Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Pension fund assets under management'.

Investment Strategy Statement 
 
Introduction 
 
The  Pension  Fund  Committee  has  drawn  up  this  Investment  Strategy  Statement 
(ISS)  to  comply  with  the  requirements  of  The  Local  Government  Pension  Scheme 
(Management  and  Investment  of  Funds)  Regulations  2016  and  the  accompanying 
Guidance  on  Preparing  and  Maintaining  an  Investment  Strategy  Statement.    The 
Authority  has  consulted  its  Actuary  and  Independent  Financial  Adviser  in  preparing 
this statement.  
 
The ISS is subject to periodic review at least every three years and more frequently if 
there  are  any  developments  that  impact  significantly  on  the  suitability  of  the  ISS 
currently  in  place.  Investment  performance  is  monitored  by  the  Committee  on  a 
quarterly  basis  and  may  be  used  to  check  whether  actual  results  are  in-line  with 
those expected under the ISS. 
 
The  Committee  will  invest  any  Fund  money  not  immediately  required  to  make 
payments  from  the  Fund  in  accordance  with  the  ISS.  The  ISS  should  be  read  in 
conjunction with the Fund’s Funding Strategy Statement. 
 
Governance Overview 
 
Oxfordshire  County  Council  is  the  designated  statutory  body  responsible  for 
administering the Oxfordshire Pension Fund. The Pension Fund Committee acts on 
the delegated authority  of  the  Administering  Authority  and  is  responsible for  setting 
investment policy, appointing suitable persons to implement that policy and carrying 
out regular reviews and monitoring of investments. 
 
The Director of Finance has delegated powers for investing the Oxfordshire Pension 
Fund  in  accordance  with  the  policies  determined  by  the  Pension  Fund  Committee. 
The  Committee  is  comprised  of  nine  County  Councillors  plus  two  District  Council 
representatives.    A  beneficiaries’  representative  attends  Committee  meetings  as  a 
non-voting member. 
 
The  Committee  meets  quarterly  and  is  advised  by  the  Director  of  Finance  and  the 
Fund’s  Independent  Financial  Adviser.    The Committee  members  are  not  trustees, 
although they have similar responsibilities. 
 
Investment Objectives 
 
The  Fund’s  primary  objective  is  to  ensure  that  over  the  life  of  the  Fund  it  has 
sufficient funds to meet  all pension liabilities as they fall due.  In seeking to achieve 
this aim, the investment objectives of the Fund are:  
 
1. 
to achieve and maintain a 100% funding level;  
2. 
to  ensure  there  are  sufficient  liquid  resources  available  to  meet  the  Fund’s 
current liabilities and investment commitments;  

3. 
for the overall Fund to outperform the benchmark, set out in the next section, 
by 1.3% per annum over a rolling three-year period. 
 
Asset Allocation 
 
The  decision  on  asset  allocation  determines  the  allocation  of  the  Fund’s  assets 
between different asset classes. The Committee believes that this is the single most 
important  factor  in  the  determination  of  the  Fund’s  investment  outcomes.  In  setting 
the asset allocation the Fund has considered advice from its Independent Financial 
Adviser and has used long-term cashflow modelling provided by the Fund’s Actuary. 
 
Every three years, following the actuarial valuation, there is a fundamental review of 
how  the  assets  are  managed.  This  review  considers  the  most  appropriate  asset 
allocation  for  the  Fund  in  order  to  achieve  its  investment  objectives  and  considers 
advice from the Fund’s Independent Financial Adviser. A balance is sought between 
risk, return and liquidity. The most recent review was undertaken in March 2017. 
 
Diversification is the Fund’s primary tool for managing investment risk. Diversification 
can improve returns and reduce portfolio volatility by ensuring that investment risk is 
not  concentrated  in  a  particular  asset  class  or  investment  style  and  by  reducing 
exposure  to  losses  through  poor  performance  of  an  individual  asset  class.  In 
considering asset class correlations it is acknowledged that these vary over time and 
as  such,  are  not  indicators  of  how  assets  will  behave  relative  to  each  other  in  the 
future. Taking this into account, the Committee believes that spreading investments 
over  a  wide  range  of  asset  classes  is  the  most  appropriate  way  to  benefit  from 
diversification having considered the factors that may cause values for various asset 
classes to move in the future. 
 
The  Committee  has  developed  the  following  guidelines  to  assist  in  ensuring 
appropriate diversification is maintained: 
 
1.  Exposure to a single security will be limited to 10% of the total portfolio.  
2.  No single investment shall exceed 35% of the Fund’s total portfolio. 
3.  Not more than 10% of the Fund may be held as a deposit in any single bank, 
institution or person. 
 
In  considering  the  asset  classes  used  to  build  the  Fund’s  overall  portfolio, 
consideration has been given to the suitability of those investments given the Fund’s 
investment  objectives  and  advice  has  been  taken  from  the  Fund’s  Independent 
Financial  Adviser.  The  fund  broadly  defines  assets  as  either  return-seeking  or 
liability-matching assets and seeks to develop an appropriate balance between these 
categories. Each asset class should be understood by the Committee, be consistent 
with  the  Fund’s  risk/return  objectives,  and  provide  the  most  effective  solution  for 
delivering a target outcome.  
 
The  Fund  currently  constructs  its  investment  portfolio  using  eleven  distinct  asset 
classes.  A  target  allocation  and  range  is  set  for  each  asset  class  as  shown  in  the 
table below. 
 

 
Target 
Range 
Asset Class 
Allocation (%) 
(%) 
UK Equities   
26 
24 - 28 
Overseas Equities   
28 
26 – 30 
Total Equities 
59 
50 - 58 
UK Gilts  
 
 
Corporate Bonds  
 
Index-Linked Bonds 
To be specified 
Overseas Bonds 
 
Total Bonds 
21 
19 - 23 
Property  

6 - 10 
Private Equity  

7 - 11 
Multi-Asset 

4 - 6 
Infrastructure 

2 - 4 
Cash 

0 – 5 
Total Other Assets 
25 
19 – 36 
 
Investment Implementation 
 
To  implement  its  asset  allocation  the  Fund  has  a  range  of  options  available  to 
access  the  different  asset  classes.  This  ranges  from  undertaking  investments  in-
house  to  using  external  Fund  Managers  or  selecting  externally  managed  pooled 
funds.  Options  to  manage  investments  in-house  need  to  be  considered against  the 
capacity  and  skills  available  to  the  Fund.  At  present  the  majority  of  assets  are 
managed externally by Fund Managers. 
 
In  selecting  Fund  Managers  the  Pension  Fund  considers  whether  they  are  suitably 
qualified  to  make  investment  decisions  on  behalf  of  the  Fund  and  takes  advice  as 
considered appropriate. The fund is primarily interested in the net return delivered by 
an investment. While the return side of the equation is less controllable the cost side 
is more certain. The Fund is conscious of the compounding effect that fees have on 
total investment performance and considers the most cost effective way to invest in 
an asset class while maintaining the same level of exposure to the desired outcome. 
 
When  selecting  investments  for  some  asset  classes  there  is  a  choice  available 
between  active  and  passive  management.  The  Fund  believes  that  active 
management  can  provide  benefits  above  passive  management  in  some  situations. 
Active  management  gives  the  potential  for  outperformance  relative  to  the  passive 
benchmark  through  the  selection  of  holdings  expected  to  outperform  the  general 
market and through the use of cash to protect against downside risk. In considering 
the  most  appropriate  type  of  mandate  the  Fund  will  consider  the  potential  for 
outperformance,  fees  and  risk.  For  some  investment  classes  there  are  not  passive 
investment  solutions  currently  available  but  the  Fund  will  monitor  the  market  to 
identify any new products that are developed in the passive arena. 
 
The  individual  managers’  performance,  current  activity  and  transactions  are 
monitored quarterly by the Pension Fund Committee.   

 
The assets are currently managed as set out in the following table. 
Asset Class 
Investment 
Benchmark 
Annual 
Manager 
Target  
UK Equities 
Baillie Gifford 
FTSE  All-Share  
+1.25%       
 
 
Legal  &  General 
Passive 
FTSE 100 
Investment 
Management 
Overseas Equities 
Legal  &  General  FTSE  AW-World  (ex- Passive 
Investment 
UK) Index 
Management 
Global Equities 
Wellington 
MSCI 
All 
Countries  + 2.0% 
World Index 
 
 
MSCI 
All 
Countries 
UBS 
+ 3.0% 
World Index 
Bonds & Index Linked 
Legal & General 
 
+ 0.6% 
 - UK Gilts 
FTSE A All Gilts Stocks 
 - Index Linked 
FTSE A Over 5 year  
 - Corporate bonds 
IBoxx Sterling Non-Gilts 
 - Overseas bonds 
JPMorgan  Global  Govt 
(ex UK) traded bond 
Property 
UBS Global Asset  IPD  UK  All  Balanced  +1.0% 
Management 
Funds Index  
Private Equity  
 
 
 
- Quoted Inv. Trusts 
Director 
of 
 
 
Finance 
 
 
 
FTSE 
Smaller 
 
+ 1.0% 
Companies 
(Including 
 
 
Investment Trusts) 
Adams Street 
- Limited Partnerships 
Partners Group 
 
Diversified 
Growth  Insight 
3 month Libor  
+  3.0  – 
Fund 
5.0% 
Cash 
Internal 
3 month Libor 

Target performance is based on rolling 3-year periods 
 
 

Rebalancing 
 
The  primary  goal  of  the  rebalancing  strategy  is  to  minimize  risk  relative  to  a  target 
asset  allocation,  rather  than  to  maximize  returns.  Asset  allocation  is  the  major 
determinant of the portfolio’s risk-and-return characteristics. Over time, asset classes 
produce  different  returns,  so  the  portfolio’s  asset  allocation  changes.  Therefore,  to 
recapture the portfolio’s original risk-and-return characteristics, the portfolio needs to 
be rebalanced. 
 
The  Fund  has  set  ranges  for  the  different  assets  included  in  the  asset  allocation, 
these are not hard limits but there would need to be a clear rationale for maintaining 
an allocation outside the ranges for any significant length of time. The fund takes a 
pragmatic  approach  to  rebalancing  and  is  cognisant  that  rebalancing  latitude  is 
important  and  can  significantly  affect  the  performance  of  the  portfolio.  Blind 
adherence  to  narrow  ranges  increases  transaction  costs  without  a  documented 
increase  in  performance.  While  a  rebalancing  range  that  is  too  wide  may  cause 
undesired  changes  in  the  asset  allocation  fundamentally  altering  its  risk/return 
characteristics.  
 
Rebalancing meetings take place on a quarterly basis where the most recent asset 
allocation  is  reviewed  against  the  target  allocations  and  the  ranges  in  place.  A 
number  of  factors  are  taken  into  account  in  the  decision  on  whether  to  rebalance 
which  includes,  but  is  not  limited  to;  current  and  forecast  market  dynamics,  and 
known future investment activity at the Fund level.  
 
Where  a  decision  is  made  to  undertake  rebalancing  the  Fund  aims  to  use  cash  to 
rebalance  as  far  as  possible,  as  this  will  minimise  transaction  costs  and  keep  the 
cash  holding  closer  to  target  avoiding  the  need  for  future  transactions  with 
associated costs. The rebalancing action will not necessarily take place immediately 
after a decision has been made as consideration is given to market opportunities and 
transaction costs. 
 
Restrictions on Investments 
 
The Regulations have removed the previous restrictions that applied under the Local 
Government Pension Scheme (Management and Investment of Funds) Regulations 
2009. These restrictions set limits for types of investment vehicles but not for asset 
classes. The Committee’s approach to setting its investment strategy and assessing 
the  suitability  of  different  types  of  investment  takes  into  account  the  various  risks 
involved  and  rebalancing  is  undertaken  as  described  above  to  ensure  asset 
allocations  are  kept  at  appropriate  levels.  When  making  investment  decisions  the 
suitability of the proposed investment structure is considered to ensure that it is the 
most efficient in meeting the Fund’s objectives. Therefore, it is not felt necessary to 
set any additional restrictions on investments. 
 
In accordance with the regulations the Fund is not permitted to invest more than 5% 
of  the  total  value  of  all  investments  of  fund  money  in  entities  which  are  connected 
with  the  Administering  Authority  within  the  meaning  of  section  212  of  the  Local 
Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007(d).  
 

 
 
Risk 
 
The overall risk for the Fund is that its assets will be insufficient to meet its liabilities. 
The Funding Strategy Statement, which  is drawn up following the triennial actuarial 
valuation of the Fund, sets out how any deficit in assets compared with liabilities is to 
be addressed.  
 
Underlying  the  overall  risk,  the  Fund  is  exposed  to  demographic  risks,  regulatory 
risks, governance risks and financial risks (including investment risk). The measures 
taken  by  the  Fund  to  control  these  risks  are  included  in  the  Funding  Strategy 
Statement  and  are  reviewed  periodically  by  the  Committee  via  the  Fund’s  risk 
register.  Further  details  on  the  risk  management  process  and  risks  faced  by  the 
Pension  Fund  are  also  included  in  the  Annual  Report  and  Accounts  document 
produced  by  the  Fund.  The  primary  investment  risk  is  that  the  Fund fails  to  deliver 
the returns anticipated in the actuarial valuation over the long term. The Committee 
anticipates  expected  market  returns  on  a  prudent  basis  to  reduce  the  risk  of 
underperforming expectations. 
 
It  is  important  to  note  that  the  Fund  is  exposed  to  external,  market  driven, 
fluctuations  in  asset  prices  which  affect  the  liabilities  (liabilities  are  estimated  with 
reference to government bond yields) as well as the valuation of the Fund’s assets.  
Holding a proportion of the assets in government bonds helps to mitigate the effect 
of falling bond yields on the liabilities to a certain extent. Further measures taken to 
control/mitigate investment risks are set out in more detail below: 
  
Concentration  
The  Committee  manages  the  risk  of  exposure  to  a  single  asset  class  by  holding 
different  categories  of  investments  (e.g.  equities,  bonds,  property,  alternatives  and 
cash)  and  by  holding  a  diversified  portfolio  spread  by  geography,  currency, 
investment style and market sectors. Each asset class is managed within an agreed 
permitted  range  to  ensure  that  the  Fund  does  not  deviate  too  far  away  from  the 
Benchmark,  which  has  been  designed  to  meet  the  required  level  of  return  with  an 
appropriate level of exposure to risk, taking into consideration the level of correlation 
between the asset classes. 
 
Volatility 
The  Benchmark  contains  a  high  proportion  of  equities  with  a  commensurate  high 
degree  of  volatility.  The  strong  covenant  of  the  major  employing  bodies  and  the 
current  forecast  cashflow  position  enables  the  Committee  to  take  a  long  term 
perspective and to access the forecast inflation plus returns from equities.  
 
Performance 
Investment  managers  are  expected  to  outperform  the  individual  asset  class 
benchmarks  detailed  in  the  overall  Strategic  Asset  Allocation  Benchmark.  The 
Committee takes a long term approach to the evaluation of investment performance 
but  will  take  steps  to  address  persistent  underperformance.  Investment  managers 
are required to implement appropriate risk management measures and to operate in 
such a way that the possibility of undershooting the performance target is kept within 

acceptable limits.  The Fund Managers report on portfolio risk each quarter and are 
required to provide internal control reports to the Fund for review on an annual basis. 
A  proportion  of  assets  are  invested  passively  to  reduce  the  risks  from  manager 
underperformance. 
 
Illiquidity  
Close attention is paid to the Fund’s projected cash flows; the Fund is currently cash 
flow  positive,  in  that  annually  there  is  an  excess  of  cash  paid  into  the  Fund  from 
contributions  and  investment  income after  pension benefits  are  paid  out. The  Fund 
expects to be cash flow positive for the short to medium term. Despite the significant 
proportion  of  illiquid  investments  in  the  Fund,  a  large  proportion  of  the  assets  are 
held  in  liquid  assets  and can be realised quickly,  in  normal circumstances,  in  order 
for the Fund to pay its immediate liabilities. 
 
Currency 
The  Fund’s  liabilities  are  denominated  in  sterling  which  means  that  investing  in 
overseas  assets  exposes  the  Fund  to  a  degree  of  currency  risk.  The  Committee 
regards the currency exposure associated with investing in overseas equities as part 
of the return on the overseas equities; the currency exposure on overseas bonds is 
hedged back to sterling. 
 
Custody 
The risk of losing economic rights to the Fund’s assets is managed by the use of a 
global custodian for custody of the assets. Custodian services are provided by State 
Street.  In  accordance  with  normal  practice,  the  Scheme’s  share  certificates  are 
registered in the name of the custodian’s own nominee company with designation for 
the  Scheme.  Officers  receive  and  review  internal  control  reports  produced  by  the 
custodian.  The  custodian  regularly  reconciles  their  records  with  the  investment 
manager records, providing a regular report to officers which they in turn review. 
 
Stock Lending 
The  Council  allows  the  Custodian  to  lend  stock  and  share  the  proceeds  with  the 
Council.  This is done to generate income for the Fund and to minimise the cost of 
custody.  To  minimise  risk  of  loss  the  counterparty  is  required  to  provide  suitable 
collateral  to  the  Custodian.  The  levels  of  collateral  and  the  list  of  eligible 
counterparties  have  been  agreed  by  the  Fund.  The  Committee  will  ensure  that 
robust  controls  are  in  place  to  protect  the  security  of  the  Fund’s  assets  before 
entering into any stock lending arrangements. 
 
Pooling 
 
The Oxfordshire Pension Fund is working with nine other administering authorities to 
pool investment assets through the Brunel Pension Partnership Ltd. (BPP Ltd).   
 
The  Oxfordshire  Pension  Fund,  through  the  Pension  Committee,  will  retain  the 
responsibility  for  setting  the  detailed  Strategic  Asset  Allocation  for  the  Fund  and 
allocating investment assets to the portfolios provided by BPP Ltd.  
 
The  Brunel  Pension  Partnership Ltd  is  a  new  company  which  will  be  wholly  owned 
by  the  Administering  Authorities.  The  company  has  received  authorisation from  the 

Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to act as the operator of an unregulated Collective 
Investment  Scheme.  It  will  be  responsible  for  implementing  the  detailed  Strategic 
Asset Allocations of the participating funds by investing Funds’ assets within defined 
outcome  focused  investment  portfolios.  In  particular  it  will  research  and  select  the 
Fund  Managers  needed  to  meet  the  requirements  of  the  detailed  Strategic  Asset 
Allocations. The Oxfordshire Pension Fund will be a client of BPP Ltd and as a client 
will  have  the  right  to  expect  certain  standards  and  quality  of  service.  A  detailed 
service agreement has been agreed which sets out the duties and responsibilities of 
BPP  Ltd,  and  the  rights  of  the  Oxfordshire  Pension  Fund  as  a  client.  It  includes  a 
duty of care of BPP to act in its clients’ interests.  
 
An  Oversight  Board  has  also  been  established.  This  will  be  comprised  of 
representatives  from  each  of  the  Administering  Authorities.  It  was  set  up  by  them 
according  to  an  agreed  constitution  and  terms  of  reference.  Acting  for  the 
Administering Authorities, it will have ultimate responsibility for ensuring that BPP Ltd 
delivers the services required to achieve investment pooling. It will therefore have a 
monitoring and oversight function. Subject to its terms of reference it will be able to 
consider relevant matters on behalf of the Administering Authorities, but will not have 
delegated  powers  to  take  decisions  requiring  shareholder  approval.  These  will  be 
remitted back to each Administering Authority individually. 
  
The  Oversight  Board  is  supported  by  the  Client  Group,  comprised  primarily  of 
pension investment officers drawn from each of the Administering Authorities but will 
also draw on Administering Authorities finance and legal officers from time to time. It 
will have a primary role in reviewing the implementation of pooling by BPP Ltd, and 
provide  a forum for  discussing  technical  and  practical  matters,  confirming  priorities, 
and  resolving  differences.  It  will  be  responsible  for  providing  practical  support  to 
enable the Oversight Board to fulfil its monitoring and oversight function.  
 
The  proposed  arrangements  for  asset  pooling  for  the  Brunel  pool  have  been 
formulated  to  meet  the  requirements  of  the  Local  Government  Pension  Scheme 
(Management  and  Investment  of  Funds)  Regulations  2016  and  Government 
guidance. Regular reports have been made to Government on progress towards the 
pooling of investment assets, and the Minister for Local Government has confirmed 
that the pool should proceed as set out in the proposals made.  
 
Oxfordshire  County  Council  has  approved  the  full  business  case  for  the  Brunel 
Pension  Partnership.  It  is  anticipated  that  investment  assets  will  be  transitioned 
across  from  the  Oxfordshire  Pension  Fund’s  existing  investment  managers  to  the 
portfolios managed by BPP Ltd between  May 2018 and March 2020 in accordance 
with a timetable that will be agreed with BPP Ltd. Until such time as transitions take 
place, the Oxfordshire Pension Fund will continue to maintain the relationship with its 
current investment managers and oversee their investment performance, working in 
partnership with BPP Ltd. where appropriate.  
 
Following the completion of the transition plan outlined above, it is envisaged that all 
of  the  Oxfordshire  Pension  Fund’s  assets  will  be  invested  through  BPP  Ltd. 
However,  the  Fund  has  certain  commitments  to  long  term  illiquid  investment  funds 
which will take longer to transition across to the new portfolios to be set up by BPP 

Ltd.  These  assets  will  be  managed  in  partnership  with  BPP  Ltd.  until  such  time  as 
they are liquidated, and capital is returned. 
 
ESG Policy 
 
The  Committee  recognises  that  environmental,  social  and  corporate  governance 
(ESG)  issues,  including  climate  change,  can  have  materially  significant  investment 
implications. The Fund therefore seeks to be a responsible investor and to consider 
ESG risks as part of the investment process across all investments. The objective of 
responsible  investment  is  to  decrease  investor  risk  and  improve  risk-adjusted 
returns.  Responsible  investment  principles  are  at  the  foundation  of  the  Fund’s 
approach  to  stewardship  and  underpin  the  Fund's  fulfilment  of  its  fiduciary  duty  to 
scheme beneficiaries. 
The  Committee’s  principal  concern  is  to  invest  in  the  best  financial  interests  of  the 
Fund’s  employing  bodies  and  beneficiaries.    Its  Investment  Managers  are  given 
performance objectives accordingly.  The Council requires its Investment Managers 
to  monitor  and  assess  the  environmental,  social  and  governance  considerations, 
which  may  impact  on  financial  performance  when  selecting  and  retaining 
investments, and to engage with companies on these issues where appropriate.  The 
Council believes that the operation of such a policy will ensure the sustainability of a 
company’s earnings and hence its merits as an investment. 
The Investment Managers report at quarterly intervals on the selection, retention and 
realisation of investments on the Council’s behalf and on any engagement activities 
undertaken.  These Reports/Review Meetings provide an opportunity for the Council 
to influence the Investment Manager’s choice of investments and to review/challenge 
their  stewardship  activities  but  the  Council  is  careful  to  preserve  the  Investment 
Manager’s autonomy in pursuit of their given performance. 
Just  because  concerns  have  been  registered  about  a  company’s  performance  on 
ESG issues, doesn’t mean our fund managers will be instructed not to invest in that 
company.  It  is  then  through  active  ownership  we  aim  to  drive  change.  Where 
engagement  is  not  seen  to  be  resulting  in  sufficient  progress,  and  so  the  risk 
associated  with  a  holding  is  increasing  or  not  reducing  sufficiently,  the  Fund  will 
consider divesting.  
As a passive investor, the Fund accepts that  it will hold  companies of varying ESG 
quality  due  to  the  requirement  to  hold  all  securities  in  the  target  index.  The 
committee believes that passive investing offers a number of benefits that need to be 
weighed  against  this  and  requires  passive  managers  to  demonstrate  effective 
engagement,  as  is  the  case  for  active  managers.  It  is  important  to  note  that 
ownership of a security in a company does not signify that the Oxfordshire Pension 
Fund approves of all of the company’s practices or its products  
The Committee is open to investing in Social Investments; investments where social 
impact  is  delivered  alongside  financial  return.  The  Committee  further  believes  that 
the  goal  of  social  impact  is  inherently  compatible  with  generating  sustainable 
financial returns by meeting societal needs. The Fund has made investments in this 
area and will continue to review whether further opportunities are available that offer 

an appropriate risk/return profile. Stakeholders’ views are taken into account through 
the  representation  of  different  parties  on  the  Pension  Fund  Committee,  which 
includes  a  beneficiaries’  representative,  and  the  Local  Pension  Board,  which 
consists of equal numbers of employer and member representatives. 
 
The Fund will not use pension policies to pursue boycotts, divestment and sanctions 
against  foreign  nations  and  UK  defence  industries,  other  than  where  formal  legal 
sanctions, embargoes and restrictions have been put in place by the Government. 
 
One  of  the  principal  benefits,  outlined  in  the  Brunel  Pension  Partnership  business 
case,  achieved through the enhanced scale and resources as a result of pooling is 
the  improved  implementation  of  responsible  investment  and  stewardship.   Once 
established  and  fully  operational  the  Brunel  Company  will  deliver  best  practice 
standards  in  responsible  investment  and  stewardship  as  outlined  in  the  BPP 
Investment Principles. 
 
Every portfolio under the Brunel Pension Partnership explicitly includes responsible 
investment  and  an  assessment  of  how  social,  environment  and  corporate 
governance considerations may present financial risks to the delivery of the portfolio 
objectives. These considerations will therefore be taken into account in the selection, 
non-selection, retention and realisation of assets.  The approach undertaken will vary 
in  order to be the most  effective in  mitigating risks and enhancing investor value in 
relation to each portfolio and its objectives.  
 
Policy on Exercise of Rights 
  
As  an  investor  with  a  very  long-term  investment  horizon  and  expected  life,  the 
success  of  the  Oxfordshire  Pension  Fund  is  linked  to  long  term  global  economic 
growth  and  prosperity.  Actions  and  activities  that  detract  from  the  likelihood  and 
potential  of  global  growth  are  not  in  the  long-term  interests  of  the  Fund.  Since  the 
Fund is a long-term investor, short-term gains at the expense of long-term gains are 
not in the best interest of the Fund. Sustainable returns over long periods are in the 
economic interest of the Fund. 
 
The  Fund  recognises  that  encouraging  the  highest  standards  of  corporate 
governance  and  promoting  corporate  responsibility  by  investee  companies  protects 
the  financial  interests  of  pension  fund  members  over  the  long  term.  Stewardship 
activities  include  monitoring  and  engaging  with  companies  on  matters  such  as 
strategy,  performance,  risk,  capital  structure  and  corporate  governance,  including 
culture and remuneration. 
 
The  Fund's  commitment  to  actively  exercising  the  ownership  rights  attached  to  its 
investments  reflects  the  Fund's  conviction  that  responsible  asset  owners  should 
maintain  oversight  of  the  way  in  which  the  enterprises  they  invest  in  are  managed 
and  how  their  activities  impact  upon  customers,  clients,  employees,  stakeholders, 
and wider society. 
 
The routes for exercising ownership influence vary across asset types and a range of 
activities  are  undertaken  on  the  Fund's  behalf  by  Fund  Managers  including 
engagement  with  senior  management  of  companies,  voting  of  shares,  direct 

representation on company boards, presence on investor & advisory committees and 
participation  in  partnerships  and  collaborations  with  other  investors.  Where  the 
Pension  Fund  invests  in  pooled  vehicles  it  will  seek  to  gain  representation  on 
investor committees if considered appropriate. 
 
In  practice  the  Fund’s  Investment  Managers  are  delegated  authority  to  exercise 
voting rights in respect of the Council’s holdings. Voting decisions are fully delegated 
to fund  managers,  while  recognising  that  the  Fund maintains  ultimate  responsibility 
for ensuring that voting is undertaken in the best interests of the Fund. 
 
The  Fund  will  exercise  its  voting  rights  in  all  markets  and  its  investment  managers 
are required to vote at all company meetings where practicable. Market conventions 
in  some countries may mean voting shares is not  in  the best  interests  of the Fund, 
for example where share-blocking is in operation. 
 
The Fund has appointed an external company to monitor the Fund’s proxy voting at 
the whole fund level. The Fund receives reports detailing where votes cast by Fund 
Managers differ to the template vote recommended by the provider. The monitoring 
service  also  includes  the  production  of  an  annual  report  for  the  Fund  summarising 
and analysing the voting activity for the Fund including at Fund Manager level. These 
reports  are used  to  inform  the  Fund and to enable  discussion  with  Fund  Managers 
where appropriate.  
 
Our  approach  to  Stewardship,  including  the  exercising  of  rights  attached  to 
investments  is  outlined  above  and  is  consistent  with  the  requirements  of  the  UK 
Stewardship Code.  During 2017 we will develop this further by becoming signatories 
to  the  code  and  clearly  demonstrating  our  position  in  relation  to  all  seven 
principles.   As  part  of  the  Brunel  Pension  Partnership  (BPP)  we  are  actively 
exploring opportunities to enhance our stewardship activities. 
 
 
June 2018