Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Central Gurdwara Khalsa Jatha (258324) Income and Charity Commission Enquiry'.


 
 
 
Charity Commission 
By email only 
PO Box 211 
request-690383-
Bootle 
xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx 
L20 7YX 
 
T:  
 
Your ref:  
Our ref: C-526626 
 
Date: 02/10/2020 
Dear Mr Ali Ahmad 
Your Freedom of Information request response 
 
Thank you for your email received 8th September 2020 in which you requested the following 
information. 
 
“1) can you please advise why no action has been taken by the Charity Commission into what  
a) xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
And 
b) the lack of any accounts 
 
 2) xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx“ 
 
The  above  request  has  been  processed  under  the  provisions  of  the  Freedom  of  Information  Act 
2000 (FOIA). 
 
Please  note  that  a  response  to  an  FOIA  request  is  considered  to  be  open  to  the  world,  and 
therefore the public interest has to be considered not the specific interests of the person requesting 
the information.   A request for information under the FOIA must be for information held in recorded 
form. 
 
 
In relation to Q1a  and Q2 
 
I can confirm that the Commission holds information relevant to your request, however we are 
unable to disclose this information as the exemptions at section 32 (2): Inquiries apply to your 
request. 
 
Section 32 (Inquiries)    
 
On track to meet your deadline? 
t: 
0300 066 9197 (General enquiries) 
Visit www.gov.uk/charity-commission for help 
on filing your annual return and accounts 
w:  www.gov.uk/charity-commission 
 
 
 

 
Section 32(2) states that information held by a public authority is exempt information if it is held 
only by virtue of being contained in a) any document placed in the custody of a person conducting 
any inquiry or arbitration for the purposes of the inquiry or arbitration, or (b) any document created 
by a person conducting an inquiry or arbitration, for the purposes of the inquiry or arbitration. In this 
context “inquiry” means any inquiry held under any statutory provision.  The Commission conducts 
statutory inquiries under the power set out in Section 46 of the Charities Act 2011.      
 
Charities Act 2011 powers     
 
Information relating to statutory inquiry cases is subject to an absolute exemption from disclosure 
under FOIA by virtue of Section 32.  However, the Commission has also considered whether to 
disclose this information by reference to its powers and duties under the Charities Act, which are 
informed by common-law principles.     
 
The Commission’s objectives include increasing public trust and confidence in charities and 
enhancing the accountability of charities to the general public (section 14).  Its general functions 
include disseminating information in connection with the performance of its functions (section 15).  
In performing its functions under the Charities Act the Commission has a duty to have regard to the 
principles of best regulatory practice which include the principles that regulatory activities should 
be proportionate and transparent (section 16).  The Commission has therefore considered the 
extent to which it is in the public interest for the information to be disclosed. Please see the Public 
Interest Test conducted below.    
 
Arguments for disclosure  
  
•  The information you have requested relates to an inquiry. The Commission recognises that 
there is public interest and concern in seeing that the regulator of charities is doing its job 
properly. As such, there are arguments that to disclose this information is in the public 
interest.    
  
•  In addition, the conduct of a quasi-judicial inquiry may engage the principle of open justice 
– that justice should be seen to be done. The open justice principle also favours disclosure.    
  
There are, however, strong arguments in favour of withholding the information in the public 
interest.   
  
Argument for non-disclosure  
 
•  The Commission’s power to conduct inquiries is set out in statute. The clear purpose of 
this power is for the Commission to prevent and take action against misconduct and 
mismanagement in charities, thereby protecting the reputation and rights of the charity and 
others and ensuring that charities are not abused for criminal or other illegal purposes. The 
disclosure of the information requested would be likely to prejudice these functions as if the 
details of information gathered during the course of an inquiry were routinely disclosed, 
charities, and other parties, would be reluctant to co-operate or enter into open and frank 
discussions with the Commission in the course of its work. This would affect the 
Page 2 of 4 
 

Commissions ability to carry out our statutory functions as outlined at s14 and s15 of the 
Charities Act 2011.  
  
Outcome  
  
For the reasons relating to the argument for non-disclosure the Commission considers that the 
greater public interest balance lies in favour of withholding this information.    
 
 
In relation to Q1 (b) 
 
I can confirm the Commission holds information relevant to your request, however it is exempt from 
disclosure under Section 22(1) of the Act.  
  
Section 22 provides that a Public Authority can exempt information from release if it is held with the 
intention  of  future  publication.    In  this  instance  The  Charity  Commission  can  confirm  that  the 
information you have requested meets these criteria.  
  
However, Section 22 is a qualified exemption and, as such, requires the Commission to carry out a 
test of public interest regarding the disclosure of the information requested.  
  
There are two qualifications to section 22; a request for information may only be refused if:  
  
a) it is reasonable in all the circumstances that the information should be withheld from disclosure 
until the future date of publication (whether determined or not) or,  
 
b) the public interest in maintaining the exemption outweighs the public interest in disclosure   
  
The  public  interest  in  permitting  Public  Authorities  to  publish  information  at  a  time  of  their  own 
choosing  is  important.    It  is  a  part  of the  effective  conduct  of  public  affairs that  the  publication  of 
information is a managed activity within the reasonable control of the relevant Public Authority.   
  
Where the decision has been taken (in principle or otherwise) to publish Public Authorities do have 
a reasonable entitlement to make their own arrangements to do so.  
  
As a result of the above the Commission is satisfied that, in this instance, the argument in favour of 
withholding the information outweighs the argument in favour of disclosure.    
 
Under Section 16 of the Act (the duty to advise and assist) when the Inquiry Report is concluded 
and  published  you  will  be  able  to  view  and  download  it  from  the  Commissions  website.  The 
information you seek will be available in the report. 
I would advise that the Commissions Inquiry is ongoing and the purpose of the inquiry is to : 
 
•  why  the  trustees  failed  to  fully  comply  with  the  action  plan  issued  by  the  commission  in 
February 2014 
•  whether there has been any private benefit to trustees with regard to the operation of the 
charity’s properties and whether any conflicts of interest have been properly managed 
Page 3 of 4 
 

•  whether  the  trustees  have  properly  administered  the  charity  in  accordance  with  its 
governing document 
•  the financial management of the charity 
•  whether or not the trustees have complied with their duties and responsibilities as trustees 
under  charity  law,  in  particular  in  relation  to  whether  the  trustees  have  made  decisions  in 
the best interests of the charity 
•  whether there has been any misconduct and/or mismanagement by the trustees 
 
The purpose of an inquiry is to examine issues in detail and investigate and establish the facts so 
that  the  regulator  can  ascertain  whether  or  not  there  has  been  misconduct  or  mismanagement; 
establish the extent of the risk to the charity’s property, beneficiaries or work; decide what action 
needs to be taken to resolve the serious concerns, if necessary using its investigative, protective 
and remedial powers to do so. 
 
It  is  the  commission’s  policy,  after  it  has  concluded  an  inquiry,  to  publish  a  report  detailing  what 
issues  the  inquiry  looked  at,  what  actions  were  undertaken  as  part  of  the  inquiry  and  what  the 
outcomes were.  
 
 
This concludes our consideration of your information request.  
 
Yours sincerely 
 
Ms Jan Provost (Data Protection and Information Rights Manager) 
 
If  you  think  our  decision  is  wrong,  you  can  ask  for  it  to  be  reviewed.   Such  requests  should  be 
submitted within two months of the date of our response and should be addressed to the Charity 
Commission  at  PO  Box  211,  Bootle,  L20  7YX  (email:  xxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx).   More 
information about our Freedom of Information Act review service can be found on the following link 
to 
our 
website: 
https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/charity-
commission/about/complaints-procedure.  
 
If  you  are  not  satisfied  with  the  internal  review,  you  can  appeal  to  the  Information 
Commissioner.  Generally, the ICO cannot make a decision unless you have exhausted our review 
procedure.  The ICO  can be contacted at the Information Commissioner’s Office, Wycliffe House, 
Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire SK9 5AF (email: xxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx). 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 4 of 4