by himselfe’, in The Principal Navigations, Voyages, and Discoveries of the English Nation ed. 
Richard Hakluyt (London, 1599-1600; STC 12626a), pp. 64-68 
  Anglo-Ottoman exchanges in The Principal Navigations, Voyages, and Discoveries of the English 
Nation, pp. 137-81 
  ‘Captaine William Hawkins, his Relations of the Occurents which happened in the time of his 
residence in India in the Country of the Great Mogoll’, in Samuel Purchas, Purchas his Pilgrimes, 
(London, 1625; STC 20509), pp. 206-27 
   
Secondary historiography: 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 104 of 230 
   Allinson, Rayne, A Monarchy of Letters: Royal Correspondence and English Diplomacy in the Reign of 
Elizabeth I (London: Palgrave, 2012), pp. 131-50 
  Aune, M. G., ‘Elephants, Englishmen and India: Early Modern travel Writing and the Pre-Colonial 
Movement’, Early Modern Literary Studies 11.1 (May, 2005) 4.1-35 URL: 
<http://purl.oclc.org/emls/11-1/auneelep.htm> 
  Barbour, Richmond, ‘Power and Distant Display: Early English “Ambassadors" in Moghul India’, 
Huntington Library Quarterly, 61:3/4 (1998), pp. 343-68 
  Boxer, Charles, ‘Anglo-Portuguese Rivalry in the Persian Gulf: 1615--1635’ in Chapters in Anglo-
Portuguese Relations ed. Edgar Prestage (Watford: Voss and Michael, 1935), pp. 46 -129 
  *Brentjes, Sonja. Travellers from Europe in the Ottoman and Safavid Empires, 16th–17th Centuries:  
Seeking, Transforming, Discarding Knowledge (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2010) 
  Britain's Oceanic Empire: Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds, 1550 -- 1850, eds.H. V. Bowen, Elizabeth 
Mancke and John G. Reid (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012), pp. 249-81 
  Burton, Jonathan, ‘The Shah’s Two ambassadors: The Travels of the Three English Brothers and the 
Global Early Modern’, in Emissaries in Early Modern Literature and Culture: Mediation, Transmission, 
Traffic, 1550-1700 eds. Brinda Charry and Gitanjali Shahani (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008), pp. 23-40 
  *Das, Nandini. ‘“Apes of Imitation”: Imitation and Identity in Sir Thomas Roe’s Embassy to India’, in A 
Companion to the Global Renaissance: English Literature and Culture in the Era of Expansion, ed. 
Jyotsna Singh (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell., 2009) pp. 114-28 
  Das, Nandini, ‘Encounter as Process: England and Japan in the Late Sixteenth Century’, Renaissance 
Quarterly, 69:4 (2016), pp. 1343-68 
  *Dimmock, Matthew. Mythologies of the Prophet Muhammad in Early Modern English Culture 
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013) 
  Eysturlid, Lee W., ‘“Where Everything is Weighed in the Scales of Material Interest”: Anglo-Turkish 
Trade, Piracy, and Diplomacy in the Mediterranean during the Jacobean Period’, Journal of European 
Economic History, 22 (1993), pp. 613–25 
  *Games, Alison. The Web of Empire: English Cosmopolitans in an Age of Expansion, 1560–1660 
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008) 
  Flores, Jorge. ‘The Sea and the World of the Mutasaddi: A profile of port officials from Mughal Gujarat 
(c. 1600–1650)’, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 21:1 (2011), pp. 55-71 
  Ferrier, R. W, ‘The Armenians and the East India Company in Persia in the Seventeenth and Early 
Eighteenth Centuries’, The Economic History Review, 26: 1 (1973), pp. 38-62 
  Hair, P.E.H., ‘Hamlet in an Afro-Portuguese Setting: New Perspectives on Sierra Leone in 1607’, 
History in Africa, 5: 1 (1978), pp. 21-42 
  Hair, P.E.H, ‘Heretics, slaves and witches -- as seen by Guinea Jesuits C. 1610’, Journal of Religion in 
Africa, 28: 2 (1988), pp. 131-44 
  Loomba, Ania, ‘Of gifts ambassadors and copy-cats: Diplomacy, Exchange and Difference in Early 
Modern India’, in Emissaries in Early Modern Literature and Culture, pp. 41-76 
  *Maclean, Gerald, & Nabil Matar. Britain and the Islamic World, 1558 – 1713 (Oxford: Oxford 
University Press, 2011) 
  MacLean, Gerald, ‘Courting the Porte: Early Anglo-Ottoman Diplomacy’, University of Bucharest 
Review - A Journal of Literary and Cultural Studies, 10: 2 (2008), pp. 80-88 
  Massarella, Derek, ‘“Ticklish Points”: The English East India Company and Japan, 1621’, Journal of the 
Royal Asiatic Society, 11: 1 (2001), pp. 43-50. 
  Matar, Nabil, ‘Elizabeth through Moroccan Eyes’, in The Foreign Relations of Elizabeth I, ed. Charles 
Beem (London: Palgrave, 2011), pp. 145-168. 
  *Matar, Nabil. Turks, Moors and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery (New York: Columbia University 
Press, 1999) 
  Matthee, Rudolph, The Politics of Trade in Safavid Iran: Silk for Silver, 1600-1730 (Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press, 1999) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 105 of 230 
  Mishra, Rupali, ‘Diplomacy at the Edge: Split Interests in the Roe Embassy to the Mughal Court’, 
Journal of British Studies, 53 (2014), pp. 5–28 
  Osborne, Toby and Joan-Pau Rubiés, ‘Introduction: Diplomacy and Cultural Translation in the Early 
Modern World’, Journal of Early Modern History, 20: 4 (2016), pp. 313–30 
  Sabine Lucia Müller, ‘William Harborne’s Embassies: Scripting, Performing and Editing Anglo-Ottoman 
Diplomacy’, in Early Modern Encounters with the Islamic East: Performing Cultures eds. Sabine 
Schülting, Sabine Lucia Müller, and Ralf Hertel (Ashgate, 2012), pp. 11-26 
  Subrahmanyam, Sanjay, Courtly Encounters: Translating Courtliness and Violence in Early Modern 
Eurasia (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2012) 
  *Subrahmanyam, Sanjay, Three Ways to Be Alien: Travails and Encounters in the Early Modern World 
(Waltham, MA: Brandeis University Press, 2011) 
  Subrahmanyam, Sanjay, Explorations in Connected History: Mughals and Franks (Oxford University 
Press, 2005), Chapters 1 and 6 
  Van Gelder, Maartje and Tijana Krstić, ‘Introduction: Cross-Confessional Diplomacy and Diplomatic 
Intermediaries in the Early Modern Mediterranean’, Journal of Early Modern History, 19: 2-3 (2015), 
pp. 93–105 
  
Secondary Literature: 
   *Barbour, Richmond, Before Orientalism: London’s Theatre of the East 1576-1626 (Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press, 2003) 
  Birchwood, Matthew, Staging Islam in England: Drama and Culture, 1640-1685 (Woodbridge, Suffolk: 
Boydell and Brewer, 2007) 
  *Fuchs, Barbara. Mimesis and Empire: The New World, Islam, and European Identities (Cambrideg: 
Cambridge University Press, 2001) 
   
   *Maclean, Gerald. Looking East: English Writing and the Ottoman Empire before 1700 (Macmillan, 
2007) 
   *Maclean, Gerald. The Rise of Oriental Travel: English Visitors to the Ottoman Empire, 1580 – 1720 
(Palgrave, 2004) 
 
Session 4: Laws of God and Man: The Middle East, India and the Americas 

Core reading: 
  Rawlins (TK 60); Giles Fletcher, ‘Considering the State and Summe of the Turks religion’, in The policy 
of the Turkish Empire (1597) 
  Roger Williams, The Bloudy Tenent of Persecution (1644); Mary Rowlandson, The soveraignty & 
goodness of God, together, with the faithfulness of his promises displayed; being a narrative of the 
captivity and restauration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson 
(1682) 
  Strenysham Masters, Unsent Letter BL IOR E/210 
  Touchstone text: Robert Daborne, A Christian Turn’d Turk (1612) from Three Turk Plays from Early 
Modern England, ed. Daniel J. Vitkus (2000) 
 
Further primary reading: 
  William Biddulph, The Travails of a Certain Englishman (1609) 
  Henry Blount, A Voyage into the Levant (1636) 
  Henry Lord, A Display of Two Foraign Sects in the East Indies (1630) 
  Edward Terry, A Voyage to East-India (1625) 
  Roger Williams, A key into the language of America (1643; Wing W2766) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 106 of 230 
 
Secondary historiography: 
  Ames, Glenn J., ‘The Role of Religion in the Transfer and Rise of Bombay, c. 1661 -- 1687’, The 
Historical Journal, 46:2 (2003), 317-40 
  Balachandran, Aparna, ‘Of Corporations and Caste Heads: Urban Rule in Company Madras, 1640-
1720’, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History, 9:2 (2008) 
  Bross, Karen, Dry Bones and Indian Sermons: Praying Indians in Colonial America (Ithaca, NY: Cornell 
University Press, 2004) 
  Drake, James, ‘Symbol of a Failed Strategy: The Sassamon Trail, Political Culture, and the Outbreak of 
King Philip’s War’, American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 19:2 (1995), 111-41 
  *Fuchs, Barbara, Mimesis and Empire: The New World, Islam, and European Identities (Cambridge 
University Press, 2001) 
  Games, Alison, ‘Beyond the Atlantic: English Globetrotters and Transoceanic Connections’, William 
and Mary Quarterly, 63:4 (2006), 675-92 
  *Games, Alison, The Web of Empire: English Cosmopolitans in an Age of Exploration, 1560 -- 1660 
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008) 
  Gaskill, Malcolm, Between Two Worlds: How the English Became Americans (Oxford: Oxford 
University Press, 2014) 
  Glover, Jeffrey, Paper Sovereigns: Anglo-Native Treaties and the Law of Nations1604 -- 1664 
(Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014) 
  Goffman, Daniel, Izmir and the Levantine World, 1550 -- 1650 (Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press, 1990) 
  Goodman, Nan, ‘Banishment, Jurisdiction, and Identity in Seventeenth-Century New England: The 
Case of Roger Williams’, Early American Studies, 7:1 (2009), 109-39 
  Hasan, Fahat, ‘Indigenous Cooperation and the Birth of a Colonial City: Calcutta, c. 1698-1750’, 
Modern Asian Studies, 26:1 (1992), 65-82 
  *Jowitt, Claire. The Culture of Piracy, 1580 -- 1630: English Literature and Seaborne Crime (Farnham: 
Ashgate, 2010) 
  Kupperman, Karen, Indians & English: Facing Off in Early America (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 
2000) 
  Laidlaw, Christine, The British in the Levant: Trade and Perceptions of the Ottoman Empire in the 
Eighteenth Century (New York, NY: Taurus, 2010) 
  *Maclean, Gerald M., The Rise of Oriental Travel: English Visitors to the Ottoman Empire, 1580 -- 1720 
(Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave, 2004) 
  *Maclean, Gerald, & Nabil Matar. Britain and the Islamic World, 1558–1713 (Oxford: Oxford 
University Press, 2011) 
  Macmillan, Ken, Sovereignty and Possession in the English New World: Legal Foundations of Empire, 
1576-1640 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009) 
  Mandell, Daniel R., King Philip’s War: Colonial Expansion, Native Resistance, and the End of Indian 
Sovereignty (Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press, 2010) 
  *Matar, Nabil. Turks, Moors and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery (New York, NY: Columbia 
University Press, 1999) 
  Pestana, Carla Gardina, Protestant Empire: Religion and the Making of the British Atlantic World 
(Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011) 
  Pulsiper, Jenny Hale, ‘“Our Sages are Sageles”: A Letter on Massachusetts Indian Policy after King 
Philip’s War’, William and Mary Quarterly 58:2 (2001), 431-48 
  Pulsiper, Jenny Hale, Subjects unto the Same King: Indian, English, and the Contest for Authority in 
Colonial New England (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005) 
  Rex, Cathy, ‘Indians and Images: The Massachusetts Bay Colony Seal, James Printer, and Anxiety of 
Colonial Identity’, American Quarterly, 63:1 (2011), 61-93 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 107 of 230 
  Rubies, Joan-Pau, ‘Oriental Despotism and European Orientalism: Botero to Montesquieu’ Journal of 
Early Modern History 9 (2005), 109-80 
  Scammell, G. V., ‘European Exiles, Renegades and Outlaws and the Maritime Economy of Asia c. 1500-
1750’, in, Modern Asian Studies 26:4 (1992), 641-61 
  Smith, Haig Z., ‘Risky Business: The Seventeenth-Century English Company Chaplain, and Policing 
Interaction and Knowledge Exchange’ Journal of Church and State, 60:2 (2018), pp. 226-47  
  Stern, Philip, ‘British Asia and British Atlantic: Comparison and Connections’, William and Mary 
Quarterly, 63:4 (2006), 693-712 
  Stern, Philip J., The Company State: Corporate Sovereignty & the Early Modern Foundations of the 
British Empire in India (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011) 
  Sweetman, Will, Mapping Hinduism: ‘Hinduism’ and the Study of Indian Religions, 1600--1776 (Halle: 
Verlag der Frenckesche Stifungen zu Halle, 2003) 
  Tomlins, Christopher, ‘The Legal Cartography of Colonization, the Legal Polyphony of Settlement: 
English Intrusion on the American Mainland in the Seventeenth Century’, Law and Social Inquiry, 1:2 
(2001), 315-72 
 
Secondary literature: 
  *Barbour, Richmond, Before Orientalism: London’s Theatre of the East 1576-1626 (Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press, 2003) 
  Birchwood, Matthew, Staging Islam in England: Drama and Culture, 1640-1685 (Woodbridge, Suffolk: 
Boydell and Brewer, 2007) 
  *Greenblatt, Steven. Marvelous Possessions: The Wonders of the New World (University of Chicago 
Press, 1991) 
  *Hoenselaars, A. J. Images of Englishmen and Foreigners in the Drama of Shakespeare and his 
Contemporaries (Rutherford, 1992) 
  Matar, Nabil, ‘The Renegade in English Seventeenth-Century Imagination’, Studies in English 
Literature 1500-1900, 33 (1993) 
  *Shapiro, James, Shakespeare and the Jews (Columbia University Press, 1996) 
  Orr, Bridget, Empire on the English Stage 1660 -- 1714 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001) 
  *Vitkus, Daniel. Turning Turk: English Theatre and the Multicultural Mediterranean (Palgrave 
Macmillan, 2003) 
  *Vitkus, Daniel, ed. Piracy, Slavery, and Redemption: Barbary Captivity Narratives from Early Modern 
England (Columbia University Press, 2001) 
  The Works of John Dryden Vol. XII: Amboyna, The State of Innocence, Aureng-Zebe, ed. Vinton Dearing 
(Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1995) 
 
Session 5 
Forms of Engagement 
We will be looking at different forms of textual and material traces of cross-cultural encounter in this session, 
which can range from Italian and French language manuals and Malay word-lists published in England, to 
maps, paintings, miniatures, letters, petitions, recipe books and food, fashion, curiosities, artefacts, and 
commodities. We will identify 3-5 topics in the course of the term through collective discussion. Seminar 
members will then be invited to work in groups or pairs to identify reading and supporting material (with 
guidance from Nandini and the TIDE team), and will lead the segment of the seminar on their chosen topic.  
 
Session 6 
Student presentations  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 108 of 230 
The final session will take the form of a symposium, where you will offer a short presentation on your planned 
final research topic. This will be an opportunity to test your ideas and evidence, and gain feedback from your 
tutor and peers. 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 109 of 230 
Slow Reading Spenser 
Professor Simon Palfrey – xxxxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
 
This course has a bifold ambition: to discover anew Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene; and in doing so to 
explore broader questions about the protocols and possibilities of critical reading. The Faerie Queene is chosen 
for a number of reason. First, it is the exemplary humanist poem, designed for active readerly virtu, inviting 
unusually multifaceted relationships between readers and protagonists. Second, it is an index of poetic forms, 
working in systems unprecedented in English poetry for their interactive range and sophistication. Third, it is a 
multiply original work: reanimating its sources and analogues; novel in its invention; generative in its effects. 
Fourth, it is a poem that at many points is commenting upon itself, critiquing or characterising or storifying its 
own procedures, and so offers a rare model of a creative work that adumbrates and extends the possibilities of 
criticism.  
Slow reading differs from close reading. It situates both reader and poem in time; more than that, it implies 
differential movement in time. The poem cannot be abstracted from its various continuums or contexts: but it 
can be seen to operate at varying speeds or momentum in relation to them. Slow reading is alert to 
interruption, to irruption, to forward and backward movements, to simultaneity that need not imply 
synchrony. The poem may work at a different speed to other discourses or institutions; more profoundly, it 
may work at a different speed to itself; some figures may be slow, others like lightning; the same applies to 
scenes, and indeed within scenes. Disparity in time-scales may also imply anachrony at larger scales. What kind 
of historicity might be recovered? To which pasts, presents, or futures might the poem be speaking?  
The idea of slow reading points to the reflexive purposes of this course. We will think about what and why we 
are doing as we do it. We will think about the implied hierarchies in critical reading: how do we decide upon 
importance? More foundationally, how do we decide upon the presence in a poem of action, passion, 
sentience? How delicate should our attention be? And how might our critical prose speak to such refinements?  
A note on reading 
The course does not require students to have studied Spenser’s work in the past, but everyone should have 
read at least Books 1-3 & 7 of The Faerie Queene before arriving. They should also read Spenser’s Four Hymns
which is both a wonderful sequence in its own right and works in very suggestive relation to The Faerie 
Queene. 
Students may choose either the Longman (ed. Hamilton) or Penguin (ed. Roche) editions of The Faerie 
Queene. 
For Spenser’s Shorter Poems either the Penguin (ed. McCabe) or Yale (ed. Dunlop) editions are fine.  
 
Other than for week 1 we will not determine at this stage which specific moments of The Faerie Queene will be 
discussed in specific weeks. It is crucial to the aims of the course that it should be a process of discovery, with a 
certain amount of improvisation and adaptation as the term goes on, as we find and share our own points of 
entry.  Alongside The Faerie Queene, students will be expected to read two strains of critical writing. First is 
examples of Spenser criticism; the second is examples of philosophy or theory that speak to the possibilities of 
slow reading. These latter are intended less as objects of study in their own right and more as tasters or 
openings to alternative readerly practices. Each week a select few texts will be listed as frames for the 
discussion, but other works may be recommended as the term proceeds. 
 
Weekly Seminars 
1.  Thinking Reading Slowly  
How does slow reading differ from conventional close reading? We will look at Book 3, Canto 1. 1-19, thinking 
about the relation of viewer to thing viewed: what is being seen? What sort of image or motion? How do 
differences in speed or direction inform what is happening, or what it portends? We will think about the 
recuperative or summative nature of much critical reading and writing: the impulse to paraphrase, for 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 110 of 230 
example. What is lost or gained in rendering poetic form into the formulations recommended by critical 
discourse? We will think about the implied hierarchies in critical reading: how do we decide upon importance? 
Paul Alpers, Poetry in The Faerie Queene, 393-7; Gordon Teskey, Spenserian Moments, ch.11; Stevie Davies, 
The Idea of Woman in Renaissance literature, 70-77; Maria Flahey, ‘Transporting Florimell: The Place of Simile 
in Book III of The Faerie Queene, Spenser Studies, 2018; William Empson, Seven Types of Ambiguity; Adorno, 
‘The Essay as Form’, in The Adorno Reader (Blackwell, Oxford, 2000), 91-111 
2.  Ethics of Attention 
Slow reading implies an ethics of paying attention. It can work to challenge or modify the imperatives of 
instrumental reading – or indeed instrumental writing – whether our own or Spenser’s. If there are hierarchies 
of life or value in Spenser, does this mean that there are also hierarchies of value in the poem’s forms of life? 
Do some forms mean more, have more probative force, than others? How might a more attentive attention 
question these presuppositions, or any teleology they subtend?  
Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations, no’s 88-142; Stanley Cavell, The Claim of Reason, 478-96; Simon 
Palfrey, Shakespeare’s Possible Worlds, ch’s 11, 12, 28; Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht Production of Presence: What 
Meaning cannot Convey (Stanford UP, 2004) 
 
3.  Magnified and Magnetic Spaces 
Slowness imports actions such as dwelling, remaining, returning, even waiting. If we do this, what may arrive 
or emerge? Temporal delay implies spatial dilation. Things we dwell upon – objects, locations, images - can 
magnify, literally opening for our entrance and discovery. As time slow or stretches, space magnifies. In this 
session we will attend to the varying scale of things, even to the varying scales of putatively single things. 
  Leibniz, Monadology 
(https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/10.3366/j.ctt1g0b6qt.8.pdf?refreqid=excelsior%3Aeaf86c9091250
1db75628b4072be379f) 
  Heidegger, ‘Building, Dwelling, Thinking’, in Basic Writings, ch. VIII.  
  Theresa Krier, ‘Time Lords: Rhythm and Interval in Spenser’s Stanzaic Narrative’, Spenser Studies, 
2006. https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/SPSv21p1?mobileUi=0&# 
  Northrop Frye, Fables of Identity, 69-87 
 
4.  Ecological Readings 
 Might slow reading entail a different ecology of reading? Perhaps the poem can be understood as a planet, 
composed of landforms and streams and sea, a shifting assemblage whose physics is discovered in poetics, in 
the poem’s distribution of matter and its principles of dynamism, gravitation, space, and motive power within 
or upon bodies. We will think about the ontology and futurity of similes and allusions: is sameness or allusion 
beholden to something anterior? Is the end implicit in each instant, the macrocosm in each object or 
organism?   
  Kate Bennett, Vibrant Matter: a political ecology of things; Michelle Boulous Walker, Slow Philosophy: 
Reading Against the Institution (Bloomsbury, London, 2017); 
  Graham Harman, Towards Speculative Realism; Levi R. Bryant, The Democracy of Objects, ch’s 1 & 5. 
 
5.  Anachrony and History 
Disparity in time-scales may also imply anachrony at larger scales. What kind of historicity might be recovered? 
To which pasts, presents, or futures might the allegory be speaking?  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 111 of 230 
Gordon Teskey, Allegory and Violence (final chapter); Theodor Adorno, Beethoven: The Philosophy of Music, 
ch’s 2 & 3; Richard McCabe, Spenser’s Monstrous Regiment; David Norbrook, Poetry and Politics in the English 
Renaissance
, ch. 5Joe Moshenka, ‘Why Can’t Spenserians Stop Talking about Hegel?’, 
https://www.english.cam.ac.uk/spenseronline/review/volume-44/441/teskey-response/why-cant-
spenserians-stop-talking-about-hegel-a-response-to-gordon-teskey/ 

 
Assembling/Disassembling Characters 
This final session will explore the poem’s construction of individual humans – if indeed there is such a thing in 
the poemworld. When do characters arrive? If we don’t presuppose instant arrival, how distributed or porous 
might their minds or bodies be? Do they exist differently in moments than across time? Do they change? Do 
they work corporately, fractally, fractionally?  
James Nohrnberg, ‘The Death of Pan’, in The Analogy of The Faerie Queene, 757-91; Harry Berger Jr, 
Revisionary Play: Studies in the Spenserian Dynamics, 89-117; 154-171; Kierkegaard, ‘The Immediate Erotic 
Stages or the Musical Erotic’ (2nd half, from ‘First Stage’ to the end of the chapter), in Either/Or; David Lee 
Miller, The Poem’s Two Bodies, ch. 5.  
 
Further Reading 
There is an enormous amount of material written about Spenser. The indispensable critical resource is The 
Spenser Encylopedia
, ed. Arthur Hamilton. The most efficient archive of past and contemporary critical work is 
the online journal Spenser Studies, which is easily searchable and includes essays from pretty much all the best 
Spenserians (including most of the ones listed above and below). Richard McCabe (ed.) The Oxford Handbook 
of Edmund Spenser
, is a good recent collection. Here is a very selective list of some other interesting Spenser 
criticism (I won’t repeat materials listed above). 
  Tamsin Badcoe, Edmund Spenser and the Romance of Space 
  Richard Danson Brown, The Art of The Faerie Queene 
  Christopher Burlinson, Allegory, Space and the Material World in the Writings of Edmund Spenser 
  Jason Crawford, Allegory and Enchantment: an Early Modern Poetics 
  Wayne Erickson, Mapping The Faerie Queene 
  Angus Fletcher, Allegory: The Theory of a Symbolic Mode 
  Kenneth Gross, Spenserian Poetics: Idolatry, Iconoclasm, and Magic 
  Richard McCabe, The Pillars of Eternity 
  Joe Moshenka, Feeling Pleasures: The Sense of Touch in Renaissance England 
  Patricia Parker, Inescapable Romance 
  Bart van Es, Spenser’s Forms of History 
  Suzanne Wofford, The Choice of Achilles: The Ideology of Figure in the Epic 
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 112 of 230 
Pope’s Dunces: Literary Mythology and its Victims 
Professor David Womersley – xxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
Alexander Pope wrote a series of poems – principally, An Essay on Criticism (1711), ‘To Arbuthnot’ (1735), ‘To 
Augustus’ (1737), and The Dunciad (1728, 1729, 1743) – which mythologised the literary world of early 
eighteenth-century London. 
The purpose of this ‘C’ course is, in the first instance, to explore the writings of a selection of those figures 
Pope dismissed as dunces.  The intention is neither to rehabilitate these writers, but nor is it not to rehabilitate 
them: there will be no pretence that they are either better or worse than on inspection they prove to be.  
Rather, we will try to recapture an intimate sense of the strange richness of the literary world that Pope 
caricatured and simplified to such devastating and memorable effect.  And we will do so in the belief that such 
a sense would be valuable to both those who wish to work on Pope or other Scriblerian authors, and those 
who wish to work on those Pope attacked.   
The course will also allow and encourage those taking it to reflect more broadly on the phenomenon of literary 
mythologising (which of course was practised by other writers as well as Pope), and on the implications literary 
mythologies hold for how we conceive and write literary history. 
The order of classes will be: 
1.  Joseph Addison and John Oldmixon 
2.  Richard Blackmore and Ambrose Phillips 
3.  John Dennis and Charles Gildon 
4.  Leonard Welsted and Laurence Eusden 
5.  Lewis Theobald and Richard Bentley 
6.  Colley Cibber and Thomas Shadwell 
Reading Lists 
General, Secondary, and Preliminary 
  Paul Baines and Pat Rogers, Edmund Curll Bookseller (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007) 
  Roland Barthes, ‘The Writer on Holiday’, in Mythologies, sel. and tr. Annette Lavers (Frogmore: 
Paladin, 1976) 
o  ‘Myth Today’, in Mythologies, sel. and tr. Annette Lavers (Frogmore: Paladin, 1976) 
  Charles Cotton, Scarronides (1670) 
  Margaret Anne Doody, The Daring Muse: Augustan Poetry Reconsidered (Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 1985) 
  John Dryden, MacFlecknoe (1682) 
  Henry Fielding, The Author’s Farce (1730) 
  Michel Foucault, ‘What is an Author?’ (1969), in Language, Counter-Memory, Practice, tr. D. F. 
Bouchard and S. Simon (Oxford: Blackwell, 1977) 
  David Foxon, Pope and the Early Eighteenth-Century Book Trade, rev. ed. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 
1991) 
  John Gay, The Present State of Wit (1711) 
  Bertrand Goldgar, Walpole and the Wits: The Relation of Politics to Literature, 1722-1742 (Lincoln, 
Nebr: University of Nebraska Press, 1976) 
  Oliver Goldsmith, An Inquiry into the Present State of Polite Learning (1759) 
  Brean Hammond, Professional Imaginative Writing in England 1670-1740: ‘Hackney for Bread’ 
(Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997) 
  Ben Jonson, Poetaster (1602) 
o  Bartholmew Fayre (1614) 
  Joseph Levine, Dr. Woodward’s Shield: History, Science, and Satire in Augustan England (Ithaca and 
London: Cornell University Press, 1991) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 113 of 230 
  —,  The Battle of the Books: History and Literature in the Augustan Age (Ithaca and London: Cornell 
University Press, 1991) 
  James McLaverty, Pope, Print and Meaning (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001) 
  Pierre Macherey, A Theory of Literary Production, tr. Geoffrey Wall (London and New York: Routledge 
Kegan Paul, 1978) 
  Andrew Marvell, ‘Flecknoe, an English Priest at Rome’ (1646?) 
  Modern Language Studies, vol. 18, issue 1 (Winter, 1988) – an issue devoted to both the eighteenth-
century canon, and the idea of the canon in the eighteenth century. 
  Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism (1711) 
o  ‘On Pastorals’, The Guardian, 40 (27 April 1713) 
o  ‘A Receit to make an Epick Poem’, The Guardian, 78 (10 June 1713) 
o  (with Gay) Three Hours After Marriage. A Comedy (1717) 
o  Peri Bathous (1728) 
o  The Dunciad (1728, 1729, 1743) 
o  ‘To Arbuthnot’ (1735) 
o  ‘To Augustus’ (1737) 
  Jonathan Swift, A Tale of a Tub and The Battel of the Books (1704) 
o  ‘On Poetry: A Rapsody’ (1733) 
  Dennis Todd, Imagining Monsters: Miscreations of the Self in Eighteenth-Century England (Chicago 
and London: University of Chicago Press, 1995) 
  Howard Weinbrot, Britannia’s Issue: The Rise of British Literature from Dryden to Ossian (Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press, 1993) 
  Abigail Williams, Poetry and the Creation of a Whig Literary Culture 1681-1714 (Oxford: Oxford 
University Press, 2005) 
  David Womersley, Augustan Critical Writing (London: Penguin Books, 1997) 
  —,  ‘Dulness and Pope’, Proceedings of the British Academy, 131 (2005), pp. 230-50 
 
Class 1: Joseph Addison and John Oldmixon 
A: Joseph Addison 
  ‘An Account of the Greatest English Poets’ (1694) 
  The Spectator (1711-12) – selections 
  The Free-Holder (1715-16) - selections 
  A Discourse on Antient and Modern Learning (1734) 
B: John Oldmixon 
  A Pastoral Poem on the victories at Schellenburgh and Blenheim (1704) 
  Iberia Liberata (1706) 
  An Essay on Criticism (1728) 
  Memoirs of the Press (1742) 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 114 of 230 
Class 2: Richard Blackmore and Ambrose Phillips 
A: Richard Blackmore 
  A Satyr against Wit (1700) 
  Advice to the Poets (1706) 
  The Kit-cats (1708) 
  The Lay-Monastery (1714) – selections 
B: Ambrose Phillips 
  Pastorals (1710) 
  The Distrest Mother: A Tragedy (1712) 
  The Freethinker (1718-21) – selections 
  A Collection of Old Ballads, 3 vols (1723-25) - selections 
 
Class 3: John Dennis and Charles Gildon 
A: John Dennis 
[NB the modern edition of Dennis’s critical works: The Critical Works of John Dennis, ed. E. N. Hooker, 2 vols 
(Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1939)] 
  The Usefulness of the Stage (1698) 
  The Advancement and Reformation of Modern Poetry (1701) 
  Taste in Poetry (1702) 
  The Grounds of Criticism in Poetry (1704) 
  Reflections Critical and Satirical (1711) 
  Remarks on Mr. Pope’s Rape of the Lock (1728) 
 
B: Charles Gildon 
  Miscellany Poems (1692) 
  Miscellaneous Letters and Essays on Several Subjects (1694) 
  ‘An Essay on the Art, Rise, and Progress of the Stage’  (1710) 
  A New Rehearsal (1714) 
  The Complete Art of Poetry, 2 vols (1718) 
  The Battle of the Authors (1720) 
  The Laws of Poetry (1721) 
   
Class 4: Leonard Welsted and Laurence Eusden 
A: Leonard Welsted 
  Epistles, Odes etc. Written on Several Subjects (1724) 
  A Discourse to Sir Robert Walpole (1727) 
  One Epistle to Mr. A. Pope (1730) 
  Of Dulness and Scandal (1732) 
B: Laurence Eusden 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 115 of 230 
  New Year and Birthday odes, 1720, 1721, and 1722 
  The Origin of the Knights of the Bath: A Poem (1725) 
  Three Poems (1727) 
   
Class 5: Lewis Theobald and Richard Bentley 
A: Lewis Theobald 
  The Cave of Poverty (1714?) 
  The Grove (1721) 
  Shakespeare Restored (1726) 
  Miscellaneous Observations, 2 vols (1731-32) 
  A Miscellany on Taste (1732) 
B: Richard Bentley 
  Dissertation Upon the Epistles of Phalaris (1697) 
  Milton’s Paradise Lost:  A New Edition (1732) 
 
Class 6: Colley Cibber and Thomas Shadwell 
A: Colley Cibber 
  Love’s Last Shift (1696) 
  An Apology for the Life of Mr. Colley Cibber, Comedian (1740) 
  A Letter from Mr. Cibber to Mr. Pope (1742) 
  Another Occasional Letter from Mr. Cibber to Mr. Pope (1744) 
  The Lady’s Lecture (1748) 
B: Thomas Shadwell 
  The Libertine: A Tragedy (1675) 
  The Virtuoso (1676) 
  The Lancashire Witches (1681) 
  The Medal of John Bayes (1682) 
  Satyr to his Muse (1682) 
  The Tory-poets: A Satyr (1682) 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 116 of 230 
Women and the Theatre, 1660-1820 
Dr Ruth Scobie – xxxx.xxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 

“Besides, you are a Woman; you must never speak what you think” (Love for Love).  
In the Restoration theatre, women were allowed to act on a public stage in England for the first time. 
Theatrical celebrity offered a handful of women, as performers and writers, public visibility and a public voice, 
as well as economic independence. At the same time, theatre’s sexual objectifications also threatened them 
with humilation, scandal, and even physical violence. Incorporating insights from performance studies, 
celebrity studies, and the ‘global eighteenth century’, as well as theories of gender and sexuality, this course 
explores the role and representation of gender in the anglophone theatre of the long eighteenth century, 
focusing mainly on writing by women. We’ll start with the tragedies, comedies, and sexual celebrities of the 
seventeenth century, reading plays by Restoration playwrights including the spy, adventurer and professional 
author Aphra Behn, (“she who earned women the right to speak their minds”, according to Virginia Woolf), but 
also less well-known figures such as Mary Pix, Susanna Centlivre and Delarivier Manley. These writers 
negotiate and challenge – and sometimes uphold and reinforce – contemporary social conventions around 
women’s characters, roles, and desires, in ways which intersect vitally with ideas about class, nationality, race, 
slavery, and disability. The course then continues chronologically to read eighteenth-century and Romantic 
writers such as Hannah Cowley, Elizabeth Inchbald, Joanna Baillie, Sarah Pogson, and Susanna Rowson, whose 
plays reflect on the theatre’s own relationship to sensation, emotion, and revolution. We’ll also consider how 
performers managed (or failed to manage) their public personae through portraits, advertising, and especially 
biographies and autobiographies, and how concepts of performance and theatricality came to shape ideas and 
anxieties about gender outside the theatre. In the last week, we’ll also think across periods about the 
representation of long eighteenth-century gender in twentieth- and twenty first-century film, TV, and theatre.  
 
Week 1. Restoration theatre: actresses, celebrity, audiences 
Primary reading 
  Epilogue to John Dryden, Tyrannick Love, or The Royal Martyr. A Tragedy. (1670) 
  Aphra Behn, preface and prologue to The Lucky Chance, or an Alderman’s Bargain. A Comedy (1686) 
  Anonymous, The Female Wits: or, the Triumvirate of Poets at Rehearsal. A Comedy. (1696, pub. 1704) 
 
Suggested further reading 
  Susan Staves, Players’ Scepters: Fictions of Authority in the Restoration (Lincoln: University of 
Nebraska Press, 1979) 
  Katherine Maus, ‘“Playhouse Flesh and Blood”: Sexual Ideology and the Restoration Actress’, ELH 46 
(1979): 595-617 
  Elizabeth Howe, The First English Actresses: Women and Drama 1660-1700 (Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 1992). [If you haven’t studied Restoration theatre before, this is an excellent 
introduction to the basics] 
  Katherine M. Quinsey (ed.), Broken Boundaries: Women and Feminism in Restoration Drama 
(Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1996) 
  Gilli Bush-Bailey, Treading the Bawds: Actresses and Playwrights on the Late Stuart Stage 
(Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2006) 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 117 of 230 
Week 2. Restoration comedies and tragedies 
Primary reading 
  Aphra Behn, The Widow Ranter  (1688) 
  Thomas Southerne, Sir Anthony Love: or, the Rambling Lady (1690) 
  Susannah Centlivre, The Busie Body (1709) 
  Mary Pix, The Conquest of Spain (1705) 
 
Suggested further reading 
  Mary Astell, Some Reflections upon Marriage (1700) 
  Pat Gill, Interpreting Ladies: Women, Wit, and Morality in the Restoration Comedy of Manners 
(Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994) 
  Simon Dickie, Cruelty and Laughter. Forgotten Comic Literature and the Unsentimental Eighteenth 
Century. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011) 
  Sarah Dewar-Watson, ‘Tragic Women’ and ‘Tragic Dualities’ in Tragedy: A Reader’s Guide to Essential 
Criticism (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2014), 61-95 
  Jean I. Marsden, Fatal Desire: Women, Sexuality, and the English Stage, 1660–1720 (Ithaca: Cornell 
University Press, 2006) 
   
   
  Week 3. Celebrity, performance, self-fashioning 
Primary reading 
  Charlotte Charke, The Art of Management; or, Tragedy Expell’d (1735)  
  Charlotte Charke, A Narrative of the Life of Mrs Charlotte Charke (Youngest Daughter of Colley Cibber, 
Esq. … Written by Herself (1755) 
 
Suggested further reading 
  Sharon Setzer and Sue McPherson (eds), Women’s Theatrical Memoirs (London: Pickering & Chatto, 
2007) [this multivolume collection is a good resource for later eighteenth- and early nineteenth-
century life writing by and about actresses.] 
  Erin Mackie, ‘Desperate Measures: The Narratives of the Life of Mrs. Charlotte Charke’ in ELH 58, no. 
4 (1991): 841-865 
  Lisa Quoresimo, ‘Charlotte Charke, a Shilling, and a Shoulder of Mutton: The Risks of Performing 
Trauma’ in Theatre Topics 26, no. 3 (2016): 333-342 
  Jade Higa, ‘Charlotte Charke’s Gun: Queering Material Culture and Gender Performance’ in ABO 7, no. 
1 (2017): 1-12 
  Cheryl Wanko, Roles of Authority: Thespian Biography and Celebrity in Eighteenth-Century Britain 
(Lubbock: Texas Tech University Press, 2003) 
  Julia H. Fawcett, Spectacular Disappearances: Celebrity and Privacy, 1696-1801 (Michigan: University 
of Michigan Press, 2016)  
  Emrys D. Jones and Victoria Joule (eds.), Intimacy and Celebrity in Eighteenth-Century Literary Culture: 
Public Interiors (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2018) 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 118 of 230 
Week 4. Eighteenth-century theatre.  
Choose A or B: 
A. Marriage plots, domesticity, publicity 
Primary reading 
  Frances Sheridan, The Discovery (1763) 
  Hannah Cowley, The Belle’s Stratagem (1780) 
  George Colman the Younger, The Female Dramatist (1781) 
Suggested further reading 
  Betty Rizzo, ‘Male Oratory and Female Prate: “Then Hush and Be an Angel Quite”’ in Eighteenth-
Century Life 29, no. 1 (2005): 23-49 
  Gillian Russell, Women, Sociability and Theatre in Georgian London (Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press, 2007)  
  Jenny DiPlacidi and Karl Leydecker, After Marriage in the Long Eighteenth Century: Literature, Law 
and Society (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2018) 
 
B. Orientalist feminism 
Primary reading 
  Isaac Bickerstaffe, The Sultan, or a Peep into the Seraglio (1775) 
  Elizabeth Inchbald, The Mogul Tale: or, The Descent of the Balloon. A Farce (1784) 
  Susanna Rowson, Slaves in Algiers (1794) 
Suggested further reading 
  Jane Moody, Illegitimate Theatre in London 1770-1840 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000) 
  John O’Brien,, Harlequin Britain: Pantomime and Entertainment, 1690-1760 (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins 
University Press, 2004) 
  Daniel O’Quinn, Staging Governance: Theatrical Imperialism in London, 1770-1800 (Baltimore: Johns 
Hopkins University Press, 2005) 
 
Week 5. Romanticism 
Choose A or B: 
A. Representing revolution 
Primary reading 
  Elizabeth Inchbald, The Massacre (1792) 
  Sarah Pogson, The Female Enthusiast (1807) 
Suggested further reading 
  Betsy Bolton, Women, Nationalism, and the Romantic Stage: Theatre and Politics in Britain, 1780-
1800 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001) 
  Adriana Craciun, British Women Writers and the French Revolution: Citizens of the World 
(Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2005) 
  John Robbins, ‘Documenting Terror in Elizabeth Inchbald’s The Massacre’ in SEL Studies in English 
Literature 1500-1900, 57, no. 3 (2017): 605-619 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 119 of 230 
B. Romantic psychology 
Primary reading 
  Joanna Baillie, ‘Introductory Discourse’, ‘Count Basil: A Tragedy’, ‘The Tryal: A Comedy’ and ‘De 
Monfort: A Tragedy’, all from the first volume of Plays on the Passions (1798). The best edition is 
Baillie, Plays on the Passions, edited by Peter Duthie (Peterborough: Broadview, 2001).  
Suggested further reading 
  Baillie wrote two later volumes of Plays on the Passions, published in 1802 and 1812. 
  Judith Pascoe, Romantic Theatricality: Gender, Poetry, and Spectatorship (Ithaca and London: Cornell 
University Press, 1997) 
  Sean Carney, ‘The Passion of Joanna Baillie: Playwright as Martyr’ in Theatre Journal 52, no. 2 (2000): 
227-252  
   
6. Fictionalising eighteenth-century theatrical women  
Primary reading: choose one text from the list below, or make your own suggestion of a twentieth-century/ 
contemporary fictionalisation of theatre in this period.  
Plays 
  Christopher St John [Christabel Marshall], The First Actress (1911). [text is in volume 3 of Women’s 
Suffrage Literature (‘Suffrage Drama’), edited by Katharine Cockin (London: Routledge, 2004)] 
  Timberlake Wertenbaker, Our Country’s Good (1988) 
  April De Angelis, Playhouse Creatures (1997) 
Novels 
  Emma Donaghue, Life Mask (London: Virago, 2004) 
  Priya Parmar, Exit the Actress (New York: Touchstone, 2011) 
Films 
  Herbert Wilcox (director), Nell Gwyn (1934) 
  Richard Eyre (director), Stage Beauty (2004) 
 
Suggested further reading 
  Katherine Cooper and Emma Short (eds.), The Female Figure in Contemporary Historical Fiction 
(Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2012) [this includes a chapter on Life Mask.] 
  Tiffany Potter (ed.), Women, Popular Culture and the Eighteenth Century (Toronto: University of 
Toronto Press, 2012) 
  Julia Novak, ‘Nell Gwyn in Contemporary Romance Novels: Biography and the Dictates of “Genre 
Literature”’ in Contemporary Women’s Writing 8, no. 3 (2014) 
  Karen Bloom Gevirtz, Representing the Eighteenth Century in Film and Television, 2000-2015 
(Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2017) 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 120 of 230 
General background reading 
  Kristina Straub, Daniel O’Quinn, and Misty G. Anderson (eds.), The Routledge Anthology of 
Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama (Abingdon: Routledge, 2017) 
  Daniel O’Quinn, Kristina Straub, and Misty G. Anderson (eds.), The Routledge Anthology of 
Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Performance (Abingdon: Routledge, 2019) 
[these are treasure-troves of material for studying theatre in this period: you may need to request print copies 
from your library
 
  Deborah Payne Fisk (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to English Restoration Theatre (Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press, 2006) 
  Maggie B. Gale and John Stokes (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Actress (Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press, 2007) 
  Jane Moody and Daniel O'Quinn (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to British Theatre, 1730-1830 
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008) 
  Julia Swindells and David Francis Taylor, The Oxford Handbook of the Georgian Theatre, 1737-1832 
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014) 
[these are all good introductions/ starting points for your research into more specific topics] 
 
  Jacqueline Pearson, The Prostituted Muse: Images of Women and Women Dramatists, 1642-1737 
(Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1988).  
  Kristina Straub, Sexual Suspects: Eighteenth-Century Players and Sexual Ideology (Princeton: Princeton 
University Press, 1992) 
  Laura Brown, Ends of Empire: Women and Ideology in Early Eighteenth-Century England (Ithaca, New 
York: Cornell University Press, 1993) 
  Julie Carlson, In the Theatre of Romanticism: Coleridge, Nationalism, Women (Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 1994) 
  Marvin Carlson, The Haunted Stage: The Theatre as Memory Machine (Ann Arbor: University of 
Michigan Press, 2001) 
  Lisa A. Freeman, Character’s Theater: Genre and Identity on the Eighteenth-Century English Stage 
(Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002) 
  Misty G. Anderson, Female Playwrights and Eighteenth-Century Comedy: Negotiating Marriage on the 
London Stage (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002) 
  Joseph Roach, It (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2007) 
  Felicity Nussbaum, Rival Queens: Actresses, Performance, and the Eighteenth-Century British Theatre 
(Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010) 
  Judith Pascoe, The Sarah Siddons Audio Files (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2011) 
  Laura Engel, Fashioning Celebrity: Eighteenth-Century British Actresses and Strategies for Image 
Making (Ohio State University Press, 2011) 
  Helen Brooks, Actresses, Gender, and the Eighteenth-Century Stage: Playing Women (Basingstoke: 
Palgrave, 2014) 
  Laura Engel and Elaine McGirr (eds.), Stage Mothers: Women, Work, and the Theater1660–1830 
(Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, 2014) 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 121 of 230 
The Romantic & Victorian Sonnet 
Dr Oliver Clarkson – xxxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
W. H. Auden once claimed that the sonnet is ‘so associated with a particular tradition’ (viz. Shakespeare, 
Spenser, Milton) that it is hard to do anything new with it. But this course considers a great period of sonnet 
writing, from the so-called Romantic ‘revival’ of the form through to the fin de siècle, in which poets did 
something new with the sonnet, or did something old in a new way. Seminars will take in such sonneteers as 
Charlotte Smith, Mary Robinson, William Lisle Bowles, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, John 
Clare, Leigh Hunt, Matthew Arnold, Arthur Hugh Clough, Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Thomas Hardy, 
the Rossettis (Christina and Dante Gabriel), Hopkins, George Meredith, Arthur Symons, and many others. 
 
  Our principal aim will be to read sonnets as closely as possible, paying sustained attention to the 
ways in which workings of form (rhymes, rhythms, turns, and so on) shape particular meanings. We shall ask 
the following questions: Did the sonnet actually need ‘reviving’? Is the sonnet plainly a restrictive form? How 
do sonneteers negotiate with specific formal expectations? Are all sonnets, in the end, about the sonnet itself? 
How do Romantic and Victorian sonnets engage with or disengage from tradition? How and why do sonnets 
bring into contact conflicting impulses and entities (temporality/eternity, art/nature, freedom/constraint, 
love/loneliness)? Do sonnets of these periods have a political dimension? Are misshapen sonnets still sonnets? 
Do series of sonnets detract from the singularity of the sonnet? Are there distinctly ‘Romantic’ and ‘Victorian’ 
sonnets? Seminars will run as follows: 
 
1.  The Sonnet Revival  
2.  The Romantic Sonnet  
3.  Sonnets about the Sonnet  
4.  The Victorian Sonnet  
5.  Misshapen Sonnets  
6.  Turning Back  
 
More specific recommendations for primary and secondary reading will be offered before each seminar. But 
you can best prepare for this course by reading very closely as many sonnets as possible written between 1770 
and 1900. For this purpose, the most useful anthologies are A Century of Sonnets: The Romantic-Era Revival 
(OUP, 1999), ed. Paula Feldman and Daniel Robinson (do read the introduction and notes as well); and the 
extremely comprehensive five-volume Anthem Anthology of Victorian Sonnets (Anthem, 2011), ed. Michael J. 
Allen. If you cannot get your hands on the Anthem anthology during the summer months, a good number of 
Victorian sonnets are contained in Victorian Poetry: An Annotated Anthology (Blackwell, 2004), ed. Francis 
O’Gorman. 
 
Some preliminary secondary reading recommendations: 
  Burt, Stephen, and David Mikics. The Art of the Sonnet (Cambridge MA: Harvard UP, 2010).  
  Alison Chapman, ‘Sonnet and Sonnet Sequence’, in A Companion to Victorian Poetry, ed. Alison 
Chapman, Richard Cronin, and Antony H. Harrison (Malden: Blackwell, 2002) 
  Curran, Stuart, ‘The Sonnet’ [chapter 3], in Poetic Form and British Romanticism (Oxford: Oxford UP, 
1986), 29-55.   
  Kerrigan, John, ‘Wordsworth and the Sonnet: Building, Dwelling, Thinking’, Essays in Criticism 35.1 
(1985), 45-75.   
  O’Neill, Michael, ‘The Romantic Sonnet’, in Cambridge Companion to the Sonnet, ed. A. D. Cousins and 
Peter Howarth (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2011), 185-203.   
  Regan, Stephen. The Sonnet (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2019) [especially chapters 2 and 3].   
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 122 of 230 
  Robinson, Daniel, ‘Reviving the Sonnet: Women Romantic Poets and the Sonnet Claim’, Eurpoean 
Romantic Review 6.1 (2008), 98-127.     
  —‘Elegiac Sonnets: Charlotte Smith’s Formal Paradox’, Papers on Language and Literature 39.2 
(2003), 185-220.  
  Wagner, Jennifer Ann, “‘Sonnettomania” and the Ideology of Form’ [Chapter 4], in A Moment’s 
Monument: Revisionary Poetics and the Nineteenth-Century English Sonnet (Madison: Fairleigh 
Dickinson UP, 1996).    
  White, R. S. ‘Survival and Change: the Sonnet from Milton to the Romantics’, in Cambridge 
Companion to the Sonnet, ed. A. D. Cousins and Peter Howarth (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2011), 
166-184.   
  Wolfson, Susan J., ‘Thinking in Sonnets’, Front Porch Journal (Fall 2012).  
  
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 123 of 230 
Literary London, 1820-1920 
Dr Ushashi Dasgupta - xxxxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 

This C-Course is about literature, geography, and modernity. London as we know it came into being during the 
long nineteenth century, and novelists, poets, journalists, social investigators and world travellers were 
irresistibly drawn to this space, determined to capture the growth and dynamism of the Great Metropolis. Do 
we have Pierce Egan, Henry Mayhew, Arthur Conan Doyle and Alice Meynell to thank for our conception of 
‘the urban’? As our classes will show, these authors created the city to a certain extent, even as they 
attempted to describe it and to use it as a literary setting. In order to appreciate the sheer breadth of 
responses London inspired, we will discuss writing from across the century, with a coda on Virginia Woolf. We 
will explore the role of the city in forming identities and communities, the impact of space upon psychology 
and behaviour, and the movements between street, home, shop and slum. Each week, we will think about 
London’s relation to the nation and the world – the significance of the capital city in the history of imperialism 
and globalisation, and as a site of encounter between diverse groups of people. And finally, we will consider 
the central tension in all city writing: was the capital a place of opportunity and freedom, or was it dangerous 
and oppressive? 
The character sketch was a major urban genre in the period, and accordingly, each of our classes will centre 
around a London ‘type’. As we move from character to character, we will begin to appreciate how cities 
fundamentally shape people – and how people leave their mark on the world around them. 
 
Primary Reading 
Before you arrive in Oxford, please try to read as many of the core works listed below as you can; a number of 
them are lengthy, and reward close and careful reading. Those that are difficult to source in hard copy are – in 
the main – available online. For more canonical titles, you could try editions from the Penguin Classics or 
Oxford World’s Classics series. Further extracts will be distributed once you’re here, during an introductory 0th 
Week meeting. 
1. The Flâneur 
This class will consider the figure of the walker, stroller, or lounger. 
  Pierce Egan, Life in London, or the Day and Night Scenes of Jerry Hawthorn, Esq., and His Elegant 
Friend, Corinthian Tom, Accompanied by Bob Logic, the Oxonian, in Their Rambles and Sprees 
Through the Metropolis (1821). 
  George Augustus Sala, Twice Round the Clock (1859). 
 
2. The ‘Tough Subject’ 
Here, we’ll discuss the nature of urban poverty. 
  Flora Tristan, Promenades dans Londres (1842). See the following chapters of the Virago edition (The 
London Journal of Flora Tristan), trans. Jean Hawkes: ‘Dedication to the Working Classes’, ‘The 
Monster City’, ‘A Visit to the Houses of Parliament’, ‘Prostitutes’, ‘St Giles Parish’. 
  Charles Dickens, Bleak House (1852-3) and ‘Night Walks’ (1861). 
  Henry Mayhew, London Labour and the London Poor (vol. ed. 1861-2). Please read the following 
sections from the Oxford University Press selection, ed. Robert Douglas-Fairhurst: ‘Preface’, ‘Of the 
London Street-Folk’, ‘Costermongers’, ‘Street-Sellers of Fruit and Vegetables’, ‘Street-Sellers of 
Manufactured Articles’, ‘Children Street-Sellers’, ‘Street-Buyers’, ‘Street-Finders or Collectors’, 
‘Crossing-Sweepers’, ‘Destroyers of Vermin’, ‘Skilled and Unskilled Labour’, ‘Cheap Lodging-Houses’. 
 
3. The Sinner 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 124 of 230 
Alienated, stigmatised and threatening figures will take centre stage this week. 
  James Thomson, The City of Dreadful Night (1874). 
  Fergus Hume, The Mystery of a Hansom Cab (1886). 
  Arthur Conan Doyle, The Sign of Four (1890) and the following stories from Adventures of Sherlock 
Holmes (1892): ‘A Scandal in Bohemia’, ‘The Red-Headed League’, ‘The Five Orange Pips’, ‘The Man 
with the Twisted Lip’, ‘The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle’, ‘The Adventure of the Speckled Band’. 
 
4. The Homemaker 
This week’s discussion will address the relationship between the home and the city: who were the guardians of 
domestic space? Did they succeed in their attempts to keep the city at bay? 
  George Gissing, The Nether World (1889) and The Paying Guest (1895). 
  Extracts to be provided from Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle’s letters (to 1866) and Octavia Hill, The 
Homes of the London Poor (1875) and Letters to Fellow Workers (1864-1911). 
 
5. The Modern Woman 
How did women claim the city as their own at the turn of the century? 
  Krishnabhabini Das, A Bengali Lady in England (1885). See Somdatta Mandal’s translation for 
Cambridge Scholars, which is available in the Bodleian Library. 
  Amy Levy, The Romance of a Shop (1888). Electronic copies of the Broadview edition can be 
purchased on their website; it is also available in the Bodleian Library.  
  Alice Meynell, London Impressions (1898), with etchings and pictures by William Hyde. 
 
6. Coda: Virginia Woolf 
We end with Woolf – writer and flâneuse.  
  Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway (1925).  
  Extracts to be provided from Woolf’s short fiction and non-fiction. 
 
Secondary Criticism 
A week-by-week breakdown of recommended critical reading will be circulated at the start of the course. You 
could take a look at a few of the following suggestions before you arrive: 
  Peter Ackroyd, London: The Biography (2000). 
  Tanya Agathocleous, Urban Realism and the Cosmopolitan Imagination in the Nineteenth Century: 
Visible City, Invisible World (2011). 
  Robert Alter, Imagined Cities: Urban Experience and the Language of the Novel (2005). 
  Isobel Armstrong, ‘Theories of Space and the Nineteenth-Century Novel’, 19, 17 (2003), 1-21. 
  Rosemary Ashton, Victorian Bloomsbury (2012). 
  Matthew Beaumont, Nightwalking: A Nocturnal History of London (2015). 
  Matthew Beaumont and Gregory Dart (eds.), Restless Cities (2010). 
  Walter Benjamin, The Arcades Project (1927-40), especially ‘The Flâneur’, ‘Baudelaire’, ‘The Interior’, 
‘Arcades’ and ‘Exhibitions’. 
  Elleke Boehmer, Indian Arrivals, 1870-1915: Networks of British Empire (2015). 
  Michel de Certeau, The Practice of Everyday Life (1980). 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 125 of 230 
  Karen Chase and Michael Levenson, The Spectacle of Intimacy: A Public Life for the Victorian Family 
(2000). 
  Gregory Dart, Metropolitan Art and Literature, 1810-1840: Cockney Adventures (2012). 
  HJ Dyos and Michael Wolff (eds.), The Victorian City: Images and Realities (1973-6). 
  Lauren Elkin, Flâneuse (2016). 
  Jed Esty, A Shrinking Island: Modernism and National Culture in England (2004). 
  Nicholas Freeman, Conceiving the City: London, Literature, and Art 1870-1914 (2007). 
  Ann Gaylin, Eavesdropping in the Novel from Austen to Proust (2002). 
  Simon Joyce, Capital Offenses: Geographies of Class and Crime in Victorian London (2003). 
  Olivia Laing, The Lonely City: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone (2016). 
  Henri Lefebvre, The Production of Space (1974). 
  Thad Logan, The Victorian Parlour (2001). 
  Lawrence Manley (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of London (2011). 
  Sharon Marcus, Apartment Stories: City and Home in Nineteenth-Century Paris and London (1999). 
  Franco Moretti, Atlas of the European Novel (1998). 
  Lynda Nead, Victorian Babylon: People, Streets and Images in Nineteenth-Century London (2000). 
  Deborah Epstein Nord, Walking the Victorian Streets: Women, Representation, and the City (1995). 
  Deborah Parsons, Streetwalking the Metropolis: Women, the City, and Modernity (2000). 
  Lawrence Phillips (ed.), A Mighty Mass of Brick and Smoke: Victorian and Edwardian Representations 
of London (2007). 
  John Picker, Victorian Soundscapes (2003). 
  Roy Porter, London: A Social History (1994). 
  Alan Robinson, Imagining London, 1770-1900 (2004). 
  FS Schwarzbach, Dickens and the City (1979). 
  Mary L. Shannon, Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a 
Victorian Street (2016). 
  Anna Snaith and Michael Whitworth (eds.), Locating Woolf: The Politics of Space and Place (2007). 
  Jeremy Tambling (ed.), Dickens and London (2009). 
  William B. Thesing, The London Muse: Victorian Poetic Responses to the City (1982). 
  Ana Parejo Vadillo, Woman Poets and Urban Aestheticism: Passengers of Modernity (2005). 
  Judith Walkowitz, City of Dreadful Delight: Narratives of Sexual Danger in Late-Victorian London 
(1992). 
  Jerry Whyte, London in the Nineteenth Century: A Human Awful Wonder of God (2008). 
  Raymond Williams, The Country and the City (1973). 
  Julian Wolfreys, Writing London (1998-2007). 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 126 of 230 
Victorian & Edwardian Drama, 1850-1914 
Dr Sos Eltis - xxx.xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
Theatre was the most popular and vital artistic medium of the nineteenth century, with some 30,000 plays 
licensed for performance in the course of the century. By 1866 there were approximately 51,000 theatre seats 
available across London alone, drawing audiences across every social class. Influencing writers from Charles 
Dickens and Wilkie Collins to Mary Elizabeth Braddon and Henry James, the theatre was also a hugely 
profitable industry, which gained a new intellectual and literary standing by the fin de siècle.  Whether in the 
hands of moral conservatives, socialists, Irish nationalists or suffragists, the theatre was also a potentially 
powerful force for political challenge and social disruption, as evidenced by the government’s determination 
to retain a tight mechanism of state censorship.  
This course will look at the development of the theatre from mid-nineteenth century though to the Edwardian 
period, across a wide range of genres, venues and performance styles. From melodrama to sensation drama, 
society play, Ibsenite problem play, theatre of ideas, women’s suffrage theatre and realist ‘new drama’, the 
course will consider plays as texts, performances, political and social events, modes of discourse, disruptive 
pleasures, commercial ventures and an unpredictable mixture of all of these. Issues covered will include 
mechanisms of censorship, conditions of performance, reception, the historiography of theatre, the influence 
of specific performers, and the relation between nineteenth-century theatre and other artistic media, 
including the novel and early film.   
There will be six weekly seminars, which will include student presentations and wide-ranging free discussion. 
There will also be opportunities to discuss presentations while they are being put together in advance of the 
seminars, and to discuss ideas, structures and approaches for each student’s assessed essay.  
 
Week 1: MELODRAMA 
Primary texts:  Douglas Jerrold, Black-Ey'd Susan (1829); Dion Boucicault, The Octoroon; or, Life in Louisiana 
(1859); G. R. Sims, The Lights o' London (1881); Henry Arthur Jones, The Silver King (1882); Bernard Shaw, The 
Devil’s Disciple
 
Possible further critical reading:  
  Michael Booth, English Melodrama 
  J. S. Bratton, Jim Cook, Christine Gledhill, Melodrama: stage, picture, screen 
  Peter Brooks, The Melodramatic Imagination: Balzac, Henry James, melodrama and the mode of 
excess 
  M. Wilson Disher, Blood and Thunder: mid-Victorian melodrama and its origins 
  Sos Eltis, Acts of Desire: Women and Sex on Stage, 1800-1930 
  Elaine Hadley, Melodramatic tactics: theatricalized dissent in the English marketplace, 1800-1885 
  Michael Hays (ed), Melodrama: the cultural emergence of a genre 
  Robert Heilman, Tragedy and melodrama: versions of experience 
  Juliet John, Dickens’s Villains: melodrama, character, popular culture 
  Michael Kilgariff, The Golden Age of Melodrama: twelve 19th-century melodramas 
  Frank Rahill, The World of Melodrama 
  Theresa Rebeck, Your cries are in vain: a theory of the melodramatic heroine 
  James Redmond, Melodrama 
  James L. Smith, Melodrama 
 
Week 2: BOX-OFFICE FAVOURITES AND SENSATION DRAMAS 
  Primary texts:  Tom Taylor, Still Waters Run Deep (1855); Dion Boucicault, The Colleen Bawn (1860); C. 
H. Hazlewood, Lady Audley’s Secret (1863); T. A. Palmer, East Lynne (1874); Caste (1867) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 127 of 230 
 
Possible further critical reading:  
  John McCormick, Dion Boucicault 
  Richard Fawkes, Dion Boucicault: a biography 
  Nicholas Grene, The Politics of Irish Drama: Plays in Context from Boucicault to Friel 
  Townsend Walsh, The Career of Dion Boucicault 
  Deirdre McFeely, Dion Boucicault: Irish Identity on stage 
  Katherine Newey, Women’s Theatre Writing in Victorian Britain 
 
Week 3: SOCIETY DRAMA AND PROBLEM PLAYS 
  Primary texts:  Henrik Ibsen, A Doll’s House (1879), Ghosts (1889); Arthur Wing Pinero, The Second 
Mrs Tanqueray (1893), The Notorious Mrs Ebbsmith (1895); Henry Arthur Jones, The Case of 
Rebellious Susan
 (1894), The Liars (1897); Sidney Grundy, The New Woman (1894) 
 
Possible further critical reading:  
  Richard Cordell, Henry Arthur Jones and the modern drama 
  John Dawick, Pinero: a Theatrical Life  
  Sos Eltis, Acts of Desire: Women and Sex on Stage, 1800-1930 
  Richard Foulkes (ed.), British Theatre in the 1890s: Essays on Drama and the Stage 
  Hamilton Fyfe, Sir Arthur Pinero’s plays and players 
  Penny Griffin, Arthur Wing Pinero and Henry Arthur Jones 
  Doris A. Jones, The Life and Letters of Henry Arthur Jones 
  Joel Kaplan and Sheila Stowell, Theatre and Fashion, from Oscar Wilde to the Suffragettes 
  Errol Durbach, Ibsen and the Theatre (1980) 
  Michael Egan, ed., Ibsen:  The Critical Heritage (1972) 
  James McFarlane, ed., The Oxford Ibsen (7 vols.) 
  ———————, Henrik Ibsen:  A Critical Anthology (1970) 
  ———————, The Cambridge Companion to Ibsen (1994) 
  Frederick J. Marker and Lise-Lone Marker, Ibsen’s Lively Art: A Performance Study of the Major Plays 
(1989) 
  Toril Moi, Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism (2006) 
  Thomas Postlewait, Prophet of the New Drama:  William Archer and the Ibsen Campaign (1986) 
 
Week 4: OSCAR WILDE AND GEORGE BERNARD SHAW 
  Wilde primary texts:  Lady Windermere’s Fan, Salome, A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband, 
The Importance of Being Earnest 
  Shaw primary texts:  Widowers’ Houses (1892), Mrs Warren’s Profession (1893), Arms and the Man 
(1894), Man and Superman (1902-3), Major Barbara (1905), Pygmalion (1913) 
 
Possible further critical reading:  
  Karl Beckson, Oscar Wilde: The Critical Heritage 
  Sos Eltis, Revising Wilde: Society and Subversion in the Plays of Oscar Wilde  
  Regina Gagnier, Idylls of the Marketplace: Oscar Wilde and the Victorian Public 
  Joel Kaplan and Sheila Stowell, Theatre and Fashion, from Oscar Wilde to the Suffragettes 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 128 of 230 
  Norbert Kohl, Oscar Wilde, Works of a Conformist Rebel 
  Kerry Powell, Oscar Wilde and the Theatre of the 1890s 
  Kerry Powell, Acting Wilde: Victorian sexuality, theatre and Oscar Wilde 
  Peter Raby, Oscar Wilde 
  Peter Raby (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Oscar Wilde 
  Frederick S. Roden (ed), Palgrave Advances in Oscar Wilde Studies 
  Neil Sammels, Wilde style : the plays and prose of Oscar Wilde 
  George Sandalescu (ed), Re-discovering Wilde
  William Tydeman (ed), Wilde: Comedies 
  Anne Varty, A Preface to Oscar Wilde 
  Katharine Worth, Oscar Wilde 
  Tracy C Davis, George Bernard Shaw and the Socialist Theatre 
  Bernard Dukore, Shaw’s Theatre  
  T. F. Evans (ed.), Bernard Shaw: The Critical Heritage 
  Nicolas Grene, Bernard Shaw: A Critical View 
  D. A. Hadfield and Jean Reynolds (eds.), Shaw and Feminisms: on stage and off 
  Michael Holroyd, Bernard Shaw, vol.s 1 & 2 – v good and detailed critical biography  
  C.D. Innes (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Bernard Shaw  
  Brad Kent (ed.), George Bernard Shaw in Context 
  Martin Meisel, Shaw and the Nineteenth Century Theatre 
  Margery Morgan, The Shavian Playground 
  Maurice Valency, The Cart and the Trumpet: The Plays of George Bernard Shaw 
Also v useful – Shaw on everyone else’s drama: George Bernard Shaw, Our Theatre in the Nineties (3 vols), and 
The Drama Observed (ed. Dukore). 
 
Week 5: NEW DRAMA  
  Primary texts:  Elizabeth Robins and Florence Bell, Alan’s Wife (1893);  Netta Syrett, The Finding of 
Nancy (1902); Harley Granville Barker, The Voysey Inheritance (1905), Waste (1907); St John Hankin, 
The Cassilis Engagement (1907), The Last of the De Mullins (1908);  
 
  Michael R. Booth and Joel Kaplan, Edwardian Theatre: Essays on performance and the stage  
  Jean Chothia, English Drama of the Early Modern Period, 1890-1940 
  Ian Clarke, Edwardian Drama: a critical study 
  Katharine Cockin, Edith Craig and the Theatres of Art 
  Tracy C. Davis and Ellen Donkin, Playwriting and Nineteenth-Century British Women 
  Jan MacDonald, The New Drama, 1900-1914 
  Sheila Stowell and Joel Kaplan, Theatre and Fashion from Oscar Wilde to the Suffragettes 
  James Woodfield, English Theatre in Transition, 1881-1914 
 
Week 6: SUFFRAGE DRAMA 
  Primary texts: Elizabeth Robins, Votes for Women! (1907); Cicely Hamilton, Diana of Dobson’s (1908); 
Githa Sowerby, Rutherford and Son (1912);  
  Naomi Paxton (ed.), The Methuen Drama Book of Suffrage Plays 
 
Possible further critical reading:  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 129 of 230 
  Katharine Cockin, Women and Theatre in the Age of Suffrage: The Pioneer Players, 1911-1925 
  Katharine Cockin and Glenda Norquay, Women’s Suffrage Literature: Suffrage Drama 
  Vivien Gardner and Susan Rutherford (eds.) The New Woman and Her Sisters: Feminism and Theatre, 
185-1914 
  Julie Holledge, Innocent Flowers: Women in Edwardian Theatre 
  Katherine Newey, Women’s Theatre Writing in Victorian Britain 
  Sheila Stowell, A Stage of their Own: Feminist Playwrights of the Suffrage Era 
  Sheila Stowell and Joel Kaplan, Theatre and Fashion from Oscar Wilde to the Suffragettes 
  Lisa Tickner, The Spectacle of Women: Imagery of the Suffrage Campaign, 1907-1914 
 
A large number of these plays are available online at http://victorian.worc.ac.uk/modx/ (a digital archive of 
Lacy’s Acting editions of Victorian plays), through the Bodleian’s SOLO catalogue, and at a number of other 
sites. Below is a list of widely available anthologies of Victorian and Edwardian plays. In the case of a couple of 
plays not in print, photocopies or electronic copies of the manuscripts will be provided.  
 
 
ANTHOLOGIES 
 
HISS THE VILLAIN: SIX ENGLISH AND AMERICAN MELODRAMAS, ed. Michael Booth. Contents: I. Pocock The 
Miller and his Men; J. T. Haines, My Poll and my Partner Joe; W. W. Pratt, Ten Nights in a Bar-Room; W. 
Phillips, Lost in London; A. Daly, Under the Gaslight; L. Lewis, The Bells. 
 
TRILBY, AND OTHER PLAYS (OUP, 1996), ed. George Taylor. Contents: J. B. Buckstone, Jack Sheppard; Dion 
Boucicault, The Corsican Brothers; Tom Taylor, Our American Cousin; Paul Potter, Trilby
 
LATE VICTORIAN PLAYS, 1890-1914 (OUP, 1972), ed. George Rowell. Contents: A. W. Pinero, The Second Mrs 
Tanqueray
; H. A. Jones, The Liars; Hubert Henry Davies, The Mollusc; St John Hankin, The Cassilis Engagement
Harley Granville-Barker, The Voysey Inheritance; John Galsworthy, Justice; Stanley Houghton, Hindle Wakes
 
FEMALE PLAYWRIGHTS OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY (Everyman, 1996), ed. Adrienne Scullion. Contents: 
Joanna Baillie, The Family Legend; De Camp, Smiles and Tears; Fanny Kemble, Francis the First; Anna Cora 
Mowatt, Fashion; Mrs Henry Wood, East Lynne; Florence Bell and Elizabeth Robins, Alan’s Wife; Pearl Craigie, 
The Ambassador

 
THE LIGHTS O’ LONDON, AND OTHER VICTORIAN PLAYS  (OUP, 1995), ed. Michael Booth. Contents: Edward 
Fitzball, The Inchcape Bell; Joseph Stirling Coyne, Did You Ever Send Your Wife to Camberwell?; George Henry 
Lewes, The Game of Speculation; George Robert Sims, The Lights o’ London; Henry Arthur Jones, The 
Middleman. 
 
NINETEENTH-CENTURY PLAYS (OUP, 1972), ed. George Rowell. Contents: 
Douglas Jerrold, Black-Ey’d Susan; Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Money; Tom Taylor and Charles Reade, Masks and 
Faces
; Dion Boucicault The Colleen Bawn; C. H. Hazlewood, Lady Audley’s Secret; Tom Taylor, The Ticket-of-
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 130 of 230 
Leave Man; W. W. Robertson, Caste; James Albery, Two Roses; Leopold Lewis, The Bells; Sidney Grundy, A Pair 
of Spectacles

 
ENGLISH PLAYS OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY (OUP, 1969-76) ed. Michael Booth: 5 vols, comprising 33 
tragedies, dramas, melodramas, comedies, farces, extravaganzas, burlesques and pantomimes. 
 
THE NEW WOMAN AND OTHER EMANCIPATED WOMAN PLAYS (OUP, 1998), ed. Jean Chothia. Contents: 
Sidney Grundy, The New Woman; A. W. Pinero, The Notorious Mrs Ebbsmith; St John Hankin, The Last of the 
De Mullins; Elizabeth Robins, Votes for Women. 
 
VICTORIAN THEATRICALS: from Menageries to Melodrama, ed. Sara Hudston. Contents: John Walker, The 
Factory Lad
; T.W. Robertson, Society; W.S. Gilbert, The Mikado; Arthur Wing Pinero, The Second Mrs 
Tanqueray
 by. Also includes excerpts from fiction and non-fiction sources on Victorian theatre. 
 
THE BROADVIEW ANTHOLOGY OF NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH PERFORMANCE, ed. Tracy C. Davis. 
Contents: George Colman, the Younger, The Africans; or, War, Love, and Duty (1808); Col. Ralph Hamilton, 
Elphi Bey; or, The Arab's Faith (1817); James Smith and R.B. Peake, Trip to America (1824); George Henry 
Lewes, The Game of Speculation (1851); Christy's Minstrels; Dion Boucicault, The Relief of Lucknow (1862); 
T.W. Robertson, Ours (1866); B.C. Stephensen and Alfred Cellier, Dorothy (1886); Joseph Addison, Alice in 
Wonderland; or, Harlequin, the Poor Apprentice, the Pretty Belle, and the Fairy Wing (1886); J.M. Barrie, 
Ibsen's Ghost; or, Toole Up-to-Date (1891); Paul Potter, Trilby (1895); Netta Syrett, The Finding of Nancy (1902 
 
GENERAL CRITICISM 
  Michael Booth, Theatre in the Victorian Age 
  ______,  Prefaces to English Nineteenth-Century Theatre 
  ______,  Victorian Spectacular Theatre 
  Jacky Bratton (ed.), Acts of Supremacy: the British Empire and the Stage, 1790-1930 
  Jacky Bratton, The Making of the West-End Stage: marriage, management and the mapping of gender 
in London, 1830-70 
  Jean Chothia, English Drama of the Early Modern Period, 1890-1940 
  _____ , André Antoine (1991) 
  Tracy C. Davis, Actresses as Working Women: their Social Identity in Victorian Culture 
  _____, The Economics of the British Stage, 1800-1914 
  _____, Women and Playwriting in nineteenth-century Britain 
  Tracy C. Davis and Peter Holland, The Performing Century: Nineteenth-Century Theatres History 
  Tracy C. Davis and Ellen Donkin, Playwriting and Nineteenth-Century British Women 
  Joseph Donohue (ed.) The Cambridge History of British Theatre: Vol.2, 1660-1895 
  Sos Eltis, Acts of Desire: Women and Sex on Stage, 1800-1930 
  Victor Emeljanow, Victorian Popular Dramatists 
  Richard Ffoulkes (ed.), British Theatre in the 1890s: Essays on Drama and the Stage 
  Vivien Gardner and Susan Rutherford (eds.) The New Woman and Her Sisters: Feminism and Theatre, 
185-1914 
  Russell Jackson, Victorian Theatre 
  Anthony Jenkins, The Making of Victorian Drama 
  Baz Kershaw (ed.), The Cambridge History of British Theatre: Vol.3, Since 1895 
  Gail Marshall, Victorian Shakespeare 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 131 of 230 
  Martin Meisel, Realizations: Narrative, Pictorial, and Theatrical Arts in Nineteenth-Century England  
  Jane  Moody,  Illegitimate Theatre in London, 1770–1840. 
  Tiziana Morosetti (ed.), Staging the Other in Nineteenth-Century British Drama 
  Katherine Newey, Women’s Theatre Writing in Victorian Britain 
  Katherine Newey, Jeffrey Richards and Peter Yeandle (eds), Politics, performance and popular culture: 
theatre and society in nineteenth-century Britain 
  Kerry Powell (ed), The Cambridge Companion to Victorian and Edwardian Drama 
  ________,  Women and Victorian Theatre 
  George Rowell, The Victorian Theatre, A Survey 
  George Rowell (editor), Victorian Dramatic Criticism 
  Kenneth Richards and Peter Thomson (editors), Essays on Nineteenth-Century British Theatre 
  Claude Schumacher, ed., Naturalism and Symbolism in the European Theatre  
  J. R. Stephens, The Censorship of English Drama, 1824-1901  
  _________, The Profession of the Playwright: British Theatre 1800-1900 
  George Taylor, Players and Performances in the Victorian Theatre 
  Sheila Stowell and Joel Kaplan, Theatre and Fashion from Oscar Wilde to the Suffragettes 
  John Stokes, Resistible Theatre: Enterprise and Experiment in the late nineteenth century 
  Lynn Voskuil, Acting naturally: Victorian theatricality and authenticity 
  Hazel Waters, Racism on the Victorian Stage: representation of slavery and the black character 
  Raymond Williams, Modern Tragedy  
  Katharine Worth, Revolutions in Modern English Drama  
  Edward Ziter, The Orient on the Victorian Stage 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 132 of 230 
Citizens of Nowhere: Literary Cosmopolitanism and the Fin de Siècle 
Dr Stefano Evangelista – xxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xx.xx.xx 

Cosmopolitanism, derived from the Greek for ‘world citizenship’, denotes the aspiration to transcend national, 
cultural and linguistic boundaries, and to imagine oneself in relation to a global community. In this course we 
will explore the meaning of cosmopolitanism, its relevance for literary studies and its role in the literature of 
the ‘long’ fin de siècle. By focusing on a broad range of authors and genres, we will study how cosmopolitanism 
was theorised, debated, practised, defended and attacked in this period. Questions we will address include: 
how did authors understand the relationship between the local and the global? What were the literary and 
social politics of cosmopolitanism at the turn of the twentieth century? How did international mobility affect 
the perception of the world (cosmos) and individual identity? What was the role of empire in the formulation 
of a specifically British cosmopolitan ideal? In our study of how texts and ideas migrated across borders, we 
will pay attention to the specifics of the European, trans-Atlantic and global connections of English literature 
from this period. 
 
Week 1. Cosmopolitanism and Modernity 
The first class provides an historical and theoretical introduction to the concept of cosmopolitanism and its 
relevance for literary studies by focusing on a number of short texts from the turn of the century and the 
present. 
  Charles Baudelaire, ‘The Painter of Modern Life’ (1863) 
  Georg Simmel, ‘The Metropolis and Mental Life’ (1903) 
  Kwame Anthony Appiah, ‘Cosmopolitan Patriots’ (1997) 
  Pascale Casanova, ‘Literature as a World’ (2005) 
 
Week 2. Precarious Identities 
In her last novel, Daniel Deronda, Eliot abandoned her commitment to the depiction of English provincial life 
and turned instead to a larger canvas. Building on Eliot’s representation of Jewishness, this week we will focus 
on questions of individual identity and on the ethics and aesthetics of the novel form. Virginia Woolf provides 
an explicitly gendered focus on the question of cosmopolitan/national identities. 
  George Eliot, Daniel Deronda (1876) 
  Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas (1938) 
 
Week 3. Senses of Place 
This week focuses on the representation of place and space – how space becomes place through travel writing, 
imaginary geography, the gaze of the foreign observer and the urban flaneur. Material from this week can be 
compared to the representation of foreign space in, for instance, Italian novels and short stories by Henry 
James. 
  Arthur Symons, London Nights (1895) and Cities (1903) 
  Vernon Lee, Genius Loci (1899) 
  Walter Benjamin, ‘Paris: Capital of the Nineteenth Century’ (1939) 
 
Week 4. At Home in the World 
This week concentrates on the lure and the dangers of foreign cultures, and their representation in fiction and 
non-fiction from this period. What are the duties of citizenship and how do writers represent their 
transgressions? We will also address the complex question of the politics and ethics of nationalism. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 133 of 230 
  Henry James, The Ambassadors (1903) 
  Stephan Zweig, The World of Yesterday (1943) 
  Rabindranath Tagore, Nationalism (1917) 
 
Week 5. The Stranger 
This week focuses on the fictional investigation of the figure of the stranger, which often has enigmatic or 
uncanny undertones. Simmel’s concise essay will provide a sociological counterpart to fictional explorations by 
Conrad, Hearn, Mansfield, and the Norwegian writer Knut Hamsun. 
  Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent (1907) 
  Knut Hamsun, Mysteries (1892) 
  Katherine Mansfield, ‘The Little Governess’ (1915) 
  Lafcadio Hearn, ‘A Street Singer’, from Kokoro (1896) 
  Georg Simmel, ‘The Stranger’ (1908) 
 
Week 6. International Styles 
Influenced by French and Belgian Symbolism, Oscar Wilde wrote Salomé in French. Decadence, Symbolism and 
Naturalism – the main literary movements of the fin de siècle – were by many perceived to be internationalist 
in style and ideas. But what is literary internationalism? Can literature, which necessarily comes to life though 
the medium of a national language, ever be truly international? We will try to answer these question by 
concentrating on British perceptions of international literary movements and avant-garde periodicals. 
  Oscar Wilde, Salomé (1891) 
  Arthur Symons, ‘The Decadent Movement in Literature’ (1893) 
  George Bernard Shaw, The Quintessence of Ibsenism (1891) 
  The Yellow Book (1894-97) 
  The Savoy (1896) 
All the longer works of fiction are available as paperbacks or online via archive.org or similar. Please note, 
however, that for the purposes of class discussion it is best to acquire hard copies and bring them with you. 
Photocopies or scanned versions of some of the shorter texts will be provided. 
Participants are not expected to be proficient in any foreign language and English translations are 
recommended for all foreign-language texts; but you are welcome to read them in the original if you prefer, 
and to draw on your foreign-language skills in your assignment. Questions of translation will also form part of 
our discussion, where appropriate. 
The primary readings on which we will focus in class obviously only constitute a small number of possible texts 
relevant to this topic. Other English-language authors from this period worth exploring for their international 
connections and experiences include Isabella Bird, George Egerton, Ford Madox Ford, E.M. Forster, Rider 
Haggard, Rudyard Kipling, Amy Levy, George Moore, Ouida, E. Mary F. Robinson, Robert Louis Stevenson, Israel 
Zangwill. Remember that virtually all authors we will study in class wrote for the periodical press, and many of 
them also doubled up as travel writers or translators, or both (e.g. Arthur Symons). Therefore periodicals 
(especially literary and international periodicals), travel literature and translations are also excellent primary 
sources. 
 
Recommended secondary reading  
  Adorno, Thedor W., ‘Words from Abroad’  
  Agathocleous, Tanya, Urban Realism and the Cosmopolitan Imagination in the Nineteen Century 
(2011) – contains a reading of Conrad 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 134 of 230 
  Albrecht, Thomas, ‘”The Balance of Separateness and Communication”: Cosmopolitan Ethics in 
George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda’, ELH 79 (2012) 
  Anderson, Amanda, The Powers of Distance: Cosmopolitanism and the Cultuvation of Detachment 
(2001) – contains readings of Eliot and Wilde 
  * Appiah, Kwame Anthony, Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers (2006) 
  * - ‘Rooted Cosmopolitanism’, in The Ethics of Identity (2005) 
  Apter, Emily, Against World Literature (2013) 
  The Translation Zone (2006) 
  ‘Untranslatables: A World System’, New Literary History 39:3 (2008) 
  * Beck, Ulrich, Cosmopolitan Vision (2006) – a very useful sociological perspective 
  Benjamin, Walter, Selected Writings (1996), especially ‘On Language as Such and on the Language of 
Man’ and ‘The Task of the Translator’ 
  Bernheimer, Charles (ed. T. Jefferson Kline and Naomi Schor), Decadent Subjects: The Idea of 
Decadence in Art, Literature, Philosophy and Culture of the Fin de Siècle in Europe (2002) 
  Bhabha, Homi K., The Location of Culture (1994) 
  * ‘The Vernacular Cosmopolitan’, in Voices of the Crossing: The Impact of Britain on Writers from Asia, 
the Caribbean, and Africa, ed. by Ferdinand Dennis and Naseem Khan (2000) 
  Boehmer, Elleke, Indian Arrivals, 1870-1915: Networks of British Empire (2016) 
  Boes, Tobias, Formative Fictions: Nationalism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Bildungsroman (2012) 
  Brown, G.W. and David Held, The Cosmopolitanism Reader (2010) 
  Brown, Julia Prewitt, Cosmopolitan Criticism: Oscar Wilde’s Philosophy of Art (1997) 
  Bullock, Philip Ross, ‘Ibsen on the London Stage: Independent Theatre as Transnational Space’ Forum 
for Modern Language Studies (2017) – several other relevant essays in this special issue 
  Bürger, Peter (trans. Michael Shaw), Theory of the Avant Garde (1984) 
  * Casanova, Pascale, The World Republic of Letters (1999, 2004) 
  Buzzard, James, The Beaten Track: European Tourism, Literature and the Ways to Culture, 1800-1918 
(1993) 
  Chakrabarty, Dipesh, Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference (2000) 
  Chapman, Alison and Jane Stabler (eds), Unfolding the South: Nineteenth-Century British Women 
Artists and Writers in Italy (2003) 
  Cohen, William A., ‘Wilde’s French’, in Wilde Discoveries: Traditions, Histories, Archives, ed. by Joseph 
Bristow (2013) 
  D’haen, Theo, ‘Mapping Modernism: Gaining in Translation – Martinus Nijhoff and T.S. Eliot’, 
Comparative Critical Studies 6:1 (2009)  
  - The Routledge Concise History of World Literature (2012) 
  Damrosch, David, What is World Literature?  (2003) 
  Eels, Emily, Proust’s Cup of Tea: Homoeroticism and Victorian Culture (2002) – stimulating on 
international styles 
  Evangelista, Stefano and Richard Hibbitt, ‘Introduction’ to ‘Literary Cosmopolitanism at the Fin de 
Siècle’, Comparative Critical Studies 10:2 (2013) – this special issues contains several essays that 
should be of interest 
  Gagnier, Regenia, Cosmopolitanism, Decadence, Globalisation (2010) 
  * Gandhi, Leelah, Affective Communities: Anti-Colonial Thought, Aesthetic Radicalism, and the Politics 
of Friendship (2006) 
  * Kant, Immanuel, ‘Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose’ (1784) 
  - ‘Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch’ (1795) 
  Livesey, Ruth, Socialism, Sex, and the Culture of Aestheticism in Britain, 1880-1914 (2007) 
  Marshall, Gail, ed, The Cambridge Companion to the Fin de Siècle (2007) – a useful introduction to this 
period with essays mapping various topics and genres 
  Marx, Carl and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto (1848) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 135 of 230 
  McDonagh, Josephine, ‘Rethinking Provincialism in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Fiction: Our Village to 
Villette’, Victorian Studies 55:3 (2013) 
  Moi, Toril, Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism (2006) 
  Moretti, Franco, Atlas of the European Novel (1998) 
  *- ‘Conjectures on World Literature’, New Left Review (2000) 
  Nussbaum, Martha, ‘Cosmopolitanism and Patriotism’, Boston Review (1 October 1994) 
  - and Joshua Coehn, For Love of Country: Debating the Limits of Patriotism (1996) 
  Pemble, John, The Mediterranean Passion (1987) 
  Pollock S., H. K. Bhaba, et al., ‘Cosmopolitanisms’, Public Culture 12:3 (2000) 
  Potolsky, Matthew, The Decadent Republic of Letters (2012) 
  Prendergast, Christopher (ed.), Debating World Literature (2004) 
  Radford, Andrew and Victoria Reid, Channel Packets: Franco-British Cultural Exchanges, 1880-1940 
  Robbins, Bruce and Paulo Lemos Horta, Cosmopolitanisms (2017) 
  Sapiro, Gisèle, ‘Authorship in Transnational Perspective: World Literature in the Making’, 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3UaLtiaprM - a very good introduction to the sociological 
approach 
  Spivak, Gayatri, ‘Can the Subaltern Speak?’ in Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture, ed. by Cary 
Nelson and Lawrence Grossberg (1988) 
  - Death of a Discipline (2003) 
  Vadillo, Ana Parejo, Women Poets and Urban Aestheticism: Passengers to Modernity (2005) 
  Venuti, Lawrence (ed.), The Translation Studies Reader (2000) 
  Walkowitz, Rebecca L., Cosmopolitan Style: Modernism beyond the Nation (2006) 
  *- Nights out: Life in Cosmopolitan London (2012) 
 
* starred items are particularly recommended 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 136 of 230 
Virginia Woolf: Literary and Cultural Contexts 
Professor Michael Whitworth – xxxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
This course aims to place Woolf’s novels and other writings in dialogue with texts by her contemporaries. 
Although Woolf often emphasised her formal originality, the course will ask about the ways that the idea of 
genre might retain some value in relating Woolf’s works to the works of others.  The course also aims to ask 
about the value and limits of understanding literary context in terms solely of texts: what happens to non-
literary texts when they are reworked in literary ones? How can we deal with contexts that are, in the first 
instance, non-verbal?  For students who are already familiar with a wide range of Woolf’s writing, the course is 
an opportunity to explore writings by her contemporaries, and to examine ideas of historical contextualization. 
Week 1: Modes of Contextualization 
  Mrs Dalloway (1925) 
  The Waves (1931) 
The first week will concentrate on two novels and a range of critical texts in order to consider what we mean 
by contextualization. As editorial annotation is one route into contextualization, it will also require you to 
compare and contrast different editorial modes of annotation. 
 
Week 2: Materiality: domestic and urban spaces 
  Night and Day (1919) 
  Mrs Dalloway (1925) 
  The London Scene (1931-32) 
  The Years (1937) 
 
Other writers: 
  Ford (Hueffer), Ford Madox. The Soul of London (also available as part of England and the English). 
  Galsworthy, John. The Man of Property (1906), reprinted in The Forsyte Saga (1922). 
 
Week 3: Philosophy: The Mind and Aesthetics 
  Mrs Dalloway (1925) 
  To the Lighthouse (1927) 
  The Years (1937) 
This week will consider some intellectual contexts for Woolf’s work, with a particular focus on the mind and 
perception: it will include Henri Bergson’s ideas about time and the self, and Roger Fry’s ideas about 
aesthetics. 
 
Week 4: Life-Writing as a genre: bildungsroman and biography 
  The Voyage Out (1915) 
  Jacob’s Room (1922) 
  Orlando (1928) 
  Flush (1933) 
 
Other writers, in order of priority: 
  Strachey, Lytton. Eminent Victorians (1918). 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 137 of 230 
  Nicolson, Harold. Some People (1927).  
  Nicolson, Harold. The Development of English Biography (1927) 
It would be advantageous to be aware of Victorian and early twentieth-century examples of bildungsroman, 
e.g., Dickens’s Great Expectations, George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss, D. H. Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers, James 
Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. 
 
Week 5: Sympathy and unanimism. 
  Mrs Dalloway (1925) 
  The Waves (1931) 
  Between the Acts (1941) 
 
Other writers: 
  Romains, Jules. Death of a Nobody (translation of Mort de quelqu’un) (available as a PDF through the 
Bodleian catalogue (link to Haithi Trust)) (as an example of unanimist writing.) 
  Harrison, Jane. ‘Unanimism: a study of conversion and some contemporary French poets: being a 
paper read before "the Heretics" on November 25, 1912’ (1912) (available as a PDF through the 
Bodleian catalogue). 
 
Week 6: Militarism and Civilization. 
  Mrs Dalloway (1925) 
  Between the Acts (1941) 
  Three Guineas (1938) 
  also reconsider The Years (1937). 
 
Other primary texts: 
  Mary S. Florence, Catherine Marshall, and C. K. Ogden, Militarism versus Feminism (1915). A reprint 
(Virago, 1987) can be found second-hand very cheaply. 
  Bell, Clive. Peace at Once (1915) (to be provided as a PDF). 
  Starr, Mark. Lies and Hate in Education (1929) (extracts to be provided as a PDF). 
 
EDITIONS 
For Woolf’s novels, you should obtain the most recent Oxford World’s Classics editions. In term-time, you 
should also refer to the available editions in the Cambridge Edition, which at present (May 2020) cover Night 
and Day
Mrs. DallowayOrlandoThe WavesThe Years, and Between the ActsJacob’s Room is forthcoming. 
 
SECONDARY READING 
This is a brief list of preparatory secondary reading; fuller lists of secondary material will be provided at the 
start of the term. 
  Sellers, Susan, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Virginia Woolf, 2nd edition (2010). 
  Randall, Bryony, and Jane Goldman, eds. Virginia Woolf in Context (2012). 
  Whitworth, Michael H. Virginia Woolf (Authors in Context) (2005) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 138 of 230 
Modernism and Philosophy 
Dr David Dwan - xxxxx.xxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 

In 1898 W. B. Yeats announced that the artist ‘must be philosophical above everything, even about the arts.’  
Modernists may not have directly followed the advice, but they often lived up to it.  This course studies the 
reasons for this philosophical turn, while also examining an anti-philosophical strand within modernism – and 
arguably within modern philosophy itself.  We shall consider some of the moral and epistemological debates 
that may have influenced modernist writers or might at least enhance our interpretation of their work.  We 
will also consider the ways in which literature often seems to exceed or bewilder a philosophical method.   The 
type of philosophy considered will be fairly catholic, but Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Adorno will be 
recurrent figures.  Writers studied on the course will include Joyce, Lewis, Stein, Stevens, Woolf and Yeats.  
 
Outline 
1.  Introduction 
‘It is self-evident that nothing, concerning art is self-evident anymore, not its inner life, not its relation to the 
world, not even its right to exist.’ (Adorno).  We shall consider this question in an effort to determine how it 
may account for modernism’s philosophical turn.  
Primary Texts: 
  Hegel, ‘Introduction’, Aesthetics, trans. T. M. Knox, 2 vols. (Oxford, 1975), vol. 1, 1-105 (focus on 
Section 7: ‘Historical Deduction’) 
  Theodor Adorno, Aesthetic Theory, trans. Robert Hullot-Kentor (London, 1997), 1-8 
  Marinetti, ‘On The Founding and Manifesto of Futurism’ (1909) 
  Wyndham Lewis ‘Blast 1’ (1914) and ‘Blast 2’ (1915) 
  Tristan Tzara, ‘Dada Manifesto’ (1918) 
Recommended Reading:  
  Roger Pippin, After the Beautiful: Hegel and the Philosophy of Pictorial Modernism (Chicago, 2013) 
o  see too Modernism as a Philosophical Problem (Oxford, 1991) 
  Jürgen Habermas, The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity, trans.  Frederick G. Lawrence (Oxford, 
1990) 
  Peter Bürger, Theory of the Avant-Garde, trans. Michael Shaw (Manchester, 1984) 
 
2. Übermenschen 
‘Nietzsche’s books are full of seductions and sugar-plums [. . .] and have made an Over-man of every vulgarly 
energetic grocer in Europe’ (Wyndham Lewis).  In this class we shall consider Nietzsche’s influence on 
modernism and the extent to which he can be regarded as one of its early theorists or practitioners.  
Primary Texts:  
  Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, ed. Rolf-Peter Horstman and Judith Norman (Cambridge, 
1992); 1-43 
  Friedrich Nietzsche, The On the Genealogy of Morality, ed. Keith Ansell-Pearson (Oxford, 1994), Essays 
I & II 
  Wyndham Lewis, Tarr, ed. Scott Klein (Oxford, 2010) 
  James Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, ed.  Seamus Deane (London, 1992) 
  Mina Loy, ‘Feminist Manifesto’ 
Recommended Reading: 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 139 of 230 
  John Burt Foster, Heirs to Dionysus (Princeton, 1981) 
  Shane Weller, Modernism and Nihilism (London, 2010), chap. 2 
  Scott Klein, The Fictions of James Joyce and Wyndham Lewis: Monsters of Design and Nature 
(Cambridge, 1994) 
  Sam Slote, Joyce’s Nietzschean Ethics (New York, 2013) 
  Anne Fernihough, Freewomen and Supermen: Edwardian Radicals and Literary Modernism (Oxford, 
2013) 
  Jean-Michel Rabaté, The Pathos of Distance: Affects of the Moderns (London, 2016), chap. 3. 
 
3. Ordinariness 
‘Does what is ordinary always make the impression of ordinariness?’ (Wittgenstein). In this session we will 
explore concepts of the ordinary, the everyday, and the pre-theoretical in literature and philosophy. 
Primary Texts:  
  Gertrude Stein, ‘Tender Buttons’ 
  William Carlos Williams, ‘This is Just to Say’, ‘The Red Wheelbarrow’ 
  Wallace Stevens, ‘Of the Surface of Things’, ‘An Ordinary Evening in New Haven’ 
  Martin Heidegger, Being and Time, trans. John Macquarrie and Edward Robinson (Oxford, 1978) 163-
169; 381-423 
  Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations, 3rd ed. (Oxford, 2001), investigation no. 97-137 
Recommended Texts:  
  Toril Moi, Revolution of the Ordinary (Chicago, 2017) 
  Liesl Olson, Modernism and the Ordinary (Oxford, 2009) 
  Bryony Randall, Modernism, Daily Time, and Everyday Life (Cambridge: 2011) 
  Lorraine Sim, The Patterns of Ordinary Experience (Ashgate, 2010) 
 
4.  The Grammar of Doubt 
‘No, no, nothing is proved, nothing is known’ (Woolf – ‘The Mark on the Wall’).  In this session we shall 
examine to what extent Woolf can be regarded as a sceptic about knowledge, while also considering the 
broader role of doubt in her work. 
Primary Texts:  
  Virginia Woolf, ‘The Mark on the Wall,’ To the LighthouseThe Waves 
  Ludwig Wittgenstein, On Certainty, ed. G. E. M. Anscombe and G. H. von Wright (London, 2001) 
  Bertrand Russell, ‘Introduction: On the Value of Scepticism,’ Sceptical Essays (London, 1928, repr. 
2004) 
Recommended Texts
  Ann Banfield, The Phantom Table: Woolf, Fry, Russell and the Epistemology of Modernism 
(Cambridge, 2008) 
  Megan Quigley, Modernist Fiction and Vagueness: Philosophy, Form and Language (Cambridge, 2015), 
chap. 2 
 
5. Subjectivity and Art   
‘Talk to me of originality and I will turn on you with rage’ (Yeats).  In this session we shall consider how Yeats’s 
ideas about subjectivity influence his theory and practice of art.  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 140 of 230 
Primary Texts:  
  Yeats, The Tower (Collection), ‘Blood and the Moon’, ‘Byzantium’, ‘The Statues’.  Friedrich Nietzsche 
On the Genealogy of Morality 
  Martin Heidegger, ‘The Origin of the Work of Art,’ and ‘Letter on Humanism,’ Basic Writings (London, 
2010)  
Recommended Texts:  
  Otto Bohlmann, Yeats and Nietzsche, (New York, 1982) 
  Julian Young, Heidegger’s Philosophy of Art (Cambridge, 2001) 
  H. L. Dreyfus, ‘Heidegger's Ontology of Art,” in H. L. Dreyfus and M. A. Wrathall (eds.), A Companion to 
Heidegger (Oxford, 2005) 
 
6.  Negativity 
‘All contemplation can do is no more than patiently trace the ambiguity of melancholy in ever new 
configurations’ (Adorno).  This week we will focus on Adorno, considering to what extent he articulates a 
coherent or satisfying philosophy of modernism. 
Primary Texts: 
  Adorno and Horkheimer, Dialectic of the Enlightenment, trans. John Cumming (London, 1973), chap. 1 
  Minima MoraliaReflections on a Damaged Life, trans. J. E. N. Jephcott (London: 2005) 
  Adorno, ‘Trying to Understand Endgame’, New German Critique, 26 (1982): 119-150 
Recommended Texts
  Jürgen Habermas, The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity, chap. 5 
  Raymond Geuss, Outside Ethics (Princeton, 2005), chap. 10 
  Geuss, ‘Suffering and Knowledge in Adorno,’ Constellations, 12.1 (2005), 3-20 
 
Some General Reading 
  Theodor Adorno, Aesthetic Theory, trans. Robert Hullot-Kentor (Athlone, 1997)  
  Ann Banfield, The Phantom Table: Woolf, Fry, Russell and the Epistemology of Modernism (Cambridge, 
2008) 
  Peter Bürger, Theory of the Avant-Garde, trans. Michael Shaw (Manchester, 1984) 
  Arthur Danto, The Philosophical Disenfranchisement of Art (New York, 1986) 
  Richard Eldridge (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Literature and Philosophy (Oxford, 2009) 
  Ana Falcato and Antonio Cardiello, Philosophy in the Condition of Modernism (London, 2018) 
  Jürgen Habermas, The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity, trans.  Frederick G. Lawrence (Oxford, 
1990)  
  Garry Hagberg and Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature (Oxford, 2015) 
  Henri Lefebvre, Critique of Everyday Life. Vol. 3: From Modernity to Modernism (London, 2008). 
  Anat Matar, Modernism and the Language of Philosophy (London, 2006). 
  Alexander Nehamas, Only a Promise of Happiness: The Place of Beauty in the World (Princeton, 2007) 
  Martha Nussbaum, Love’s Knowledge: Essays on Philosophy and Literature (Oxford, 1992) 
  Peter Osborne, ‘Modernism and Philosophy’ in The Oxford Handbook of Modernisms (Oxford: Oxford 
University Press, 2012). 
  Roger Pippin, After the Beautiful: Hegel and the Philosophy of Pictorial Modernism (Chicago, 2013) 
  Roger Pippin, Modernism as a Philosophical Problem (Oxford, 1991)  
  Megan Quigley, Modernist Fiction and Vagueness: Philosophy, Form and Language (Cambridge, 2015) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 141 of 230 
  Jean-Michel Rabaté, The Pathos of Distance: Affects of the Moderns (London, 2016) 
  Philip Weinstein, Unknowing: The Work of Modernist Fiction (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005). 
  Shane Weller, Modernism and Nihilism (London, 2010)  
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 142 of 230 
Sea Voyages, Literature and Modernity 
Professor Santanu Das – xxxxxxx.xxx@xxxxxxxxx.xx.xx.xx  

Overview 
What happens to the most ancient of themes, going back to the Odyssey and 'The Seafarer', in the age of 
technological modernity and imperial expansion? The maiden transatlantic voyage of the Great Western in 
1837 is often said to mark the beginning of the end of a whole way of feeling and writing about the sea, as we 
move from a world held together by wooden hulls, wind-power and enterprise to steam-ships and a global 
maritime empire. How does literature register these changes? Two broad questions will guide us through this 
course: can a close engagement with maritime literature, alongside archival, historical and visual material, 
enable us to recover the experiential and emotional world of sea-voyages? Second, how does a view from the 
deck, rather than from land, alter our understanding of some of the most fraught issues within modernist 
writing – from processes of perception and consciousness to empire, race and sexuality – as well as the 
workings of literary form?   
The course starts at the close of the nineteenth century, with the shift from sail to steam. Instead of maritime 
fiction coming to an end, as is often thought, we will investigate how writers such as Conrad, Melville, Woolf 
and Hanley creatively represent this shift through the worlds of merchant marine, navy, cargo and passenger 
ships, as the voyage narrative undergoes a radical transformation. What distinguishes their sea-worlds is a new 
kind of sensuous aesthetics where the processes of perception are shaped by complex political, 
epistemological and formal questions, ranging from those about the social conditions of modernity to doubt 
and serendipity to meditations on the very nature of representation. In the first four weeks, we will explore 
how these writers at once inherit and transform the 'poetics' of the sea-voyage: the synaesthesia of seafaring 
evolves into a complex phenomenology as the most contentious issues of the twentieth century – race, 
imperialism, labour, sexuality - are sifted across what Freud called the 'grey of theory' to the 'green of 
experience'. In the final two seminars, we will examine how two contemporary writers, the British-Guyanese 
writer Fred D'Aguiar and the Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh, in turn, engage with some of these issues and 
works as they delve into colonial histories, from slave transportation to opium trade; and as they recreate the 
minutiae of past voyages, they present us with the antimatter of modernism - 19th-century realism. 
Victorian, American, modernist and postcolonial studies: ship narratives move across these fields. While we 
will engage with the metaphoric dimensions of the ship, from Foucault's 'heterotopia par excellence' to 
Gilroy's image of 'ships in motion' as well as the ‘maritime turn’ in humanities, the focus in the seminars will be 
on the voyages themselves. Our ships accommodate a disparate crowd: lascars, stowaways, doubles, 
imperialists, rajas, syphilitic boys, hapless slaves, colonial intellectuals, blond sailor-gods, and the 'international 
bastards' that empire breeds. While we will mainly examine Anglophone novels, in conjunction with historical 
and theoretical material, we will also refer to poetry and short stories, as well as to images, songs, archival 
recordings, and films. You may choose to undertake further research in maritime museums, in London, 
Liverpool and elsewhere, and delve into the flotsam and jetsam of archival debris – log-books, diagrams, 
diaries, memoirs, artefacts – to enrich your understanding.  
Please find below a preliminary reading list and course programme; a fuller programme, with additional details 
and bibliography for each seminar, will follow. Handouts, links to, and/or PDFs of the secondary reading will be 
provided in advance of the class. There may be some small changes to the critical materials listed.  You are 
strongly encouraged to read the primary texts and the couple of critical works, listed under Essential Readings, 
before you come to the first seminar. 
Seminar 1 Introduction - Modernity, Perception and Strangeness 
Primary Texts:  
  Joseph Conrad, ‘The Secret Sharer’ (1910) and ‘The Nigger of the “Narcissus”’ [a title that is 
problematic and distressing, a point we will address] (1897); Extracts from The Mirror of the Sea 
(1906). 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 143 of 230 
Criticism:  
  Conrad, ‘Preface to “Narcissus” and selection of letters 
  Margaret Cohen, ‘Chronotope of the Sea’ in Franco Moretti ed. The Novel 
  extract from Cesarino, Modernity at Sea
[Please use the Norton Critical Edition for the Narcissus. Read as much of the background material as you can, 
particularly the essays by Ian Watt on the Preface and by Gerald Morgan on Conrad’s connection with the 
actual ship. We shall also touch upon the issue of race and Conrad: following Achebe’s landmark essay, see 
Cedric Watts, ‘A Bloody Racist': About Achebe's View of Conrad’, The Yearbook of English Studies, Vol. 13, 
(1983), Miriam Marcus, ‘Writing, Race, And Illness In "The Nigger Of The "Narcissus", The Conradian, Vol. 23, 
No. 1 (Spring 1998), and Peter Macdonald,  British Literary Culture and Publishing Practice, 1880–1914 (1997)]. 
 
Seminar 2 Articulate Flesh: Desire, Violence and Sacrifice 
Primary Texts:  
  Herman Melville, Billy Budd; extracts from the libretto by E.M .Forster and Eric Crozier 
  Forster, ‘The Other Boat’ 
  Viewings of the opera Billy Budd (Benjamin Britten) and of clips from Fassbinder, Querelle (1982) and 
Claire Dennis, Beau Travail (1999) will be organised at All Souls 
Criticism: 
  Foucault, ‘Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias’ 
  Barbara Johnson, ‘Melville’s Fist’: The Execution of Billy Budd’, Studies in Romanticism, Vol. 18, No. 4, 
(Winter, 1979), pp. 567-599 
  extracts from Eve Kosofsky Sedwick, Epistemology of the Closet 
 
Seminar 3 ‘Shrinking Island’?: Empire, Exhilaration, Critique  
Primary Texts: 
  Virginia Woolf, The Voyage Out 
  extracts from Robert Louis Stevenson, The Amateur Emigrant and Alfred Stieglitz, The Steerage 
(photograph) 
  selections from the writings of Solomon Plaatje and Rabindranath Tagore on their voyages to Europe 
Criticism: 
  extracts from Leonard Woolf, Empire and Commerce in Africa, Edward Said, Culture and Imperialism 
and Jane Marcus, Hearts of Darkness. 
 
Seminar 4 Death Ships: Labour, Avant-Garde Realism and Interwar Maritime Fiction 
Primary Texts:  
  James Hanley, Boy; extracts from B. Traven, The Death Ship: The Story of an American Sailor (1934) 
Criticism: 
  Anthony Burgess, ‘Introduction’ to the Oneworld edition of Boy 
  Harris Feinsod, ‘Death Ships: The Cruel Transformation of Interwar Maritime Fiction’, 
Modernism/Modernity, August 2018, Vol. 3:3 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 144 of 230 
Seminar 5 – ‘The Sea is History’: Reimagining Slave Transport 
Primary Texts: 
  Fred D'Aguiar, Feeding the Ghosts 
  extracts from The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano (1789 
  NourbeSe Philip, Zong! 
  Turner, ‘The Slave Ship’ 
Criticism:  
  Anita Rupprecht, ‘A Limited Sort of Property: History, Memory and the Slave Ship Zong". Slavery & 
Abolition, 29 (2): 265–277 
  Joan Dayan, ‘Paul Gilroy’s Slaves, Ships and Routes: The Middle Passage as Metaphor’, Research in 
African Literatures, Vol. 27, No. 4 (Winter, 1996), pp. 7-14   
  [You may also want to read James Walvin, The Zong: A Massacre, the Law and the End of Slavery 
(2011)] 
 
Seminar 6  ‘English Vinglish’: Afloat on Opium 
Primary Text 
  Amitav Ghosh, Sea of Poppies 
  selection of archival material from the National Maritime Museum 
  audio-recordings of lascars from the Humboldt Sound Archives.  
Criticism: 
  Extracts from Rozina Visram, Ayahs, Lascars and Princes: Indians in Britain, 1700–1947 and Hobson-
Jobson 
  ‘Actually Existing Cosmopolitanism’ and ‘Mixed Feelings’ from Cosmopolitics: Thinking and Feeling 
Beyond the Nation. 
 
Essential Reading  
Primary Texts (in order of the programme): 
  Joseph Conrad, The Nigger of the ‘Narcissus’ ed. Robert Kimbrough (Norton Critical Edition, 1979) 
o  The Secret Sharer and Other Stories ed. John Peters (Norton Critical Edition, 2015) 
o  The Mirror of the Sea (1906) (any edition) 
  Herman Melville, Billy Budd in Melville’s Short Novels ed. Dan McCall (Norton Critical Edition, 2002) 
o  Benito Cereno (in the above edition) 
o  Moby Dick (any edition)  
  Virginia Woolf, The Voyage Out ed. Jane Wheare (Penguin, 1992) 
o  To the Lighthouse (any edition) 
  James Hanley, The Boy, with an introduction by William Burroughs (Oneworld Classics, 2007) 
  Bruno (?) Traven, The Death Ship (1934, Trans.) (any edition)   
 
  Fred D'Aguiar, Feeding the Ghosts (Granta, 2014) 
  Setaey Adamu Boateng and M. NourbeSe Philip, Zong! (2011) 
  The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African. ... Olaudah 
Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa (1789) (https://www.gutenberg.org/files/15399/15399-h/15399-h.htm) 
  Amitav Ghosh, Sea of Poppies (John Murray, 2009) 
  Amitav Ghosh, The River of Smoke (2012) and Flood of Fire (2016)] [Optional but strongly 
recommended]  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 145 of 230 
  Robert Louis Stevenson, The Amateur Emigrant (1895) (any edition) [Optional but strongly 
recommended]  
  Tony Tanner (ed.), The Oxford Book of Sea Stories (1994) [Optional but strongly recommended]  
  Jonathan Raban (ed.), The Oxford Book of the Sea (1993)  
 
Criticism 
  John Mack, The Sea: A Cultural History (2011), particularly Chapter 2 (‘Concepts of the Seas’), Chapter 
3 (‘Navigation and the Arts of Performance’) and Chapter 4 (‘Ships as Societies’) 
  Margaret Cohen, The Novel and the Sea (2013), especially the Introduction (‘Seafaring Odysseus’), 
Chapter 4 Sea Fiction in the Nineteenth Century: Patriots, Pirates and Supermen’) and Chapter 5 (‘Sea 
Fiction Beyond the Seas’) 
 
Further Reading (to be supplemented with primary texts as well as works on individual authors nearer the 
time) 
  Aldersey-Williams, Hugh, Tide: The Science and Lore of the Greatest Force on Earth (2017)  
  Bakhtin, M.M., ‘The Forms of Time and Chronotropes in the Novel’ in Narrative Dynamics ed. Brian 
Richardson (2002) 
  Balachandran, Gopalan, Globalizing Labour? Indian Seafarers and World Shipping, c. 1870–
1945 (2012) 
  Bolster, W. Jeffrey, Black Jacks: African American Seamen in the Age of Sail (1997) 
  Boehmer, Elleke, Indian Arrivals 1870-1915: Networks of British Empire (2015) 
  Bristowe, Joseph, Empire Boys: Adventures in a Man's World (1991) 
  Carson, Rachel, The Sea Around Us (1951) 
  Casarino, Cesare, Modernity at Sea. Melville, Marx, Conrad in Crisis (2002) 
  Costello, Ray, Black Salt: Seafarers of African Descent on British Ships (2012) 
  Danius, Sara, The Senses of Modernism (2002) 
  Das, Nandini and Tim Youngs (ed.), The Cambridge History of Travel Writing (2019) 
  dwards, Philip, The Story of the Voyage: Sea-narratives in Eighteenth-century England (2008) 
  Fouke, Robert, The Sea Voyage Narrative (1997) 
  Fordham, John, James Hanley: Modernism and the Working Class (2002)  
  Franco, Jean, Cruel Modernity (2013) 
  Gillis, J.R., The human Shore: Seacoasts in History (2012)  
  Gilroy, Paul, The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness (1993) 
  Hoare Philip, The Sea Inside (2013) 
  Jasanoff, Maya R., The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World (2017) 
  Macdonald, Peter, British Literary Culture and Publishing Practice, 1880–1914 (1997) 
  Marcus, Jane, Hearts of Darkness: White Women Write Race (2004)  
  Klein, Bernhard (ed.), Fictions of the Sea: Critical Perspectives on the Ocean in British Literature and 
Culture (2002) 
  Lamb, Jonathan, Preserving the Self in South Seas, 1680-1840 (2011) 
  Levenson, Michael (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Modernism (2011) 
  Lukacs, George, The Theory of the Novel: A Historico-philosophical Essay on the Forms of Great Epic 
Literature (1962) 
  Mathieson, Charlotte, Sea Narratives: Cultural Responses to the Sea, 1600–Present (2016
  Matz Jesse, Literary Impressionism and Modernist Aesthetics (2001) 
  Mentz, Steve, Martha Elena Rojas (ed.), The Sea and Nineteenth-Century Anglophone Literary Culture 
(2016) 
  McClintock, Anne, Imperial Leather: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest (1995) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 146 of 230 
  Miles Taylor ed. The Victorian Empire and Britain's Maritime World, 1837-1901 (2013).  
  Miller, P.N., The Sea: Thalassography and Historiography (2013) 
  Nicholls, Peter and Laura Marcus (ed.), The Cambridge History of Twentieth-century Literature (2012) 
   Peck, John, Maritime Fiction: Sailors and the Sea in British and American Novels, 1719-1917 (2001) 
  Riding C and Johns, R., Turner and the Sea (2013) 
  Said, Edward, Culture and Imperialism (1994) 
  Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky Epistemology of the Closet (1990)  
  Sekula, Allan, Fish Story (1995)  
  Stanley, Jo, and Paul Baker, Hello Sailor! The hidden history of gay life at sea: Gay Life for 
Seamen Paperback (2003) 
  Thomas, Nicholas In OceaniaVisionsArtefacts, Histories (1997) 
  Walvin, James, The Zong: A Massacre, the Law and the End of Slavery (2011) 
  Watt, Ian, The Rise of the Novel (2000 [1957]) 
  Watt, Ian, Conrad in the Nineteenth Century (1979) 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 147 of 230 
Prison Writing & The Literary World 
Dr Michelle Kelly - xxxxxxxx.xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 

The scale of mass incarcerations that characterized the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the willingness of 
states to imprison political opponents, and the new prominence within the literary field of forms of testimony 
and life writing, have together produced a body of writing that is both highly attentive to the experience of 
incarceration and to its power as a form of political writing. At the same time, the prisoner of conscience, 
especially the imprisoned writer, acquired increasing moral authority in the global public sphere, becoming a 
foundational figure within human rights discourse, while literacy, writing, and cultural programmes have 
become part of the prison’s rehabilitative function in some parts of the world. 
This course will focus on writing representing or produced under conditions of incarceration in the later 
twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Incorporating writing from locations like newly independent African 
states, the US, the UK, Ireland, and South Africa, the course aims to map prison writing as a distinctive form, 
shaped both materially and formally by the conditions in which it was created, but nonetheless integral to 
broader patterns of literary and cultural production in the later twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The 
selection of texts ranges across key historical moments (the Cold War, decolonization, the war on terror), and 
a wide range of locations, both core and peripheral, and enjoy varying degrees of global circulation. In this 
way, the course aims to interrogate the extent to which prison writing is a genre of world literature, and to 
consider its potential to reconfigure the coordinates of the literary world. As the course progresses, we will 
test the appropriateness of particular critical and theoretical frameworks to this distinctive form of writing. 
How does prison writing fit within the field of postcolonial literature, or the various paradigms of world 
literature? To what extent might it challenge some of these models? What do examples of prison writing tell 
us about the relationship between the writer and the state? Is prison writing a form of resistance literature, as 
Barbara Harlow describes it, or is it more appropriately considered within the sphere of the biopolitical? 
Drawing on legal and archival materials we will consider the circulation of prison writing within the literary 
field, and in the case of texts by imprisoned writers, their relationship to the writers’ reputation and oeuvre. 
The discussion will critically consider the circulation and prominence achieved by some of these texts, reading 
them in relation to forms like autobiography and confession, as well as legal testimony. But it will also take 
seriously the privileged position granted to writing and reading within this body of work.  
 
Please read as many of the primary texts as possible before the start of term. Seminar preparation will also 
involve theoretical and critical readings which will be circulated.  
 
Week 1 Fictions of Incarceration 
  Samuel Beckett, Catastrophe (1982) 
  Alan Sillitoe, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1959) 
  Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange (1962) 
  Steve McQueen (Dir), Hunger (2008) (Screening will be arranged at the start of term) 
 
Week 2 The Writer and the Postcolonial State 
  Wole Soyinka, And the Man Died (1972) 
  Nawal el Saadawi, Memoir from the Women’s Prison (1983, trans. 1984) 
  Ngugi wa Thiongo, Detained (1981) 
 
Week 3 Race and Incarceration 
  Malcolm X, The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 148 of 230 
  Assata Shakur, Autobiography (1988) 
  Reginald Dwayne Betts, A Question of Freedom: A Memoir of Learning, Survival, and Coming of Age in 
Prison (2009) 
  Colson Whitehead, The Nickel Boys (2019) 
 
Week 4 Apartheid South Africa  
  Ruth First, 117 Days (1965) 
  Neville Alexander, Robben Island Prison Dossier 1964-1974 (1994) 
  Breyten Breytenbach, True Confessions of an Albino Terrorist (1984) 
  Athol Fugard, The Island (1974) 
 
Week 5 Detention in the Era of the War on Terror 
  Mohamedou Ould Slahi, Guantanamo Diary (2015) See also: http://guantanamodiary.com/ 
  Behrouz Boochani, No Friend But the Mountains: The True Story of an Illegally Imprisoned Refugee 
(2019) 
  Pawel Pawlikowski (Dir), Last Resort (2000) 
 
Week 6 Prison Writing and Institutions 
  Paula Meehan, Cell (2000) 
  Erwin James, A Life Inside (2003) 
  *Peter Benenson, ed. Persecution 1961 (1961) 
  *Siobhan Dowd, ed. This Prison Where I Live: PEN Amthology of Imprisoned Writers 
  *The PEN Handbook for Writers in Prison  
   
*Extracts from Benenson, Dowd, the PEN Handbook and other materials will be circulated. 
 
Background reading: 
  Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colourblindness. New York: 
The New Press, 2012.  
  Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. Trans. Alan Sheridan. New York: 
Vintage, 1995. 
  Barbara Harlow, Barred: Women, Writing, and Political Detention. Hanover and London: Wesleyan 
University Press, 1992. 
  Graeme Harper, ed. Colonial and Postcolonial Incarceration. London: Continuum, 2001.  
  David Lloyd, Irish Culture and Colonial Modernity 1800-2000: The Transformation of Oral Space
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.  
  Brenna Munro, South Africa and the Dream of Love to Come: Queer Sexuality and the Struggle for 
Freedom. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012.  
  Daniel Roux, ‘Writing the Prison.’ In Cambridge History of South African Literature, edited by Attwell 
and Attridge. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012, 545-563. 
  Caleb Smith, The Prison and the American Imagination. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009. 
  Jonny Steinberg, The Number (2004) 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 149 of 230 
Literatures of Empire and Nation 1880-1935  
Dr Graham Riach - xxxxxx.xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
Ranging from R.L. Stevenson’s indictment of colonialism’s ‘world-enveloping dishonesty’, to Mulk Raj Anand’s 
divided responses to Bloomsbury and to Gandhi, this course investigates the literary and cultural perceptions, 
misapprehensions, and evasions that accompanied empire, and the literary forms that negotiated it. The 
course examines the literary antecedents of what we now call postcolonial writing, and some of the textual 
instances upon which anti-colonial theories of resistance have been founded. Special attention will be given to 
the intimations of modernist writing in the authors of empire and to the disseminations of modernism in 
‘national’ writing. Where possible, the conjunctions of empire writing with other discourses of the time – 
travel, New Woman, degeneration, social improvement, Freud, masculinity – will be traced. Each week we will 
consider one or two of the works of the key writers of empire and nation in the period, alongside critical and 
literary writing relating to them. 
 
Course Outline 
Week 1 - Imperial Pastoral 
Primary Reading 
  Olive Schreiner, The Story of an African Farm (1883) 
Critical Reading 
  JM Coetzee, ‘Farm Novel and “Plaasroman” in South Africa’, English in Africa, 13, 2 (1986), pp. 1-19 
  Anne McClintock, ‘Introduction’ in Imperial Leather: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Colonial 
Contest (1995) 
  Jed Esty, ‘The Story of an African Farm and the Ghost of Goethe’, Victorian Studies, 49, 3 (2007), pp. 
407-430 
 
Additional Reading 
  Jed Esty, Unseasonable Youth: Modernism, Colonialism, and the Fiction of Development (2012) 
  Edward W. Said, Culture and Imperialism (1993) 
 
Week 2 - The View from the Beach 
Primary Reading 
  R. L. Stevenson, South Sea Tales (1891, 1892), especially ‘The Beach of Falesa’ 
  Katherine Mansfield, Collected Short Stories, Including: ‘Prelude’, ‘At the Bay’, ‘The Garden Party’, ie. 
her longer short fiction 
Critical Reading 
  Paul Carter, ‘Introduction’ in The Road to Botany Bay 
  Rod Edmond, ‘Introduction’ in Representing the South Pacific 
  Michelle Keown, ‘Introduction’ in Pacific Islands Writing 
  Pamila Gupta and Isabel Hofmeyr (eds), ‘Introduction’ in Eyes Across the Water 
 
Week 3 - Imperial Gothic 
Primary Reading 
  Richard Marsh, The Beetle (1897) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 150 of 230 
  H.G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896) 
Critical Reading  
Read a selection from: 
  Stephen D. Arata, ‘The Occidental Tourist: “Dracula” and the Anxiety of Reverse Colonization’, 
Victorian Studies 33.4 (1990), 621-45  
  Patrick Brantlinger, The Rule of Darkness (1989) (chapter 8: Imperial Gothic) 
  Christine Ferguson, Language, Science and Popular Fiction in the Victorian Fin-de-Siècle: The Brutal 
Tongue (2006) (Introduction and Chapter 4) 
  Joseph McLaughlin, Writing the Urban Jungle (2000) (chapters 1-3 on Doyle) 
  Andrew Smith and William Hughes (eds), Empire and the Gothic (2003) 
  Tim Youngs, Beastly Journeys: Travel and Transformation at the fin de siècle (2013)  
 
Week 4 - Adventure Tales 
Primary Reading 
  Rudyard Kipling, Kim (1901) 
  Robert Baden-Powell, Scouting for Boys (1908) 
  If you wish: J.M Barrie, Peter Pan (1904) and/or Peter Pan and Wendy (1911) 
 
Critical Reading 
Read a selection from: 
  Patrick Brantlinger, Victorian Literature and Postcolonial Studies 
  Joe Bristow, Empire Boys 
  Laura Chrisman, Rereading the Imperial Romance 
  Don Randall, Kipling’s Imperial Boy, (ch 5 ‘Ethnography and the hybrid boy’) 
  John Tosh, Manliness and Masculinity in Nineteenth Century Literature 
 
Week 5 - Empire’s Certainties and Uncertainties  
Primary Reading 
  Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (1899) and ‘Youth’ (1898/1902) 
 
Critical Reading 
Read a selection from: 
  Chinua Achebe, ‘An Image of Africa’, Norton Anthology 7th edn 
  Robert Fraser, Victorian Quest Romance 
  Christopher GoGwilt, The Passage of Literature: Genealogies of Modernism in Conrad etc. 
  Benita Parry, Conrad and Imperialism 
  Charlie Wesley, ‘Inscriptions of Resistance in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness’, Journal of Modern 
Literature 38.3 (2015), 20-37 
 
Week 6 - National stirrings 
Primary Reading 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 151 of 230 
  Claude McKay, Banjo (1929) 
  Mulk Raj Anand, Untouchable (1935) 
  Toru Dutt, ‘The Lotus’ (1870s) 
 
Critical Reading 
Read a selection from 
  Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities (1991) 
  Elleke Boehmer, ‘The Stirrings of New Nationalism’ in Colonial and Postcolonial Literature 
  ––– Empire, the National and the Postcolonial: Resistance in Interaction (2002) 
  Amilcar Cabral, ‘National Liberation and Culture’, in Colonial Discourse and Post-Colonial Theory: A 
Reader, Patrick Williams and Laura Chrisman eds. 
  Partha Chatterjee, Nationalist Thought and the Colonial World: A Derivative Discourse? 
  Frantz Fanon, ‘On National Culture’, in Colonial Discourse and Post-Colonial Theory: A Reader, Patrick 
Williams and Laura Chrisman eds. 
 
Selected further reading: 
  Amar Acheraiou, Rethinking Postcolonialism (2008) 
  Ian Baucom, Out of Place: Englishness, Empire, and the Locations of Identity (1999) 
  *Elleke Boehmer (ed.), Empire Writing (1998) 
  --- Colonial and Postcolonial Literature: Migrant Metaphors (1995/2005) 
  *--- Empire, the National and the Postcolonial: Resistance in Interaction (2002) 
  Boehmer and Steven Matthews, ‘Modernism and Colonialism’, The Cambridge  
  Companion to Modernism, ed. Michael Levenson (2011) 
  Deepika Bahri, Native Intelligence, 2003 
  *Howard J. Booth and Nigel Rigby (eds), Modernism and Empire: Writing and British  
  Coloniality, 1890-1940 (2000) 
  Patrick Brantlinger, The Rule of Darkness: British Literature and Imperialism, 1830-1914 (1988) 
  David Huddart, Postcolonial Theory and Autobiography (2008) 
  Amit Chaudhuri, D.H.Lawrence and ‘Difference’ (2003) 
  Peter Childs, Modernism and the Post-Colonial (2007) 
  Laura Chrisman, Postcolonial Contraventions: Cultural Readings of Race, Imperialism and 
Transnationalism (2003) 
  *--- Re-reading the Imperial Romance (2000) 
  W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk (1903/2003) 
  *Jed Esty, Unseasonable Youth: Modernism, Colonialism, and the Fiction of Development (2012) 
  Ben Etherington, Literary Primitivism (2017) 
  Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, White Masks, trans. Charles Lam Markmann (1986) 
  Declan Kiberd, Inventing Ireland (1995) 
  Henry Louis Gates (ed.), ‘Race’, Writing and Difference (1986) 
  Simon Gikandi, Maps of Englishness (1996) 
  Paul Gilroy, After Empire (2004) 
  Abdul JanMohamed and David Lloyd (eds), The Nature and Context of Minority Discourses (1990)  
  Gail Ching-Liang Low, White Skins, Black Masks: Representation and Colonialism (1996)    
  *Anne McClintock, Imperial Leather: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest (1995) 
  Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Social Postmodernism: Beyond Identity Politics, ed. Linda Nicholson (1995) 
  Ashis Nandy, The Intimate Enemy (1983) 
  Benita Parry, Postcolonial Studies: A Materialist Critique (2004) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 152 of 230 
  *Mary Louise Pratt, Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturation (1992) 
  Jahan Ramazani, The Hybrid Muse (2001) 
  Sangeeta Ray, En-gendering India (2000) 
  Edward W. Said, Culture and Imperialism (1993) 
  Ella Shohat and Robert Stam, Unthinking Eurocentrism: Multiculturalism and the Media (1994) 
  Gayatri Spivak, “Three Women’s Texts and a Critique of Imperialism,” Critical Inquiry 12:1 (1985): 243-
61 
  --, In Other Worlds: Essays in Cultural Politics (1988) 
  --, The Postcolonial Critic: Interviews, Strategies, Dialogues (1990) 
  *Sara Suleri, The Rhetoric of English India (1992) 
  John Thieme, Postcolonial Con-Texts: Writing Back to the Canon (2001) 
  Gauri Viswanathan, Masks of Conquest: Literary Study and British Rule in India (1989) 
  Robert Young, Colonial Desire: Hybridity in Theory, Culture, and Race (1995) 
  --- The Idea of English Ethnicity (2008) 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 153 of 230 
American Fiction Now 
Dr Michael Kalisch – xxxxxxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx  

In this course, we will contextualise a range of 21st-century novels and short stories within a longer literary 
genealogy, paying particular attention to questions of periodisation ‘after postmodernism’. Tracking the routes 
taken by recent American writing beyond the borders of the United States – whether to Europe, Africa, or the 
Middle East – we will consider how contemporary fiction contests the boundaries of the nation’s literature. 
We will focus on how the contemporary novel engages with history, from recent events such as the 2008 
financial crisis, to the long legacy of slavery. Secondary reading will bring to the fore a range of key critical 
debates in contemporary American studies, including theories of affect, critique, and temporality.  
1) Beginning with Postmodernism 
  Jonathan Franzen, The Corrections (2001) 
  Jennifer Egan, A Visit from the Goon Squad (2010) 
 
2) Voices 
  Marilynne Robinson, Gilead (2004) 
  George Saunders, Lincoln in the Bardo (2017) 
 
3) Arriving 
  Dinaw Mengestu, How to Read the Air (2010) 
  Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah (2013) 
 
4) Boomers 
  Dana Spiotta, Eat the Document (2006) 
  Ben Lerner, The Topeka School (2019) 
 
5) Homeland  
  Nicole Krauss, Forest Dark (2017) 
  Michael Chabon, Moonglow (2016) 
 
6) Short Cuts 
  Lydia Davis, Can’t and Won’t (2014) 
  Diane Williams, Fine, Fine, Fine, Fine (2016) 
Wider Reading  
  Lauren Berlant, Cruel Optimism (2011) 
  Kasia Boddy, The American Short Story Since 1950 (2010) 
  Peter Boxall, Twenty-First-Century Fiction: A Critical Introduction (2013) 
  Nicholas Dames, “The Theory Generation”, n+1 (October 2012)  
  Andrew Hoberek, “Introduction: After Postmodernism”, Twentieth Century Literature, 53:3 (Fall 2007)  
  Amy Hungerford, Making Literature Now (Stanford: Stanford UP, 2016) 
  Theodore Martin, Contemporary Drift: Genre, Historicism, and the Problem of the Present (2017) 
  Rachel Greenwald Smith (ed.), American Literature in Transition, 2000–2010 (2017) 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 154 of 230 
Modern Irish-American Writing and the Transatlantic 
Dr Tara Stubbs – xxxx.xxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 

This course uses Irish-American Writing as a springboard to interrogate wider questions about hyphenated 
cultures, transatlantic literature and theories of criticism and reading. In so doing, it will discuss a range of 
texts (poetry, prose and drama) from c.1900 to the present day alongside provocative and pertinent critical 
arguments. It will also scrutinise the value of considering literature and theory from the perspective of 
nationality and trans-nationality. 
Handouts, links to, and/or PDFs of the secondary reading will be provided in advance of the class. 
Students will be encouraged to bring along examples from primary texts as part of their presentations. 
Week 1: What is ‘Irish-American Writing’? 
  Brian Caraher and Robert Mahony, eds., Ireland and Transatlantic Poetics: Essays in Honor of Denis 
Donoghue (New Jersey: Rosemont, 2007). Preface: ‘Speaking of Donoghue: A Preface for Transatlantic 
Poetics’, Brian Caraher, pp.9-19. Photocopy/ PDF. 
  Charles Fanning, ed., New Perspectives on the Irish Diaspora (Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern 
Illinois University Press), 2000. Selections; photocopy/ PDF. 
  Ellen McWilliams and Bronwen Walter, ‘Introduction: New perspectives on women and the Irish 
diaspora’, Irish Studies Review 21.1 (2013), pp.1-5. Online access through SOLO. 
  Tara Stubbs, ‘“Beyond the lines of poetry”: Ethnic Traditions and Imaginative Interventions in Irish-
 
American Poetics’, Oxford Handbooks Online (OUP, February 2017): 
http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199935338.001.0001/oxfo
rdhb-9780199935338-e-151 

 
Week 2: Narratives of Crossing 
  James Joyce, ‘Eveline’, from Dubliners (1914; Oxford World Classics edition preferred) 
  Brian Friel, Philadelphia Here I Come! (London: Faber, 1965) 
  Colm Toíbín, Brooklyn (2009) 
 
Week 3: Irish-American Poetry 
  Michael Donahy, selections from Dances Learned Last Night: Poems , 1975-1995 
  Lorna Goodison, ‘Country, Sligoville’, from Turn Thanks: Poems (Champaign, Illinois: University of 
Illinois Press, 1999). 
  Marianne Moore, ‘Sojourn in the Whale’ and ‘Spenser’s Ireland’, from Complete Poems 
  Wallace Stevens, ‘The Irish Cliffs of Moher’ and ‘Our Stars Come from Ireland’, from Collected Poems 
  Daniel Tobin, Awake in America: On Irish American Poetry (Notre Dame, Indiana: University Notre 
Dame Press, 2011). Preface; and essay, ‘The Westwardness of Everything: Irishness in the Poetry of 
Wallace Stevens’, pp.87-112. Photocopy/ PDF. 
  --, ‘Irish American Poetry and the Question of Tradition’, New Hibernia Review Vol.3(4), (Winter 
1999): 143-154. Online access through SOLO. 
 
Week 4: America Looks to Ireland 
  John Berryman, ‘One Answer to a Question: Changes’ (1965), reprinted in The Freedom of the Poet 
(New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1976), p.323. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 155 of 230 
  Elizabeth Bishop, ‘Efforts of affection: a memoir of Marianne Moore’ (c.1969), Bishop: Poems, Prose, 
and Letters (New York: Library of America, 2008), pp.471–499. 
  Rebecca Palen, “Real Journeys of the Imagination: Carson McCullers and Ireland.” IJAS online, issue 3: 
http://ijas.iaas.ie/?issue=issue-3. 
  John Steinbeck, ‘I go back to Ireland’, first published in Collier’s, 31 January 1953, reprinted in Of Men 
and their Making: The Selected Non-fiction of John Steinbeck, ed. Susan Shillingshaw and Jackson J. 
Benson (London: Allen Lane/Penguin, 2002), pp.262–269. 
   
Week 5: Ireland Looks to America 
  Allen, Michael, ‘The parish and the dream: Heaney and America, 1969–1987’, The Southern Review
31.3 (summer 1995): 726–38. Online access through SOLO. 
  Fran Brearton and Eamonn Hughes, eds.,, Last Before America: Irish and American Writing (Belfast: 
Blackstaff, 2001). Introduction. Photocopy/ PDF. 
  Elmer Kennedy-Andrews, Northern Irish Poetry: The American Connection (Basingstoke: Palgrave 
Macmillan, 2014). Chapter 1: ‘Transnational Poetics’, pp.1-26. Photocopy/ PDF.  
  Edna Longley, ‘Irish Bards and American Audiences’, Poetry and Posterity (Newcastle upon Tyne: 
Bloodaxe, 2000), pp.235–258. Photocopy/ PDF. 
 
Week 6: Race 
  Noel Ignatiev, How the Irish Became White (New York and London: Routledge, 1995). Selections from 
Introduction and Chapter 1. Photocopy/ PDF. 
  James Weldon Johnson, ed., The Book of American Negro Poetry (New York: Hartcourt, Brace & Co., 
1922). Preface: available freely online and through Gutenberg online library. 
  Sinéad Moynihan, Other People’s Diasporas: Negotiating Race in Contemporary Irish and Irish-
American Culture (Syracuse NY: Syracuse University Press, 2013). Introduction. Whole book available 
online through SOLO. 
  Daniel G. Williams, ‘Introduction: Celticism and the Black Atlantic’, Comparative American Studies, 8.2 
(June 2010): 81–87. Online access through SOLO. 
 
Further Reading 
1) Primary Texts 
  John Berryman, The Dream Songs (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1969). 
  Greg Delanty, Collected Poems, 1986–2006 (Manchester: Carcanet, 2006). 
  Derek Mahon, The Hudson Letter (Oldcastle: Gallery Books, 1995). 
  Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men (London: Vintage, 2006). 
  Paul Muldoon, The Prince of the Quotidian (Oldcastle: Gallery Press, 1994). 
  Joseph O’Connor, Star of the Sea (London: Secker, 2004). 
  Sharon Olds, ‘Easter, 1960’, The New Yorker 12.3 (February 2007): 158; reprinted in Olds, One Secret 
 
Thing (London: Jonathan Cape, 2009). 
  Eugene O’Neill, Complete Plays 1932–1943 (New York: Library of America, 1988). 
 
2) Secondary Texts 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 156 of 230 
  Peter Brazeau, ‘The Irish connection: Wallace Stevens and Thomas McGreevy’, The Southern Review
17.3 (summer 1981), 533–541. 
  Rachel Buxton, Robert Frost and Northern Irish Poetry (Oxford: OUP, 2004). 
  James P. Byrne, Philip Coleman, and Jason King, eds., Ireland and the Americas: Culture, Politics, and 
History. Santa Barbara: ABC-Clio, 2008. 
  Daniel Casey and Robert E. Rhodes, eds., Irish-American Fiction: Essays in Criticism (New York: AMS 
Press, 1979). 
  Philip Coleman, ‘“The politics of praise”: John Berryman’s engagement with W. B. Yeats’, Études
 
Irlandaises, 28.2 (automne 2003): 11–27. 
  Wai Chee Dimock, Through Other Continents: American Literature Across Deep Time (Princeton and 
Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2006). 
  Ron Ebest, Private Histories: The Writing of Irish-Americans, 1900–1935 (Notre Dame: The University 
of Notre Dame Press, 2005) 
  Sally Barr Ebest, The Banshees: A Literary History of Irish American Women Writers (Syracuse: 
Syracuse UP, 2013) 
  Bart Eeckhart and Edward Ragg, eds., Wallace Stevens Across the Atlantic (Basingstoke: Palgrave 
Macmillan, 2008). 
  Charles Fanning, Private Histories: The Writing of Irish Americans, 1900–1935 (Notre Dame, Indiana: 
University of Notre Dame Press), 2005. 
  --., The Irish Voice in America: Irish-American Fiction from the 1760s to the 1980s (Lexington, 
Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky, 1990). 
  Paul Giles, American Catholic Arts and Fictions: Culture, Ideology, Aesthetics (Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 1992). 
  --, ‘From decadent aesthetics to political fetishism: the “oracle effect” of Robert Frost’s poetry’, 
American Literary History, 12.4 (winter 2000): 713–744. 
  --, Virtual Americas: Transnational Fictions and the Transatlantic Imaginary (Durham: Duke University 
Press, 2002).  
  Green, Fiona, ‘“Your trouble is their trouble”: Marianne Moore, Maria Edgeworth and Ireland’, 
Symbiosis: A Journal of Anglo-American Literary Relations, 1.2 (October 1997): 173–85. 
  John Harrington, The Irish Play on the New York Stage, 1874–1966 (Lexington, Kentucky: University 
 
Press of Kentucky, 1997). 
  Matthew Frye Jacobson, Whiteness of a Different Colour: European Immigrants and the Alchemy of 
Race (Cambridge, Massachusetts and London: Harvard University Press, 1998).  
  Maria Johnston, ‘“This endless land”: Louis MacNeice and the USA’, Irish University Review, 38.2 
(autumn/winter 2008): 243–262. 
  Tracy Mishkin, The Harlem and Irish Renaissances: Language, Identity and Representation (Gainesville, 
Florida: University Press of Florida, 1998). 
  Diane Negra, ed., The Irish in Us: Irishness, Performativity, and Popular Culture (Durham and 
 
London: Duke University Press, 2006). 
  Laura O’Connor, Haunted English – the Celtic Fringe, the British Empire, and De-Anglicization 
(Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2006). 
  --, ‘Flamboyant reticence: an Irish incognita’, in Linda Leavell, Cristanne Miller, and Robin G. Schulze, 
eds., Critics and Poets on Marianne Moore: ‘A Right Good Salvo of Barks’  
(Lewisburg: Bucknell 
University Press, 2005), pp.165–183. 
  Fintan O’Toole, Ex-Isle of Erin: Images of a Global Ireland (Dublin: New Ireland Books, 1997)
  Jahan Ramazani, A Transnational Poetics (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009) 
  Edward L. Shaughnessy, Down the Nights and Down the Days: Eugene O’Neill’s Catholic Sensibility 
(Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2000). 
  -- ed., Eugene O’Neill in Ireland: The Critical Reception (Greenwood Press, 1998). 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 157 of 230 
  Tara Stubbs, American Literature and Irish Culture, 1910–1955: the politics of enchantment 
 
(Manchester: MUP, 2013; paperback 2017). 
  -- and Doug Haynes, eds., Navigating the Transnational in Modern American Literature and Culture 
(New York and London: Routledge, 2017). 
  Daniel Tobin, ‘Irish-American poetry and the question of tradition’, New Hibernia Review, 3.4 (winter 
1999): 143–154. 
  Eamonn Wall, From the Sin-é Café to the Black Hills: Notes on the New Irish (Madison, Wisconsin and 
London: University of Wisconsin Press, 1999). 
  Patrick Ward, Exile, Emigration and Irish Writing (Dublin and Portland, Oregon: Irish Academic Press, 
2002). 
 
3) Irish-American History 
(N.B. Some of these texts [marked with *] are now quite dated and display considerable political bias, but are 
useful as examples of the contentious nature of the subject matter!) 

  Thomas Brown, Irish-American Nationalism 1870–1890 (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1966). 
  Charles Callan, America and the Fight for Irish Freedom, 1866–1922 (New York: Devon Adair, 1957).* 
  F.M. Carroll, American Opinion and the Irish Question 1910–1923 (Dublin and New York: Gill and 
 
Macmillan and St. Martin’s Press, 1978). 
  Dennis Clark, Irish Blood: Northern Ireland and the American Conscience (New York: Kennikat, 1977).* 
  T. Ryle Dwyer, Irish Neutrality and the USA (Dublin: Gill and Macmillan, 1977).* 
  Maldwyn A. Jones, ‘The Scotch-Irish of British America’, in Bernard Bailyn and Philip D. Morganeds., 
Strangers within the Realm: Cultural Margins of the First British Empire (Chapel Hill and London: 
University of North Carolina Press, 1991), pp.284–313. 
  Billy Kennedy, The Scotch-Irish in Pennsylvania and Kentucky (Belfast: Causeway Press, 1998). 
  Lawrence McCaffrey, Textures of Irish America (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1992). 
  Robert Keating O’Neill, ‘The Irish book in the United States’, in Clare Hutton and Patrick  Walsh, eds., 
The Oxford History of the Irish Book, Volume V: The Irish Book in English, 1891–2000 (Oxford: Oxford 
University Press, 2011), pp.413439. 
  William Vincent Shannon, The American Irish: A Political and Social Portrait (New York: Macmillan, 
1966). 
  Charles Townshend, Easter 1916: The Irish Rebellion (London and Dublin: Penguin, 2005). 
  Alan J. Ward, Ireland and Anglo-American Relations, 1899–1921 (London: LSE / Weidenfeld and 
Nicolson, 1969). 
  Clair Wills, That Neutral Island: A Cultural History of Ireland During the Second World War (London: 
 
Faber, 2007). 
  --, ‘The aesthetics of Irish neutrality during the Second World War’, Boundary 2, 31.1 (spring 2004): 
119–145. 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 158 of 230 
Political Histories of Modern Reading, 1780-Present 
Professor Lloyd Pratt – xxxxx.xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
The history of reading and the history of modernity are inextricable. Precisely those things associated with 
modern culture—expansion of the franchise, secularisation, liberalism, critique, democratisation in general—
appear to follow from rising literacy rates, the reading revolution, and the industrial print culture that for many 
scholars signal the advent of modernity. This seminar interrogates will aims to identify and then interrogate 
some key assumptions about the relation of reading to democratisation, in particular, and, in general, to 
modernity. Our texts will include theories of reading from the eighteenth century to the present, and from 
across the North Atlantic world, including Ruskin, Emerson, Proust, the European Romantics, the African 
American intellectual tradition, feminist and queer theory, Marxist theory, theories of race and ethnicity, and 
contemporary work in history and theory of reading. Our aim will be to develop a clarified sense of which 
historical traditions of thinking about reading are taken up when literary studies and the other humanities 
disciplines lay claim to be producing ‘critical readers’. We will also attempt to identify the limits of reading—
aesthetic, political, social, affective limits—and their bearing on the role that reading can play in a democracy. 
 
Week 1 
Serious Reading 
 
Week 2 
Heroic Reading 
 
Week 3 
Creative Reading 
 
Week 4 
Secular Reading 
 
Week 5 
Sacred Reading 
 
Week 6 
Democratic Reading 
 
Bibliography 
  Rancière, Jacques. The Politics of Literature 
  Ruskin, John. Sesame and Lilies 
  Proust, Marcel. On Reading 
  Althusser, Louis. Reading Capital 
  Emerson, Ralph Waldo. Nature 
  Thoreau, Henry David. Walden 
  Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Michaelmas Term 
 
Page 159 of 230 
  Zambra, Alejandro. Not to Read 
  de Man, Paul. Allegories of Reading 
  Johnson, Barbara. The Critical Difference: Essays in the Contemporary Rhetoric of Reading 
  Emre, Merve. Paraliterary: The Making of Bad Readers in Postwar America 
  Marx, Karl. Capital, Vol 1 
  Schor, Naomi. Reading in Detail 
  Gates, Jr., Henry Louis. The Signifying Monkey 
  Crain, Patrica. Reading Children 
  PMLA. Spec issue On Reading 
  de Tocqueville, Alexis. Democracy in America, Vol 1 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 160 of 230 
Hilary Term C-Courses 
 
Old Norse 
Professor Heather O’Donoghue – xxxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx  

This course is designed to be flexible enough to meet two distinct needs. On the one hand, beginners in Old 
Norse will be introduced to a varied range of Old Norse Icelandic prose and poetry, and be able to set these 
texts in their historical and cultural contexts. On the other, those who have already studied some Old Norse 
will be able to focus on texts directly relevant or complementary to their own interests and expertise. There 
will be language classes in Old Norse, and a series of introductory classes on the literature, in Michaelmas 
Term 2019. These classes are mandatory for anyone who wishes to do the option in Hilary Term but has not 
done any Old Norse at undergraduate level. Prospective students are very welcome to contact Heather 
O’Donoghue with any queries. 
Preliminary Reading List 
Language: 
  E.V.Gordon, Introduction to Old Norse (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981) 
  Michael Barnes, A New Introduction to Old Norse, Part I Grammar (London: Viking Society for 
Northern Research, 1999) 
Old Norse-Icelandic Literature:  
  Heather O’Donoghue, Old Norse-Icelandic Literature: A Short Introduction (Blackwell, 2004) 
  Preben Meulengracht Sorensen, Saga and Society, transl. John Tucker (Odense: Odense University 
Press, 1993) 
  G. Turville-Petre, Origins of Icelandic Literature (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1953) 
  E.O.G. Turville-Petre, Scaldic Poetry (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1976) 
  Margaret Clunies Ross, ed., Old Icelandic Literature and Society (Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press, 2000) 
  Jóhanna Katrín Friðriksdóttir, Women in Old Norse Literature: Bodies, Words and Power (Palgrave 
MacMillan: 2013) 
  William Ian Miller, Bloodtaking and Peacemaking: feud, law and society in saga Iceland 
(London;Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990) 
  Carolyne Larrington, et.al., A Handbook to Eddic Poetry (Cambridge, 2016) 
  Vésteinn Ólason, Dialogues with the Viking Age (University of Chicago Press, 1998) 
Translations: 
  The Sagas of the Icelanders: a selection, ed., Viðar Hreinsson (London: Penguin, 2000) 
  The Complete Sagas of Icelanders, ed.Viðar Hreinsson (five volumes, various translators) (Reykjavík: 
Leifur Eiríksson Publishing, 1997)(now being published separately as Penguin Classics, various 
translators) 
  Snorri Sturluson: Edda , trans. Anthony Faulkes (London: Dent, 1987) 
  The Poetic Edda, trans. Carolyne Larrington (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014) 
Reference Works: 
  Phillip Pulsiano, ed., Medieval Scandinavia: an encyclopaedia (New York; London: Garland: 1993) 
  Rory McTurk, ed., A Companion to Old Norse-Icelandic Literature and Culture (Blackwell, 2005) 
  The Routledge Research Companion to the Medieval Icelandic Sagas, ed., Ármann Jakobsson and 
Sverrir Jakobsson (Routledge, 2019) 
  Lexikon der Altnordischen Literatur, ed. Rudolf Simek and Hermann Pálsson (Alfred Kröner Verlag, 
1987) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 161 of 230 
The Age of Alfred 
Dr Francis Leneghan – xxxxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 

Outline: King Alfred of Wessex (871–99) has been credited with the invention of English prose, the Anglo-
Saxon kingdom and even the idea of “Englishness”. However, recent scholarship has begun to question the 
extent of the king’s personal involvement in the so-called ‘Alfredian renaissance’. This course will interrogate 
these issues by exploring the burgeoning vernacular literary culture associated with Alfred’s court and its wider 
impact on English writing and society in the ninth and tenth centuries and beyond. Under consideration will be 
the first philosophical writing in English, biblical translations and reworkings of Latin classics. Texts will be 
studied in Old English, so some prior knowledge of the language (basic level) will be required. Key texts will 
include the Old English translations of the following works: 
  Gregory the Great, Pastoral Care  
  Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy  
  St Augustine, Soliloquies 
  Psalms 1-50 
  Orosius, Seven Books of History Against the Pagans 
We will also look at other important contemporary vernacular works such as Alfred’s Lawcode (Domboc), 
Wærferth’s translation of Gregory’s Dialogues, Bald’s Leechbook and The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (MS A), and 
Latin texts such as Asser’s Life of Alfred, while considering continental influences on Alfredian writing.  
Editions and translations: 
  Aykerman, J. Y. et al. The Whole Works of King Alfred the Great: With Preliminary Essays, Illustrative 
of the History, Arts, and Manners, of the Ninth Century, 2 vols (London, 1858). [Full translations of the 
OE Orosius, Laws (with Alfred’s Preface), Boethius, and Soliloquies; readable as a pdf on solo]. 
  Bately, Janet M., ed. The Old English Orosius, EETS, ss. 6 (Oxford, 1980). 
  Browne, Bishop G. F. King Alfred’s Books (London, 1920). [Translation of excerpts from OE Soliloquies, 
Dialogues, Orosius, Pastoral Care, Bede, Boethius]. 
  Carnicelli, Thomas A., ed. King Alfred’s Version of St. Augustine’s ‘Soliloquies’ (Cambridge, MA, 1969). 
  Godden, Malcolm, transl. The Old English History of the World: An Anglo-Saxon Rewriting of Orosius 
(Harvard, 2016). [Facing-page translation of OE Orosius]. 
  Godden, Malcolm and Susan Irvine, eds, The Old English Boethius, 2 vols (Oxford, 2010). 
  ———— ed. and transl. The Old English Boethius with Verse Prologues and Epilogues Associated with 
King Alfred (Harvard, 2012) [Facing-page translation of C-text, i.e. prosimetrical OE Boethius, as well 
as various Alfredian prologues and epilogues].  
  Hargrove, Henry L., transl. King Alfred’s Old English Version of St. Augustine’s Soliloquies, Turned into 
Modern English (New York, 1904).  
  Hecht, Hans, ed., Bischof Wærferths von Worcester Übersetzung der Dialoge Gregors des Grossen, 
Bibliothek der Angelsächsischen Prosa, 5 (Liepzig: 1900; repr. Darmstadt:, 1965).  
  Keynes, Simon and Michael Lapidge, Alfred the Great: Asser’s ‘Life of King Alfred’ and Other 
Contemporary Sources (London, 1983). [Translations of excerpts from Boethius, Soliloquies, Laws 
(without preface), Preface to Pastoral Care, Alfred’s Will]. 
  Liebermann, Felix (ed.). 1903. Die Gesetze der Angelsachsen, Volume 1: Text und Übersetzung. Halle: 
Max Niemeyer. [Alfred’s Laws (with Preface – Einleitung)] 
  O’Neill, Patrick P. ed. King Alfred’s Old English Prose Translation of the First Fifty Psalms (Cambridge, 
MA, 2001). 
  ———— ed. and transl. Old English Psalms (Harvard, 2016) [Facing-page translation of the OE text of 
the Paris Psalter, i.e. Prose Psalms 1-50 and Metrical Psalms 51–150]. 
  Preston, Todd, ed. and transl. King Alfred’s Book of Laws: A Study of the ‘Domboc’ and Its Influence on 
English Identity (Jefferson, NC, 2012). 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 162 of 230 
  Swanton, Michael, transl. Anglo-Saxon Prose (London, 1993). [Translations of Orosius (Ohthere and 
Wulfstan), Preface to Pastoral Care, Preface to Soliloquies] 
  Sweet, Henry, ed. and transl. King Alfred’s West-Saxon Version of Gregory’s Pastoral Care, 2 vols, Rolls 
Series (London, 1887–89). 
 
Recommended preliminary reading: 
  Abels, Richard. Alfred the Great: War, Kingship and Culture in Anglo-Saxon England (London, 1998). 
  Anlezark, Daniel. Alfred the Great (Kalamazoo, MI, 2017). 
  Bately, Janet M. The Literary Prose of King Alfred’s Reign: Translation or Transformation? (London, 
1980). 
  ————. ‘Did King Alfred Actually Translate Anything? The Integrity of the Alfredian Canon Revisited’
Medium Ævum 78 (2009), 189–215. 
  Discenza, Nicole G. and Paul E. Szarmach. (eds). A Companion to Alfred the Great, Brill Companions to 
the Christian Tradition 58 (Leiden: Brill, 2014). 
  Foot, Sarah. ‘The Making of Angelcynn: English Identity Before the Norman Conquest’, Transactions of 
the Royal Historical Society, 6th ser. 6 (1996), 25–49.  
  Frantzen, Allen J. King Alfred (Boston, 1986). 
  Godden, Malcolm. ‘Did King Alfred Write Anything?’, Medium Ævum 76 (2007), 1–23. 
  ————. ‘The Alfredian Project and its Aftermath: Rethinking the Literary History of the Ninth and 
Tenth Centuries’, Proceedings of the British Academy 162 (2009), 93–122.  
  ————. ‘Alfredian Prose: Myth and Reality’, Filologia Germanica 5 (2013), 131–58. 
  Karkov, Catherine E, The Ruler Portraits of Anglo-Saxon England (Woodbridge, 2004), pp. 23–52. 
  Pratt, David. The Political Thought of King Alfred the Great (Cambridge, 2007).  
  ————. ‘Problems of Authorship and Audience in the Writings of King Alfred the Great’, in Lay 
Intellectuals in the Carolingian World, ed. Patrick Wormald and Janet L. Nelson (Cambridge, 2007), pp. 
162–91. 
  Waite, Greg. Annotated Bibliographies of Old and Middle English Literature Volume VI: Old English 
Prose Translations of King Alfred’s Reign (Cambridge, 2000).   
  Whitelock, Dorothy. ‘The Prose of Alfred’s Reign’, in Continuations and Beginnings: Studies in Old 
English Literature, ed. E. G. Stanley (London, 1966), pp. 67–103.  
 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 163 of 230 
Wycliffite and Related Literatures: Dissidence, Literary Theory and 
Intellectual History in Late-Medieval England 
Dr Kantik Ghosh – xxxxxx.xxxxx@xxxxxxx.xx.xx.xx  
 
The latter half of the fourteenth and the first half of the fifteenth centuries in England witnessed an 
extraordinarily rich and diverse literary creativity in a range of genres, both inherited and novel, often 
accompanied by a notable degree of theoretical and hermeneutic self-consciousness.  This discursive and 
generic fragmentation and innovation was in part the result of an explosive – and transnational -- ecclesiastical 
politics (the papal schism 1378-1417; various heresies, both in England and on the Continent, preeminently 
those associated with John Wyclif in England and Jan Hus in Bohemia; conciliar negotiations at Constance and 
Basel; ‘anticlericalism’ of various kinds), as well as a burgeoning lay intellectual ambition outside the traditional 
Latinate domain of the arts and theology faculties of Oxford, Paris and a handful of other European 
universities.  This C-course will examine a range of writing – polemical, poetic, homiletic, exegetic and 
theoretical -- produced in England (primarily in English, but also taking into account some Latin texts of major 
relevance): the works of Wyclif and of his followers (e.g. Of the Truth of Sacred ScriptureEnglish Wycliffite 
Sermons
; tracts relating to translation into the vernacular;  various polemical tracts dealing with aspects of 
hermeneutics, ecclesiology and philosophical theology); the works of the hereticated bishop, Reginald Pecock; 
poetry and homiletic writings directly addressing contemporary concerns relating to ecclesiastical politics and 
academic learning (e.g. ‘Piers Plowman tradition’; Court of Sapience; macaronic sermons in MS Bodley 649).  It 
will seek to understand how intellectual labour and identity are reconfigured in an environment when 
university-learning merges pervasively into the sphere of broader cultural negotiations encompassing political 
dissidence, ecclesiastical critique, theological scepticism and poetic ambition.  Scholarly work – of recent 
decades and ongoing -- on Wycliffism / lollardy in particular and on the fifteenth century in general has been 
fundamentally reshaping our understanding of late-medieval England, and this course will seek to offer an 
informed introduction to the field. 
THEMES: Reading for each week will address aspects of socio-political dissidence, major issues in hermeneutic 
and theoretical debate and English literature in a variety of genres. 
 
Course overview
Week 1Introduction and orientation: themes and critical issues 
This class will begin with individual c.15-minute presentations on issues and problems raised by vacation 
reading. When preparing for this session, you will find it helpful to focus on particular questions raised by your 
reading, e.g. what relationship(s) seem to have subsisted between learning, especially biblical learning, and 
dissent, whether in medieval polemics or practice or both? What might be the problems/opportunities 
afforded by doing intellectual, particularly theological, work in the vernacular? What opportunities does 
poetry or the dialogic form afford vis-à-vis homiletics or polemical tracts? How is the role of exegesis 
theorized, and how is exegesis practised?  
  
Week 2The Bible, learning, translation and dissidence: Prologues to the Wycliffite Bible; selected English 
Wycliffite Sermons; tracts debating Bible translation
 
Classes in weeks 2-5 will begin with short presentations (5-10 minutes each) on particular issues relating to the 
set reading. 
What kinds of intellectual identity are assumed or shaped by the ‘General Prologue’ to the Wycliffite Bible?  
How do we understand the translations of Jerome’s prologues? How do the prologues and the Sermons 
understand the task of the exegete and the translator?  To what extent do the prologues and the English 
Wycliffite sermons illuminate one another, and how helpful is it to consider them as ‘dissident’ texts?  What 
are the larger cultural implications of the debate over Bible translation? How do such texts situate themselves 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 164 of 230 
vis-à-vis the medieval university and clergie? How do we read the Wycliffite translations of Jerome’s Prefatory 
Epistles? 
 
Week 3Dialogic dissent: The Testimony of William Thorpe; Four Wycliffite Dialogues; Reginald Pecock’s The 
Book of Faith 

How do we interpret the literary forms chosen by authors such as Thorpe and Pecock?  How diversely is the 
dialogic form used? What distinctions or overlaps can we identify between thinkers writing on opposite sides 
of doctrinal and institutional divides? What kinds of hermeneutic and other theories are proposed by 
‘dissenting’ as well as ‘orthodox’ writers? How do such theories affect their authorial strategies? 
 
Week 4The laicization of learning: De Oblacione Jugis SacrificiiThe Lanterne of Li3t; more Reginald Pecock; 
Lollard revision of Richard Rolle’s Palter Commentary / Glossed Gospels/ Glossed Psalter Bodley 554; 
macaronic sermons in MS Bodley 659 

What are the implications of the transmission of specialized academic learning in the vernacular? How are the 
interrelationships of Latin and English, of clergie and popular religion, reconfigured? Of what nature are 
orthodox responses: reformist / reactionary/ other? Which kinds of academic techniques and methods are 
presented in Wycliffite writings, and in those of Pecock?  How does Wycliffism shape, and how is it shaped by, 
the larger literary-intellectual context of the late-middle ages? 
 
Week 5Learning, dissent, homiletics and poetics: Piers Plowman, B. VIII-XIII; Mum and the Sothsegger
Court of Sapience 

Langland, and to an extent, poems in the ‘Piers Plowman tradition’, weave fragments from learned discourses 
into a distinctive poetic idiolect. What is at stake in their juxtaposition and interrogation of different learned 
idioms, and in their evocations of the vulnerability of pedagogic and ecclesiastical institutions? How do these 
experiments with learning and poetics compare with Wycliffite products in other genres? Do they adopt 
similar kinds of scepticism towards the uses to which learning can be put? Are their expressions of literary and 
theoretical self-consciousness mutually illuminating? How do we read The Court of Sapience in a post-
Arundelian context? How do the macaronic sermons in Bodley 659 respond ideologically and formally to the 
popularization of university-thought? 
 
Week 6Overview/retrospective 
Assessment: Assessment will take place via a 6000-7000 word essay produced at the end of the course. See 
Course handbook for further details. 
 
BIBLIOGRAPHY: 
The following (reasonably full) bibliography is for reference, and you are not expected to cover all of it; selected 
primary texts for discussion each week are indicated above, under ‘Course Overview’. Guidance regarding 
further reading (both primary and secondary) will be provided each week.  

 
PRIMARY TEXTS around which discussion will be structured over the course:  
On medieval literary theory, see: 
  *Alastair Minnis and A B Scott, Medieval Literary Theory and Criticism (Oxford, 1988) [foundational 
collection of scholastic and other texts, covering both biblical and other discourses] 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 165 of 230 
  Rita Copeland and Ineke Sluiter (eds), Medieval Grammar and Rhetoric: Language Arts and Literary 
Theory A. D. 300-1475 (Oxford, 2009) 
  Jocelyn Wogan-Browne et al. (ed), The Idea of the Vernacular: An Anthology of Middle English Literary 
Theory (Exeter, 1999) 
  Beryl Smalley, The Study of the Bible in the Middle Ages (Oxford, 1983) 
  Rita Copeland, Rhetoric, Hermeneutics and Translation: Academic Traditions and Vernacular Texts 
(Cambridge, 1991): a classic study of basic relevance to late-medieval politics of language and 
interpretation and much else besides 
  Alastair Minnis and Ian Johnson (eds): The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism v. 2: The Middle 
Ages (Cambridge, 2005) 
  Alastair Minnis, Medieval theory of Authorship (Aldershot, 1983) 
  Christopher Ocker, Biblical Poetics before Humanism and Reformation (Cambridge, 2002) 
Also see St. AugustineDe Doctrina Christiana, edited and translated by R.P.H. Green (Oxford: Clarendon 
Press, 1995). (There is also a World’s Classics edition of the English translation alone, but if you have Latin you 
must see the original). This is a demanding and complex text, and one of the most fundamental for the study 
of Christian hermeneutics, since it established the terms on which later debates were conducted. See for 
example III.30-37, in which Augustine commends the hermeneutic ‘rules’ of Tyconius the Donatist, and 
compare with the Prologue to the Wycliffite Bible (below) which also uses them. Book Four is the most well-
known, but 2 and 3 are also important: the cumulative effect of the book is to establish a comprehensive 
biblical rhetorics and hermeneutics. It thus represents – and, indeed, constitutes – one of the kinds of 
‘learning’ that late-medieval controversialists were using and interrogating. 
 
John Wyclif:  
  *De Veritate Sacre Scripture, ed. Rudolf Buddensieg (London, 1905-7) 
  excerpts translated as *On the Truth of Sacred Scripture by Ian Levy (TEAMS, 2001) 
  Trialogus, trans. by Stephen Lahey (Cambridge, 2013) 
  **Selected Latin Works in Translation by Stephen Penn (Manchester, 2019): has a substantial 
introduction. 
  Wycliffite Spirituality, ed. and trans. Fiona Somerset et al. (Mahwah, 2013 
Wyclif’s (almost) complete Latin works are to be found in volumes published by the Wyclif Society 
https://archive.org/details/latinworks21wycl/page/n5/mode/2up 
https://www.library.fordham.edu/wyclif/#/ 
 
The Wycliffite Bible 
  The Holy Bible…made from the Latin Vulgate by John Wycliffe and his Followers, ed. J. Forshall and J. 
Madden, 4 vols (Oxford, 1850) / 
https://archive.org/details/holybiblecontain01wycluoft/page/n6/mode/2up 
**See the online (partial) edition by Elizabeth Solopova and her team: 
https://wycliffite-bible.english.ox.ac.uk/#/ 
 
English Wycliffite writings / Lollardy: 
Thanks largely to Anne Hudson, a substantial body of Wycliffite writing in English is now available.  Good 
places to start are the anthologies by Hudson, covering a range of topics (n. 1) and Dove, covering mostly 
issues relating to the vernacular and translation (n. 6). Wycliffite sermons are found in 2, 4 (William Taylor), 10.  
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 166 of 230 
Learned materials and biblical exegesis (often highly polemical) in English are found more or less everywhere; 
see in particular 2, 3, 10, 11, 14, 15. For unusual formal choices, see 4 (Thorpe’s testimony) and 12 (dialogues). 
For the ‘Glossed Gospel’ (partial edition as well as study), see 14; for the Glossed Psalter, see 15. 
1. **Selections from English Wycliffite Writings, ed. A. Hudson (Cambridge, 1978) 
2. *English Wycliffite Sermons, ed. A. Hudson and P. Gradon, 5 vols (Oxford, 1983-96) 
3. *The Lanterne of Li3t, ed. L. M. Swinburne (EETS 151, 1917) 
4. *Two Wycliffite Texts, ed. A. Hudson (EETS 301, 1993) [contains William Taylor’s sermon and 
Testimony of William Thorpe
5. *Prologue to the Wycliffite Bible, in The Holy Bible…made from the Latin Vulgate by John Wycliffe 
and his Followers
, ed. J. Forshall and J. Madden, 4 vols (Oxford, 1850) [in vol I]; also edited in Mary 
*Dove [n. 6 below]; also see the translations of Jerome’s prefatory material, in Forshall and Madden; 
and in *Conrad Lindberg (ed), The Middle English Bible: Prefatory Epistles of St Jerome (Oslo, 1978) 
6. **The Earliest Advocates of the English Bible, ed. by Mary Dove (2010) [v useful edition of a range 
of writings dealing with Biblical translation] 
7. English Wyclif Tracts 1-3, ed. Conrad Lindberg 
8. English Wyclif Tracts 4-6, ed. Conrad Lindberg 
9. The Middle English Translation of the Rosarium Theologiae: a selection, ed. Christina von Nolcken 
10. *The Works of a Lollard Preacher, ed. Anne Hudson (EETS 317, 2001) [contains De Oblacione Iugis 
Sacrificii
]  
11. *Two revisions of Rolle’s English Psalter Commentary and the related Canticles, ed. Anne Hudson, 
3 vols (EETS 340-3, 2012-14) 
12. *Four Wycliffite Dialogues, ed. Fiona Somerset (EETS 333, 2009) 
13. ‘A Lollard Tract: on Translating the Bible into English’, ed. C. F. Bühler, Medium Aevum, 7 (1938), 
167-83 
14. *Anne Hudson, Doctors in English: A Study of the Wycliffite Gospel Commentaries (Liverpool, 
2015) 
15. *A Glossed Wycliffite Psalter: Oxford, Bodleian Library MS Bodley 554, ed. by Michael P. Kuczynski, 
2 vols, EETS OS 352-3 (Oxford, 2019) 
 
Of related interest
For an influential example of contemporary vernacular orthodox homiletics, see John Mirk’s Festial, ed. Susan 
Powell (EETS 334 & 336, 2009/10) 
  *A Macaronic Sermon Collection from Late Medieval England: Oxford MS Bodley 649, ed. and trans. 
Patrick J. Horner (Toronto, 2006) 
  Dives and Pauper, ed. Priscilla Barnum, EETS 275 (1976), 280 (1980), 323 (2004) 
  *Nicholas Love, Mirror of the Blessed Life of Jesus Christ, ed. M. G. Sargent (Exeter, 2005) 
 
Reginald Pecock: 
  Repressor of Overmuch Blaming of the Clergy, ed. C Babington, 2 vols, Rolls series (London, 1860) 
  *Reginald Pecock’s Book of Faith, ed. J. L. Morrison (Glasgow, 1909) 
  Reule of Crysten Religioun, ed. W. C. Greet (EETS 171, 1927) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 167 of 230 
  The Donet, ed. E.V. Hitchcock (EETS 156, 1921) 
  Folewer to the Donet, ed. E.V. Hitchcock (EETS 164, 1924) 
 
Poetry: 
 
  The Vision of Piers Plowman, B-text, ed. A. V. C. Schmidt; C-text, ed. Derek Pearsall; Parallel-text 
edition (A, B, C and Z), ed. A. V. C. Schmidt 
  Piers Plowman electronic archive: 
o  http://piers.chass.ncsu.edu/index.html 
  *The Piers Plowman Tradition, ed. Helen Barr (Everyman, 1993) 
  The Court of Sapience, ed. E. Ruth Harvey (Toronto, 1984) 
  The Digby Poems, ed. Helen Barr (Exeter, 2009) 
 
SECONDARY READING: 
John Wyclif: 
Essential: 
  Anthony Kenny (ed): Wyclif in his Times (Oxford, 1986) 
o  *John Wyclif (Oxford, 1985) 
  Stephen Lahey: John Wyclif (Oxford, 2009) 
  Jeremy Catto, *‘Wyclif and Wycliffism at Oxford’ & ‘Theology after Wycliffism’ 
o  Both in **The History of the University of Oxford vol. II: Late Medieval Oxford, ed. by Jeremy 
Catto and Ralph Evans (Oxford, 1992) 
  *Ian Levy (ed): A Companion to John Wyclif: Late Medieval Theologian (Leiden, 2006) 
  J. A. Robson, Wyclif and the Oxford Schools (Cambridge, 1961) 
  Alexander Brungs and Frédéric Goubier, ‘On Biblical Logicism: Wyclif, Virtus Sermonis and 
Equivocation’ [+ further references therein to important recent work on Wyclif’s philosophy of 
language], Recherches de Théologie et Philosophie Médiévales 76 (2009), 201-246  
 
Further: 
  Anne Hudson and Michael Wilks (eds): From Ockham to Wyclif. Studies in Church History Subsidia 5 
(Oxford, 1987) 
  Anne Hudson, Studies in the Transmission of Wyclif’s Writings (Aldershot/Variorum, 2008) 
  Ian Levy: John Wyclif: Scriptural Logic, Real Presence and the Parameters of Orthodoxy (Marquette, 
2003) 
  Ian Levy, Holy Scripture and the Quest for Authority at the End of the Middle Ages (Notre Dame, 2012) 
  Michael Wilks: Wyclif: Political Ideas and Practice (Oxford, 2000) 
  Kantik Ghosh: The Wycliffite Heresy: Authority and the Interpretation of Texts (Cambridge, 2002) 
  Stefano Simonetta and M-T. Fumagalli Beonio Brocchieri (eds): Wyclif: Logica Politica Theologia 
(Florence, 2003) 
  *Helen Barr and Anne Hutchison (eds), Text and Controversy from Wyclif to Bale (Turnhout, 2005) 
  *Mishtooni Bose and J. Patrick Hornbeck (eds), Wycliffite Controversies (Turnhout, 2011) 
  P Hornbeck and M Van Dussen (eds), Europe After Wyclif (NY, 2016) 
 
English Wycliffite writings / Lollardy / Wycliffite Bible: 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 168 of 230 
Foundational work remains **Anne HudsonThe Premature Reformation (Oxford, 1988) 
Also see her Lollards and their Books (London, 1985) – important collection of articles; also Studies in the 
Transmission of Wyclif’s Writings
 (Aldershot, 2008) 
For a useful survey of the historiography and much else besides, see Patrick Hornbeck (with Fiona Somerset 
and Mishtooni Bose), *A Companion to Lollardy (Leiden, 2016) 
The literature on Wycliffism is now vast; the following is a select bibliography that will be supplemented in 
class depending on your interests. You will find further bibliography and other materials of interest on 
http://lollardsociety.org/ 

  *Mishtooni Bose and J. Patrick Hornbeck, eds, Wycliffite Controversies (Turnhout, 2011) 
  J Patrick Hornbeck, What is a Lollard? Dissent and Belief in Late Medieval England (Oxford, 2010) 
  Margaret Aston and Colin Richmond (eds), Lollardy and Gentry in the Later Middle Ages (Stroud, 
1997) 
  Anne Hudson, ‘William Thorpe and the Question of Authority’, Christian Authority: Essays in Honour 
of Henry Chadwick’, ed. G R Evans (Oxford, 1988) 
  *‘Laicus litteratus: the paradox of Lollardy’ in Heresy and Literacy, 1000-1530 (Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 1994), pp. 222-36 
  *“Five Problems in Wycliffite Texts and a Suggestion.” Medium Ævum 80.2 (2011): 301- 324. 
  *Margaret Aston, Lollards and Reformers: Images and Literacy in Late Medieval Religion (London: 
Hambledon Press, 1984), esp. ch. 6: ‘Lollardy and literacy’. 
  ------------------, *Faith and Fire: Popular and Unpopular Religion 1350-1600 (London: Hambledon Press, 
1993), esp. ch. 2, ‘Wycliffe and the Vernacular’. 
  Rita Copeland, ‘Childhood, Pedagogy and the Literal Sense: From Late Antiquity to the Lollard 
Heretical Classroom’, New Medieval Literatures, 1 (1997), 125-56 
  ------------------, ‘William Thorpe and his Lollard Community: Intellectual Labor and the Representation 
of Dissent’, in Bodies and Disciplines: Intersections of Literature and History in Fifteenth-Century 
England
, ed. David Wallace and Barbara Hanawalt (Minneapolis, 1996), pp. 199-221 
  ---------------, *Pedagogy, Intellectuals and Dissent in the Later Middle Ages: Lollardy and Ideas of 
Learning (Cambridge, 2001) 
   *Rhetoric, Hermeneutics and Translation: Academic Traditions and Vernacular Texts (Cambridge, 
1992) 
  ------------------*‘Wycliffite Ciceronianism?  The General Prologue to the Wycliffite Bible and 
Augustine’s De Doctrina Christiana’, in Constant J. Mews, Cary J. Nederman and Rodney M. Thomson 
(eds), Rhetoric and Renewal in the Latin West 1100-1540: Essays in Honour of John O. Ward 
(Turnhout: Brepols, 2003), pp. 185-200 
  Kantik Ghosh, *The Wycliffite Heresy: Authority and the Interpretation of Texts (Cambridge, 2002) 
  ----------------, ‘Logic and Lollardy’, Medium Aevum, 76 (2007).  
  ----------------, *‘Wycliffism and Lollardy’ in The Cambridge History of Christianity: Christianity in 
Western Europe 1000-1500, ed. Miri Rubin and Walter Simons (Cambridge, 2009).  
  ‘Wycliffite Affiliations: Some Intellectual-Historical Contexts’, in Wycliffite Controversies, ed. Bose and 
Hornbeck (2011) 
  ----------------, ‘Logic, Scepticism and Heresy in Later Medieval Europe: Oxford, Vienna, Constance’, in 
Uncertain Knowledge: scepticism, relativism and doubt in the Middle Ages, ed. D. Denery, K Ghosh, 
and N Zeeman (Turnhout, 2014) 
  ----------------, ‘University-Learning, Theological Method and Heresy in 15th C England’, in Religious 
Controversy in Europe, 1378-1536, ed. Michael Van Dussen and Pavel Soukup (Turnhout, 2013) 
  ---------------, ‘Magisterial Authority, Heresy and Lay Questioning in Early 15th-Century Oxford’, Revue 
de l’histoire des religions 231/2 (2014), 293-311 
   ‘And so it is licly to men: Probabilism and Hermeneutics in Wycliffite Discourse’, Review of English 
Studies, 70 (2019), 418-36 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 169 of 230 
  *Ralph Hanna III: ‘“Vae Octuplex”, Lollard Socio-Textual Ideology, and Ricardian-Lancastrian Prose 
Translation’, in Criticism and Dissent in the Middle Ages (Cambridge, 1996), pp. 244-63. 
  ---------------------, ‘The Difficulty of Ricardian Prose Translation: the Case of the Lollards’, Modern 
Language Quarterly, 51 (1990), 319-40. 
  *Fiona Somerset, Clerical Discourse and Lay Audience in Late Medieval England (Cambridge, 1998) 
  Feeling like Saints: lollard writings after Wyclif (Ithaca, 2014) 
  --------------------, **‘Their writings’, in A Companion to Lollardy, ed. Hornbeck  
  --------------------, *‘Radical Latin and the Stylistics of Reform’, Yearbook of Langland Studies 17 (2003), 
73-92  
  --------------------, ‘Wycliffite Prose’ in A Companion to Middle English Prose, ed. A. S. G. Edwards 
(Cambridge, 2004) 
  -------------------, ‘Professionalizing Translation at the Turn of the Fifteenth Century: Ullerston’s 
Determinacio, Arundel’s Constitutiones’, in The Vulgar Tongue: Medieval and Postmedieval 
Vernacularity
, ed. by Fiona Somerset and Nicholas Watson (University Park, PA: Pennsylvania 
University Press, 2003), pp. 145-57 
  ------------------, ‘Wycliffite Spirituality’, in Barr and Hutchison (eds), Text and Controversy from Wyclif 
to Bale 
  *Helen Barr and Anne Hutchison (eds), Text and Controversy from Wyclif to Bale (Turnhout, 2005) 
  Christina von Nolcken, ‘A certain sameness and our response to it in English Wycliffite Texts’, in 
Richard Newhauser and John Alford, Literature and Religion in the Later Middle Ages: Philological 
Studies in Honour of Siegfried Wenzel 
(Binghampton, NY, 1995)  
  **Nicholas Watson, ‘Censorship and cultural change in late medieval England: vernacular theology, 
the Oxford translation debate, and Arundel’s Constitutions of 1409’, Speculum 70 (1995), 822-64. 
[Hugely influential but by-no-means-definitive article on the differences between Ricardian and 
Lancastrian literary and religious cultures.] The Oxford conference After
 Arundel was in part 
devoted to discussing Watson’s work: see below for the proceedings ed. by Vincent Gillespie and 
Kantik Ghosh (Turnhout, 2011) 

  ‘Conceptions of the Word: the mother-tongue and the incarnation of God’, New Medieval Literatures 
1 (1997), 85-124 
  *Daniel Hobbins, ‘The schoolman as public intellectual: Jean Gerson and the late medieval tract’, 
American Historical Review 108 (2003), 1308-37. [Useful for general context – how does Hobbins 
define the medieval ‘intellectual’ and what bearing might this have on our own explorations of 
Wycliffite literary culture?
  Authorship and Publicity before Print: Jean Gerson and the Transformation of Late Medieval Learning 
(Philadelphia, 2009) 
  *Fiona Somerset, Jill Havens and Derrick Pittard (eds), Lollards and their influence in Late Medieval 
England (Woodbridge, 2003); contains bibliography
  Joanna Summers, Late Medieval Prison-Writing and the Politics of Autobiography (Oxford, 2004) 
  Elizabeth Schirmer, ‘William Thorpe’s Narrative Theology’, SAC 31 (2009), 267-99.  
  Maureen Jurkowski, ‘The Arrest of William Thorpe in Shrewsbury and the Anti-Lollard Statute of 
1406’, Historical Research, 75 (2002), 273-95.  
  Bradley, Christopher G., ‘Trials of Conscience and the Story of Conscience’, Exemplaria, 24 (2012), 28-
45 
  Michael Van Dussen, From England to Bohemia: Heresy and Communication in the Later Middle Ages 
(Cambridge, 2012) 
  *Several articles of interest in Yearbook of Langland Studies, 31 (2017) 
 
Wycliffite Bible 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 170 of 230 
  *Mary Dove, The First English Bible (Cambridge, 2007) 
  **Elizabeth Solopova (ed), The Wycliffite Bible: Origin, History and Interpretation (Leiden, 2017) 
  MSS of the Wycliffite Bible in the Bodleian and Oxford College Libraries (Liverpool, 2016) 
  K Kennedy, The Courtly and Commercial Art of the Wycliffite Bible (Turnhout, 2014) 
 
Important works on late-medieval homiletics in England include: 
  *Helen Spencer, English Preaching in the Late Middle Ages (Oxford, 1993) 
  *Siegfried Wenzel, Latin sermon collections in later medieval England (Cambridge, 2005) 
 
On translation, see chapters by *David Lawton and *Vincent Gillespie in The Oxford History of Literary 
Translation in English: v.1/ to 1550
, ed. Roger Ellis (2008) 
  Jeremy Catto, ‘Written English: The Making of the Language 1370–1400’Past and 
Present (2003) 179 (1): 24-59 
 
Also of use: 
  *David Aers, Sanctifying Signs: Making Christian Tradition in Late Medieval England (Notre Dame, 
2004) 
  Curtis Bostick, The Antichrist and the Lollards (Leiden, 1998) 
  Matti Peikola, Congregation of the Elect: Patterns of self-fashioning in English Lollard writings (Turku, 
2000) 
  Katherine Little, Confession and Resistance: Defining the self in late-medieval England (Notre Dame, 
2006) 
  Shannon McSheffrey, Gender and Heresy (Philadelphia 1995) 
  ‘Heresy, Orthodoxy, and English Vernacular Religion, 1480-1525’, Past and Present, 186 (February 
2005): 47-80. 
  Paul Strohm, England’s Empty Throne: Usurpation and the Language of Legitimation, 1399-1422 (New 
Haven and London, 1998)  
  Andrew Cole, Literature and Heresy in the Age of Chaucer (Cambridge, 2008) 
  *Andrew Larsen, The School of Heretics: Academic Condemnation at the University of Oxford 1277-
1409 (Leiden, 2011) 
  **Vincent Gillespie and Kantik Ghosh, eds, After Arundel: Religious Writing in Fifteenth-Century 
England (Turnhout, 2011): important papers by Gillespie, Catto, Sargent, Johnson and others 
  Shannon Gayk, Image, Text and Religious Reform in Fifteenth-Century England (Cambridge, 2010) 
  Ryan Perry and Stephen Kelly, eds, Devotional Culture in Late Medieval England and Europe 
(Turnhout, 2014) 
  Ian Johnson and Allan Westphall, ed., The Pseudo-Bonaventuran Lives of Christ (Turnhout, 2013) 
  Ian Johnson, The Middle English Life of Christ: academic discourse, translation and vernacular 
theology (Turnhout, 2013) 
  Judy Ann Ford, John Mirk’s Festial (Cambridge, 2006) 
  Jenni Nuttall, The creation of Lancastrian Kingship: Literature, language and politics in late medieval 
England (Cambridge, 2007) 
  Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, Books under Suspicion (Notre Dame, 2006): (see the roundtable devoted to 
this book in Journal of British Studies, 46 (2007) + Kerby-Fulton’s response) 
  See also Allan Westphall’s review: http://www.qub.ac.uk/geographies-of-
orthodoxy/discuss/2007/11/08/review-books-under-suspicion/ 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 171 of 230 
Reginald Pecock 
  *Wendy Scase, Bishop Reginald Pecock ((Variorum, 1996) 
  ‘Reginald Pecock, John Carpenter, and John Colop’s “common-profit” books: aspects of book 
ownership and circulation in 15th century London’, Medium Aevum, 61 (1992) 
  *V. H. H. Green, Bishop Reginald Pecock: A Study in Ecclesiastical History and Thought (Cambridge, 
1945) 
  Joseph Patrouch, Reginald Pecock (New York, 1990) 
  James Simpson, ‘Reginald Pecock and John Fortescue’, in A Companion to Middle English Prose, ed. A. 
S. G. Edwards (Cambridge, 2004) 
  Mishtooni Bose: ‘The annunciation to Pecock: clerical imitatio in the fifteenth century’, Notes and 
Queries, n.s. 47 (2000), 172-76. 
  ‘Two phases of scholastic self-consciousness: reflections on method in Aquinas and Pecock’, in Aquinas as 
Authority, ed. Paul van Geest, Harm Goris and Carlo Leget. Publications of the Thomas Instituut te 
Utrecht, n.s. 7 (Louvain: Peeters, 2001), pp. 87-107. 
  *‘Reginald Pecock’s vernacular voice’, in Jill Havens, Derrick Pitard and Fiona Somerset eds. Lollards and 
Their Influence in Late Medieval England (Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer, 2003), pp. 217-236. 
  *‘Vernacular Philosophy and the Making of Orthodoxy in the Fifteenth Century’, New Medieval 
Literatures 7, eds. Wendy Scase, Rita Copeland and David Lawton (Oxford University Press, 2005), pp. 
73-99. 
  ‘Writing, Heresy and the Anticlerical Muse’, in Elaine Treharne and Greg Walker (eds.), The Oxford 
Handbook of Medieval Literature in English (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), pp. 276-296. 
  ‘Vernacular opinions’ in Uncertain Knowledge: scepticism, relativism and doubt in the Middle Ages
ed. D. Denery, K Ghosh, and N Zeeman (Turnhout, 2014) 
  Kantik Ghosh, ‘Bishop Reginald Pecock and the Idea of “Lollardy”’, in Text and Controversy from Wyclif 
to Bale, eds. Helen Barr and Ann Hutchison (Turnhout, 2005) 
  ‘Logic and Lollardy’, Medium Aevum, 76 (2007) 
  University-Learning, Theological Method and Heresy in 15th C England’, in Religious Controversy in 
Europe, 1378-1536, ed. Michael Van Dussen and Pavel Soukup (Turnhout, 2013) 
  Stephen Lahey, ‘Reginald Pecock on the Authority of Reason, Scripture and Tradition’, Journal of 
Ecclesiastical History 56 (2005), 235-260.  
  James Landman, ‘“The Doom of Resoun”: Accommodating Lay Interpretation in Late Medieval 
England’, in Medieval Crime and Social Control, ed. Barbara Hanawalt and David Wallace 
(Minneapolis, 1999) 
  Jeremy Catto, ‘The King’s Government and the Fall of Pecock’, in Rulers and Ruled in Late Medieval 
England, ed. Rowena Archer and Simon Walker (London, 1995) 
  Allan F. Westphall, ‘Reconstructing the Mixed Life in Reginald Pecock’s Reule of Crysten Religioun’ in 
After Arundel, ed. Vincent Gillespie and Kantik Ghosh (Turnhout, 2011) 
  Kirsty Campbell, The Call to Read: Reginald Pecock’s Books and Textual Communities (Notre Dame, 
2010) 
  Norman Doe, Fundamental Authority in Late Medieval English Law (Cambridge, 1990) 
  Shannon Gayk, Image, Text and Religious Reform in Fifteenth-Century England (Cambridge, 2010) 
  Sarah James, ‘Langagis, whose reules ben not written: Pecock and the uses of the vernacular’, in 
Vernacularity in England and Wales: c. 1300- c.1500, ed. Elisabeth Salter and Helen Wicker, (Brepols, 
2011), pp. 101-17 
  ‘Revaluing vernacular theology: the case of Reginald Pecock’, Leeds Studies in English, NS 33 (2002), 
135-69 
  Ian Johnson, ‘Mediating voices and texts: Nicholas Love and Reginald Pecock’, in Laura Ashe and Ralph 
Hanna (eds), Medieval and Early Modern Religious Cultures (Cambridge, 2019) 
See also Mishtooni Bose, ‘Intellectual Life in Fifteenth-Century England’, New Medieval Literatures 12 
(2010), 333-65
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 172 of 230 
 
Poetry: 
 
*Wendy Scase, Piers Plowman and the New Anticlericalism (Cambridge, 1989) 
*Emily Steiner, Reading Piers Plowman (Cambridge, 2013), esp. c. 4 
Fiona Somerset, Clerical Discourse and Lay Authority in Late Medieval England  (Cambridge, 1998), esp. c. 2 
*Fiona Somerset, ‘Expanding the Langlandian Canon: Radical Latin and the Stylistics of Reform’, Yearbook of 
Langland Studies
 17 (2003), 73-92 + articles by Andrew Cole, Derek Pearsall and Anne Hudson in the same 
volume.  
Andrew Cole, Literature and Heresy in the Age of Chaucer (Cambridge, 2008) 
*John Bowers, Chaucer and Langland: the Antagonistic Tradition 
*J. M. Bowers: ‘Piers Plowman and the Police: Notes towards a history of the Wycliffite Langland’, Yearbook of 
Langland Studies
, 6 (1992), 1-50. 
 
Ralph Hanna III, ‘Langland’s Ymaginatif: Images and the Limits of Poetry’, in Images, Idolatry and Iconoclasm in 
Late Medieval England
, eds. Jeremy Dimmick, James Simpson and Nicolette Zeeman (Oxford: Oxford University 
Press, 2003), 81-94. 
Alastair Minnis, ‘Langland’s Ymaginatif and Late-Medieval Theories of Imagination’, Comparative Criticism 3 
(1981), 71-103 
*Michelle Karnes, Imagination, Meditation and Cognition in the Middle Ages (Cambridge, 2011) 
*Andrew Galloway, ‘Piers Plowman and the Schools’, Yearbook of Langland Studies 6 (1992), 89-107. 
*Nicolette Zeeman, ‘“Studying” in the Middle Ages – and in Piers Plowman’New Medieval Literatures 3 
(1999), 185-212 
 
*Piers Plowman and the Medieval Discourse of Desire (Cambridge, 2006) 
Pamela Gradon, ‘Langland and the Ideology of Dissent’, Proceedings of the British Academy, 66 (1980) 
Steven Justice and Kathryn Kerby-Fulton eds., Written Work: Langland, Labor and Authorship (Philadelphia, PA: 
University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997). All relevant, but see especially Kerby-Fulton, ‘Langland and the 
Bibliographic Ego’. 
A.V.C. Schmidt, The Clerkly Maker: Langland’s Poetic Art (Cambridge: Brewer, 1987) 
 
Earthly Honest Things: Collected Essays on PP (Newcastle, 2012) 
Ralph Hanna III, ‘“Meddling with Makings” and Will’s Work’, in A.J. Minnis ed. Late-Medieval Religious Texts 
and their Transmission: Essays in Honour of A.I. Doyle
 (Cambridge: D.S. Brewer, 1994), 85-94. 
*Rita Copeland ed., Criticism and Dissent in the Middle Ages (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996). 
See in particular Copeland’s introduction and the chapters by Nicolette Zeeman (‘The schools give a license to 
the poets’), James Simpson (‘Desire and the scriptural text: Will as reader in Piers Plowman’) and Ralph Hanna 
III (‘Lollard socio-textual ideology’) 
Janet Coleman, Piers Plowman and the Moderni (Rome: edizione di storia e letteratura, 1984). 
Emily Steiner, Documentary Culture and the Making of Medieval English Literature (Cambridge, 2003) 
Emily Steiner and Candace Barrington (eds), The Letter of the Law: Legal Practice and Literary Production in 
Medieval England
 (Ithaca, 2002) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 173 of 230 
*David Aers, Beyond Reformation? An essay on Piers Plowman and the End of Constantinian Christianity (Notre 
Dame, 2015) 
 
*Helen Barr, Signes and Sothe: Language in the Piers Plowman Tradition (Cambridge, 1994) 
 
‘The Deafening Silence of Lollardy in the Digby Lyrics’, in Wycliffite Controversies, ed. Bose and 
Hornbeck (2011) 
 
‘This holy tyme: Present Sense in the Digby Lyrics’, in After Arundel, ed. Gillespie and Ghosh (2011) 
James Simpson, ‘The Constraints of Satire in Piers Plowman and Mum and the Sothsegger’, in Helen Phillips 
(ed), Langland, the Mystics and the Medieval English Religious Tradition (Cambridge, 1990) 
 
The Oxford English Literary History 1350-1547: Reform and Cultural Revolution (Oxford, 2002) 
Stephen Yeager, ‘Lollardy in Mum and the Sothsegger: a reconsideration’, Yearbook of Langland Studies, 25 
(2011) 
John Scattergood, ‘Pierce the Ploughman’s Crede: Lollardy and Texts’, in Lollardy and the Gentry in the Later 
Middle Ages
, ed. Margaret Aston and Colin Richmond (1997) 
Wendy Scase, ‘Latin composition lessons, PP and the PP Tradition’, in Answerable Style: The Idea of the Literary 
in Medieval England
, ed. Frank Grady and Andrew Galloway (Ohio, 2013) 
Tamas Karath, ‘Vernacular Authority and the Rhetoric of Sciences in Pecock’s The Folwer to the Donet and in 
The Court of Sapience’, in After Arundel, ed. Gillespie and Ghosh (2011) 
 
Many articles of importance in recent issues of the **Yearbook of Langland Studies 
 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 174 of 230 
Ideas of Literature in the Fifteenth Century 
Professor Daniel Wakelin – xxxxxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx 
 
Our course will introduce some excellent, experimental or influential poems of the fifteenth century, with a 
little drama and prose: Thomas Hoccleve, James I of Scotland, John Lydgate, William Caxton, the anonymous 
female author of The Assembly of Ladies, and assorted humanists, songwriters and playwrights. It will range 
from works of clear literary pretension such as dream vision and classical epic to works more surprising such as 
verse manuals for laundresses. It will explore elements of literary practice and language as they develop in this 
period – the poetic voice, the claim to authority, the written medium, experiments in form, kinds of content, 
social functions. It will explore how writers practise composition within various traditions – Chaucerian, French 
courtly, Italian humanist, ecclesiastical - and in particular social and material conditions – scribal transmission, 
early printing, pragmatic literacy, political counsel. 
Some of this enquiry might trace a genealogy of what later criticism would recognize as literary; but other 
aspects of fifteenth-century writing disrupt expectations of what counts as literature. Our historical and critical 
enquiries will, then, be informed by, and inform, theoretical debates about categories of ‘the literary’: the self-
consciousness, playfulness or obliquity of literary language? The separation of art from utility, fiction from 
information? The synergy of content with form? The enabling authorial voice? The product of reception as 
much as composition? English literature as secular scripture or as the poor person’s classics? The course will 
not assume but will question what ‘literature’ is by reading works from an age that had different – or perhaps 
no? – concepts or institutions of literature, and yet which also seems often to lay the groundwork for later 
traditions. 
For each week I specify primary works to read for class. I also propose selective secondary readings to limn the 
lineaments of the topic, and some optional follow-up examples which might suggest coursework projects 
beyond our classes. The longer works could wisely be started before term. Some are available in TEAMS 
editions online or in the Chadwick-Healey English Poetry Full-Text database through the University’s catalogue, 
as well as in the scholarly editions cited here. At the end, I suggest a few general readings in literary history 
and theory with which to frame your questions. 
 
1) Voice and authority 
Works to read for class 
  Thomas Hoccleve, The Reg*e*ment of Princes, ed. Frederick J. Furnivall, EETS es 72 (1897), or The 
Reg*i*ment of Princes, ed. Charles M. Blyth (Kalamazoo, MI, 1999). 
  James I of Scotland, The Kingis Quair, in Julia Boffey, ed., Fifteenth-Century English Dream Visions 
(Oxford, 2003), 90-157. 
  anon., The Assembly of Ladies, in Julia Boffey, ed., Fifteenth-Century English Dream Visions (Oxford, 
2003), 195-231, or in Walter W. Skeat, ed., Chaucerian and Other Pieces (Oxford, 1897), no. XXI. 
Secondary readings for orientation 
  David Lawton, ‘Dullness and the Fifteenth Century’, English Literary History, 54 (1987), 761-799. 
  David Lawton, Voice in Later Medieval English Literature (Oxford, 2017). 
  Lois A. Ebin, Illuminator, Makar, Vates: Visions of Poetry in the Fifteenth Century (Lincoln, NE, 1988). 
  Robert Meyer-Lee, Poets and Power from Chaucer to Wyatt (Cambridge, 2007). 
  Nicholas Perkins, Hoccleve’s Regiment of Princes: Counsel and Constraint (Cambridge, 2001). 
  Jenni Nuttall, The Creation of Lancastrian Kingship (Cambridge, 2007). 
Follow-up examples 
  George Ashby, ‘A Prisoner’s Reflections’ and ‘Active Policy of a Prince’, in George Ashby’s Poems, ed. 
Mary Bateson, EETS os 76 (London, 1899), 1-41. 
  lyrics perhaps by women in Alexandra Barratt, ed., Women’s Writing in Middle English (London, 
1992), 262-90 (nos 16.a-16.k) 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 175 of 230 
 
2) Medium 
Works to read for class 
  Thomas Hoccleve, Complaint and Dialogue, ed. J.A. Burrow, EETS os 313 (Oxford, 1999), or in Roger 
Ellis, ed., My Compleinte and Other Poems (Exeter, 2001), 115-130. 
  John Bowers, ed., Fifteenth-Century Continuations and Additions to The Canterbury Tales (Kalamazoo, 
MI, 1992). 
  William Caxton, Prologues and Epilogues, ed. William J. Crotch, ed., EETS os 176 (London, 1928), or in 
N. F. Blake, ed., Caxton’s Own Prose (London, 1973). 
There will also be a visit to a display of some relevant manuscripts and printed books in the Bodleian. 
Secondary readings for orientation 
  Jane Griffiths, Diverting Authorities: Experimental Glossing Practices from Manuscript to Print (Oxford, 
2014). 
  Seth Lerer, Chaucer and His Readers: Imagining the Author in Late Medieval England (Princeton, NJ, 
1993). 
  Daniel Wakelin, Scribal Correction and Literary Craft: English Manuscripts 1375-1510 (Cambridge, 
2010), esp. chaps 7-9. 
  Daniel Wakelin, ‘Not Diane: Writing and the Risk of Error in Chaucerian Classicism’, Exemplaria, 29 
(2017), 331-348. 
  Alexandra Gillespie, The Medieval Author in Print: Chaucer, Lydgate, and their books, 1473-1557 
(Oxford, 2006). 
Follow-up examples 
  ‘literary’ anthologies: e.g. John Norton-Smith, ed., A Facsimile of Bodleian Library, MS Fairfax 16 
(London, 1979) and Richard Beadle and A.E.B. Owen, ed., The Findern Manuscript (Cambridge, 1977). 
  Robert Copland, Poems, ed. Mary Erler (Toronto, 1993). 
 
3) Traditions: classicism and humanism 
Works to read for class 
  John Lydgate, The Siege of Thebes, ed. Robert R. Edwards (Kalamazoo, 2001), or ed. Axel Erdmann and 
E. Ekwall, EETS es 108, 125 (London, 1911-30). 
  John Lydgate, The Fall of Princes, ed. Henry Bergen, EETS es 121-124 (London, 1924-27), book II, lines 
967-1344, and book VI, lines 1-518, 2948-3400. 
  Mark Liddell, ed., The Middle English Translation of Palladius De Re Rustica (Berlin, 1896), prohemium, 
book I, and book II, lines 449-87. 
  Edward Wilson with Daniel Wakelin, ed., A Middle English Translation from Petrarch’s Secretum, EETS 
os 351 (Oxford, 2018). 
Secondary readings for orientation 
  A.C. Spearing, Medieval to Renaissance in English Poetry (Cambridge, 1985). 
  Daniel Wakelin, Humanism, Reading and English Literature 1430-1530 (Oxford, 2007). 
  Daniel Wakelin, ‘Religion, Humanism and Humanity: Chaundler’s Dialogues and the Winchester 
Secretum’, in Vincent Gillespie and Kantik Ghosh, ed., After Arundel: Religious Writing in Fifteenth 
Century England
 (Turnhout, 2012), 225-244. 
  Lisa H. Cooper, ‘Agronomy and Affect in Duke Humfrey’s On Husbondrie’, Speculum, 95 (2020), 36-88. 
Follow-up examples 
  Janet Cowen, ed., On Famous Women: The Middle English Translation of Boccaccio’s De Mulieribus 
Claris, MET 52 (Heidelberg, 2015). 
  Jane Chance, ed., The Assembly of Gods (Kalamazoo, MI, 1990). 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 176 of 230 
 
4) Traditions: liturgy and scripture 
Works to read for class 
  John Lydgate, religious lyrics and Testament, in his Minor Poems: Volume I, ed. H. N. MacCracken, 
EETS os 107 (London, 1911), nos 5-8, nos 13-17, nos 45-64, nos 68-69. 
  James Ryman’s carols, in R.L. Greene, ed., The Early English Carols, 2nd edn (Oxford, 1977), nos 53-6, 
61-3, 65-7, 70-72, 74-76, 81.A, 82, 84, 88, 92, 127-30, 154, 156, 159, 160, 174, 189, 192-205, 207-12, 
214-29, 243.a., 243.b, 244-5, 257-8, 262, 267-69, 275-76, 279-81, 282-305, 318, 352-53, 360. 
  ‘The First Shepherds’ Play’ and ‘The Second Shepherds’ Play’, in A.C. Cawley and Martin Stevens, ed., 
The Towneley Cycle, EETS ss 13-14 (Oxford, 1994), nos 12-13. 
Secondary readings for orientation 
  Robert Meyer-Lee, ‘The Emergence of the Literary in John Lydgate’s Life of Our Lady’, Journal of 
English and Germanic Philology, 109 (2010), 322-248. 
  Shannon Gayk, ‘Images of Pity: The Regulatory Aesthetics of John Lydgate’s Religious Lyrics’, Studies in 
the Age of Chaucer, 28 (2006), 175-203. 
  Shannon Gayk, ‘Idiot Psalms: Sound, Style, and the Performance of the Literary in the Towneley 
Shepherds’ Plays’, in Robert J Meyer-Lee and Catherine Sanok, ed., The Medieval Literary: beyond 
Form
 (Cambridge, 2018), 119-140. 
Follow-up examples 
  John Lydgate, Life of Our Lady, ed. Joseph A. Lauritis, Ralph A. Klinefelter and Vernon F. Gallagher, 
Duquesne Studies: Philological Series, 2 (Pittsburgh, PA, 1961). 
  ‘The Visit to Elizabeth’, in Stephen Spector, ed., The N-Town Cycle, EETS ss 11-12 (Oxford, 1991), no. 
13. 
 
5) Forms 
Works to read for class 
  John Walton, trans., Boethius: De Consolatione Philosophiae, ed. Mark Science, EETS os 170 (London, 
1927), general preface and prologue, parts of book II, the preface to book IV, parts of book IV. 
  anon., A Lovers’ Mass, in Eleanor Prescott Hammond, ed., English Verse between Chaucer and Surrey 
(Durham, NC, 1927), 207-13. 
   ‘Courtly Love Lyrics’ in Rossell Hope Robbins, ed., Secular Lyrics of the XIVth and XVth Centuries 
(Oxford, 1952), nos 127-212. 
Secondary readings for orientation 
  D. Vance Smith, ‘Medieval Forma: The Logic of the Work’, in Reading for Form, ed. Susan J. Wolfson 
and Marshall Brown (Seattle, 66-79. 
  Nicholas Myklebust, ‘Misreading English Meter: 1400–1514’ (unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, 
University of Texas at Austin, 2012), chapters 1 and 8: online at: 
https://repositories.lib.utexas.edu/bitstream/handle/2152/19527/myklebust_dissertation_201291.p
df?sequence=1.
 
  Jenni Nuttall, ‘Lydgate and the Lenvoy’, Exemplaria, 30 (2018), 35-48: on a formal device found in 
many poems, not only Lydgate’s. 
  Jenni Nuttall, the blog Stylisticienne, http://stylisticienne.com/: introduces various verse forms in this 
period. 
Follow-up examples 
  Charles d’Orléans, Fortunes Stabilnes: Charles d’Orléans’s English Book of Love, ed. Mary-Jo Arn, MRTS 
138 (Binghampton, NY, 1994). 
  Ewald Flügel, ed., ‘Eine Mittelenglische Claudian-Übersetzung (1445)’, Anglia, 28 (1905), 255-99, 421-
38. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 177 of 230 
 
6) Functions 
Works to read for class 
  Lydgate, ‘A Dietary’, ‘A Doctrine for Pestilence’ and ‘A Treatise for Lauandres’, in his Minor Poems: 
Volume II, ed. Henry Noble MacCracken, EETS os 192 (London, 1934), nos 47-48, 52. 
  George Warner, ed., The Libelle of Englyshe Polycye (Oxford, 1926). 
  R. Dyboski and Z. M. Arend, ed., Knyghthode and Bataile, EETS os 201 (London, 1935), esp. prologue 
and books I and IV. 
  ‘Practical Verse’ in Rossell Hope Robbins, ed., Secular Lyrics of the XIVth and XVth Centuries (Oxford, 
1952), nos 61-88. 
Secondary readings for orientation 
  Maura Nolan, ‘Lydgate’s Worst Poem’, in Lisa H. Cooper and Andrea Denny-Brown, ed., Lydgate 
Matters: Poetry and Material Culture in the Fifteenth Century (London, 2007), 71-87: on ‘A Treatise for 
Lauandres’. 
  Lisa H. Cooper, ‘The Poetics of Practicality’, in Paul Strohm, ed., Twenty-First Century Approaches to 
Literature: Middle English (Oxford, 2007), 491-50. 
  Sebastian Sobecki, The Public Self and the Social Author in Late Medieval England (Oxford, 2019), 
chap. 3: on The Libelle. 
  Hannah Bower, ‘Similes We Cure By: The Poetics of Late Medieval Medical Texts’, New Medieval 
Literatures, 18 (2018), 183-210. 
Follow-up example 
  E. Ruth Harvey, ed., The Court of Sapience (Toronto, 1984). 
 
General background reading 
It would be useful to reread some Chaucer, as he is a large influence on these writers. You should gain an 
overview of the literary history of this period from one of the following surveys: 
  Douglas Gray, Later Medieval Literature (Oxford, 2008): the most comprehensive historical survey. 
  James Simpson, Reform and Cultural Revolution (Oxford, 2002): a polemical defence of this period. 
 
Also useful are these discussions which, although not focused on fifteenth-century works in particular, debate 
the category of ‘the literary’ in the Middle Ages in general: 
  Christopher Cannon, From Literacy to Literature (Oxford, 2016). 
  Rita Copeland, Rhetoric, Hermeneutics and Translation in the Middle Ages (Cambridge, 1992). 
  Daniel Sawyer, Reading English Verse in Manuscript c.1350-1500 (Oxford, 2020). 
  Ingrid Nelson, ‘Form’s Practice: Lyrics, Grammars, and the Medieval Idea of the Literary’, in Robert J 
Meyer-Lee and Catherine Sanok, ed., The Medieval Literary: beyond Form (Cambridge, 2018). 
  Pascale Bourgain, ‘The circulation of texts in manuscript culture’, in Michael Johnston and Michael 
Van Dussen, ed., The Medieval Manuscript: Cultural Approaches (Cambridge, 2015), 140-159. 
 
To introduce current debates about the category of literature, I might start working backwards from these 
recent studies: 
  Derek Attridge, The Singularity of Literature (London, 2004), The Work of Literature (Oxford, 2015) 
and The Experience of Poetry: From Homer's Listeners to Shakespeare's Readers (Oxford, 2019), esp. 
chap. 10, on fifteenth-century England. 
  Rita Felski, Uses of Literature (Oxford, 2008) and The Limits of Critique (Chicago, 2015). 
But you will find many other interlocutors on these long-debated questions. 
 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 178 of 230 
Milton and the Philosophers 
Dr Noël Sugimura – xxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx  

This M.St. option is designed for graduate students interested in reading and reflecting on the intersection of 
philosophy and literature in Milton’s poetry, particularly in his magnificent epic poem, Paradise Lost. Although 
the title of this option is ‘Milton and Philosophy’, the term ‘philosophy’ is used heuristically: we will explore 
what it means for a poem to be ‘philosophical’, and how different modes of philosophic discourse are present 
in, or emergent from, Milton’s poetry. In this context, the term, ‘philosophy’, will be opened up to include a 
range of ‘philosophies’ or philosophical commitments (ontological, epistemological, etc), many of which may 
seem at odds with one another. A previous knowledge of Milton is recommended, though no previous 
knowledge of philosophy is necessary. The course presumes that you will have read Milton’s Paradise Lost in 
its entirety over the long vacation, including also his Masque (aka Comus), Paradise Regained, and Samson 
Agonistes
. One substantial aim of this M.St option is to integrate close readings of the poetry with an 
understanding of Milton’s own historical, political, philosophical, and theological engagements. The result is 
that primary readings are drawn from Milton’s oeuvre as well as major philosophical works (classical as well as 
early modern). Secondary literature includes seminal studies by historians, philosophers, and literary critics, all 
of which are meant to present you with a variety of critical approaches to Milton. I ask that you assess what 
purchase each of these theories has on Milton’s poetry, including its limitations (if any). Participation in class 
discussion is mandatory and will revolve around the ‘focus questions’ for each week (given at the end of the 
reading list under the week in question) or from our in-class presentations (to be assigned). Please note that 
the primary reading and recommendations for supplementary reading are given under the week in which 
those texts will be discussed in class.  
Course Outline and Reading List 
Recommended Texts 
For the primary readings in Milton, I would ask that you bring the physical book to class. Recommended 
editions for Milton’s Comus, Paradise LostParadise Regained, and Samson Agonistes are either The Complete 
Poems
, ed. John Leonard (Penguin, 1999) OR Paradise Lost, ed. Alastair Fowler (2nd edition; Routledge, 2006) 
and The Complete Shorter Poems (2nd edition; Routledge, 2006).  
Milton’s prose works are available in the Complete Prose Works of John Milton, gen. ed. D. M. Wolfe (New 
Haven, CT: Yale UP, 1953-). Please note that these volumes are gradually being superseded by the more recent 
Oxford editions (volumes 2 and 7 will be of particular interest to you in this course).  
For readings in Aristotle, I recommend The Works of Aristotle, tr. W. D. Ross (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1905-
52). As with the other classical texts on this list, the Loeb editions will suffice as well. 
For readings in Augustine, a good edition is the City of God, ed. G. R. Evans (Penguin, 2004) or, alternatively, 
the Loeb edition.  
 
Weekly Assignments 
Week 1: Comus: Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Poetry 
Primary Reading 
  Milton, Comus: A Masque Presented at Ludlow Castle.  
Please also read: 
  Aristotle, Rhetoric, I. 3 [forms of rhetoric] and I. 9 – I.15 
  Cicero, De Oratore book 1 (on rhetoric and pathos). 
  Plato, Gorgias – in its entirety. 
  Warren Chernaik, Milton and the Burden of Freedom (Cambridge UP, 2017), chapter 3, pp.61-85. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 179 of 230 
  Amélie Oksenberg Rorty, ‘Structuring Rhetoric’, in Essays on Aristotle’s Rhetoric, ed. Amélie 
Oksenberg Rorty (Berkeley/London, 1993), pp. 1-33 – a good introduction to rhetoric and Aristotle’s 
view of it and his legacy. 
 
Suggested Reading: 
  W. W. Fortenbaugh, Aristotle on Emotion (1975; London, 2002). 
  Bryan Garsten, Saving Persuasion: A Defense of Rhetoric and Judgment (Cambridge, MA, 2006) pp.1-
23 (intro) and ch.1 (on Hobbes). 
  Victoria Kahn, Machiavellian Rhetoric: from the Counter-Reformation to Milton (Princeton, 1994) 
pp.185-208 (ch. 7 is on Comus; ch. 8 on PL). 
  Barbara Keifer Lewalski, Paradise Lost and the Rhetoric of Literary Forms (Princeton, 1985) – especially 
good for looking forward to PL
  --. ‘Milton’s Comus and the Politics of Masquing’, in The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque, ed. David 
Bevington and Peter Holbrook (Cambridge, 1998) pp.296-320 – see the entire collection for more on 
the tradition, structure, and politics of the masque as a genre. 
  A. A. Long, ‘Cicero’s Plato and Aristotle’, in From Epicurus to Epictetus: Studies in Hellenistic and 
Roman Philosophy (Oxford, 2006) – available also online through Oxford Scholarship Online. 
  William Pallister, Between Worlds: The Rhetorical Universe of Paradise Lost (Toronto, 2008)especially 
chapters 1 and 4. 
  Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria [Institutes of Oratory] – again, the Loeb edition is very good or the text 
on Perseus (online). It’s worth reading books 1, 2, and 8-10. 
  Eckart Schütrumpf, ‘ No-logical Means of Persuasion in Aristotle’ Rhetoric and Cicero’s De oratore, in 
Peripatetic Rhetoric after Aristotle, ed. William W Fortenbaugh and David C. Mirhady (New Brunswick, 
NJ/London, 1994) pp.95-110. 
  Robert Wardy, The Birth of Rhetoric: Gorgias, Plato, and their Successors (Routledge, 1996). 
*We will return to discuss rhetoric in week 5 in the context of Paradise Regained, so it’s worth reading ahead 
in some of these texts! 
Focus question for class: ‘What impressed me most deeply about Plato in that book [the Gorgias] was, that it 
was when making fun of orators that he himself seemed to me to be the consummate orator.’ (Cicero, De 
oratore 
I.xi.47 [Loeb, 1942], pp.35-37.). To what extent can the same assessment be made about Milton’s 
treatment of Comus in the genre of the masque? 
 
Week 2 Theodicy and Aetiology in Paradise Lost 
Primary Reading 
As you will have read all of Paradise Lost over the long vacation, please reread books 1-3 and book 9 for our 
class in this week (week 2). Please also read: 
  Aristotle, Metaphysics V.2 and Physics II.3 (on the four causes). 
  Augustine, City of God book xi, chapters 14-15; book xii, chapters 1, 3, and 7; book xiv, chapters 3, 11-
19. 
  Warren Chernaik, ‘Introduction’, Milton and the Burden of Freedom (Cambridge UP, 2017), pp.1-20 -- 
read this as one introduction to Milton’s religious politics and his prose works alongside the poetry. 
  Dennis Danielson, “The Fall and Milton’s Theodicy’, in The Cambridge Companion to Milton 
(Cambridge UP, 1999) – also available online (online publication May 2006). 
  Harold Skulsky, Milton and the Death of Man, pp. 13-55 (God's Attorney: Narrative as Argument’). 
 
Suggested Reading: 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 180 of 230 
  John Carey, ‘Milton’s Satan’, in Cambridge Companion to Milton, ed. Dennis Danielson (Cambridge, 
1999) pp.160-74; available also through the Cambridge Companions Online. 
  Dennis Danielson, Milton’s Good GodA Study in Literary Theodicy (Cambridge UP, 1982). 
  William Empson, Milton’s God (Chatto & Windus, 1961). 
  Neil Forsyth, ‘The English Church’, in Milton in Context, ed. Stephen Dobranski (Cambridge UP, 2015) 
pp.292-304. 
  C. S. Lewis, Preface to Paradise Lost (Oxford, 1942). 
  Robert Pasnau, Metaphysical Themes, 1274–1671 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2011) – especially helpful 
for an understanding of Aristotle’s four ‘causes’ and their history. 
NB: A handy introduction to Aristotelian causation is also available in the online Stanford Encyclopedia of 
Philosophy: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/aristotle-causality/ 
Class Discussions on the ‘origins’ of the Fall: one part of the class will present on and engage in a critique of 
John S. Tanner, “’Say First What Cause’,” PMLA 103.1 (1988): 1-45 (available through JSTOR), while the other 
half of the class will examine and assess William Poole’s account in chapter 1: “Causality of Wickedness,” in 
Idea of the Fall [available also by PDF for distribution via email]. The merits/demerits of each approach along 
with your own critical contributions with regard to how you understand Milton’s account of the Fall will focus 
our class discussion.  
 
Week 3 Ontology and Narrative: Chaos and Creation 
Primary Reading 
  PL, books 5-7; re-read PL 2.890-967, and PL 3.705-35.  
Please also read: 
  Aristotle Rhetoric, III, ch. 11. 
  Lucretius, De Rerum Natura (DRN), i.1-858, 921-1117; ii.1-181, 541-99, 1023-1175; iii.1-71, 98-109; 
iv.722-823. 
  Augustine, City of God, bk xi, ch. 17, 18, 22, 23; bk xii, ch. 4 and bk xiii, ch. 24 (creation of humankind). 
  Stephen Fallon, Milton among the Philosophers, chapter 3 (‘Material Life: Milton’s Animist 
Materialism’), pp.79-110. 
  David Bentley Hart, The Hidden and the Manifest in Theology and Metaphysics (Grand Rapids, MI: 
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, 2017), chapter 11 (‘Matter, Monism, and Narrative: Essays on the 
Metaphysics of Paradise Lost’).** 
  William Kolbrener, Milton’s Warring Angels, pp.89-98 (on ‘monism and dualism’); optional reading on 
pp.98-105. 
  Christopher Lüthy and William Newman, ‘“Matter” and “Form”: By Way of a Preface’, Early Science 
and Medicine 2.3 (1997): 215-226. 
  John Rogers, The Matter of Revolutionchapter 1 (‘The Power of Matter’ and ‘The Vitalist Movement’, 
pp.8-16 and chapter 4 (‘Chaos, Creation, and the Political Science of PL’), pp.103-30. 
  Regina Schwartz, Remembering and Repeating (Chicago/London, 1988), ‘Preface, Intro, and Ch. 1’, xi-
39. 
  Ann Thomson, ‘Mechanistic Materialism vs Vitalistic Materialism’ in Mécanisme et vitalisme, ed. Mariana 
Saad, La lettre de la Maison française d’Oxford 14 (Oxford: Maison française d’Oxford, 2001) pp.22–36. 
**Our focus question for this week will take for its starting point this essay, so please read it with care. 
 
Suggested Reading  
  Noel Malcolm, Aspects of Hobbes (Oxford, 2004) – especially ch. 5 (and discussion of Hobbes and 
metaphysics). 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 181 of 230 
  John Milton, Of Christian Doctrine, in The Complete Works of John Milton, Vol. 8: De Doctrina 
Christiana, ed. John K. Hale and J. Donald Cullington (Oxford, 2012); also available online (published 
2013) at: 
http://www.oxfordscholarlyeditions.com/view/10.1093/actrade/9780199651900.book.1/actrade-
9780199651900-book-1. See especially the chapters on God, Creation, etc. 
  Phillip J. Donnelly, Milton’s Scriptural Reasoning: Narrative and Protestant Toleration (Cambridge UP, 
2009), especially pp.1-72. 
  Robert Pasnau, Metaphysical Themes, 1274–1671 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2011) – especially helpful 
for discussions of form and matter in the early modern period. 
  Lynn S. Joy, ‘Scientific Explanation: Formal Causes to Laws of Nature’, in The Cambridge History of 
Science: Vol. 3, Early Modern Science, ed. Katharine Park and Lorraine Daston (Cambridge, 2003) pp. 
70-105. 
Focus Question: To what extent do you agree with D. Bentley Hart’s reading of Milton’s metaphysic in 
Paradise Lost? Explain. Ground your discussion in close readings of the poetry as well as your understanding of 
the poetry’s philosophical and/or theological commitments. 
 
Week 4 Milton’s Metaphysics of Desire: The Nature of the Passions and Experience in Paradise Lost 
Primary Reading 
  Reread with care PL, books 1, 2, 4, 8-10 and Milton, Doctrine of Discipline and Divorce, especially book 
1 (read with care chapters ii and ch. xiii). 
 Please also read: 
  Augustine, City of God, bk xi, ch. 26-28 (on love and knowledge) and bk xiv, chapters 10, 23-24, 26-27 
(on the passions in a prelapsarian and postlapsarian world); and a short excerpt from On Music 6, 2.3 
– 13.38 in Greek and Roman Aesthetics, tr. and ed. Oleg V. Bychkov and Anne Sheppard (Cambridge, 
2010), pp.206-18 [also available for distribution via email].  
  Lucretius, DRN iv. 473-521, 1049-1208. 
  Plotinus, excerpts from the Enneads I.6.1-9, 5.8.1-2, 6.7.22.24-26, 6.731-33, in Greek and Roman 
Aesthetics, tr. and ed. Oleg V. Bychkov and Anne Sheppard (Cambridge, 2010), pp.185-200 [also 
available for distribution via email]. 
  Peter Dear, ‘The Meanings of Experience’, in The Cambridge History of Science: Vol. 3, Early Modern 
Science, ed. Katharine Park and Lorraine Daston (Cambridge UP, 2003) pp.106-31. 
  Maggie Kilgour, Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid (Oxford UP, 2012) pp.229-72. 
  Michael Schoenfeldt, ‘“Commotion Strange”: Passion in Paradise Lost’, in Reading the Early Modern 
Passions: Essays in the Cultural History of Emotion, ed. Gail Kern Paster, Katherine Rowe, and Mary 
Floyd-Wilson (Philadelphia, PA: Univ of PA Press, 2004) pp.43-68. 
  Harold Skulsky, Chapter 3 (‘The Creator Defended’), in Milton and the Death of Man, pp. 114-171. 
 
Suggested Reading 
  Aristotle, Rhetoric book I, chapters 1-2 (on rhetoric and character); Rhetoric book II, chapters 2-4, 5, 
and 7-11 and Aristotle’s Poetics, chapters 9, 13-14 – these will help you to reflect on how the 
relationships between the passions/pathos and ethos in relation to moral philosophy and rhetoric. 
  Descartes, Les Passions de L’Âme (1649), or Passions of the Soul [especially article 70 on ‘wonder’]. A 
good translation of this text is available in The Philosophical Writings [of Descartes], ed. J. Cottingham, 
R. Steinhoff, D. Murdoch, and A. Kenny, 3 voles (Cambridge, 1985-1991). 
  Plato, Phaedrus and the Symposium (on Eros). 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 182 of 230 
  Katharine Park and Lorraine Daston, ‘Introduction: The Age of the New’, in The Cambridge History of 
Science: Vol. 3, Early Modern Science, ed. Katharine Park and Lorraine Daston (Cambridge, 2003) pp.1-
17 – good introduction to the ‘new science’. 
Focus Question: Aristotle begins his Metaphysics (I.2.982b) by observing, ‘For it is owing to their wonder that 
men both now begin and at first began to philosophize; they wondered originally at the obvious difficulties, 
then advanced, little by little, and stated difficulties about the greater matters’ (tr. W. D. Ross). To what extent 
is Aristotle’s claim--which has its origins in Plato (Theaetetus 155d)—equally applicable to Milton’s descriptions 
of wonder/admiration in Paradise Lost? What does one wonder at, and what other passions (if any) can it 
arouse? 
 
Week 5 Satanic or Christian Liberty?: Reading the Political Theology of Paradise Lost 
Primary Reading 
  PL, books 1-2, 10-12 and all of Paradise Regained (books 1-4) and Milton, Doctrine and Discipline of 
Divorce book 2, ch. 3. Please also read: 
  Augustine, City of God, bk. xiii, ch. 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14-15, 16; bk xiv, chapters 1-9, 11, 15-19, 21 
(and reread) 24 and 26; and bk. xxii, ch. 30; and also Augustine, ‘On Free Choice of the Will’ 2.11.31-
16.43, in Greek and Roman Aesthetics, tr. and ed. Oleg V. Bychkov and Anne Sheppard (Cambridge, 
2010) pp.227-30. 
  Lucretius, DRN, ii. 251-443. 
  Warren Chernaik, Milton and the Burden of Freedom (Cambridge UP, 2017) chapter 3 (‘“Providence 
Thir Guide”: Providence in Milton’), pp.39-60; chapter 6 (‘Monarchy and Servitude: The Politics of 
Paradise Lost’), pp.124-42; and chapter 7 (‘God’s Just Yoke: Power and Justice in Paradise Lost’) 
pp.143-71. 
  Filippo Falcone, Milton’s Inward Liberty (James Clarke & Co Ltd, 2014), chapter 4 (‘Satan’s inward 
prison’) and chapter 5 (‘Christian liberty in Adam and Eve’). 
  Benjamin Meyers, chapter 1 (‘The Theology of Freedom: A Short History’), in Milton’s Theology of 
Freedom (Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter, 2006) pp.15-52 and chapter 2 (‘The Satanic Theology of 
Freedom’) pp.53-71. [Also available on ProQuest ebrary]. 
 
Suggested Reading  
  Juliet Cummins, “New Heavens, New Earth,” Milton and the Ends of Time (ch. 10) – on eschatology. 
  Stephen Fallon, Milton’s Peculiar Grace: Self-Representation and Authority (Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 
2007) especially chapters 5, 7-9. 
  Phillip Donnelly, Scriptural Reading, chapter 9 (‘Paradise Regained as rule of charity), pp.188-200. 
  William Empson, Milton’s God, chapters 2 (‘Satan’) and 3 (‘Heaven’). 
  Stanley Fish, ‘Things and Actions Indifferent: The Temptation of Paradise Regained,’ Milton Studies 
(1983): 163-85, reprinted in How Milton Works (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2001), pp.349-90.  
  Northrop Frye, “The Typology of Paradise Regained,” Modern Philology 53.4 (1956): 227-38. 
  Barbara Lewalski, Milton’s Brief Epic: The Genre, Meaning, and Art of Paradise Regained (Providence, 
RI: Brown UP, 1966) – a classic study of PR
  Peter Mack, History of Renaissance Rhetoric, 1380-1620 (Oxford, 2011) – gives you the broad sweep 
for background reading with admirable detail.  
  David Norbrook, Writing the English Republic: Poetry, Rhetoric, and Politics, 1627-1660 (Cambridge 
UP, 1999). 
  William Poole, Milton and the Fall, chapter 4 (‘The Heterodox Fall’), pp.58-83. 
  David Armitage, Armand Himy, and Quentin Skinner (eds), Milton and Republicanism (Cambridge UP, 
1995; 1998) – a seminal collection of essays on this topic. 
Back to Contents 
 
M.St. & M.Phil Course Details 2020-21 v1.1 

link to page 2 C-Courses – Hilary Term 
 
Page 183 of 230 
  William Walker, ‘Milton’s Dualistic Theory of Religious Toleration in “A Treatise of Civil Power”, “Of 
Christian Doctrine” and “Paradise Lost”’, Modern Philology 99.2 (2001): 201–230. 
Focus Question: In your own reading, what type(s) of liberty does Milton’s epic champion? Explain with 
reference to at least two arguments drawn from the secondary literature. 
 
Week 6 From Paradise Regained to Samson Agonistes: Wrath Returned 
Primary Reading 
  Milton, Samson Agonistes.  
Please also read: 
  Warren Chernaik, Burden of Freedom, chapter 8, pp.181-205. 
  Phillip Donnelly, Scriptural Reasoning, chapter 10 (‘Samson Agonistes as personal drama’), pp.201-27. 
  Stephen Fallon, Milton’s Peculiar Grace, chapter 9 (‘“I as All Others”: Paradise Regained and Samson 
Agonistes’), pp.237-64. 
  Noam Reisner, Milton and the Ineffable, chapter 5 (‘Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes: the 
ineffable self’), pp.234-81. 
Suggested Reading 
Please see the bibliography handed out in class 
<