Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'BMI examiner reports'.


UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD 
University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD 
 
 
Ref. FOI/20191216/1 
20 January 2020 
Reply to request for information under the Freedom of Information Act  
Your Ref 
Your email of 18 December 2019 
Address 
WhatDoTheyKnow.com 

Request 
According  to  the  Freedom  of  Information  Act,  I  would  like  to  request  past  (internal) 
examiners' reports for the First BM Part I Examinations (trinity term) from the years 2004-
2015. If you do not have records back to 2004, please provide to the earliest year you 
do have. Thank you. 
 
Dear Damien Wallace, 
 
I write in reply to your email of Wednesday 18 December, requesting the above information. 
 
Please find the reports for the period specified attached. 
 
Section 40(2) exemption 
 
We have redacted the names of examiners/assessors together with any other identifying information, such as 
examination results that could be attributed to one student, as we consider that this information is exempt from 
disclosure under section 40(2) of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). Section 40(2) provides an exemption 
from  disclosure  for  information  that  is  the  personal  data  of  an  individual  other  than  the  requester,  where 
disclosure  would  breach  any  of  the  data  protection  principles  in  Article  5  of  the  General  Data  Protection 
Regulation  (GDPR).  We  consider  that  disclosure  of  the  information  requested  would  breach  the  first  data 
protection principle, which requires that personal data is processed lawfully, fairly and in a transparent manner, 
for the reasons given below. 
 
Disclosure would be unfair to the individuals concerned as it would be contrary to their reasonable and legitimate 
expectations. Examiners/assessors would not reasonably expect their names to be made public under the FOIA 
without  their  consent.  Similarly,  student  would  not  reasonably  expect  information  on  their  performance  in 
examinations to be disclosed under FOIA without their agreement. (Please note that a disclosure of information 
under FOIA is presumed to be a disclosure to the world at large, and not just a disclosure to the individual 
making the request.) 
 
For the disclosure of personal data to be lawful, it must have a lawful basis under Article 6 of the GDPR. There 
are six possible lawful bases in Article 6; we do not consider that any of them would be satisfied in respect of 
the disclosure. 
 
The exemption in section 40(2) is an absolute exemption and is not subject to the public interest test provided 
for in section 2(2)(b) of the FOIA. To the extent that the public interest is relevant in this case, we believe that 
it is sufficiently met by disclosure of the material provided. 
 
Section 43(2) exemption 
 
We have also redacted any questions that were used in examination papers, as we consider this information to 
be exempt from disclosure under section 43(2) of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). 
 



 
Section 43(2) provides that information is exempt where its disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice 
the commercial interests of any person. In our view, disclosure of the information requested would be likely to 
prejudice  the  University’s  commercial  interests,  by  revealing  information  that  would  be  of  value  to  other 
institutions  offering  courses  in  Medicine.  There  is  strong  competition  for  students,  both  nationally  and 
internationally.  The  examination  questions  and  supplementary  materials  reproduced  in  these  reports  would 
indicate the particular approach taken by Oxford to particular topics or issues, and would be of interest and 
value  to  rival  organisations,  who  could  use  the  information  to  improve  their  own  courses.  The  University’s 
approach would be of especial interest to rival organisations because Oxford has been ranked as the world’s 
best institution for medical health teaching and research1 for the ninth consecutive year.2 In addition, the nature 
of  undergraduate  medicine  courses  means  that  most  higher  education  institutions  use  their  own  ‘banks’  of 
standard set examination questions, which can be reviewed and reused as required – such resources could be 
easily replicated to mimic Oxford’s rigorous academic assessment. 
 
Section 43(2) is a qualified exemption that requires the University to weigh up the public interest in disclosing 
the information requested, which is presumed under FOIA, against the public interest in withholding it. The 
University recognises that there is some public interest in disclosure of the examination questions. Generally, 
there is an interest in openness and transparency in the conduct of the University’s affairs. More specifically, 
there is an interest in information relating to the performance of the Medical Sciences Division as the world’s 
leading destination for studying medicine. However, we consider that the interest can be met without impairing 
the University’s ability to compete with other institutions. The information released in the redacted documents 
contains  detailed  comments  about  each  cohort’s  performance  in  the  examinations,  as  well  as  suggested 
improvements for them. The course information available on the University’s website covers content, structure, 
assessment methods and the resources available to students (including the four most recent internal examiner’s 
reports)  which,  in  our  view,  is  more  than  sufficient  to  meet  the  public  interest  in  disclosure.  We  therefore 
consider that the balance of public interests lies in favour of maintaining the exemption.  
 
INTERNAL REVIEW 
 
If  you  are  dissatisfied  with  this  reply,  you  may  ask  the  University  to  review  it,  by  writing  to  the  Head  of 
Information Compliance at the following address: 
 
University Offices 
Wellington Square 
Oxford 
OX1 2JD 
 
Alternatively, you may request a review by e-mailing xxx@xxxxx.xx.xx.xx  
 
THE INFORMATION COMMISSIONER 
 
If, after the internal review, you are still dissatisfied, you have the right under FOIA to apply to the Information 
Commissioner for a decision as to whether your request has been dealt with in accordance with the FOIA. The 
Information Commissioner’s address is:  
 
Information Commissioner  
Wycliffe House 
                                               
1 https://www.timeshighereducation.com/world-university-rankings/2020/world-
ranking#!/page/0/length/25/sort_by/rank/sort_order/asc/cols/stats 
 
2 http://www.ox.ac.uk/news/2019-11-19-oxford-named-best-medicine-ninth-consecutive-year 
 
 



Water Lane 
Wilmslow 
SK9 5AF 
 
Tel:  0303 123113 
 
Further  information  for  submitting  complaints  to  the  Information  Commissioner  is  available  at 
http://www.ico.gov.uk/complaints.aspx   
 
 
 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
FOI OXFORD