Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'History Examiners’ reports'.


 
Miss Zoe Allwood 
FOI Manager 
 
 
 
 
Daniel Darwood 
 
By email 
 
 
Reference: FOI-2019-843 
07 January 2020 
 
 
 
 
Dear Mr Darwood, 
 
Your request was received on 5 December 2019 and I am dealing with it under the terms of the 
Freedom of Information Act 2000 (‘the Act’). 
 
You asked for: 
 
History Examiners’ Reports, Part I and Part II for the years 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016 
 
Your request is refused under section 14(1) of the Act because the University considers it to be 
vexatious. This is not because of the tone or content of your request but instead because of the grossly 
oppressive burden that would be imposed on the University by the requirement to manually review all 
these reports to ensure that none of the information requested is subject to any substantive exemptions 
(in particular those for personal information) set out in Part II of the Act. While there is no obligation to 
provide advice and assistance when refusing a request under section 14(1) of the Act, we have 
attached the redacted External Examiner reports and Chair's reports for the relevant years. 
 
Please note that the attached document should not be copied, reproduced or used except in 
accordance with the law of copyright. 
 
If you are unhappy with the service you have received in relation to your request and wish to make a 
complaint or request an internal review of this decision, you should contact us quoting the reference 
number above. The University would normally expect to receive your request for an internal review 
within 40 working days of the date of this letter and reserves the right not to review a decision where 
there has been undue delay in raising a complaint. If you are not content with the outcome of your 
review, you may apply directly to the Information Commissioner for a decision. Generally, the 
Information Commissioner cannot make a decision unless you have exhausted the complaints 
procedure provided by the University. The Information Commissioner may be contacted at: The 
The Old Schools 
Trinity Lane 
Cambridge, CB2 1TN 
 
Tel: +44 (0) 1223 764142 
Fax: +44 (0) 1223 332332 
Email: xxx@xxxxx.xxx.xx.xx 
www.cam.ac.uk 
 


 
 
 
Information Commissioner’s Office, Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire, SK9 5AF 
(https://ico.org.uk/)
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
Zoe Allwood 
 

HISTORICAL TRIPOS PART I 2016 
External Examiner’s Report:  
  
It is a pleasure to write in my third and final year as external examiner for Part I of the Historical 
Tripos. I can confirm that, as has been the case throughout my term, I have total confidence in the 
academic standards, processes for assessment and the determination of awards; special mention 
must be made in this respect of the work undertaken by 
 as chair of the board of 
examiners, and by 
, Principal Secretary, in supporting the process. The Board and 
processes connected with assessment and classification have run smoothly, allowing appropriate 
academic discussion and judgment, within the clear framework of agreed regulations and guidelines. 
 
Moving from these points about formal process to the substantive, I have no doubt that Cambridge 
History continues to deserve its reputation as the destination of choice for budding undergraduate 
historians in the UK and beyond. Even at Part I, the best scripts were stunning, with one prize 
winning long essay I saw this year being worthy of publication. What shone through was the ability 
of the best students to encounter a diverse range of cutting edge work, in dialogue with which they 
developed their own approaches. This strength is something more or less unique to the Cambridge 
system with its particular division of responsibilities between Faculty and College, and in terms of 
assessment process it is reflected in the practice of classifying on the basis of two unreconciled 
marks for each paper, which particularly rewards students who develop original syntheses rather 
than textbook answers. This year, moreover, the overall standard was higher than previously, with 
very little tail other than a few incomplete scripts. The strength of the very many of strong 2:1 
students, with median marks in the high 60s and first class performances in areas, is a striking 
feature of the Cambridge cohort; my sense is that in other Russell Group and comparable 
institutions many of these students, who are ‘normal’ in a Cambridge context, would be seen as very 
strong verging on outstanding.  
 
This broad based strength is something to be celebrated, and examiners are very consistent in  
policing the crucial first class boundary in order to differentiate the very good from the outstanding; 
they do so assiduously, consistently and with careful reference to their own criteria. It is striking that 
one result is a set of markbooks where there is a huge clustering in the high 60s, with 69 frequently 
being the most commonly deployed mark. As I have no doubt whatsoever that this boundary is 
being applied consistently and carefully, in a way deeply embedded in the institution’s culture and 
following from its student intake, I would urge against artificially attempting to move it. Nonetheless 
colleagues might usefully reflect on the mark distributions they award (very helpfully the board 
tables for each paper and examiner averages and % in each class, but a scatter diagram of actual 
frequency of particular marks might be instructive). 
 
This extreme bunching does create challenges in classification of awards, where it is possible for 
candidates to achieve a run of marks entirely or almost entirely in the high 60s, with four or five first 
class marks, and a very high overall aggregate, and emerge under the regulations with a very high 
2:1. Aside from the obvious issues about the huge range of performances between the top and 
bottom of the upper second class, it is my sense that in most if not all other major UK Universities 
students with the profile sketched above would be awarded a first class degree. Again, I would not 
urge artificial change led by instrumental or externally facing concerns, but the issue around 
classification does seem to me to be of a different order from that around marking: the latter rests 
on consistent and coherent standards shared by examiners and culturally embedded in the Faculty’s 
practice, whilst the former is the outcome of a particular set of regulations. In each of the previous 
two years I have made the point that at Cambridge the bar to be awarded a first is set differently 
than elsewhere, and I know colleagues have looked closely at it; I am particularly grateful for the 
detailed work done which shows that there is no gender imbalance in those high aggregate students 

who do not under current regulations qualify for a first. Ultimately, one of the strengths of the 
Faculty is that it is guided by academic as opposed to instrumental concerns in these matters, and it 
may be that colleagues are happy to confirm that they wish a Cambridge first to continue to be 
different from a first awarded elsewhere. If they do so, I would simply urge that they think about 
how they explain and justify this difference more explicitly than at present, as external pressures and 
policy change are likely to make it more visible in the future. I would add that in terms of standards I 
would have no problem whatsoever with some tweaks being made to the classification system - for 
example allowing discretion where a student with a mean of more than (say) 68, who had a first 
class mark from at least one examiner in 4 or 5 papers, or allowing a first for 5 marks over 70 with a 
significant number of other marks with alpha quality signalled. 
 
Over the last three years I have been really refreshed and impressed by the way in which Tripos 
operates, and the constructive and engaged discussions that take place within the Faculty each year 
to improve and refine the assessment and classification process. New initiatives agreed last year, for 
example around divergence, have had a noticeable effect this year and the marking, which has 
always been careful and excellent, was the most coherent and consistent I had seen this year. The 
one area for concern which I would highlight, where discussions and suggestions have not yet born 
fruit, is around the gender gap in Part I performance. This year of a cohort of 196 (55% female) only 
11/107 women were awarded firsts or starred firsts, as opposed to 24/89 men, whilst all the lower 
seconds awarded were to women. Whilst 33% of firsts going to women represents an improvement 
on last year (21%), which was itself an improvement on the 10% of the year before, I would be 
concerned about the continued structural imbalance, and would take relatively little comfort from 
the slow upward trend (especially when it is remembered that given the relatively small numbers 
where 2 or 3 first class awards make a 10% difference). A more meaningful way to put the statistics 
would be to consider that of the women taking Part 1, 87% were awarded upper seconds and 10% 
firsts; whereas for men 73% secured upper seconds and 27% firsts. These raw statistics, and the fact 
that they are not aberrations, and that the initiatives considered and in some cases implemented 
after previous discussions have not yet had an effect, must be real causes for concern. I would also 
be concerned that there might be similar structural attainment gaps linked to currently ‘invisible’ 
factors of educational and family background, and as last year would urge the Faculty to widen the 
scope of its analysis to consider these factors. I know that the Faculty has looked into those 
candidates falling just below class boundaries, and discovered that their gender profile did not 
materially differ from the cohort, so recalibrating classification guidelines will not in and of itself 
remove the imbalance. This must suggest more deeply rooted structural factors are at work here, 
and it would surely be worthwhile hearing student voices on this matter, as well as undertaking 
further investigation to understand causation. My one regret is that I won’t be here, as an external, 
to see how this crucial issues resolves, and I would hope that it will continue to be at the forefront of 
colleagues’ minds as it strikes me that continuous and determined action over a number of years is 
going to be crucial: rectifying action must be an absolute priority. 
 
 
External Examiner’s Report:  
 
In the first place I would like to refer to the most fundamental aspects of the process. The standard 
of the scripts was high and there was plenty of evidence of outstanding teaching. For what it is 
worth, and for whatever it might be considered to mean, I would give it as my judgment that the 
significant gap between the attainment of Cambridge students and those at a Russell Group 
university with a good history department is as marked as ever. I was happy to confirm the number 
of firsts agreed at the examiner’s meeting. I was also very happy with the award of prizes.  
 
If I may offer a reflection of a slightly different sort which is a comparison of these students and the 
Cambridge students of my own generation, I think that the range of knowledge of these students is 

wider but not perhaps as deep, in the sense that depth was based then on intense reading of literary 
sources. I noticed that, among the very best students, allusions to classic texts such as Marx’s 
Eighteenth Brumaire or Bury on progress were slightly cack-handed. I also noticed at times an 
inability to place events in their proper intellectual context – particularly noticeable in the discussion 
of French anti-Semitism and 1930s theories of Totalitarianism. Particularly because of the great 
variety of talented historians available for teaching duties in Cambridge and partly because of their 
own innate ability, these students do, however, probably have a wider range of knowledge and 
interests than that of a previous generation.  
 
 
Report of the Chair of Examiners 2016  
 
 
The following matters emerged from the examination this year, and I would like to draw them to the 
attention of the Faculty Board and the Committee on Examining Matters.  
 
1.  Irregularities in central/College exam administration 
A great many more irregularities came to light this year than the previous, both with the central 
University administration and with colleges, such as lost scripts, scripts sent to the wrong 
addressee, other delays in scripts reaching examiners, scripts with named cover-sheets on them. 
There is concern that staff in both areas have not been adequately advised on procedures. This 
caused delays and extra work for both examiners and the Faculty’s staff. It was decided to draw 
up a list of the irregularities and forward it to relevant authorities. In future, all examiners should 
be advised to check scripts immediately on receipt, for missing scripts that cannot be accounted 
for, or wrong scripts. 
 
2.  Handbook for examiners 
This year was the first year in which the new rule reducing the mark divergence that triggers an 
‘R’ mark (or sending to the external if unresolvable) was reduced from 9 to 7, with the proviso 
that this must be across a class boundary. It would be a good idea to monitor the effect of this 
change, even though there were no reports of anyone finding it problematic; indeed it seemed 
generally welcome. 
 
3.  Profiling materials made available to examiners 
It was suggested that it might be helpful, on examiner profiles by paper, to include the mean 
overall mark. 
 
4.    Continuing gender gap  
 
Part I results, by gender and class 2016:  
Class 




Total 
*1 

20% 

80% 

  1 
10 
33.3% 
20 
66.7% 
30 
III.1 
93 
59.2% 
64 
40.85% 
157 
II.2 

100% 
 
 

Total 
107 
52.8% 
85 
47.2% 
196 
 

Gender breakdown based on individual marks by class: 
Class 


II.1 

II.2 

III 

Fail 
%  Total 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

232 
18% 
917 
71.2% 
134  10.4% 

0.4% 
 
 
1288 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

323 
30.4% 
676 
63.5% 
61 
5.7% 
 
 

0.4% 
1064 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total 
555 
23.6% 
1593 
67.7% 
195 
8.3% 

0.2% 

0.2% 
2352 
 
The board was disappointed that yet again, this year, the final statistics showed a disquietingly 
large gender gap in achievement. Once again, internal and external examiners supported the 
Faculty’s continuing efforts to get to the root of the problem, with one external repeating his 
previous suggestion that the Faculty needs to take a comprehensive approach including school 
type, ethnic origin and other potential factors that may affect History candidates. Future exam 
boards need to continue to look at what factors related to exams, specifically, may be in play, 
and take measures to address them. 
 
5.    Thanks  
In my second and final year as Chair, I have been exceptionally appreciative yet again of the hard 
work, including long hours beyond the working day, that the Faculty’s staff put in to making the 
process run smoothly, and especially to 
, who makes the Chair’s job infinitely easier 
than it might otherwise be. 
 
HISTORICAL TRIPOS PART I 2017 
External Examiner’s Report:  
  
This is my first year acting as external for Part I of the Cambridge History Tripos. The administrative 
support and guidance provided throughout the year has been excellent, underpinning the smooth 
efficiency of the examination process itself. I would like to record my sincere thanks to 
 
(as Chair) and especially to 
 and 
 administrative team. I have no doubt 
whatsoever that the academic standards evident in the Cambridge History Tripos Part I exceed those 
of similar programmes within the U.K. The quality of candidates and teaching is outstanding, as 
demonstrated by the strong cohort of starred firsts, firsts and 2.is. 
 
In addition to acting as third reader on a handful of scripts (as required), I was asked to moderate 
one set of ‘Themes and Sources’ essays (option vii, ‘Nature and the City in Medieval Thought’), in 
addition to two sets of scripts: Papers 2 and 12. I moderated fifteen essays for ‘Themes and Sources’ 
option vii. Overall, this was a genuinely impressive set of scripts suggesting an exceptionally well 
designed and well taught course. Both markers’ sets of comments were carefully weighed, full of 
evaluative detail and explanation and scrupulously fair. As to be expected, weaker candidates 
tended to treat the essay as if it was being written for a historical outline paper. Stronger candidates’ 
essays had an analytical drive that was anchored in primary source evidence, but also pushed 
beyond that evidence to develop independent arguments. There was the usual smattering of slips 

and errors, but there were no common or general misconceptions. Section A of the paper was more 
popular than Section B (which allows the candidate to develop their own question on the basis of a 
specific prompt). There may be a case here for encouraging stronger students to attempt section B, 
thus giving them valuable experience in how to construct viable research questions - but I have no 
doubt that those who teach this course have already thought of this. It was a genuine pleasure to 
read through this set of essays. 
 
For papers 2 and 12 I moderated fifteen scripts each. Paper 12 was a strong set. In the upper range 
of marks candidates deployed both primary and secondary sources to excellent effect, with some 
deeply impressive analytical abilities on show in the first class answers. The weaker scripts tended to 
use primary source evidence ineffectively and/or failed to structure a convincing overarching 
argument. The standard of marking and comments was, again, first rate. An excellent level of care 
and attention to detail was shown by both markers. There were a couple of significant disparities, 
but I was able to see the exact reasons why these divergences had occurred. The sample set for 
Paper 2 had one outstanding first class script, with no scripts classed lower than 2.i. A relatively good 
spread of questions was attempted, with 10th century England and Aethelstan proving particularly 
popular. The marking was crystal clear and even-handed, with some helpful critique that was clearly 
related to the grading scale (making my task as moderator that much easier). 
 
The pre-meeting for the exam board and the board itself were both run smoothly and efficiently. I 
endorse the board’s decision to include a new general rule to cover cases where candidates make a 
mistake on the exam paper rubric.   I am also happy to see the seriousness with which the Part I 
Chair, the examination board and the gender working party are addressing the problem of gender 
disparity in first class awards - thus responding to a central concern raised by 
 in his 
final examiner’s report. I look forward to this work bearing (further) fruit in years to come. 
 
 
External Examiner’s Report:  
 
Once again the standard was high and the marking exemplary. 
 
I have one substantive comment about the final meeting to make. I made a number of comments on 
particular papers – all of them subjects for debate as much as anything. Afterwards I was told that 
the examiners were not present to hear my remarks.  There can be very good reasons for this – but I 
would be grateful if I had the full information on this point beforehand, if only to save time at the 
meeting. 
 
 
Report of the Chair of Examiners 2017 
 
 
 
The following matters emerged from the examination this year, and I would like to draw them to the 
attention of the Faculty Board and the Committee on Examining Matters.  
 
1.  Irregularities in central/College exam administration 
The number of irregularities which came to light this year was not exceptional, but vigilance is 
still needed to reduce extra work.  This year there were a number of candidates whose answers 
did not follow the required rubric in regards to requirements for answering a question from 
different sections, and it was decided that in the future the handbook should include a 
statement about the penalty for breach of rubric by answering more questions than permitted 
from either Section A or B.  It was also decided that markers of papers to be moderated would 

receive a clear and direct reminder of this fact, early in the process.  Not all examiners found the 
use of encrypted data-sticks straightforward and ways to simplify the process will be explored.   
 
 
2.  Handbook for examiners 
The new rule reducing the mark divergence that triggers an ‘R’ mark (or sending to the external 
if unresolvable) was reduced from 9 to 7, with the proviso that this must be across a class 
boundary was monitored and it was again unproblematic and worked well. 
 
3.  Profiling materials made available to examiners 
This year it was decided, in consultation with the Gender Working Group, to supply each 
individual examiner, who examined last year, with their personal gender profile to take into 
consideration while marking. 
 
4.    Continuing gender gap  
 
Part I results, by gender and class 2017 (presented as a percentage of the whole cohort)1:  
% of 
% of 
whole 
whole 
Class 


cohort 


cohort 
Total 

*1 

3.0% 
1.6% 

4.3% 
2.1% 

3.6% 
  1 
10 
10.1% 
5.2% 
19 
20.5% 
9.9% 
29 
15.1% 
II.1 
85 
85.9% 
44.3% 
67 
72.0% 
34.9% 
148 
77.1% 
II.2 

1.0% 
0.5% 

3.2% 
1.6% 

4.2% 
Total 
99 
100% 
51.6% 
93 
100% 
48.4% 
192 
100% 
 
Gender breakdown based on individual marks per script, by class: 
Class 


II.1 

II.2 

III 

Fail 
%  Total 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

251 
20.9% 
852 
71.0% 
88 
7.3% 

0.4% 

0.3% 
1200 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

306 
27.4% 
726 
65.1% 
77 
6.9% 

0.4% 

0.2% 
1116 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total 
557 
24.1% 
1578 
68.1% 
165 
7.1% 
10 
0.4% 

0.3% 
2316 
 
                                                             
1 In previous years, these figures have been presented as percentage of students achieving each class.  

This year the percentage of individual first class marks awarded to single papers for women rose 
quite significantly from 18% to 20.9%.  However, this had almost no effect on the classification, 
which remained at a disappointing level of 12% for men and 6.8% for women.  New classification 
schemes will be introduced for the two new joint Tripos degrees this year and it will be 
important for future exam boards to compare, and consider if this new form of classification has 
any effect on gender performance. 
 
5.    Thanks  
In my first year as Chair, as with past Chairs I have been helped enormously by the hard work, 
including long hours beyond the working day, that the Faculty’s staff put in to making the 
process work, and especially to 
, whose organisation and attention to detail makes 
the Chair’s job run smoothly. Special thanks must also be given to the computing staff for doing 
the extra work needed for the individual gender profiles this year, and for the entry and analysis 
of a large amount of data in a very tight timeframe. 
 
HISTORICAL TRIPOS PART I 2018 
External Examiner’s Report:  
  
 
This is my second year acting as external for Part I of the Cambridge History Tripos. The administrative 
support  and  guidance  provided  throughout  the  year  has,  again,  been  of  the  highest  standard.  My 
sincere  thanks  to 
  (as  Chair)  and  to 

  and  their 
administrative team. The 'Handbook for Examiners', provided in advance, was, again, exceptionally 
useful. As I noted last year, the academic standards evident in the Cambridge History Tripos Part I 
clearly exceed those of similar programmes within the U.K. The quality of candidates and teaching is 
excellent  and  the  examination  process  is  conducted  with  rigour  and  thoroughness,  within  a  clear 
framework of agreed regulations and guidelines. As other HE institutions across the sector move to 
less exacting moderation practices, it is a genuine pleasure to see the Faculty of History at Cambridge 
University continuing to uphold - and exceed - standards. In addition to acting as third reader on ten 
scripts  (as  requested),  I was  asked to  moderate one  set of  ‘Themes  and  Sources’  essays: option  ii, 
‘Royal  and  Princely  Courts’,  in  addition  to  two  sets  of  scripts:  Papers  3  and  9.  I  read  (a  full  set  of) 
nineteen essays for ‘Themes and Sources' option ii. This was a strong set of essays and the top four 
essays were exceptional. It is a genuine strength of the Cambridge system that it enables candidates 
to  get  to  grips  with  complex  and  challenging  research  whilst  testing  out  their  own,  independent, 
analyses of evidence and data. The standard of teaching, in addition to the standard of assessment, 
was obviously extremely high.
 It is a testimony to the option coordinator / tutor(s) that eleven out of 
the nineteen candidates chose to craft the wording of their own questions. As I know from experience, 
it  takes  a  great  deal  of  concerted  effort  to  keep  eleven  students  on  track  with  developing  viable 
research  topics  /  questions.  The  payoff,  however,  is  immense  in  terms  of  giving  those  students 
valuable experience of crafting an independent research question in Part I - preparing them for the 
demands  of  Part  II.  Both  markers’  sets  of  comments  were  detailed  and  meticulous.  There  were  a 
number  of  essays  where  the  marks  diverged  widely,  but  in  most  cases  it  was  obvious  why  these 
divergences had occurred. 
 
For papers 3 and 9 I moderated fifteen and twelve scripts respectively. Paper 3 was an excellent set. 
There were no obviously weak (2.ii or below) scripts in the sample that I looked at. In the upper range 
of marks candidates demonstrated an excellent level of knowledge of both primary and secondary 
sources. The standard of marking and the care taken in providing evaluative comments was excellent 
throughout, with clear justifications given for marks awarded. The practice of trying to reconcile marks 
to  within  a  set  number  of  points  of  each  other  makes  eminent  sense  and  works  well.  It  would  be 

useful, however, from an external examiner's point of view, to have just a brief sentence from the 
examiner / assessor explaining how a given 'R' mark had been arrived at. 
 
The sample set for Paper 9 also suggested a very high standard in both student ability and teaching. A 
good spread of questions was attempted. The marking was exceptionally careful and balanced, and I 
could see a clear correlation between the marking scale and awarded grades. On three scripts within 
my sample set, the grades given by the examiner and assessor differed by a class - with justifications 
clearly laid out in the comments.  
 
The pre-meeting for the exam board and the board itself were run with exceptional efficiency and 
included a number of constructive discussions around how to improve and refine the assessment and 
classification process. There was one case of plagiarism reported to the board, which was obviously 
handled in a timely, fair and balanced manner. As discussed at the pre-meeting, the board may like to 
consider  adding  a  compulsory  on-line  element  to  the  students’  ‘Good  Academic  Practice’  training 
(thus,  perhaps,  getting  around  any  problems  associated  with  having  to  maintain  hand-written 
attendance lists?). The board also noted the ‘baggy-ness’ of the 2:i classification, namely the fact that 
there can be a huge qualitative difference between a ‘high’ and ‘low’ 2.1 script - but both result in the 
same  award.  This  is,  of  course,  a  sector-wide  challenge  and  Cambridge  is  not  alone  in  currently 
conducting a review of its degree classifications. 
 
Finally, I would like to commend the Part I Chair and examination board for the seriousness with which 
they continue to address the problem of gender disparity within classification bands (in particular, this 
year,  with  reference  to  both  1st  and  2.ii  awards).  The  1st  class  results  this  year  indicate  an 
improvement in the male:female ratio, but - as everyone is fully aware - there remains more work to 
be done. 
 
 
External Examiner’s Report:  
   
 
This is my final report as external examiner for History. In summary, the standard was excellent and 
there was evidence of superb teaching. 
 
 
Report of the Chair of Examiners: 

 
 
The following matters emerged from the examination this year, and I would like to draw them to the 
attention of the Faculty Board and the Committee on Examining Matters.  
 
1. 
Irregularities in central/College exam administration 
There were no notable irregularities which came to light this year and the use of encrypted 
data-sticks worked well.  
 
2.  
Turnitin 
This year Turnitin identified one themes and sources essay where it was deemed necessary to 
investigate further with the involvement of the Senior Proctor. This investigation concluded 
that there was  no  deliberate attempt  to gain an unfair advantage in the examination, and 
instead the essay was marked down for poor scholarly practice. However the Proctors made 
a recommendation that attendance be kept at the faculty’s study skills session to ensure that 
all students attended, in addition to the declaration that all first years are required to sign. 
 
 

3. 
Handbook for examiners 
The  new  penalty  for  breaches  of  rubric  set out  in  the  Examiners’  Handbook  seem  to  have 
worked well as none occurred this year. 
 
4. 
Profiling materials made available to examiners 
This year the practice of supplying each individual examiner, who examined last year or the 
year before, with their personal gender profile to take into consideration while marking was 
continued and will be continued in future years. 
 
5. 
Gender gap  
Part I results, by gender and class 2018 (presented as a percentage of the whole cohort): 
  

of 
% of whole 
Class 




whole 
Total 

cohort 
cohort 
*1 

2.0% 
1.0% 

4.3% 
2.1% 

3.1% 

14 
14.1% 
7.3% 
18 
19.6%  9.4% 
32 
16.8% 
II.1 
79 
79.8% 
41.4% 
69 
75.0%  36.1% 
148 
77.5% 
II.2 

4.0% 
2.1% 

1.1% 
0.5% 

2.6% 
Total 
99 
100% 
51.80% 
92 
100% 
48.20% 
191 
100% 
 
Gender breakdown based on individual marks per script, by class: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total 
 


II.1 

II.2 

III 

 
  F 
267 
22.6% 
817 
69.0% 
94 
7.9% 

0.5% 
1184 
  M 
331 
30.0% 
692 
62.7% 
76 
6.9% 

0.5% 
1104 
Total 
598 
26.10% 
1509  66.0% 
170 
7.4% 
11 
0.5% 
2288 
 
This year the percentage of first class marks awarded to women continued to rise. Individual 
first class marks awarded to single papers rose from 20.9% in 2017 to 22.6% and from 18% in 
2016. More significantly, this year the percentage of female candidates awarded firsts rose 
from 13.1% in 2017 to 16.1%, and the gender gap between female and male firsts awarded 
was  reduced from 12% to 8%. Although this is certainly  welcome, the gender gap remains 
large  and  the  Gender  Working  Party  will  continue  its  investigation  of  different  forms  of 
classification. 
 
6. 
Thanks  
This year as always I have been helped enormously by the hard work, including long hours 
beyond  the  working  day,  that  the  Faculty’s  staff  put  in  to  making  the  process  work.  After 
serving for many years 
 stepped down as Part I Secretary and was replaced by 
 who did an excellent job in her first year. Special thanks must also be given to 
the computing staff for doing the extra work needed for the individual gender profiles this 
year, and for the entry and analysis of a large amount of data in a very tight timeframe. 
 
 
 

HISTORICAL TRIPOS PART I 2019 
External Examiner’s Report:  
  
This is my third and final year acting as external for Part I of the Cambridge History Tripos. My sincere 
thanks to the (new) Part I Chair 
 and to 
 and
 administrative team 
for their support and guidance throughout the year. There were a couple of minor issues in the final run-
up to the exam board, completely understandable given the incredibly pressured exam timetable, but the 
process itself is robust, rigorous and functioning smoothly. The academic standards evident in the 
Cambridge History Tripos Part I clearly exceed those of similar programmes across the U.K and the 
examination process operates within a clear framework of agreed regulations and guidelines. 
 
In addition to acting as third reader on four scripts, plus advising on a number of borderline classifications 
and potential rubric infringements, I was asked to moderate one set of ‘Themes and Sources' essays 
(option i) and two sets of scripts: Papers 14 and 19. I read a full set of eleven essays for 'Themes and 
Sources' option i. This was a strong set of essays, with a number of candidates taking up the invitation to 
craft their own question around a one-word ‘prompt (under the guidance of their supervisor). As noted 
last year, the ‘Themes and Sources’ papers are an excellent way of preparing candidates for the 
challenges of Part II, enabling them to get to grips with complex and challenging research topics whilst 
testing out their own, independent, analyses of evidence and data. The standard of assessment for 
Themes and Sources Option (i) was extremely high, with full sets of careful and meticulous comments 
from both the examiner and assessor. There were a number of essays where the two marks diverged 
across class boundaries, but it was obvious why these differences had occurred. For papers 14 and 19 I 
moderated eleven and twelve scripts respectively. Paper 14 was an excellent set of scripts. The standard 
of marking and the care taken in providing evaluative comments was impressive, with clear justifications 
given for marks awarded. My set of Paper 19 scripts showed a very good spread of attempted questions 
across the exam paper. The marking was exceptionally careful and detailed. In the upper range of marks, 
candidates demonstrated an exceptional level of knowledge of primary source material. Finally, all of the 
examiners and assessors for papers 1(i), 14 and 19 should be praised for their efforts in reconciling marks 
to within the required range (i.e., no more than a seven point divergence). This year, in contrast to last, it 
was crystal clear how and why all ‘R’ grades had been arrived at - thus addressing my main 
recommendation from last year. 
 
The pre-meeting for the exam board and the board itself were run efficiently and – as in previous years - 
included a number of constructive discussions around how to improve and refine the assessment and 
classification process. The Faculty / University process for detecting and handling potential cases of 
plagiarism is running efficiently; likewise, the new practice of applying standardized penalties for late 
submission of Paper 1 essays. The one-off difficulty with the administration of the exam for Paper 20 was 
dealt with rigorously and robustly by the relevant examiners and especially by the Part I Chair. I am 
satisfied, as external examiner, that every measure has been undertaken to ensure that the no candidate 
was adversely affected in terms of their Paper 20 / overall class result. It is a pleasure to note that an 
almost perfect correlation between the male:female percentage ratio and class results was achieved 
across this year’s Part I cohort. As I know from my work as external over the last three years, this year’s 
gender parity is the result of a focused, sustained and collaborative effort. The Faculty should 
congratulate itself on achieving this important milestone – the challenge now, of course, will be to 
maintain this gender parity in Part I results throughout the years to come. 
 

 
External Examiner’s Report:  
 
This was my first year as external and I would like to start by thanking 
 and 
 for 
their help in guiding me through Cambridge’s practices and procedures, and 
 in particular for his 
hospitality.  
I moderated three papers: Themes and Sources (Conversion); Paper 4 (British Political History 1485-
1714); and Paper 17 European History 1715-1890. I was asked to adjudicate on 21 scripts where there 
were irreconcilable differences between the two internal markers. 
Overall, the process worked well and it was pleasing to read high quality work by the students. I found 
the most interesting and innovative work to be in the Themes and Sources paper, a point to which I will 
return later, where students evidently relished the freedom and scope to explore a topic of their 
choosing in some depth. The standards achieved at Cambridge were comparable with other UK 
institutions and the examination process was conducted fairly and in line with internal policies and 
regulations.  
Inevitably, though, particularly as a new examiner, there were aspects of the process and assessment 
structure that struck me as worthy of some comment. 
 
1.  Process:  
There was a troubling report from the Chair of the Exam Board that a question on a paper had been 
replaced during an exam in response to a student complaint. Clearly this is an unacceptable practice. The 
Chair handled the issue well, asking the internal examiners to scrutinise all candidates who could 
potentially have been affected, and fortunately it was found that the incident had not materially affected 
the degree classification of any student. 
There was also a significant hitch at the beginning of the Exam Board, when it appeared that a number of 
students had not been included on the final grid of marks. Again, the Chair handled the situation as best 
he could but the process by which student data reaches the final grid should be reviewed for next year.  
The only scripts I received prior to my arrival in Cambridge (on the night before the prelim board) were 
those for Themes and Sources, which meant that I had a large amount of reading to do in a short space of 
time. I understand that the constraints of the exam timetable meant that it was impossible for me to be 
sent any exam scripts at an earlier stage, so I would put in a heartfelt plea that the exam/marking 
schedule is altered slightly so that the externals can see more scripts prior to the exam meetings and 
hence perform their moderating function more easily. 
There was very little reference in the comments made by internal examiners to the marking guidelines. 
This is more than just a box-ticking exercise, since it could help markers decide on the right mark. For 
example, on one adjudication script a marker gave 43 for a two-sentence answer, even though that 
clearly fits the fail descriptor of ‘Work which makes no attempt to develop a sustained argument’. I would 
encourage more reference to the guidelines, especially where internals are unsure about the mark. 
Marks tended to bunch in the 65-72 range and I would encourage markers to make greater use of the 
marking range. I appreciate that the aggregate makes no difference to the final outcome (apart from 
starred firsts), but it would be good to see more use of the upper range of marks – there were a number 
of instances on the Themes and Sources paper where higher marks could have been awarded. 
There was a variance between the practices of the Part One and Finals boards about which mark, in cases 
of adjudication, should be retained (either the one nearest the third mark, or the higher of the two 

original marks). I would strongly urge that a single policy is adopted across the two parts of the 
assessment, for the sake of coherence and clarity. The current Part One policy (taking the mark nearest 
the third mark) seems to me to be the better of the two but that is for the Faculty to decide.  
It wasn’t clear to me how a revised mark, agreed between the two internals, had been arrived at. Some 
comment from one or other of the internals would be useful. 
It was excellent to see that the gender balance for part one classifications was almost exact and the 
Faculty is to be congratulated on this, since I gather that efforts have been made to ensure this over 
recent years. In the light of a recent RHS report on inequalities for ethnicities and the University’s 
widening participation agenda, I would now strongly encourage the Faculty to examine performance in 
relation to BAME students and students from different school backgrounds.  
2.  Structure of assessment: 
As noted above, I thought the standard of work in the Themes and Sources paper was generally much 
higher than that produced in the exams and I would encourage the Faculty to think about the balance of 
assessment, which is currently out of line with other UK institutions where at least 50% is assessed 
coursework. Clearly exams are a time-honoured and valuable part of assessment at Cambridge and I 
certainly think they should continue to have a very important place; but they do not assess the whole 
range of skills that students gain or hone during their studies and arguably favour a certain set of skills 
over all others. It would be interesting, for example, to compare results in Themes and Skills, which 
clearly assesses research skills far more effectively than an exam, with those achieved on other papers, 
since I saw at least some students who did far better on Paper 1 than on the exam-focused others. I 
would recommend consideration of moving towards a more mixed economy of assessment patterns. I 
heard, in conversation with colleagues, that there may be movement in that direction and if so, I would 
strongly encourage it. 
Most other institutions now routinely offer exam feedback to students and, especially (though not only) if 
the Faculty retains the very strong emphasis on exams, this seems a helpful innovation that can only 
assist students approach their final year. Such feedback can be relatively painless for markers if their 
comments are recorded in a way that is presentable to students. In my experience, this does not 
prejudice the robustness of the process, and feedback can be revised to reflect the resolution of any 
disagreement between markers (which would also address a point raised earlier). The feedback needs, of 
course, to be done in a structured way, showing students what they did well but also how to improve, 
and this is perhaps best done at the beginning of the next academic year, though practice across 
universities varies. 
3.  Moderated papers 
Themes and Sources (Conversion): I saw some really excellent work, equal perhaps to final year 
dissertations at times. I could see students stretching themselves in a way that they were able to do far 
less frequently in exams. So this paper is clearly a very valuable alternative form of assessment. 
Examiners’ comments often mentioned skimpy bibliographies. This suggests that more guidance needs to 
be given to the students about this. On occasion I also felt that students needed more guidance with the 
choice of their title – some didn’t have a sharp enough question. 
Answers on paper 4 had very little historiographical framing. I gather, in conversation, that this may have 
been in response to the views of a previous internal examiner who had let it be known that ‘name-
dropping’ should be avoided. There may be a case for reminding students of the guidelines on this issue 
which do clearly require an engagement with secondary literature. I also understand that the scope of 
the paper is being changed and I would welcome this, since I felt that at times students were able to 

answer the paper based on quite narrow knowledge and were often overly-reliant on A level material. 
Given that the paper is taught early in a student’s career, there is a good case for signalling the difference 
between A level and University approaches through a redesigned paper. 
Answers on Paper 17 also sometimes lacked an adequate historiographical/conceptual framing – in 
response to a question about Enlightened Absolutism I saw a couple of papers which only invoked the 
1975 work of Betty Behrens and seemed unaware of more recent debates, though this was not true 
across the board and some students did have a good conceptual framework derived from scholarship 
over the last thirty years. More generally, the paper’s focus is on Europe but it did seem to me that 
Europe might be treated in a more expansive way, at least to examine more of the margins of Europe and 
the interactions between Europe and the wider world - but perhaps that encroaches on Papers 21/22 
(which seem to have to carry a huge amount of weight, given the vast increase in the amount of 
literature in their fields, let alone that which connects both Britain and Europe to imperial contexts)? 
I hope these are useful comments and I look forward to hearing the Faculty’s response to them. 
 
**********************************************************************************
******* 
 
 
Report of the Chair of Examiners 2019 
 
 
 
The following matters emerged from the examination this year, and I would like to draw them to the 
attention of the Faculty Board and the Committee on Examining Matters.  
1. 
Irregularities in College exam administration 
I received complaints from examiners that a script sat by a candidate in College had been typed up 
without the examiners having requested that it be typed. On further investigation, it transpired that this 
was due to an intervention by the DRC. Efforts need to be made to ensure that, in circumstances such as 
these, the Faculty is informed in advance. 
2. 
Irregularities in the examination process 
A major irregularity occurred with respect to the conduct of one of the Political Thought papers (Paper 
20). At the start of the examination, a candidate complained that there was no question on a topic on 
which there was supposed to be one. Rather than simply over-riding the complaint and allowing the 
examination to proceed normally (and the candidate to complain down the line), the examiner present 
decided, in consultation with the Proctors, to remove an existing question and insert a new one. This 
inevitably caused considerable disruption, not least because it took some time for the information to 
reach Colleges. None of this should have been allowed to happen and, as a former Proctor, I still do not 
understand how the Proctors agreed to it. I am uncomfortable with the idea that candidates should be 
able to expect topics with such a degree of specificity. But more seriously, as I made clear to the 
examiners and re-iterated to the Board, once a paper has been agreed by the Board, it becomes the 
property of the Board, and is not to be altered or tampered with save to emend typographical errors.  
Examination papers must not be re-written in the Examination Hall. 
As I say, none of this should have happened. Thereafter, however, the examiners were scrupulous in 
scrutinising the scripts of all candidates taking this paper to see if any showed signs of having been 
adversely affected by the disruption. The marks of all candidates for this Paper were scrutinised further 
by the Chair and External Examiners. No candidate was found to have been significantly disadvantaged by 

what had transpired, and subsequent claims to the contrary by individual candidates were rejected by 
the University. 
3. 
Irregularities in Faculty exam administration 
At the start of the final meeting of the Board, it transpired that several candidates had been entirely 
omitted from the markbook, whilst others were listed as having been entered for papers which they had 
not, in fact, taken. As a result, an entirely new markbook had to be generated, printed and re-checked. 
This caused considerable delay and disruption, and also meant that there were candidates whom the 
Chair and External Examiners had not been able to discuss at the pre-Meet. Even once that was sorted 
out, it soon became clear that, even in the new markbook, the marks for scripts that had been 
moderated or re-marked by virtue of examiners having been unable to reconcile their initial marks 
satisfactorily, had been entered in a haphazard manner, requiring correction. As a result, all of these 
marks had to be checked, leading to further delay. I have never been provided with any satisfactory 
explanation as to how any of this happened, and the Academic Secretary should look into it as a matter 
of urgency.  
With respect to the pre-Meet itself, I was somewhat surprised to find, as a new Chair, that I was provided 
with no guidance as to how it was to be conducted. A ‘crib sheet’ should be produced for Examination 
Board Chairs setting out how such meetings are to proceed: I had to rely on the memory of one of the 
External Examiners. 
4.  
Turnitin 
This year Turnitin identified one themes and sources essay for which the candidate was deemed guilty of 
‘poor academic practice.’ A penalty was applied, although this made no difference to the candidate’s 
ultimate classification. 
5. 
Late submission 
The new penalty for late submission of themes and sources work appears to have operated well. 
Penalties were applied for late submission, although in no case did it affect the candidate’s ultimate 
classification. 
6. 
Handbook for examiners 
I received complaints from examiners that they had been sent instructions from the Faculty, over and 
above those set out in the handbook, as to how they should examine scripts  (in this instance, so as to 
avoid gender bias). The view was strongly expressed that instructions to and guidelines for examiners 
should be limited to the handbook, and others should not interpose. 
7. 
Profiling materials made available to examiners 
This year the practice of supplying each individual examiner, who examined last year or the year before, 
with their personal gender profile to take into consideration while marking was continued and will be 
continued in future years. 
8. 
Gender gap  
This year, the figures presented to the Board revealed that there was no significant difference in the 
overall performance of male and female candidates in terms of classification 
 
 

Part I results, by gender and class 2019 (presented as a percentage of the whole cohort): 
 
Class 


% of 


% of 
Total 

whole 
whole 
cohort 
cohort 
*I 

2.1% 
1.1% 

2.4% 
1.1% 

2.2% 

19 
19.6% 
10.6% 
19 
23.2% 
10.6% 
38 
21.2% 
II.1 
75 
77.3% 
41.9% 
60 
73.2% 
33.5% 
135 
75.4% 
 
 
 
II.2 

1.0% 
0.6% 

0.6% 
 
 
 
III 

1.2% 
0.6% 

0.6% 
Total 
97  100.0% 
54.2% 
82 
100.0%  45.8% 
179  100.0% 
 
Gender breakdown based on individual marks per script, by class: 
 
 


II.1 

II.2 

III 

Fail 

Total 
 

310  26.7% 
788  67.9% 
59  5.1% 
3  0.3% 
 
 
1160 

316  32.0% 
618  62.6% 
48  4.9% 
2  0.2% 
4  0.4% 
988 
Total 
626  29.1% 
1406  65.5% 
107  5.0% 
5  0.2% 
4  0.2% 
2148 
 
This is excellent news. I am strongly of the opinion that we now need to expand our scope to include 
analysis of the performance of BAME students, and students from different school and, especially, social 
backgrounds. 
9. 
‘Third marks’ 
At the start of the final meeting of the Board, we were informed that the Part II Board had decided to 
change the way it dealt with ‘third marks’ resulting from moderation or the inability of examiners to 
reconcile. Rather than keeping the original mark closest to the third mark provided by an External or 
other examiner, the Part II Board had decided that the highest of the original two marks should always be 
retained. We were invited to follow suit, but declined on the grounds that we simply regarded this as a 
means of achieving grade inflation. Obviously, an agreed position needs to be established or (preferably) 
reverted to. It should be noted that the errors in the Part I markbook concerning ‘third marks’ were not 
simply the result of following the new procedures adopted by the Part II Board. 
 

10. 
Examination Timetable 
The credibility of our examination process depends, to a considerable extent, on the ability of our 
External Examiners to moderate effectively. The extraordinarily short period of time which the External 
Examiners had to moderate the scripts with which they were presented placed an almost intolerable 
burden on them. We probably need to start our examinations earlier. 
11.    Thanks  
This year, I have been helped enormously by the hard work, including long hours beyond the working 
day, that the Faculty’s staff put in to making the process work. Particular thanks are due to 
 
and those involved in the final number crunching on the day. As a new Chair, I was also especially grateful 
to the External Examiners for their assistance and forbearance. 
 
EXAMINERS' REPORT: PART II OF THE HISTORICAL TRIPOS, 2016 
External Examiner’s Report 
 
This was my final year serving as an external examiner for Part II of the History Tripos.  
 
As in previous years the examination process was undertaken with care and collegiality by all 
concerned. The meeting of the examination board and the pre-meeting was serviced and 
administered efficiently by 
 and the whole process was overseen by the chair of 
the board, 
, who acted throughout with efficiency and good humour.  
 
Examiners this year attended more consistently to the marking conventions and remembered to 
indicate with asterisks scripts which contained a first class mark but were not of first class standard 
overall.  
Cambridge attracts excellent students and they are well-served by a wide and exciting range of 
papers.  
 
There are some other matters that require comment.  
 
The Cambridge History Faculty awards a large number of first class degrees in Part II and it is rare for 
a student to fall below the upper second category. For some Faculty members this is a matter for 
congratulation, for others it is a concern. Doubtless this pattern of classification reflects the quality 
of the intake at Cambridge and the teaching students receive. However, the pattern of awards may 
also reflect ways in which the Cambridge History Faculty classifies students. First, by its very nature, 
classification in Part II does not take account of work undertaken in the first two years of a student’s 
undergraduate career. To the best of my knowledge, the work undertaken by History students in 
their final year in other universities is weighted more heavily but it is unusual for earlier work to be 
of no account when their degree is classified. Second, the practice of not reconciling marks between 
examiners allows candidates to gather first class marks, which may contribute to a first class result, 
even though markers for a particular paper disagree on whether the work is first class. In my 
experience of other universities, it is usual for examiners to have to reconcile marks. In these 
marking systems it is likely that a portion of these cases would be resolved as higher upper second 
marks. The Faculty may want to consider whether the structure of the degree and the marking 
system give students in Part II of the History Tripos advantages which students at other universities 
do not enjoy.  
  
 
 


External Examiner’s Report 
 
I was appointed at short notice only for the preparatory pre-board, and the examination board itself, 
to cover the absence of another external examiner, and I will not be continuing in this role next year. 
(I am indeed joining the Faculty of History next academic year, so will be part of the examination 
process from the ‘inside’). I therefore cannot comment upon earlier elements of process and 
procedure prior to the board itself. 
 
I am satisfied by the care taken in recording grades, calculating outcomes, and the collegial and 
reflective practice of the board in deciding borderlines. The work of the chair of the Board and of the 
key administrative staff was exemplary, and considerable effort had been put into briefly me clearly 
about procedures, and running things smoothly on the day. The Part II element of the Tripos is very 
strong pedagogically, with some fascinating papers on offer and some wonderful teaching; though it 
is unusual – in fact possibly unique in a UK context – that students do not have to produce a 
dissertation as part of the assessment (though I understand that this may be subject to change in the 
near future). The standards of work and grading are roughly comparable to other UK institutions, 
though it is notable that Cambridge markers are loathe to reward stellar performance with marks 
higher than the low 70s. This does not materially affect the outcome for students given the use of a 
preponderance system for awarding degrees (though see further my comments below); but it may 
be something that members of Faculty need to reconsider particularly with regard to flagging stellar 
performance – both for the award of ‘starred Firsts’, and in terms of ensuring that extremely bright 
students who wish to go on to further study are marked out in a way that is clearly legible to other 
institutions.  
 
There was much work and performance of a very high standard on display, and this was rightly 
reflected in the high attainment of the students. With regard to the high number of firsts, the 
Faculty may wish to reflect a little on its practice and rules here, in comparison with procedures in 
almost all other UK institutions. There is no real reconciliation of grades between internal markers, 
other than where grades differ by more than 7 marks and fall across a class boundary; the 
classification of Firsts is then awarded on preponderance across the 10 marks garnered for the 5 
papers sat, with 5 first-class marks across any of the papers being sufficient to award a First-class 
degree. This would appear on first sight to be notably robust, and one may perhaps feel that the lack 
of reconciliation of grades prevents one marker talking another ‘up’. However, because the 5+ first-
class grades necessary for a First can come anywhere in the transcript, this means that a goodly 
proportion of finalists gained a first where only one internal marker thought the performance in a 
particular paper merited that outcome; in fact, by my calculation, about 1/3 of all the First-class 
degrees awarded fell into this pattern. In the system of reconciliation used in almost all other 
institutions, at least some proportion of these grades would have then fallen to a 2.i, and the 
preponderance needed for an overall First would have been lost. I am not decrying the system 
Cambridge currently employs, and it is possible, as already noted, to argue that reconciliation could 
also result in a second marker being ‘talked into’ proffering a First – but it is important for the 
Faculty to note that in this regard its practice differs notably from other institutions, and it is also 
important for the Faculty to understand what it is actually doing (i.e. not assuming that its system is 
‘tougher’ or ‘more robust’ than in fact it is). In noting this, I am not raising an issue of concern 
regarding quality assurance, but passing on critical reflection for colleagues to consider in their 
future practice. Overall the examination processes were conducted fairly, and marking was for the 
most part exemplary. 
 
I am very grateful for the exemplary hard work and care shown by the administrative staff tasked 
with running the examination board, and for the highly professional fashion in which the exam board 
itself was run. 
 

 
Part II Chairman's Report

 
 
  
Thanks. Firstly, I again wish to thank 
 for all her friendly assistance and timely 
efficiency in handling queries, scheduling meetings, chasing up copy and revisions from examiners in 
the History Faculty and elsewhere, and generally for her huge contribution to the smooth working of 
this complex process. Thanks are also due again this year to 
 for managing the IT 
dimension of the examining process, ensuring in the inevitably short time-frame available, that the 
Board was provided with updated aggregates, examiner and result profiles and class lists. We are 
also grateful to 
 for her assistance in the final meeting of the examinations Board. 
 oversaw the setting and revising of HAP with efficiency. Finally, I am grateful to fellow-
examiners and assessors for all the care they invested in setting, revising and marking their papers 
and especially for the submission of good, clean copy in the form required by the printers, in 
response to a request emphasizing the need for this. Due to University and College Union industrial 
action one of our external examiners, 
, resigned from 
post on 23rd May. This 
necessitated searching for a new external examiner in order to keep our examinations procedures as 
robust as possible. In the event we were very grateful to 
 from 
 
, for stepping in at such short notice. It was thus a great pleasure to have 
the benefit of these two excellent colleagues, 
 and 
, whose 
support was invaluable, particularly of course in the work of reading through and assessing 
borderline cases at the pre-meeting, the day before the main Examiners’ meeting. 
 
2. The Candidates. 
There were 179 candidates for Honours (97 females and 82 male). 
 
3. The Papers. There were no changes to the standard format. This year there were 12 Special 
Subjects (of which candidates chose one) examined by a 3-hour source-based paper and a Long 
Essay submitted in early May; 20 Specified Subject papers (plus three Section C political thought 
papers), from which candidates chose one or two, depending on whether they had elected to do an 
optional dissertation or not; the optional dissertation, which was offered by 99 students; and the 
compulsory Paper 1 (Historical Argument and Practice).  
 
Paper 7 (Transformation of the Roman World) was shared with the Classical Tripos Part II; Paper 11 
(Early Medicine) was shared with the Department of HPS [Paper 2 of History and Philosophy of 
Science] within Part II of the Natural Sciences Tripos; and Paper 4 (History of Political Thought c.1700 
– 1890) and 5 (Political Philosophy and the History of Political Thought since c.1890) were shared 
with The Social and Political Sciences Tripos.  
 
4. Preliminaries. 
The early stages of this year's proceedings—division of responsibilities in 
November, scrutiny and revision of question papers in January, proof readings in March—all passed 
without problems, thanks to the efficient support provided by 
. The collaboration 
with partners in other faculties worked smoothly.  
 
5. The pre-meeting and final meeting. The preliminary meeting attended by the chair and the 
external examiners made it possible to identify the borderline cases for classification on the basis of 
the profiles. The external examiners read all the scripts in which there were unreconciled marks (i.e. 
seven or more and a class apart) and all problem scripts. We were able to concentrate in particular 
on unreconciled marks that were likely to be crucial for classification. The excellent work of the 
externals greatly facilitated the work of the full Board on the following day, though due note was 
taken of the importance of taking full account of the judgements of examiners in borderline cases 
and an effort was made where appropriate to open the discussion in this direction. The number of 
borderline cases this year decreased yet again, confirming that the new policy of allowing only 6 
marks difference across a class before reconciliation appears to be having the desired effect. I would 

like to thank this year’s academic secretaries for their work improving the Examiners’ Handbook 
during the year.  
 
6. Plagiarism/Turnitin 
All dissertations and long essays are uploaded to Turnitin via Moodle and the 20% with the highest 
text-matching score are further scrutinized by the Academic Secretary for plagiarism. Thirty-six Long 
Essays and twenty dissertations were scrutinized for plagiarism.  
 
7. Applications Procedure 
The Chairman received 11 notices advising of dyslexic/dysgraphic/dyspraxic candidates, which were 
circulated to Examiners. The Chair is not informed of the existence of other types of warning letters, 
such as notably medical matters. There were also 3 requests for modest time extensions made to 
the Chair for the Special Subject Long essays. In each case these were granted on production of 
medical evidence by the colleges.  
  
There was one informal appeal about the outcome of the exam. There were also three formal 
appeals, which came via Applications Committee. A small ad hoc committee was convened to 
consider the appeals and it was determined that there were no grounds to revise the marks in each 
of the three cases. I am grateful to those colleagues who assisted me on the committee.  
 
8. The outcome. 
The breakdown of results (distinguishing by gender) was as follows. 
 
 
 
 
      Female    
         %           Male  
         %          Total 
 
 
1* 
 
 

 
 
4  
100.0%   


 
            33  
  55.0%               27             45.0%              60 
 
IIi 
 
            63  
  55.3%              51             44.7%            114 
 
IIii 
 
 
1            100.0%   
  
   
    
1  
III 
 
 

     
 
 0             
 

 
Total   
            97              54.2%               82  
 45.8 %             179 
 
 
 
 
What is notable in these statistics is that the shortfall of female Firsts, the cause of much concern 
over recent decades, is NOT in evidence this year (starred Firsts excepted). Obviously we will need 
data from future years (and Part I results) to determine whether our gender policies have 
established a new more positive trend but the results to represent a pleasing departure from recent 
years.  
 
9. Dissertations99 candidates out of the 179 opted to submit a dissertation – a decrease of about 
9% from the last three years. 
 
10. Prizes.  
The Board's final task before candidates were identified by name was to award prizes and nominate 
for external prizes: 
 
The Cambridge Historical Society Prize for the Best Dissertation in Tripos was awarded to a 
dissertation entitled ‘The experience of first-wave female immigrants from Pakistan to West 
Yorkshire, 1960-80’; furthermore, this dissertation was nominated for the Gladstone Memorial Prize 

(in competition with entries from the Economics and SPS Tripos) and also nominated for the Royal 
Historical Society's History Today Prize.  
 
The Board agreed that the Alan Coulson Prize for the best dissertation in the field of British imperial 
expansion (including North American history before 1776) should be awarded to a dissertation 
entitled ‘The English Levant Company in the age of Ottoman Crisis, 1620-1660’. 
 
The Junior Sara Norton Prize in American political history was awarded to a dissertation entitled 
‘Latino Americans and the 1992 Los Angeles Riots’.  
 
The following dissertation was nominated for a prize awarded by the Society for the Study of French 
History: ‘English Policy in Gascony 1413-1437’.  
 
The following dissertation was nominated for a prize awarded by the History of Parliament 
Dissertation Competition: ‘The Blasphemy Act of 1698’.  
 
It was agreed that a dissertation entitled ‘Gift Giving and Reciprocity in European Diplomacy with 
Southeast Asia, c1500-1824’ should be submitted for the Prize for Undergraduate Achievement in 
Maritime History awarded by the British Commission for Maritime History. 
 
The Board agreed that the Faculty Prize of £300 for the best overall performance in Part II should be 
awarded to two candidates who both achieved ten 1st class marks in their papers.  
 
Finally, the following dissertation was nominated for the new CUQM Quantitative Dissertation Prize: 
‘Retailers’ records as evidence for a ‘Consumer Revolution’ c.1660-1780’.  
 
11. External Examiners’ Reports
 
The role of External Examiners
   
Like last year both external examiners commented on the difficulty which they perceive in carrying 
out the function which the Handbook allocates to them of guarantor of ‘independent assessment of 
academic standards’,
 given that they no longer see a random selection of scripts to mark as 
previously (when there were three externals one was marking and the other two moderating; now 
both are moderating, only). At present they only get to see the set of borderline and disputed 
scripts, which they are called on to reassess at the pre-meeting and hence have little chance of 
reaching a broad view of standards. Once again external examiners regretted that the wealth of 
detailed commentary on exam scripts by examiners and assessors is seen by no one other those who 
write it.  
 
Members of the Exam Board expressed concern that the moderators were in effect unable to 
moderate and recommended that they were sent, at the very least, specimen dissertations and sets 
of long essays. This should be possible if examiners keep to marking deadlines. 
 
Plagiarism and Turnitin
There is a good deal of material on the Faculty and University webpages defining plagiarism and a 
useful flowchart outlining procedure for suspected cases. However, members of the Board were 
concerned that there was not enough guidance on what to do when plagiarism is detected. There is 
need for a set of guidelines, which detail a scale of penalties for cases of plagiarism ranging from 
crass derivation and sloppy referencing to a wilful desire to mislead. It is clear that the Proctors are 
only interested in the more serious cases of plagiarism. In the absence of detailed guidelines from 
the University it was suggested that the Faculty writes its own. The Board endorsed this decision.  

 
12. Other matters: 
 
Borderline marks 
While the Exam Board reserves the right to raise border line marks – 49, 59, 69 - it would be helpful 
if examiners and assessors, particularly those not on the Board, provide a clear steer on the matter 
i.e. whether their mark was simply borderline and should remain as such or whether they were 
ambivalent and open to having the mark modified in the light of the candidate’s overall 
performance.  
 
Late submission of marks 
While recognizing the hard work and dedication of examiners and the increasing pressures we are all 
under, it was nevertheless regrettable that colleagues missed deadlines, sometimes by two or more 
weeks, in returning marks to 
. This was particularly the case with long essays and 
dissertations. Indeed, two examiners returned marks for these just two days before the final Exam 
Board. The late return of marks has a number of serious consequences: it wastes the administrator’s 
time at an otherwise hectic moment in the term; it makes impossible our resolution to send work to 
externals for moderation; and endangers the viability of the final meeting of the Exam Board where 
ALL marks need to be tabled for the awarding of degrees. There is no alternative to colleagues 
making marking their absolute priority during Easter Term.  
 
EXAMINERS' REPORT: PART II OF THE HISTORICAL TRIPOS, 2017 
External Examiner’s Report – 
 
Following my year’s service as external examiner for Part II of the History Tripos at Cambridge, I have 
no hesitation in commending the History Faculty for its programme of third year teaching and 
assessment.   My thanks must go to the Chair of Examiners, 
, and the exams 
administrator, 
, for the clarity and efficiency with which they navigated the workload.  
There is a very tight turnaround between the submission of marks and the meeting of the board.  
Hellen and Tim were extremely organised in getting the work I needed to read to me in a timely 
fashion.  I note that this was 
 last year in the role.  Given the tight timetable and the 
importance of the task, I urge the Faculty to put in place a suitably experienced successor. 
 
The standards set were appropriate and comparable with other institutions with which I am familiar, 
and the quality of the work I read, both as a moderator and as a second-marker, was extremely 
good.  The spread and range of marks seemed appropriate for a cohort of this size, and I note that 
the Faculty is tracking the marks profiles of individual examiners, which is an important and valuable 
mechanism for ensuring parity across different markers.  In general, markers used the full range of 
marks.  The actual levels the students achieved was considerably higher than those at (say) my own 
non-Russell Group university, as one would expect. The best work was astonishingly good, but it was 
also gratifying to see the sizeable number of students who achieved consistently high marks spread 
across several courses. 
 
The assessment tasks were well-designed and appropriate for study at this level. HAP worked very 
effectively in encouraging students to think conceptually and allowing the best students to 
demonstrate their ability to turn the in-depth learning of their final year to more general historical 
problems. Dissertations and long essays gave students the opportunity to reflect upon historical 
problems in considerable depth.  The dissertations enabled some of the best students to shine, and 
shine they certainly did – there were a few excellent dissertations amongst those I read.  Most 
markers clustered their distinctions between 70 and 80, only a few went beyond. As I did not read all 
dissertations, I cannot say whether this reflects different marking styles or differences in the quality 

of the work submitted.  Nonetheless, it might be worth profiling the marks of individual dissertation 
markers as is done for HAP and other elements of assessment.  At the very least, with dissertation 
marking spread over such a very large pool of markers, it is worth consistently reminding all markers 
of the upper range, as inconsistent use amongst examiners in using the post-80 range might 
discriminate students in competitions for prizes and external funding.  
 
The assessment criteria and the course materials were clear and well presented. The assessment 
methods and the quantity of work that the students were expected to submit seemed appropriate 
for this course, and I was very impressed by the extent of the markers’ engagement with the 
students’ work. Their comments were constructive and in most instances extremely comprehensive 
as well.  I was very surprised to discover that all the comment books were to be immediately 
destroyed, particularly in the cases of the extended essays and dissertations. Such feedback is useful 
to those who intend to continue their studies and the destruction of feedback, whilst clearly 
understandable in the context of our increasingly litigious students, flies in the face of initiatives 
across the sector to improve the quality and quantity of the feedback we provide. 
 
The processes of the exam board and of degree classification were exemplary.  All assessment was 
blind double-marked, and borderline candidates were identified ahead of time, so that they could be 
fully considered in advance of the board. I must, however, draw attention to a fly in the ointment 
outside the Faculty’s control.  One course offered outside the Faculty was returning exam scripts 
with one agreed mark, rather than the two unreconciled marks required, leaving them with nine 
rather than ten marks in total.  As an ad hoc solution, the ninth mark was doubled, and as it 
happened this did not raise any issues for the students concerned, as none, fortunately, were 
borderline cases. Clearly, however, the time will come when one of these candidates is a borderline 
case, in which case the missing tenth mark would play a critical role in determining the candidate’s 
degree classification.  This strikes at the issue of fairness across candidates, both those taking 
courses external to the Faculty and those who don’t. It is not unreasonable to expect that 
departments which offer courses to History students, must also agree to mark them according the 
History Faculty’s criteria. 
 
As must be clear, I have no substantive concerns with the History Faculty’s Part II Tripos.  The degree 
includes a very wide range of content  and a good range of assessment, which stretches the students 
in the manner that one would expect at this level.  All elements of the marking and assessment run 
extremely well.  The degree is a credit to the University of Cambridge and it has been a pleasure to 
have been so closely involved in it.  
 
 
External Examiner’s Report – 
 
This is my first year as an external examiner.  Shortly after my appointment, 
, the Part 
II administrator, sent me all the relevant material relating to last year’s examinations and board 
meetings.  I also saw the documentation for the meetings that approved this year’s exam papers and 
had the opportunity to make suggestions for changes to draft papers. 
 
Before I arrived in Cambridge, I received scripts, long essays, and dissertations for moderation and, 
in a small number of cases, for remarking when the first and second examiners could not reconcile 
wide variations in the marks that they had awarded.  I saw further material in Cambridge, on the 
evening before the pre-meeting of the board.  Though I viewed only a small sample of the total 
volume of work for the examination and assessment, I saw enough to say that the whole process 
seems both rigorous and fair.   
Internal examiners in nearly every case that I saw produced thorough and helpful comments on all 
the work that they assessed.  I did not always agree with their marks, but their comments gave me a 

clear sense of why they had awarded them.  In most cases where there was a wide discrepancy 
between the two marks, internal examiners had made an effort to reconcile their differences, which 
spared me from having to third mark too many pieces of work. 
 
 the Chair of the Board, led the pre-meeting, on Wednesday 21 June, at which he 
and the two externals considered the individual candidates and deliberated on borderline cases.  
This pre-meeting, though long, proved a valuable preliminary to the meeting of the board the next 
day.  
 ran both meetings with good humour, great thoroughness, and scrupulous 
fairness to all candidates.
 handling of the administrative side of the process was 
exemplary.     
 
The general standard of the work that I saw was high. In nearly every case, candidates displayed 
knowledge and understanding, and illustrated their arguments with well-chosen examples.  Most 
importantly, they demonstrated analytical, evaluative, and rhetorical skills.  The best of the work 
was truly exceptional; some of it was of publishable quality. 
 
Given the high standard of the student intake, impressive work is perhaps to be expected. Even so, 
the way in which most candidates structured and presented their work and their engagement with 
the historiography and handling of primary materials suggests excellent training by History Faculty 
teachers. 
I have only two recommendations.  The first is that examiners go a little bit farther in rewarding truly 
outstanding work.  I saw evidence of willingness to go into the mid- and even late-seventies, which 
was pleasing, but very few marks of eighty and only one mark (I think) above 85, which in many 
institutions would be a sign of publishable work.  My second recommendation is that the faculty 
secures an experienced and able replacement for 
, for whom this was the last year of 
distinguished service to the Part II Board. 
 
 
Part II Chairman's Report: 
 
 
 
  
 
1. Thanks
  
Special thanks this year go to 
, who has guided the Chairs of many Part II Boards with 
such skill, friendliness and dedication over the years.  This year was no exception, and this was also 
the final year she undertook this task, before her retirement.  It is significant that both external 
examiners drew attention to her outstanding work and cautioned the Faculty about the difficulties 
of replacing her.  As in previous years, the Board was also most grateful to 
 for her help 
on the increasingly demanding IT side of the operation, to 
 for her reassuring presence 
at the final meeting, and to 
 for additional administrative assistance.   
 
I am most grateful to my fellow examiners for their hard work, helpfulness and care.  The process of 
setting, revision and marking was handled with great skill and dedication, not least under tightened 
time-frames in some cases.  
 provided excellent leadership and oversight of the task of 
setting HAP.  This year, due in part to the unusual circumstances last year, noted by my predecessor, 
we had two new external examiners.  

were hugely dedicated and hard-working externals, who were asked to put in more time, and do 
more by way of marking than their predecessors.  Their input and wisdom was vital at every stage of 
the process.  
 
2. The Candidates.  
There were 198 candidates for Honours (109 females and 89 male). 
 

3. The Papers.  
There were no changes to the standard format.  This year there were 13 Special Subjects (of which 
candidates chose one) examined by a 3-hour source-based paper and a Long Essay submitted in 
early May; 20 Specified Subject papers (plus three Section C political thought papers), from which 
candidates chose one or two, depending on whether they had elected to do an optional dissertation 
or not; the optional dissertation, which was offer 126 students; and the compulsory Paper 1 
(Historical Argument and Practice).    
 
Special Subject A (Constructing the worlds of Archaic Greece. c. 750–480 B.C.), Paper 7 
(Transformation of the Roman World) and Paper 9 (Writing History in the Classical World) were 
shared with the Classical Tripos Part II;  Paper 11 ‘Early Medicine’ was shared with History and 
Philosophy of Science within Part II of the Natural Sciences Tripos; and Paper 4 (History of Political 
Thought c.1700 – 1890) and 5 (Political Philosophy and the History of Political Thought since c.1890) 
were shared with the Humanities, Social and Political Sciences Tripos.  Paper 18, ‘Japanese history in 
the nineteenth and twentieth centuries’ was shared with Part IB of the AMES Tripos. 
 
4. Preliminaries.  
The allocation of examiners, setting and proofing of scripts passed without problems.  
 
5. The pre-meeting and final meeting
.  
At the Preliminary meeting, and with the invaluable help of the external examiners, we identified 
borderline classes for discussion and they reread problem scripts.  This allow us to focus on the 
borderline cases for classification at the Full Board meeting, whilst not pre-empting the Board’s 
discussion.  
 
The final meeting proceeded to class candidates. It had not been possible at the pre-meeting stage 
to look closely at the candidates' aggregates to check for anomalies between profile and mark score. 
Members of the Board were therefore instructed to look out for any such anomalies as each 
candidate was considered in turn. It was also necessary for the Board to classify those borderline 
and other candidates whom the members of the Preliminary Meeting had not felt able to classify 
provisionally.   
 
It was noted that two Assessors for Paper 18, Japanese history in the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries (Paper J6 Part IB AMES) had not followed the marking pattern of the History Faculty so in 
fairness to those candidates at the pre-meeting they agreed double the one agreed mark.  This 
matter has been raised by the external examiners. 
 
6. Plagiarism/Turnitin 
The work of the Faculty’s Compliance Officer, 
, was carried out with exemplary 
diligence and fairness.  Twenty-five dissertations were scrutinised for plagiarism or poor scholarly 
practice. Two dissertations raised sufficient concerns that they were passed on to me for further 
scrutiny, but I took the view that they were not in breach of plagiarism guidelines.    
 
Forty-two Long Essays were scrutinised for plagiarism or poor scholarly practice. One long essay 
raised serious concerns and was subject to a procedure of a Special Meeting to investigate the case.  
On the recommendation of that meeting, the candidate’s marks for the long essay were revised.  
 
7. Applications Procedure
 
The Chairman received 13 notices advising of dyslexic/dysgraphic/dyspraxic candidates, which were 
circulated to Examiners. The Chair is not informed of the existence of other types of warning letters, 

such as notably medical matters. I granted 4 requests for extensions to long essay/dissertation 
deadlines, on medical grounds, which had been forwarded by the Applications Committee.   
  
There were three formal appeals.  In one case, made on alleged procedural irregularity, there were 
found to be no grounds for granting the appeal.  However, the class list was revised in two appeals 
made on the basis of medical/tutorial evidence.  In deciding these cases, as per usual practice, I 
consulted with two examiners.  I am grateful to 
 and 
 for 
their assistance.  
 
8. The outcome.  
The breakdown of results (distinguished by gender, as a percentage of the whole cohort) was as 
follows
 

% of 
% of 
whole 
whole 
Class 


cohort 


cohort 
Total 

*1 

2.6% 
1.5% 

7.9% 
3.5% 
10 
5.1% 
  1 
26  23.9% 
13.1% 
30  33.7% 
15.1% 
56  28.2% 
II.1 
78  71.6% 
39.0% 
52  58.4% 
26.3% 
130  65.7% 
II.2 

1.9% 
1.0% 

0% 
0% 

1.0% 
III 

0% 
0% 

0% 
0% 

0% 
Total 
109 
100% 
55.1% 
89 
100% 
44.9% 
198 
100% 
 
What is immediately noticeable is that the shortfall in female Firsts, which was not in evidence last 
year (when female firsts were 55% of the total), has returned this year.  Clearly more data from 
future years is needed to ascertain the trend in the light the Faculty’s work in this area over past 
years. 
 
The one candidate for the Preliminary to Part II examination was deemed to have passed. 
 
9. Dissertations.  
This year, 126 candidates out of the 198 opted to submit a dissertation – this was up from a slight 
dip in numbers (99) in the previous year. 
 
10. Prizes.  
i. 
Alan Coulson Prize: awarded for the best dissertation in the field of British imperial 
expansion to a dissertation entitled: An Oral History of Colour and Identity in the Making of Modern 
Nepal. 
ii. 
Junior Sara Norton Prize: awarded for the best dissertation on some aspect of American 
political history to a dissertation on: The Culture Wars and the Supreme Court Nomination of 
Douglas Ginsburg. 
iii. 
Gladstone Memorial Prize: The Board selected the following two dissertations for 
consideration for the Gladstone Memorial Prize: on The Making and Breaking of Trust during the 
British Savings Banks Scandals, 1848-1860, and on Changing patterns of female employment in 
Westmorland 1787-1851.   
iv. 
Royal Historical Society [2 prizes]: History Today Prize, and History of Scotland Prize: For 
the History Today Prize, the Board nominated a dissertation on The Making and Breaking of Trust 
during the British Savings Banks Scandals, 1848-1860. For the Scottish history prize, the Board 
nominated a dissertation entitled: The Evolution of the Scottish Diplomatic Subculture, c.1740-
c.1793. 

 v. 
Cambridge Historical Society Prize: awarded to a dissertation entitled: The Making and 
Breaking of Trust during the British Savings Banks Scandals, 1848-1860. 
vi. 
Undergraduate Dissertation/Extended Essay Prize: The Society for the Study of French 
History: 
The Board nominated a dissertation entitled: French non-state actors in the Caribbean during the 
French Revolutionary Wars. 
vii. 
The History of Parliament Dissertation Competition: The Board nominated a dissertation 
entitled: The Conservative Party and British Indians, 1975-1990. 
viii. 
Achievement in Maritime History: The Board nominated a dissertation entitled: The male 
occupational structure of Kent in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 
ix. 
Faculty Prize: The Board agreed that the Faculty prize of £300 for the best overall 
performance in Part II should be awarded to a dissertation entitled: The Making and Breaking of 
Trust during the British Savings Banks Scandals, 1848-1860. 
x. 
Istvan Hont Prize: awarded to a dissertation entitled: The role of credit in John Locke. 
xi. 
CUQM Quantitative Dissertation Prize: The Board nominated a dissertation entitled: 
Changing patterns of female employment in Westmorland 1787-1851. 
xii. 
Winifred Georgina Holgate-Pollard Memorial Prizes – new this year for each Tripos: The 
Board nominated a dissertation entitled: The Making and Breaking of Trust during the British Savings 
Banks Scandals, 1848-1860. 
xiii. 
GHS Undergraduate Dissertation Prize – new this year: The Part II Board did not wish to 
nominate a dissertation for this prize. 
 
11. External Examiners’ Reports
Concerns were raised in 2015 and 2016 by external examiners on the difficulty which they perceive 
in carrying out the function of guarantor of ‘independent assessment of academic standards’, given 
that they no longer saw a random selection of scripts to mark as previously.  It was very gratifying 
that revised measures for moderation of scripts and specimen dissertations and sets of long essays, 
set in motion by my predecessor and the previous Board, met with the approval of the examiners 
this year.   
 
This was helped by the improved performance of colleagues in keeping to marking deadlines 
(another concern raised last year), and by the willingness of the externals to undertake a heavier 
workload under time pressure.  
 
One of the externals raised again the issue of examiners using the entire range of marks in rewarding 
outstanding work.  This is a matter for the Faculty to continue to keep in consideration, in its review 
of the documentation and training given to examiners. 
 
12. Other matters 
Last year, my predecessor raised the issue of clarity of guidance in raising borderline marks. Both the 
narrowing of the margin for reconciliation (to seven or more and a class apart) and the emphasis this 
year on more clearly signalling the ‘raise-ability’ of 49, 59 and 69 marks, seemed to be working 
effectively this year. Some excellent work had been done on the handbook during the year towards 
this, particularly by the Academic Secretary,
, and the Chair of Part I, 
 

 
EXAMINERS' REPORT: PART II OF THE HISTORICAL TRIPOS, 2018 
External Examiner’s Report – 
  
This has been my second year’s service as external examiner for the Part II of the History Tripos at 
Cambridge.  Firstly, I would like to commend and thank both the chair of examiners, 


and the administrator,
.  There is a large amount of work to complete in a very short time-
frame  and  the  competence  and  professionalism  certainly  made  my  role  as  external  both 
straightforward and enjoyable. 
 
As I observed previously, standards are appropriate for the final year of an undergraduate degree, the 
processes for assessment are sound, and the marking rigorous and fair.    I have seen evidence of 
excellence  with  respect  both  to  the  students’  work  and  the  faculty’s  teaching,  assessment,  and 
administration  of  the  degree.    I  have  no  concerns  about  the  systems  of  assessment  and  degree 
classification that are currently in place. 
 
The  History  Faculty’s  range  of  third-year  courses  is  imaginative  and  stimulating.    There  was  clear 
evidence in the work that I saw that many students had been engaged by their courses, and there 
seems  considerable  evidence  of  committed  and  inspiring  teaching.    Some  students  had  really 
immersed themselves in the long essays and dissertations and gone far beyond the minimum reading 
required.  The best work was truly excellent and certainly of a publishable standard. 
 
The mode of assessment is clearly weighted towards exams, but the dissertation and extended essay 
provide the opportunity to reflect upon historical problems in considerable depth and for assessment 
by coursework rather than exam.  The format of exams is also varied, with the long essay of HAP and 
the gobbet questions on the Special paper, sitting alongside the more traditional one-hour thematic 
essay questions.  The varied modes of assessments provide opportunities for students with different 
aptitudes to excel. 
 
I  was  highly  impressed  by  the  feedback  provided  by  markers,  particularly  given  that  none  of  this 
feedback is made available to students.  The detailed comments were extremely useful in cases where 
externals  were  needed  to  provide  third  marks  or  consider  discrepancies  between  markers.    The 
assessment methods and the quantity of work that the students were expected to submit seemed 
appropriate  for  this  course.    It  is  clear  that  the  dissertation  is  a  high-reward  but  high-risk  choice.  
Certainly the best dissertations achieved higher marks than the best exam scripts, but on the other 
hand there were two cases this year of dissertations that had gone badly wrong.  The preponderance 
principle for the classification of degrees meant that these did not alter the final result, but these cases 
are a salutary reminder  that  not  all undergraduates are suitable  candidates for extended research 
projects. 
 
The  exam  board  and  the  pre-board  meeting  were  both  very  well  conducted.    All  the  borderline 
candidates had already been identified, and the chair had done considerable work in collecting data 
from previous years for comparative purposes.  The system of degree classification is complex, and 
the whole system relies heavily on institutional memory.  When we encountered a couple of unusual 
cases, the handbook was not sufficiently clear on how the process works and were ultimately resolved 
by the chair without reference to the handbook.  The handbook should really contain clearer guidance, 
so that it – rather than individuals – contains the answers required. 
 
Our decision-making in several instances was made easier by the historic information (concerning the 
proportion of firsts and starred firsts that had been awarded in the previous six years, as well as the 
cut-off point for the award of starred firsts) that the chair had brought to the meeting.  As attention 
within the sector is increasingly focussing on grade inflation, the board’s knowledge of recent trends 
provides a helpful guard against an unwanted, upwards creep.  The historic information about starred 
firsts simply spares each new exam board rethinking how to set about awarding starred firsts from 

scratch each year.  I would recommend formalising this innovation, so that this information is routinely 
collected and kept on the exam board’s agenda. 
 
Can  I  finally  thank  all  my  colleagues  on  the  Board  for  another  very  enjoyable  and  intellectually 
stimulating  experience  of  the  Board  at  work.  This  is  an  excellent  programme,  serving  its  equally 
excellent candidates very well indeed. 
 
 
External Examiner’s Report – 
 
This is my second and final year as external examiner for Part II of the History Tripos.  As last year, I 
was impressed by the thorough and meticulous care taken by the board in the process of classification.  
Every candidate was treated fairly, with time given to discussion of difficult and borderline cases.  I 
wish to thank 
 for the very calm and efficient service she gave to the board; it was hard to 
believe that this was her first year as the administrator for Part II.  My thanks are also due to this year’s 
chair, 
, who led the process with care, precision, and great humanity.  His skilful chairing 
of the board meeting was no doubt facilitated by the time and effort he had taken to prepare, but also 
reflected his abilities as a chair; he conducted the meeting with good humour, rigorous fairness, and 
a willingness to listen to all points of view.  As last year, a pre-board meeting of the external examiners, 
chair and administrative officers greatly aided the efficient dispatch of business at the board meeting 
itself. 
 
The quality of the marking made my task straightforward in most cases; the internal examiners gave 
ample and clear justification for the marks that they had awarded.  As an external examiner, asked to 
moderate  (and  in  a  few  cases  third  mark)  in  areas  in  which  I  was  far  from  expert,  the  detailed 
comments of the internal examiners proved an invaluable guide. I saw some very impressive work, a 
reflection, no doubt, of the quality of the History Faculty’s intake, but also of the quality of the teaching 
and supervision, which seems to have been of an exceptionally high standard.  The students benefited, 
as well, from the availability of a wide range of interesting and exciting courses. 
 
Students who opted to do a dissertation generally fared well; my impression was that many achieved 
their highest marks on this independent study.  A few, however, under-performed on the dissertation, 
as compared with taught courses.  This suggests (on the positive side) that dissertations give a boost 
to the best students, but (more negatively) can, through circumstances not entirely in the control of 
the candidate, lead to disaster.   
 
The overall results this year were strong; a record proportion of candidates ended up in the first-class 
category.  The proportion, however, is not out of line with the results achieved by students in other 
institutions, including those that might reasonably be compared with Cambridge.  Most pleasingly, the 
higher proportion of firsts seems to have led to a narrowing of the gender gap; this year the proportion 
of men and women emerging with first-class degrees seems to have been closer than ever before. 
 
It might seem perverse, given the record number of firsts, to urge internal examiners to award higher 
marks.    But  my  impression  was  that  the  large  number  of  firsts  was  at  least  partly  the  result  of  a 
willingness on the part of internal examiners to give 70 or 71 for work that, in previous years, might 
have been rewarded with only 68. Outstanding first-class work, it seems to me, is still not sufficiently 
differentiated from work that just makes it into the first-class category.  I gained the impression that 
more candidates secured marks of 80 than in previous years, but noted that none (as far as I could 
see)  obtained  a mark  higher  than 80.    As  the  Handbook  for Examiners  and  Assessors  notes  (p. 1), 

‘examiners are encouraged to use marks in the high 80s and the 90s for truly outstanding work’. In 
many institutions, 85 or above is regarded as an appropriate mark for work of publishable or near 
publishable standard.  I saw some work that appeared to me to be in this category. 
 
I do not wish to close my report with a criticism (mild though it is). My view of the examination and 
assessment process is overwhelmingly positive.  My experience this year confirms the impression I 
gained last year – that History students at Cambridge enjoy access to a wide range of interesting and 
well-taught courses and that their work is assessed with great rigor. 
 
Part II Chairman's Report:  
  
  
   
  
1. Thanks   
It  was  pleasing  that  during  the  year  in  which  she  took  over  from 
,  both  Externals 
commented on how smooth and professional had been the support offered to them by 
 
throughout the process; and as Chair I would certainly agree wholeheartedly with this sentiment.  It 
is only a shame that the Faculty has not been able to retain 
 services for Tripos 2019. The 
Board was again also most grateful to
 for her help on the increasingly demanding IT side 
of the operation, and to 
 for her reassuring presence and wisdom at both the pre- and the 
final meeting of the Board.  
As  Chair  I  am  also  most  grateful  to  my  fellow  examiners  for  all  their  hard  work,  helpfulness  and 
diligence,  not  least  during  the  second  half  of  the  Lent  Term  and  the  Easter  vacation  when  they 
responded with great efficiency and professionalism to the Chair’s need for extra information due to 
the unusual circumstances created by the pensions strike. In the event, thankfully, the strike caused 
minimal disruption, overall, to the examining process. The process of setting, revision and marking 
was handled with great skill and dedication and 
 provided excellent leadership and oversight 
with the task of setting HAP. This year we had the benefit of two experienced external examiners, 
 and 
. They were highly supportive and hard-
working  externals,  whose  advice,  many  contributions  and  good  humour  were  much-appreciated 
throughout the process.  
  
2. The Candidates 
There were 194 candidates for Honours (100 females and 94 male).  
  
3. The Papers  
This  year  there  were  15  Special  Subjects  (of  which  candidates  chose  one)  examined  by  a  3-hour 
source-based paper and a Long Essay submitted in early May; 21 Specified Subject papers (plus three 
Section C political thought papers), from which candidates chose one or two, depending on whether 
they had elected to do an optional dissertation or not; the optional dissertation, which was offered 
by 122 students; and the compulsory Paper 1 (Historical Argument and Practice).     There were no 
changes to the standard format.   
  
Special  Subject  A  (Roman  Religion:  Identity  and  Empire);  Paper  7  (Transformation  of  the  Roman 
World); Paper 9 (Writing History in the Classical World); and Paper 10 (Living in Athens) were shared 
with the Classical Tripos Part II;  Paper 11 ‘Early Medicine’ was shared with History and Philosophy of 
Science within Part II of the Natural Sciences Tripos; and Paper 4 (History of Political Thought c.1700 
– 1890) and 5 (Political Philosophy and the History of Political Thought since c.1890) were shared with 

the Humanities, Social and Political Sciences Tripos.  Paper 18, ‘Japanese history in the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries’ was shared with Part IB of the AMES Tripos.  
  
4. Preliminaries  
The allocation of examiners, setting and proofing of scripts passed without problems.   
  
5. The pre-meeting and final meeting  
At  the  Preliminary meeting,  and  with  the  invaluable  help  of  the  external examiners,  we  identified 
borderline classes for discussion and they reread problem scripts.  The external examiners prepared 
non-binding recommendations for borderline cases.  
  
An irregularity regarding the gobbets paper of Special Subject (L) ‘The Transformation of Everyday Life 
in Britain, 1945-1990’ was discussed. One gobbet had appeared in error, which was not a set primary 
source  in  the  current  academic  year,  so  in  effect  the  students  had  only  four,  not  five,  gobbets  to 
choose  from  for  question  two  of  that  exam  paper.  No  student  had  attempted  to  answer  on  that 
gobbet. Statistical analysis showed that the first examiner awarded 0.3 fewer marks on average to 
question two compared with question one (the other gobbet question on the paper); while the second 
examiner awarded 0.8 fewer marks. The Board agreed unanimously with the proposal of the Chair and 
the external examiners to raise the marks of all students taking this paper by 2-marks per examiner 
and the marks were duly adjusted ahead of classing. 
 
The final meeting proceeded to class candidates. Borderline candidates were discussed individually 
and classed by unanimous agreement. 
  
6. Plagiarism/Turnitin  
The work of the Faculty’s Academic Integrity Officer, 
, was carried out with exemplary 
diligence  and  fairness.    Twenty-five  dissertations  were  scrutinised  for  plagiarism  or  poor  scholarly 
practice. Two dissertations raised serious concerns and both were subject to a procedure of a Special 
Meeting to investigate.  On the recommendation of those meetings, both candidates’ marks for the 
dissertation were revised.   
  
Forty-two  Long  Essays  were  scrutinised  for  plagiarism  or  poor  scholarly  practice.  None  raised 
significant concerns.    
 
7. Applications Procedure  
The Chair received twelve notices advising of dyslexic/dysgraphic/dyspraxic candidates, which were 
circulated to Examiners. The Chair is not informed of the existence of other types of warning letters, 
such  as  notably  medical  matters.  Nine  applications  for  extensions  had  been  received  from  six 
candidates, four in respect of dissertation submission and five in respect of Long Essay submission. All 
had been granted on medical grounds.  
 
The  Chair  reported  that  two  Representations  to  Examiners  had  been  received  for  procedural 
irregularities.  The  Board  considered  the  students’  cases  and  concluded  that  neither  student’s 
examination  results  had  been  adversely  impacted  as  a  result  of  the  irregularities  described  and 
therefore their marks would not be changed.  
  
 
 
 


 
8. The outcome 
The  breakdown  of  results  (distinguished  by  gender,  as  a  percentage  of  the  whole  cohort)  was  as 
follows 
  
%  of 
%  of 
whole 
whole 
Class  
 
 
cohort    
 
cohort   Total  
 
*1  
 
3.0%  
1.5%  
 
9.6%  
4.6%  
12 
6.2%  
  1  
38  
38.0%  
19.6%   33 
35.1%  
17.0%   71 
36.6%  
II.1  
59 
59.0%  
30.4%   51 
54.3%  
26.3%   110 
56.7%  
II.2  
0 
   0% 
   0%  
1 
0%  
1.1% 
1 
0.5%  
III  
 
0%  
0%  
 
0%  
0%  
 
0%  
Total  
100 
100%  
51.5%   94 
100%  
48.5%   194 
100%  
  
The five candidates for the Preliminary to Part II examination were deemed to have passed.  
  
9. Dissertations 
This year, 122 candidates out of the 194 opted to submit a dissertation – this was up from a slight dip 
in numbers (99) in the previous year.  
  
10. Prizes 
i.  
Alan Coulson Prize: awarded for the best dissertation in the field of British imperial expansion 
to a dissertation entitled: Bholanauth Chunder, a Global Bengali in British India, 1845-1869. 
ii.  
Junior  Sara  Norton  Prize:  awarded  for  the  best  dissertation  on  some  aspect  of  American 
political history to a dissertation on: Kennedy on the ‘New Frontier’: The Western, Rhetoric, and the 
Cold War, 
1960-1963. 
iii.  
Gladstone  Memorial  Prize:  The  Board  selected  the  following  two  dissertations  for 
consideration  for  the  Gladstone  Memorial  Prize:  Rethinking  middle-aged  women’s  sexuality  in 
England, 1700-1815; and: Anglo-Jewish Humanitarianism and the Jewish Relief Unit, 1943-50. 
iv.  
Royal Historical Society [2 prizes]: History Today Prize, and History of Scotland Prize: For the 
History  Today  Prize,  the  Board  nominated  the  following  two  dissertation,  which  it  would  not 
distinguish  between,  both being  considered  equally meritorious:  Rethinking  middle-aged  women’s 
sexuality in England, 1700-1815; and: Anglo-Jewish Humanitarianism and the Jewish Relief Unit, 1943-
50. For the Scottish history prize, the Board nominated a dissertation entitled: Scottish Covenanters 
and "Loyalist Resistance" to Charles I in 1638. 
v.  
Cambridge  Historical  Society  Prize:  the  Board  awarded  the  prize  to  the  following  two 
dissertation, which it would not distinguish between, both being considered equally meritorious: 
Rethinking  middle-aged  women’s  sexuality  in  England,  1700-1815;  and:  Anglo-Jewish 
Humanitarianism and the Jewish Relief Unit, 1943-50. The fund managers were asked to consider 
raising the prizemoney, which would need to be split. 
vi.  
Undergraduate  Dissertation/Extended  Essay  Prize:  The  Society  for  the  Study  of  French 
History:    The  Board  nominated  three  dissertations,  the  maxiumum  number  that  could  be  put 
forward,  for  the  following  dissertations:  Louis  XIV’s  mistresses  and  the  political  implications  of 
favour,  1664-1674;  The  role  of  time  in  the  political  writings  of  Jean-Jacques  Rousseau;  and  The 
Revolution in Saint-Domingue and the Historicity of Liberty, 1791-1797. 

vii.  
The History of Parliament Dissertation Competition: The Board nominated a dissertation 
entitled: Grassroots Liberalism and Irish Home Rule, 1910-1914. 
viii.  
Achievement  in  Maritime  History:  The  Board  nominated  a  dissertation  entitled:  Ludwig 
Horner and Scientific Research in the Dutch East Indies, 1800-1850. 
ix.  
Faculty Prize: The Board agreed that the Faculty prize of £300 should be awarded to the two 
students who had the highest aggregates of those students achieving all ten First Class marks, which 
in the Board’s view constituted the ‘best overall performance’ in Part II of the Historical Tripos. The 
Faculty was asked to consider raising the prizemoney, which would need to be split.  
x.  
Istvan  Hont  Prize:  awarded  to  a  dissertation  entitled:  The  Materialist  Conception  of 
History’ in Marx’s Dispatches for the New-York Daily Tribune, 1852-1862. 
xi.  
CUQM  Quantitative  Dissertation  Prize:  The  Board  nominated  a  dissertation  entitled: 
Derivatives, secondary markets and credible commitment in the City of London, 1688-1734. 
xii.  
Winifred  Georgina  Holgate-Pollard  Memorial  Prizes:  The  Board  awarded  the Winifred 
Georgina Holgate Pollard Memorial Prize for the ‘most outstanding result’ to the student with the 
highest aggregate. 
xiii.  
GHS  Undergraduate  Dissertation  Prize:  The  Board  nominated  a  dissertation  entitled: 
Anglo-Jewish Humanitarianism and the Jewish Relief Unit, 1943-50. 
xiv. 
Ellen McAthur Undergraduate Prize  –  New for Tripos 2018:  The managers of the  Ellen 
McArthur Fund had instituted a new annual prize of £250 for the best undergraduate dissertation 
in Economic and Social History, which would be awarded for the first time at their Michaelmas 
2018  meeting.  The  Board  of  Examiners  nominated  four  candidates  for  consideration  for  the 
following dissertations: Women and Work in Bradford and Halifax, 1838-51; Domesday Book as 
Evidence for Sheep Farming in Later Eleventh-Century Essex; Derivatives, secondary markets and 
credible commitment in the City of London, 1688-1734; and South Asian families and the welfare 
state in two West London boroughs, c.1967 to 1983. 
  
11. External Examiners’ Reports:  
Evidently the most  significant  general outcome this year was the  step-change in the proportion of 
First-class degrees awarded to candidates by the Board, which reached fully 43% of the total (having 
never previously been above 36%). It is extremely reassuring that the same two External examiners 
served this year as last year (when 33% achieved a First) and that they have each endorsed the validity 
of  this  significantly  larger  proportion  of  first-class  degrees  awarded,  based  on  their  comparative 
knowledge  of  proportions  awarded  at  other  institutions  and  their  moderating  reviews  of  a  varied 
sample of scripts, long essays and dissertations, continuing the practice initiated last year. 
 
, the retiring external examiner from 
, another Russell Group university, also repeated his 
view that examiners in Cambridge are not marking the very best dissertations sufficiently highly and 
should  venture  more  confidently  into  the  range  above  80  for  those  deemed  publishable  or  near 
publishable. 
, the returning external examiner, also noted that dissertations appeared to 
have  been  a  risky  activity  for  a  small  number  of  students,  ‘a  salutary  reminder  that  not  all 
undergraduates are suitable candidates for extended research projects’.  
 also pointed out how 
helpful and important (to guard against notions of ‘inflation’) it was to the Board to have available to 
them  the  historic  information  on  proportion  of  Firsts  and  numbers  of  starred  Firsts  and  their 
aggregates, for each of the previous five years when determining the award of starred firsts.     
  
12. Other matters 
Firstly, it should be noted that along with the increased proportion of Firsts awarded this year, the 
proportion of female students achieving a First in Part II was an enormous relative improvement on 
this same cohort’s capacity to achieve a First when they took Part I last year.  In Part I 13% of females 

got a First; 25% of males ie nearly 100% greater chance of getting a First for males. In Part II 41% of 
females got a First; 45% of males; ie only 10% greater chance of getting a First for males. 
 
Secondly, several colleagues on the Board raised the issue of the unfortunate coincidence of timing of 
Part II Tripos examining of scripts with both deadlines for examining on many M.Phils and also for the 
Faculty’s RAE exercises for all first-year PhD students. It was strongly represented that the deadlines 
for  the  latter,  whose  timing  lies  within  the  Faculty’s  discretion,  should  be  brought  forward 
significantly, to ensure that all RAEs are completed before the end of May each year, the date at which 
Tripos examining commences.  
  
EXAMINERS' REPORT: PART II OF THE HISTORICAL TRIPOS, 2019 
 
External Examiner’s Report –

  
This is my third and final year as external examiner for the Part II of the History Tripos at Cambridge, 
and I would like to thank both the exams administrator, 
, and the two chairs I have 
worked with – 
 and 
 – for their unfailing courtesy and attention to my 
observations over the last three years. It has been hard work, but also an immense privilege to act 
as external on a degree which affords the opportunity each year to read work of outstanding quality 
 
As already indicated, I have no concerns about the operation of the degree for which I have been 
external examiner. I was kept fully informed by the chair of examiners and the relevant 
administrators of the assessment procedures and deadlines. In light of the very tight deadlines, the 
work for moderating and re-reading was delivered to me as swiftly as practicable, and I was allowed 
sufficient time to assess the work and return feedback. The degree includes a wide and varied range 
of courses, both chronologically and geographically, and despite a weighting towards three-hour 
exams as the mode of assessment, there is also some variety – dissertations and long essays, as well 
as the one-essay HAP exam and the gobbets element of the Special exam. In all, the content and 
methods of assessment stretch the students in the manner that one would expect at this level. In 
particular HAP encourages students to think outside the narrow frames necessarily imposed by 
subject-specific questions and enables them to think about the creation of historical knowledge 
more broadly and imaginatively. 
 
Once more, I received work (both essays and exams) from moderated courses, and spent the pre-
exam board meeting and the Tuesday evening looking at some additional work to which I was 
directed by the chair. The work was once again of a very high standard and standards of written 
English were also high. There is clear evidence of markers venturing above 80 to reward outstanding 
work.  The best work is simply excellent and very much of the standard one hopes to see at this 
level. The marking standards in the department are in line with the relevant external reference 
points. I would reiterate my comments of previous years about the overall level of performance in 
this degree being significantly higher than would be found in level work in other institutions. There 
are candidates who fall below the line for a first-class degree who would easily achieve the same on 
programmes elsewhere. The number of first-class degrees awarded is rising, as they are across the 
sector. At Cambridge, the welcome shift towards using a fuller range of marks above 80 is clearly 
contributing to the rise in the overall number of firsts, as well as to the number of very strong 
performances and higher aggregates. Whilst grade inflation is not to be encouraged, the precise 

factors at work reflect the policy decision (and one which I fully support) to use a wider range of 
marks above 70. 
 
The university’s processes for assessment are transparent and fair. With almost no exceptions, the 
written feedback on the work I assessed was clear, detailed, and constructive. In many cases, 
written feedback was extremely extensive as well. The process of reconciliation between the two 
markers was clearly explained. For the most part there was considerable parity between markers 
across different courses, though inevitably some disagreements between markers did need to be 
resolved. In cases of disagreements, it is extremely helpful that we have all work and such detailed 
comments to hand. In the case of HAP scripts, one examiner is usually present too. It is helpful that 
the faculty collects and distributes information about marking profiles. The sharing of such 
information seems a valuable and non-intrusive way of ensuring parity between markers and 
ensuring against unintended grade inflation.  
 
This year’s exam board was conducted with particular swiftness, owing in part no doubt to the 
chair’s close knowledge of all procedures, in particular concerning the proportion of firsts and 
starred firsts that had been awarded in recent years. I have a few very minor points concerning 
procedure so that this efficiency can be maintained in future. As the chair’s role is a rotating 
position, it may be useful to formalise the collection and presentation of historic data so that this is 
available to the board independent of the chair’s expertise. It would also be possible to expedite the 
nominations and awards for prizes if members of the board received an additional print-out of 
dissertations that had been awarded a mark higher than 70, listed in rank order. The list of prizes is 
also listed in a slightly haphazard fashion, with no distinction between nominations and actual 
awards. If this list could be further rationalised, the task of awarding prizes and nominations would 
be simplified. 
 
Clearly, these are all very minor suggestions. As must be clear, I have no serious concerns with the 
quality of assessment for the History Faculty’s Part II Tripos. All elements of the marking and 
assessment run extremely well. The degree is a credit to the University of Cambridge and it has been 
a pleasure to have been so closely involved in it.  
 
 
External Examiner’s Report – 
  
It is my great pleasure to submit my first report as External Examiner for the History Tripos Part II, 
for the academic year 2018-2019.  
 
From the  beginning of my involvement in scrutinising draft exam papers, to the final meeting of the 
Board, I was hugely impressed with the care, the time and the level of professionalism given over to 
this process, from all staff, working at all levels.  
 
The standard of marking is wholly appropriate for the award of a History Degree from Cambridge 
University, and the criteria and process are both extremely fair. In particular, there is a great deal of 
attention given to making sure students are given their due credit, with marks of a ‘9’ carrying  
potential  significance of being raise-able into the higher threshold. Thus many cases are discussed 
in detail. 
 

I was given in advance, samples of marked work across all class boundaries from high firsts to fails, 
and across a number of papers. I found the marks awarded to be appropriate for the degree in 
relation to all assessed work: long essays, dissertations and examination essays. The guidelines for 
marking and for the degree classification are extremely well thought through and comprehensive. 
Moreover, the detailed justification of marks each examiner supplies in typed format for each 
question, and in an overall summary, is extensive and robust. I have not seen such time and care 
given over to a long written justification for marks awarded (or not) within the examining process at 
the universities of 
, where I have examined in the past 
and/or run the undergraduate examination process (
).  
 
In advance of the Board meeting and at the Board meeting itself, there was plenty of time allocated 
for full discussion of any borderline cases. The externals were involved in any cases that required 
discussion and we were consulted throughout the process on all issues. I thank and congratulate the 
Chair, 
, and 
 on their professionalism and attention to detail 
throughout. 
 
It was extremely gratifying to see the healthy number of first class degrees awarded including a 
number of starred firsts. From my experience in other Russell Group universities, the quality of 
history being produced here is by far the best it gets. I was delighted to see academic staff using 
more of the full range of marks and would encourage that further in relation to work in dissertations 
and long essays judged to be publishable quality (which it certainly was). 
 
The fact that this year there are as many women graduating with a first class degree as men, puts 
the Faculty ahead of many others in History and is extremely laudable. The long term effort which 
has gone into producing such a result ought to be acknowledged and celebrated. 
 
My only two minor suggestions for consideration were discussed and resolved by the Board. These 
were (a) to produce some brief guidelines on what constitutes a marginal fail, a serious fail and a 
catastrophe; and (b) that perhaps, despite the impressive number of prizes available, the range of 
topics attached to some prizes, did not quite reflect all subjects being studied with aplomb, so the 
list might be widened further. 
 
Finally, as closing thought, since  it appears that Cambridge is not immune either to the rise in 
students battling mental health issues during their studies, as we have also experienced at 
 
recently, I would underscore the need for the University to make extra funding available to meet the 
current situation. 
 
All good wishes, and many congratulations to the Part II Board, on an outstanding set of results, the 
result of hard work and inspirational teaching. 
 
Part II Chairman's Report:  
  
  
   
  
1. Thanks   
For the second year in a row the Part II Exam Board has been served by an administrator new to the 
role. 
 provided a most diligent and efficient service throughout the process and both 
Externals commented on how much they valued the helpful assistance she has provided. The Part II 
Board was again also most grateful to 
 for her help on the IT side of the operation, and, 
in particular, to 
, who provided a much-appreciated presence during the pre-meeting 
day and at the commencement of the final meeting of the Board.  
 

As last year, I am also most grateful to my fellow examiners for all their hard work, helpfulness and 
diligence. The process of setting, revision and marking was handled with great skill and dedication 
and 
 provided excellent leadership and oversight with the task of setting HAP. This year our 
two external examiners were 
, returning for a second year in the role, 
and 
. They were highly supportive and hard-working externals, whose advice, 
many contributions and good humour were much-appreciated throughout the process.  
 
2. The Candidates 
There were 195 candidates for Honours (101 females and 94 male).  
  
3. The Papers  
This year there were 14 Special Subjects (of which candidates chose one option) examined by a 3-
hour source-based paper and a Long Essay submitted in early May; 21 Specified Subject papers (plus 
three Section C political thought papers), from which candidates chose one or two papers, 
depending on whether they had elected to do an optional dissertation or not; the optional 
dissertation, which was offered by 113 students; and the compulsory Paper 1 (Historical Argument 
and Practice).   There were no changes to the standard format.  
  
Special Subject A (Roman Religion: Identity and Empire); Paper 7 (Transformation of the Roman 
World); Paper 9 (Writing History in the Classical World); and Paper 10 (Living in Athens) were shared 
with the Classical Tripos Part II;  Paper 11 ‘Early Medicine’ was shared with History and Philosophy of 
Science within Part II of the Natural Sciences Tripos; and Paper 4 (History of Political Thought c.1700 
– 1890) and 5 (Political Philosophy and the History of Political Thought since c.1890) were shared 
with the Humanities, Social and Political Sciences Tripos. Paper 18, ‘Japanese history in the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries’ was shared with Part IB of the FAMES Tripos.  
  
4. Preliminaries  
The allocation of examiners, setting and proofing of scripts passed without problems.  
  
5. The pre-meeting and final meeting  
At the Preliminary meeting, and with the invaluable help of the external examiners, we identified 
borderline classes for discussion and they re-read problem scripts. The external examiners prepared 
non-binding recommendations for borderline cases. At this meeting, there was also a re-marking of 
scripts whose marks remained unreconciled (i.e. seven or more and a class apart). Marks were 
revised where necessary, and new marks indicated in the markbook by a dagger. In total, eighteen 
scripts were considered for re-assessment and re-reading. Out of those eighteen, four remained for 
consideration at the final meeting, in the presence of the examiners for those papers. The Chair 
extended his gratitude to 
 who attended the pre-meeting and offered her valuable 
advice with regard to procedural matters. 
 
The final meeting proceeded to class candidates. Borderline candidates were discussed individually 
and classed by unanimous agreement. 
  
6. Plagiarism/Turnitin  
The work of the Faculty’s Academic Integrity Officer, 
 was carried out with 
exemplary diligence and fairness. Seventeen dissertations (15%) were scrutinised for plagiarism or 
poor scholarly practice. One dissertations raised minor concerns and, in consultation with the 
examiners, it was concluded that it should be treated as ‘very minor’ and the candidate was not 
interviewed internally. On the examiners’ recommendations, marks for the dissertation were not 
revised.  

  
Thirty (15%) Long Essays were scrutinised for plagiarism or poor scholarly practice. One of these was 
considered to be ‘relatively minor’ and the candidate was not interviewed internally. In consultation 
with the examiners, a five-mark deduction from each examiner was applied. The other long essay 
raised significant concerns and it was thought necessary to interview the candidate. The Chair, one 
of the examiners, the senior tutor and the candidate met on Friday 14 June to investigate the case 
further. As a result of this interview, the examiners recommended a fifteen-mark deduction. The 
case was considered very carefully and discussed with the external examiners, who agreed with this 
deduction. It was deemed that the plagiarism was not sufficiently serious to warrant the 
involvement of the Proctors.  
 
7. Applications Procedure  
The Chair received sixteen notices advising of dyslexic/dysgraphic/dyspraxic candidates, which were 
circulated to Examiners. The Chair is not informed of the existence of other types of warning letters, 
such as notably medical matters. Thirteen applications for extensions had been received, two in 
respect of dissertation submission and eleven in respect of Long Essay submission. All had been 
granted on medical grounds.  
 
8. The outcome 
The breakdown of results (distinguished by gender, as a percentage of the whole cohort) was as 
follows 
  
 
% of 
 
% of   
whole 
whole 
Class  
 
 
cohort  
 
 
cohort  
Total  
 
*1  
  4 
4.0%  
2.1%  
  7 
7.4%  
3.6%  
 
11 
5.6%  
  1  
  41 
40.6%   21.0%  
  35  37.2%   17.9%  
 
76  39.0%  
II.1  
  52 
51.5%   26.7%  
  49  52.1%   25.1%  
 
101  51.8%  
II.2  
  4 
   4.0% 
   2.1%  
  2  2.1%  
1.0% 
 

3.1%  
III  
  0 
0%  
0%  
  0  0% 
0% 
 
0  0% 
Fail 
  0 
0% 
0% 
  1  1.1%  
0.5%  
 
1  0.5%  
Total  
  101 
100%  
51.8%  
  94  100%  
48.2%  
 
195  100%  
  
The two candidates for the Preliminary to Part II examination were deemed to have passed.  
  
9. Dissertations 
This year, 113 candidates out of the 195 opted to submit a dissertation – this was a slight dip, 
relative to the number (122) in the previous year.  
  
10. Prizes 
 
a)  Alan Coulson Prize: The Alan Coulson Prize for the best dissertation in the field of British 
imperial expansion was awarded to 
 for 
 dissertation entitled, ‘The 
Bristol press and the Crisis of Empire, c.1765 – c.1785’. 
 
b)  Sara Norton Junior Prize: The Sara Norton Junior Prize for the best dissertation in the field 
of American political history was awarded to 
 for 
dissertation 

entitled, ‘Irish-Catholic history and the experience of Irish American sectarianism in 
Antebellum America’. 
 
c)  Gladstone Memorial Prize: The Board nominated 
] for 
dissertation 
entitled, ‘Community life on the Park Hill estate, 1953-1969’ and 
 
for 
 dissertation entitled, ‘Irish-Catholic history and the experience of Irish American 
sectarianism in Antebellum America’ for the Gladstone Memorial Prize which would be 
awarded by three adjudicators to the candidate offering the best dissertation from amongst 
students of Economics, History, and Social and Political Sciences. 
 
The Board were grateful to 
 for acting as the Historical Tripos adjudicator. 
 
d)  Royal Historical Society [2 prizes]:  
History Today Prize, and History of Scotland Prize: The Board nominated 
 
] for 
 dissertation entitled, ‘The Franks Casket and Elite Culture in 
Eighth Century Northumbria’. 
 
In addition
 
 was nominated for the best dissertation on Scottish 
history for 
 dissertation entitled, ‘Secrecy, Materiality, and Authority in Elizabeth I’s 
Scottish Correspondence, 1583-1603’. 
 
e)  Cambridge Historical Society: The Board awarded the prize to 
 
for 
 dissertation entitled, ‘The Franks Casket and Elite Culture in Eighth Century 
Northumbria’. 
 
f)  The Society for the Study of French History: The Board nominated 
 
 for the best dissertation concerning any aspect of French history: for 
 
dissertation entitled, ‘Interpretations of the Iranian Revolution in France, 1978-1989’. 
 
g)  The History of Parliament Dissertation Competition:  The criteria for nominations for this 
prize are for a dissertation relating to British or Irish parliamentary or political history 
before 1997. The Board proposed to nominate 
 for 
dissertation 
entitled, ‘Reimagining Labour Party ‘Modernisation’ in an affluent suburb, c. 1996-2001’, 
but noted that the range of dates of this dissertation may exclude it from eligibility. A 
second nomination was therefore also proposed: 
 for 
 dissertation 
entitled, ‘Neil Kinnock, Tony Blair, and the root of new Labour’s political marketing strategy, 
1983-1997. The Faculty would therefore put forward 
, if the range of dates fit the 
criteria or 
 if that were not the case.  
 
h)  Achievement in Maritime History: The Board nominated 
 for 
 
dissertation entitled, ‘A Social History of Smuggling in North East England during the 
Eighteenth Century’ for the best dissertation in maritime history.  
 
i)  Faculty Prize: The Board awarded the Faculty prize for the best overall performance to 
 
 who achieved the highest aggregate (this was achieved without offering a 
dissertation) of those students achieving all ten First Class marks.  
 

j)  Istvan Hont Prize: The best undergraduate dissertation in the field of political thought and 
intellectual history was awarded to 
] for 
 dissertation entitled, 
‘Empire, Socialist republicanism and the path to 1916 in James Conolly’s Political Thought’. 
 
k)  CUQM Quantitative Dissertation Prize: The Board did not propose a nomination in this 
category.  
 
l)  Winifred Georgina Holgate Pollard Memorial Prizes: The Board nominated the Winifred 
Georgina Holgate Pollard Memorial Prize for the ‘most outstanding result’ to the student 
with the highest aggregate (this was achieved without offering a dissertation), 
 
  
 
m)  German Historical Society (GHS) Undergraduate Dissertation Prize: The Board nominated 
 for 
 dissertation entitled, ‘The International Thought of Johann 
Gottlieb Fichte, 1792-1808’, for the best undergraduate dissertation that addresses a theme 
in German history. 
 
n)  Ellen McArthur Undergraduate Prize: The Board of Examiners nominated two candidates 
for consideration for the best dissertation in Economic history: 
 
] for 
 dissertation entitled, ‘Sex work, surveillance, and everyday life in New York 
City, c. 1916-1930’, and
 for 
 dissertation entitled ‘’A Social History 
of Smuggling in North East England during the Eighteenth Century’. 
 
o)  NEW –Levantine archaeology or history and Contemporary Levantine studies: The Board 
was notified that The Council for British Research in the Levant (CBRL) has instituted a new 
annual prize of £250 for the best undergraduate dissertation for topics relating to the 
Levant (Lebanon, Syria, Cyprus, Israel, Palestine and Jordan), ancient or modern for the first 
time in 2019. The Board nominated 
] for 
dissertation entitled, 
‘Hizbullah’s print media and the formation of a Shia identity, 1985-2006’, under both 
categories. 
 
The Board proposed the creation of a Faculty Prize for a dissertation in i) Social and Cultural 
history and ii) Gender and Sexuality history, as it was deemed that these categories are not 
represented in the current prizes available.  
 
11. General Observations:   
Last year, in response to many years of exhortation from External Examiners, there was a step-
change in the proportion of First-class degrees awarded to candidates by the Board, which reached 
fully 43% of the total (having never previously been above 36%). This was consolidated as a new 
norm this year, with 44.6% of the 195 candidates entered achieving a First Class degree. 
 
The standout, and indeed historic, statistic this year was the outcome of complete gender equality 
in the proportion of Firsts achieved at Part II by female and male candidates, which was 44.6% and 
44.7% respectively. While it would be foolish to declare this issue no longer a concern, given that 
the Part II cohort last year reached within 10% of gender equality, there does seem cause for 
cautious optimism that, at least at Part II, our pedagogic and examining practices are no longer 
generating a strong gender bias in outcomes.   
 

A second significant feature, which was beginning to be evident last year, is that examiners are 
more regularly using the range above 75-80 for the most outstanding scripts, though venturing 
above 80 is still a relative rarity, even where examiners have, for instance, commented on the near-
publication quality of a dissertation. Again, this is a development which has been encouraged for 
several years by External Examiners. 
 
In the Part II Tripos of 2018, 19 individual marks of 80 and above were awarded but every single one 
of them was just the bare mark of exactly 80; i.e. no marks were given above 80. This year for the 
first time a number of marks above 80 have been awarded. Altogether 32 marks of 80 and above 
were awarded in Part II Tripos 2019; and 14 of these marks were in the range 81-85. This indicates 
that examiners are beginning to become accustomed to fully using and discriminating within the 
range 75-85. It would be helpful to monitor these figures in the future. 
 
12. Other matters 
It was a sensible initiative, which could be adopted as advisory in future when a new Chair of 
Examiners will take over in the subsequent year, that next year’s Part II Chair, 

elected to sit-in in an observational capacity on a substantial part of the pre-meeting with External 
Examiners. 
 
This year there was a notably strong performance by one of the two-year Part II candidates, which 
revealed the fact that there are no handbook guidelines for the criteria for awarding a star to those 
taking 7 papers. In particular, whether 12 or 11 first-class marks should be required for 
consideration. The question of the appropriate aggregate to be achieved can be read-off from the 
aggregate defined by the Exam Board as ‘extremely high’ for the one-year Part II students. The latter 
figure varies somewhat from year to year and it is not unlikely that it may increase slightly in the 
future if the mark range of 75-85 is used more extensively. However, whatever level it is set at, to be 
awarded a starred performance, the two-year, 7-paper student(s) should be expected to achieve 
more or less the same average number of marks per paper as those 5-paper students accorded a 
starred first in the year in question.   
 
The tendency for more examiners to use the range 75-79 as well as 80-plus also resulted in the need 
for a new guideline to be adopted. This emerged at the pre-meeting and was put as a resolution to 
the exam board at the beginning of the final meeting, where it was passed unanimously and 
immediately adopted. 
 
This new guidance principle applies where a paper is re-read by the External due to one mark in the 
sixties (typically in the range 65-69) and another well above 70 and usually above 75. If the 3rd mark 
comes in above 70 but nearer the original lower mark in the 60s than the mark which was originally 
above 70, then, under extant rules, the two lower marks would be taken and the higher mark 
knocked out, leaving the candidate still with one mark in the 60s, even though the External’s 3rd 
mark explicitly refuted that judgement and gave a mark of 70 or above. Therefore, the new 
guidance acknowledges that in the first-class range the preponderance principle trumps the 
numerical proximity principle; and that in such a case it is the two first-class marks which are 
retained, if a re-read by an External examiner results in a 3rd mark of 70 or above, even if it is 
numerically closer to the lower original mark that was in the sixties.