Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Inspectors Training Manual'.

896. In considering whether the obvious alternative can be achieved through 
the grant of planning permission, it will be necessary to make a specific 
finding as to whether the development to be permitted would constitute 
the “whole or part of” the development enforced against.  Planning 
permission cannot be granted for a different development.   
897. Where such a finding can be made, the planning merits fall to be 
considered in the usual way. Where such a finding cannot be made, 
consideration should be given to the prospect of extending the compliance 
period under ground (g), to allow time for a planning application to be 
2019
made for the obvious alternative; Arnold.        
898. The purpose of the notice may be to remedy the breach by complying with 
the terms (including conditions and limitations) of a permission which has 
been granted in respect of the land. The Elmbridge case makes it clear 
that that permission must still be extant and not have subsequently 
November 
lapsed. The key question is whether that can be done with precision, 
particularly where there is no appeal on ground (a) with the associated 
ability to impose conditions.  However, it should be noted that ce
26th  rtain 
conditions can be re-drafted in the form of requirements; see para 872.  
at: 
899. It is for the Inspector to assess whether the development permitted by an 
earlier scheme would overcome the planning difficultie
as s at less cost and 
disruption than total removal. If so, it must then be decided whether there 
had been any material change to the planning considerations that had led 
to the approval of that scheme on the conditions then imposed and 
correct 
whether a variation of the notice consequent upon the grant of permission 
for that scheme would cause any “injustice” to the LPA within s176(1).    
900.
Only 
 Both Wyatt and Mata were cases where there was no appeal on ground (a) 
or DPA. The Wyatt approach to the scope of ground (f) was endorsed by 
the CoA in the case of Miaris.  However, even where there is no ground (a) 
appeal, there are instances where proposed modifications should not be 
dismissed out-of-hand simply because the purpose of the notice has been 
identified as remedying the breach.  
updated.  
901. Where there is a valid fall-back position, for example, by way of PD rights, 
the question to be considered is whether complete removal of an 
unauthorised structure would ultimately achieve anything; see Nolan v 
SSE & Bury MBC
. The enforcement regime is not meant to be punitive.   
902. However, it is important to bear in mind that the ground (f) appeal 
freequently 
provides more limited powers than ground (a) in terms of providing a 
is 
solution short of a complete remedy. Thus, the occasions on which it can 
be done with precision may well be limited, but Inspectors should at least 
show that they have considered the possibility.      
Protecting Lawful Rights 
903. The requirements must not purport to prevent an appellant from doing 
publication 
something he or she is entitled to do without planning permission, relying 
on lawful use rights or rights of reversion; s57(4), GDO or UCO rights, or 
This 
any of the exceptions from the definitions of development. This is the 
"Mansi" principle, so called from the High Court decision iMansi v Elstree 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 149 of 203 

RDC [1964] 16 P&CR 153260 as re-stated iSouth Ribble BC v SSE, [1990] 
JPL 808261
, and Kennelly v SSE [1994] JPL B83.  
904. An example is farm gate sales of home grown produce, which are likely to 
be ancillary to an agricultural or horticultural use, however great the 
volume; see s55(2)(e),and Allen v Reigate and Banstead BC [1990] JPL 
340262.  In such a case a requirement to "discontinue the sale of fruit and 
vegetables" should be varied to incorporate the saving, eg "to discontinue 
the sale of fruit and vegetables other than those grown on the land".  
905.
2019
 The "Mansi" principle extends to degrees of use which were lawful because 
they were subsisting at the Appointed Day (1 July 1948) or have become 
immune from enforcement in accordance with the old law (Denham 
Developments v SSE 
[1984] JPL 347263
), or the rolling 10-year period 
under s171B(3). A requirement prohibiting a use "except to the extent to 
which such use was carried on prior to the relevant date" has been held to 
November 
be validTrevors Warehouses v SSE [1972] 23 P&CR 215264Lee v 
Bromley LBC [1982] JPL 778.  
26th 
906. However, such uses should generally be limited to a particular area or 
numbers, particularly in view of the emphasis on specifics in the advice 
at: 
relating to LDCs; see Choudhry v SSE [1983] JPL 231265, and see 
Wallington v SSW [1991] JPL 542266 and contrast  R v 
as Runnymede BC ex 
parte Singh [1987] JPL 283267. For a detailed summary of all cases on the 
“Mansi” doctrine, see EPL P176.05.  
907. There are limits to the “Mansi” doctrine. The case of Mohamed v SSCLG 
correct 
[2014] EWHC 4045 (Admin) concerned an EN which alleged “Without 
planning permission, the erection of a dwelling in the rear garden of the 
premises.”
 The Appellant submitted that 
Only no dwelling had been erected.  
The only building being a garage which had been cleaned out and 
refurbished with only internal works having taken place. The decision was 
challenged inter alia on the ground that the Inspector should have 
considered whether some steps short of complete demolition would suffice 
to remedy the breach of planning control.   
updated.  
908. The challenge succeeded on another ground but on that ground the Court 
held that the Appellant had not argued that the requirements of the EN 
were excessive and had not asked that planning permission be granted. 
The decision in Mansi as to whether what had existed before should be 
allowed to remain applied to the retention of use rights and not the 
freequently 
retention of buildings erected or altered in breach of planning control, 
Mansi not
is   applied.  That approach was supported by the decision of the 
High Court in the case of Graham Oates v SSCLG and Canterbury City 
Council
 [2017] EWHC 2716 (Admin).
  The court held that there is no 
reason in principle or by reference to any decided case to extend the 
reasoning in Mansi which was all about a change of use, to an EN 
issued where the breach of planning control was operational 
publication 
development.  
                                       
260 J.32 
This  261 J.727 
262 J.707 
263 J.468 
264 J.120 
265 J.425 
266 J.684 
267 J.571 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 150 of 203 

909. IDuguid v SSETR & W Lindsay DC [2001] 82 P&CR268 (CoA), it was 
confirmed the notice can only require the cessation of the activity which 
constitutes the breach of control. The EN cannot be interpreted so as to 
make an offence out of a lawful activity.  
910. The Court acknowledged that there remained some cases where it would 
be convenient, if not essential, to define in the notice the extent to which a 
use should be discontinued – cases such as Mansi where there was a 
lawful component in intensification cases. In Duguid’s case it was the 
GPDO provisions for temporary markets but the same principle applies to 
2019
incidental or ancillary activities. Where there is a mixed use, the 
requirements of the EN only bear on the activities associated with the 
unlawful component of the mixed use.  
911. The approach in Duguid reflects the earlier judgment iCord v SSE [1981] 
JPL 40269, where the Court was not prepared to extend the Mansi principle 
November 
to an EN requiring the discontinuance of a use of dwellinghouse for 
commercial storage, adaptation, overhaul and repair of engines so as to 
safeguard such use as might be incidental to the use as a dwelling
26th  house. 
There was no need to state what “must be obvious to everybody”. 
at: 
912. INorth Sea Land Equipment v SSE & Thurrock [1982] JPL 384270
Glidewell J reconciled Mansi and Cord on the basis tha
as t the former “was a 
case of an established mixed use and…not a case of a single established 
use to which some other activity was said to be incidental or ancillary”. 
913. The case of Hancock v SSCLG & Windsor and Maidenhead RBC [2012] 
correct 
EWHC 3704 clarified the position in relation to lawful use rights were 
buildings have been demolished.  In 1993, planning permission had been 
granted to use land for the repair of motor
Only   vehicles.  In 2008, a four unit 
building had been demolished and four larger replacement units erected.  
The notice requiring the demolition of the units was upheld.   
914. The Court held that the 1993 permission was for the use of the land not 
operational development, and there were no existing use rights to have 
updated.  
buildings on the site which the notice had to protect. The only lawful use 
was the general light industrial use on the whole site which the notice did 
nothing to prevent continuing. 
915. The approach in Wallington is relevant to allegations of activities of a kind 
which might ordinarily be held to be incidental to the enjoyment of a 
dwellinghouse as such (s55(2)(d)) but are taking place on such a scale as 
freequently 
to involve a material change of use. The ground (f) challenge is either 
is 
because the LPA specified in the requirements a number or level to which 
the offending activity is to be reduced or, faced with a requirement to 
cease the use, the appellant seeks to have set a specified number or level.  
916. Where the allegation is correctly formulated as a mixed use as a 
dwellinghouse and for a use not incidental to the enjoyment of the 
dwel
publication linghouse, the Wallington approach is unnecessary and potentially 
dangerous. In the light of Duguid, where the allegation is correctly 
formulated it is sufficient for the notice to bring about the cessation of the 
This 
unlawful component of the mixed use.  
                                       
268 J.1027 
269 J.296 
270 J.385 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 151 of 203 

917. There is no need to specify what number might be incidental. In 
Wallington the Inspector was not defining the level at which a material 
change of use would be involved but in upholding the requirement “for no 
more than six dogs”, as issued, his finding was simply that the six dog 
limit was not excessive in the circumstances of the case.  
918. If, with a mixed use allegation, the requirement sets a numeric limit, it is 
in effect under enforcing against the unlawful component of the mixed 
use. Once complied with, s173(11) would grant an unconditional planning 
permission for that mixed use. It might be seen as an academic point 
2019
while the notice remains in force but it could be argued that the owner is 
entitled to the six dogs as part of the mixed use in addition to whatever 
their entitlement might be as incidental to the dwellinghouse part.  
919. However, an outcome specifying a maximum level of use may provide 
valuable certainty and in deciding the appeal on ground (f) it would be 
November 
appropriate to have regard to the specific terms of the notice, the cases of 
the parties and long term enforceability. 
26th 
920. Where GPDO provisions apply, and the "fallback" position would allow 
some element of the development enforced against, e.g. a fence 1m high 
at: 
instead of one 2m high adjacent to a highway used by vehicular traffic, a 
requirement to reduce the height of the fence to 1m w
as  ill be appropriate, to 
accord with s173(4)(a), even though the whole development in such a 
case will be unlawful and not just that element in excess of PD rights; see 
Garland v MHLG (1968) 20 P&CR 93.    correct 
921. In such a situation it is necessary to consider: (1) Would the replacement 
fence be any different from the fence that would be left if it were simply to 
be reduced in height to the PD limit? (2) 
Only What is the likelihood that such a 
replacement fence be re-erected? (3) What would be the impact that the 
replacement fence would lawfully cause in any event?   
922. Where, if the existing fence is removed entirely, and there is no legal or 
other reason to think that it will not immediately be replaced with a fence 
updated.  
of the same or similar design but at a height within the PD limits, there 
would be no grounds on which to conclude that requiring its complete 
removal would achieve anything. The requirement to completely remove 
the structure would therefore be excessive; see Tapecrown 
923. The same reasoning would apply to the application of other PD rights 
provided, of course, that the requirements could be varied with the 
freequently 
necessary degree of precision. However, caution should be exercised 
is 
where other PD rights are subject to conditions, since such PD would be 
different to development permitted unconditionally by way of s173(11). In 
such cases, it may not be possible to entirely reflect the fallback position 
by way of a variation of the requirements.  
924. The case of Singhal UK Limited v SSCLG and London Borough of Hounslow 
[201
publication 7] EWHC 946 (Admin) gave consideration to the fall-back position 
provided by GPDO rights on an appeal under ground (f).  At the 
permission hearing the High Court held that there was an arguable case to 
This 
answer that the Inspector has erred in law in his consideration of ground 
(f) (that the steps required by the notice to be taken exceed what is 
necessary to remedy the injury to the amenity of the occupiers of the 
outbuilding and the rear extension).  
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 152 of 203 

925. Permitted development rights were available to the Applicant in certain 
circumstances that would have allowed him to rebuild the outbuilding and 
the rear extension exactly as they were. Those permitted development 
rights were put forward as a reason why he should not be required to 
demolish those structures and it was arguable that the Inspector erred in 
law in failing properly to understand the extent of those rights and to take 
their full potential effect into consideration in determining what steps were 
necessary to remedy the harm to the amenity of the occupiers of the 
residential units and the outbuilding. (NB. In that case the purpose of the 
2019
notice was to remedy the injury to amenity and not to remedy the breach 
of planning control).     
General 
926. Any variation of the requirements constitutes a success on ground (f). 
Where there is under-enforcement, as indicated above, s173(11) will come 
November 
into play to grant a deemed planning permission for the development 
when and so long as the remaining requirements are fully met.  
26th 
927. Deletions and variations can sometimes have unintended consequences, 
such as making a notice uncertain; Bennett v SSE [1993] JPL 134271. If 
at: 
there is any likelihood of the parties being taken unawares, then 
comments should be sought first. 
as 
Ground (g) 
"That any period specified in the notice in accordance with s173(9) falls short of 
what should reasonably be allowed". 
correct 
928. Although the notice may have been issued some time before the Inspector 
takes his decision, the appellant is entitled to assume success and to a 
Only 
reasonable period for compliance after the notice takes effect. During the 
period for compliance, including any extended period following success on 
ground (g), the use remains unlawful but not illegal unless there is also a 
Stop Notice. 
929.
updated.  
 The overall period for compliance must never be decreased, but where 
requirements are staged, as is often the case in tipping cases, it may be 
appropriate to advance one stage, (e.g. to cease tipping), where the 
overall revised time scale still represents a concession to the appellant.  
930. Where a notice requires both the cessation of a use and other remedial 
works, such as the removal of ancillary structures, it may be appropriate 
freequently 
to stage the period for compliance, with progressive steps to wind down 
is 
the activity, rather than allowing an overall extension, so that the 
appellant does not continue an activity which is causing annoyance to 
others throughout the extended period. 
931. Where a stop notice has been issued and complied with, there would be no 
reason to extend the period for compliance. If it has not been complied 
with, the appellant will still be committing a criminal offence during any 
publication 
extended period. 
932. Where a calendar date for compliance is quoted this is likely to have been 
This 
overtaken by the appeal process, and the notice should be varied to 
provide for a clear period, no shorter than the original period but 
expressed in months, to run from the date the EN comes into effect. 
                                       
271 J.818 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 153 of 203 

References to calendar months, which can give rise to uncertainty, should 
be avoided in decision letters, but it is not essential to correct notices in 
that respect if the parties do not raise the point. 
933. Only in the most exceptional circumstances should the period for 
compliance be extended beyond one year. A longer period not only blunts 
the urgency, but may call into question the expediency of issuing the 
notice in the first place. In such cases consideration should be given to a 
temporary planning permission, but always remembering that the notice is 
then quashed and the LPA will have to enforce again if the use continues 
2019
after the temporary period expires.  
934. In one exceptional case, involving the provision of a lift for a disabled 
person in a listed building, the Court declined to upset an extension of the 
period to eight years although the appellant had only asked for 18 
months; Hounslow LBC v SSE & Lawson [1997] JPL 141272
November 
935.  Inspectors should also bear in mind the powers in s173A(1)(b) which 
allow the LPA to extend any period for compliance formally, without 
26th 
prejudicing their rights to take further action. In the light of the O’Connor 
case, references to this power in decisions are best avoided. If included 
at: 
they should be neutral simply noting the availability of the power but 
recognising that its exercise is entirely a matter within 
as  the discretion of the 
LPA; see para 55. 
936. The rights and freedoms enshrined in the European Convention on Human 
Rights (ECHR) as enacted through the Human Rights Act 1998 may also be 
correct 
a relevant consideration under this ground of appeal, particularly where 
the question of the proportionality of the enforcement action is at issue.  
For example, if someone stands to lose th
Only  eir home as a result of the 
appeal decision it is likely to be a serious interference with their rights 
under Article 8 but it does not follow that this would be a violation of their 
human rights.   
937. Nevertheless, it is essential that the proportionality test can be seen to 
updated.  
have been applied properly. In doing so, it may be necessary to address 
arguments about compliance periods, because, all other things being 
equal, a short compliance period will have a greater impact than a longer 
one on someone who may lose their home.     
Grounds not Pleaded 
938.
freequently 
 Inspectors should never base their conclusions on matters not fully argued 
at the inq
is  uiry or hearing or dealt with in the written representations. 
However, it often happens that the Inspector realises there are issues of 
validity or other issues which have not been appreciated by the parties. It 
is the Inspector's duty to be up to date as to the law and to ensure that it 
is applied correctly to the facts as found, John Pearcy Transport v SSE 
[1986] JPL 680273

publication 
939.  Ideally any such points should be raised by the Inspector at the inquiry or 
hearing, but if this is not done, and in any event in written representation 
This 
cases, the Inspector must go back to the parties for their comments 
before taking a decision on any basis which could possibly come as a 
surprise to one or other party. Unrepresented appellants sometimes make 
                                       
272 J.965 
273 J.545 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 154 of 203 

statements in their appeals that indicate that a different ground might 
apply. Frequently the case officer will have identified this and gone back to 
the appellant to clarify the matter. Where this has not happened the 
Inspector must not ignore potential “hidden” grounds of appeal.  
940. If grounds (f) and (g) are not pleaded at the inquiry, and no arguments 
clearly relating to those grounds are advanced, then the Inspector is under 
no obligation to consider them. However it is always open to the 
Inspector, in a transferred case, to vary the requirements, or period for 
compliance, if he or she considers it appropriate or, in a SoS case, to 
2019
conclude and recommend accordingly. This applies particularly when the 
LPA indicate a willingness to make a concession.  
941. Examples would be where the disturbance caused to the neighbourhood by 
removing quantities of spoil would clearly outweigh the harm done by 
letting it remain in situ, or where the compliance period would oblige a 
November 
family to move out of their caravan home in mid-winter. However it is 
never right to introduce new grounds merely to find that they fail and the 
usual warning about the terms of a decision not taking the partie
26th  s by 
surprise applies. 
at: 
Requirements Affecting Land in Separate Ownership 
as 
942. Planning permission may be sought for development of land outside the 
control of the applicant, subject to the requirements of s65 as to notifying 
owners. Conditions may be imposed, under the general powers contained 
in s70(1)(a), in respect of land within the application site at the date of 
correct 
the decision, or under s72(1)(a) to regulate the use or development of 
land under the control of the applicant, whether within the application site 
or not. Control does not necessarily mean 
Only  ownership, but can extend to 
some form of agreement or licence sufficient to allow the condition to be 
implementedWimpey v SSE & New Forest DC [1979] JPL 314274.  
943. Even if the land is outside the appeal site, a condition will be valid if it can 
be shown that the applicant had control at the date of the decision; 
updated.  
Atkinson v SSE [1983] JPL 599275. A condition which affects land which is 
both outside the control of the applicant and the application site is usually 
invalidPeak Park JPB v SSE and ICI [1980] JPL 114276.  
944. However, it is possible to impose a condition affecting land outside the 
appeal site and the applicant’s control so long as the activity being 
prohibited there is within the appellant’s control and they are able to 
freequently 
comply with it; Davenport v Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [1996] The 
is 
Times 26 April 1996 – a condition requiring cars left in the control of the 
applicant not to be parked on an adjacent road.  
945. Where a notice seeks to enforce a condition which requires works to be 
carried out or some ancillary activity to be provided for on land in separate 
ownership from that actually benefiting from the permission, the appellant 
may 
publication  be unable to comply with the requirements. The first consideration 
will be whether planning permission should be granted without the 
condition. If that is not the case, and the condition cannot in practice be 
This 
complied with, then the terms of the condition will need to be examined. 
                                       
274 J.261 
275 J.438 
276 J.271 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 155 of 203 

946. If it is a condition precedent (see paras 158 and 570), or there is a clear 
link with the continuation of the use, i.e. "the use shall be carried on only 
during such time as parking is available on the adjacent site", then the 
Inspector should: 
(a)  make it clear that the development is unacceptable without 
compliance with the condition 
(b)  conclude that the notice should properly have required the use to 
cease, or the development which had been permitted to be removed 
2019
(c)  decline to vary the requirement because to do so would put the 
appellant in a worse position than if there had been no appeal and so 
cause injustice,  
(d)  quash the notice on ground (c) on the basis that the condition cannot 
be complied with, and the notice is therefore invalid. 
November 
947. The result of this is likely to be that the LPA will issue another notice 
requiring the use to cease. However if the condition is so worded that a 
26th 
requirement to cease the use or remove the development would in any 
event be unreasonable in the circumstances, the notice must be quashed. 
at: 
948. Where there is doubt about an appellant's capacity to comply with a 
as 
requirement because of lack of control over the land, but there is some 
possibility of reaching an accommodation with the adjacent owner, it 
might be reasonable to vary the requirements, to provide for compliance 
with the condition, or alternatively to cease the use. However such a 
correct 
course could risk the requirements becoming either more onerous or 
uncertain. No such variation should be made without the matter being 
canvassed fully with the parties.  Only 
 
 
 
updated.  
 
 
 
 
freequently 
 
is 
 
 
 
 
publication 
 
 
This 
 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 156 of 203 

14. Lawful Development Certificates (LDCs) 
949. This section focuses on the procedure and the specific aspects of LDCs. 
Issues of lawfulness which are applicable to s174 appeals under grounds 
(c) and (d) are dealt with in the sections on those appeals above and not 
repeated here.  LDCs are applied for to establish: 
i.  that an existing use or development has become ‘lawful’ through the 
passage of time; or 
ii.  that an existing or proposed use or development is lawful because it 
2019
did /does not require planning permission; or 
iii.  that an existing or proposed use or development benefits from a 
general planning permission for the use or development granted by 
the GPDO (or any previous version of the GPDO in the case of section 
191 applications); or 
November 
iv.  that an existing or proposed use or development complies with a 
current planning permission.  
26th 
Applications and Appeals 
at: 
950. S191 TCPA 90 enables any person to apply to the LPA for a Certificate, to 
the effect that:- 
as 
i.  Any existing use of buildings or other land is lawful, (s191(1)(a)).  
ii.  Any operations which have been carried out in, or over or under land 
are lawful, (s191(1)(b)).  
correct 
iii.  Any activity in breach of a planning condition or GDO limitation is 
lawful, (s191(1)(c)).  
Only 
S192 has similar provisions relating to proposed use of buildings or other 
land, and proposed operations (s192(1)(a) and (b)). 
951. S191(2)(a) and (b) sets out that uses and operations are lawful at any 
time if: 
updated.  
i. 
No enforcement action may be taken in respect of them (whether 
because they did not involve development or require planning 
permission or because the time for enforcement action has expired 
of for any other reason); and  
ii. 
They do not constitute a contravention of any enforcement notice 
freequently 
then in force.    
is 
952. S191(3A) provides that the time for enforcement is to be taken as not to 
have expired if: 
i. 
The time for applying for an order under s171BA(1) (PEO) in 
relation to the matter has not expired; 
ii. 
An application has been made for a PEO in relation to the matter 
publication  and the application has neither been decided nor withdrawn; 
iii. 
A PEO has been made in relation to the matter, the PEO has not 
This 
been rescinded and the enforcement year for the order (whether or 
not it has begun) has not expired.    
953. Unlike the previous Established Use Certificate regime, s191 applications 
can be made in respect of operational development or changes of use to a 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 157 of 203 

single dwellinghouse. There is no specific requirement, as there was 
previously, that a use must be "subsisting" at the date of the application.  
954. As the Panton and Farmer case makes clear, see para 703, a use can exist 
despite being inactive on the ground, for example following the death of a 
landowner, but it must have achieved a lawful status before it became 
dormant otherwise the necessary continuity will have been lost; see para 
69. An application for a lawful use which became dormant and was 
obviously abandoned would not succeed. The land should not have been 
put to any other use inconsistent with the use for which an LDC is sought.   2019
955. An LDC application must relate to a specific existing or proposed use, 
operation or activity. It is not open to an applicant to pose a general 
enquiry as to what is or might be lawful. Whilst s191(5)(b) states that 
where a use is within a class in the UCO it should be identified by 
reference to that Class, this does not mean that a certificate should be 
November 
issued simply for a class of use.  
956. The exact terms of the LDC and the development specified will be the base 
26th 
from which it will provide a datum against which any subsequent change 
may need to be assessed and thus whether it is permissible under UCO or 
at: 
GPDO provisions, for example if the UCO Classes are changed. The LDC 
as 
should describe the actual use and refer to it as being within the 
appropriate UCO Class.  
957. Of course, in general, where a lawful use is within a use class, whether or 
not so certified, the lawfulness of any new use will
correct  only be constrained by 
the need to demonstrate that it remains within the parameters of that 
Class of the UCO; see the PPG section for Lawful development Certificates. 
Only 
958. S191(5) provides that an LDC for an existing use, granted by the LPA, or 
by the SoS or an Inspector on appeal, under s195(2) shall: 
a.  Specify the land to which it relates, normally by reference to a plan.  
b.  Describe the use, operations or other matters in question, and in the 
updated.  
case of any use falling within one of the classes specified in the UCO, 
identifying it by reference to that class.  
c.  Give the reasons for determining the use, operations or other matters 
to be lawful.  
d.  Specify the date of the application for the Certificate. 
freequently 
S192(3), for proposed uses and operations, is in the same terms without 
is 
the reference to "other matters", i.e. matters involving breach of 
conditions.   
959. Article 39 and Schedule 8 of the DMPO set out the requirements for 
applications. LDCs must be substantially in the form prescribed by the 
Order; if not they will be invalidJames Hay Pension Trustees Ltd v FSS & 
S Gloucs 
publication  Council [2006] EWCA Civ 1387277. The form of certificate is at 
DMPO Schedule 8.  
This  960. Any person may apply, regardless of whether or not they have an interest 
in the land. There is no statutory requirement to notify owners and 
occupiers, although a statement as to the appellants’ interest, details of 
other known interests, and whether they have been notified is required.  
                                       
277 J.1161 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 158 of 203 

961. An appeal may be made under s195 against a refusal to issue a certificate 
in whole or in part, with “part” in this context including a modification by 
the LPA of the development described in the application, or against a 
deemed refusal, following failure to determine an application within the 
prescribed period. S195(2) and (3) refer to the SoS’s role on appeal as 
one of being satisfied that the LPA’s decision is or is not “well-founded”.  
962. The EPL commentary to the section says that the appeal is confined to the 
narrow remit of reviewing the LPA’s decision. It is sometimes argued that 
the Inspector must only consider the evidence which was before the LPA 
2019
when they made their decision. However, s195 refers only to the refusal 
being well-founded or not well-founded; that is the decision itself, not the 
reasons for it. It would be wrong to grant an LDC where the evidence, 
taken as a whole, suggests that the matter in question is not lawful, even 
if the LPA’s original reasons can be shown later to be misplaced.  
November 
963. ICottrell v SSE & Tonbridge and Malling BC [1982] JPL 443278 , albeit an 
EUC case, it was held that the SoS cannot be compelled to issue a 
certificate when he is of the opinion that one should not be grant
26th  ed. 
Conversely, for the LPA to argue that only evidence put to them as part of 
at: 
the application should be considered denies the purpose of the LDC 
procedure which is to arrive at an objective decision based on the best 
as 
facts and evidence available at the time the decision is taken.  
964. In any event it would always be open to the applicant to re-apply and it 
would serve no useful purpose to refuse an LDC on the basis only of the 
correct 
evidence submitted with the application, if subsequent evidence had come 
to light proving the case on the balance of probability. 
965.
Only 
 A consideration of the effect of an incorrect material date being specified 
in an LDC was discussed in R (oao North Wiltshire) v Cotswold DC [2009]. 
In that LDC the dated inserted was patently not the date of the application 
but it had been inserted due to an administrative error.  This defect did 
not render the LDC invalid or unlawful on its face so as to be incapable of 
rectification by an administrative act on the part of the LPA.  It was within 
updated.  
the power of the LPA to re-issue the LDC with the date of the application 
as the certified date of lawfulness, in substitution for the date of issue of 
the LDC; see also R v Arun DC ex parte Fowler [1998] JPL 674.  
Some Aspects of Lawfulness 
966. The categories of lawfulness for planning purposes extend to uses or 
freequently 
operations which are not development at all, e.g. agriculture, or 
is 
operations not materially affecting the external appearance of a building, 
development permitted by the GPDO, or activities ancillary to a lawful use 
not prohibited by condition.  
967. S193(5) provides that a Certificate does not affect any non-compliance 
with a condition on a planning permission unless that matter is mentioned 
in th
publication e Certificate. This means the LDC procedure cannot be used to 
circumvent conditions imposed on an existing permission, unless the 
permission itself is invalid.  
This  968. The links between the planning and advertisement regimes (s55(5) and 
s222) also suggest that there is no legal restriction on applying for an LDC 
to determine whether an advertisement display is lawful. It is possible to 
                                       
278 J.391 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 159 of 203 

issue an LDC for a specific advert it if benefits from deemed consent under 
the advert regulations and therefore has planning permission under s222.   
969. All lawful development attracts permitted development rights under the 
GPDO, and rights to revert following an enforcement notice against a 
subsequent breach of planning control under s57(4). However, because of 
the specific provisions of s57(5), excluding uses begun in contravention of 
previous planning control, an LDC does not necessarily confer rights to 
revert to the “normal” use under s57(2) and (3) after a subsequent 
temporary planning permission, or GPDO permission subject to limitations;  2019
this is explained in more detail at para 600. 
970. The grant of a certificate is not a pre-requisite to lawfulness. Either an LDC 
or planning permission is, however, essential before a caravan site licence 
under s3 CSCDA, or a Waste Management Licence under s36 EPA can be 
granted. An LDC does not grant consent under any other legislation, such 
November 
as that relating to listed buildings.  
971. A use, operation or failure to comply with a condition or limitation is lawful 
26th 
if no enforcement action as defined in s171A(2) can be taken in respect of 
it, and it is not in contravention of any EN or BCN which is in force. The 
at: 
PPG (Lawful development certificates) states that a notice is not in force 
as 
where an enforcement appeal is outstanding – or an appeal has been 
upheld and the decision has been remitted to the Secretary of State for 
redetermination, but that redetermination is still outstanding.  
972. Since 27 July 1992, there has been no distinction apart from that provided 
correct 
by s57(5) (see para 600), between development with express or deemed 
planning permission, that which does not require permission, and 
development or a breach of condition whi
Only ch has become immune from 
enforcement by the passing of the 4 or 10 year periods in s171B. 
973. While a LDC cannot be granted where it contravenes the requirements of a 
enforcement notice or BCN in force, it does not follow that an LDC appeal 
may be turned away on that basis, if an appellant were to pursue their 
updated.  
right of appeal. The appellant has statutory right that their appeal is 
heard; it is for the Inspector to reject the appeal having heard it, not to 
deny the right of appeal in the first place.  
Modification of Terms of Application 
974. S191(4) allows the LPA to modify the terms of the application, giving a 
freequently 
certificate in somewhat different terms so as to accord with the facts and 
evidence
is  , rather than an outright refusal. The power probably does not 
extend to allowing an LDC to be granted for something totally different to 
that described in the application.  
975. The SoS or Inspector can exercise the same power in s191(4) on appeal 
as the LPA have on the application; Panton and Farmer v SSETR and Vale 
of White Horse DC 
[1999] JPL 461279
. Indeed the Panton judgment 
publication 
indicated that an Inspector is obliged to issue a LDC for any use of the 
planning unit which the evidence shows is lawful, and to modify or 
This 
substitute the descriptions of the use and the land if necessary.  
976. These obligations would seem to apply whether that use and the whole 
planning unit were included in the application or not. The judgment 
                                       
279 J.1013 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 160 of 203 

reinforces the need to identify the relevant planning unit when considering 
uses of land. However, it would clearly not be sensible to issue a certificate 
in every case certifying the obvious, such as that any existing use of the 
land for agriculture would have been lawful on the application date, when 
the appellant had applied for a certificate for something completely 
different. The apparent power to issue a certificate for any lawful use other 
than that applied for should therefore be exercised with discretion.  
977. S193(4) allows a certificate to be granted for all or part of the site, and 
one or more of the uses or operations comprised in the application, ie, a 
2019
split decision, in respect of both s191 and s192 applications. However the 
LPA/SoS power to modify the terms of the application is limited to s191 
applications; there is no similar power under s192 but it may be modified 
by the applicant or by the LPA/SoS where the applicant agrees; see R v 
Thanet DC ex parte Tapp & Anr 
[2000] EWHC, [2001] EWCA Civ 559280
.  
November 
978. It is sometimes the case that both parties may have agreed a modified 
description or drawings and plans, including a modification of the site plan 
from that contained in the application, and the appeal has gone 
26th forward on 
that basis. In those circumstances, this rule can be relaxed but only if 
at: 
granting a LDC in the modified terms would not have wider implications for 
other parties who have not been a party to the agreed modification.  
as 
979. The material date remains that of the original application and not the date 
of any subsequent amendment to it. Inspectors should exercise sensible 
discretion where dismissing the appeal would only lead to the submission 
correct 
of a successful “re-labelled” s192 application in slightly revised terms.  
980. It would be appropriate to convert an application made under s192 to one 
under s191 where what the applicant is r
Only eally seeking is to have the 
existing use declared lawful, for example to put the property on the 
market. A building might, for instance, be used for a particular general 
industrial use and the s192 application specifies the proposed use as 
general industry within Class B2. It is not permissible to do so.  
updated.  
981. The way forward is a change from considering the appeal under s192 to 
s191 for the specific existing use. This should only be made with the 
agreement of the parties and where there is enough information to enable 
proper consideration under s191, pointing out if needed to the appellant 
that it is necessary to precisely describe what is being applied for. 
Specifying Level of Use 
freequently 
982. An LDC 
is  cannot be subject to conditions, but it should specify the precise 
level or scale of use. Although there is no legal requirement, despite 
s191(5) and the PPG for the Inspector to specify the quantity of any 
particular item or items that are lawful; see Hillingdon LBC v SSCLG & 
Autodex
 [2008]281, 
it is a point of reference against which the materiality 
of any subsequent intensification or other change can be measured.  
publication 
983. Where there has been an increase in activity during the ten year period 
which has not yet been sufficient to amount to a material change by 
This 
intensification, the LDC should refer to a specific level. The degree of 
particularisation, e.g. the level at the start of the ten year period, average 
throughout or lowest level, will be a matter for the decision-maker based 
                                       
280 J.1074 
281 J.1176 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 161 of 203 

on the evidence, subject to the usual test that the analysis is not so 
irrational that no reasonable Inspector could have reached it.  
984. The lawfulness of the use as specified in the Certificate is “conclusively 
presumed” by virtue of s191(6).  If it were to be alleged in a subsequent 
EN that the character or intensity of the use has changed following the 
issue of a LDC, it would be the benchmark of the use at the date it was 
issued.  It is unlikely it would be appropriate to look behind the Certificate 
to examine the character of the use at or before the date it was issued 
when dealing with an appeal on ground (c).   
2019
985. This would be grounds to ensure that the Certificate describes the use as 
carried out throughout the preceding ten years. In those circumstances an 
appropriate wording for the certificate would be (eg):-  
"Use as a caravan site for the stationing of caravans at a level that does not result 
in  a  material  change  of  use  of the  land  from its use  as  existing  on 1  September 
November 
1997, namely use for the stationing of 10 caravans." 
986. Where the application is in respect of one of a number of uses on a site in 
26th 
mixed use, or relates to part only of a larger planning unit, then this needs 
to be made clear in the LDC, so that if there is a later chang
at:  e whereby 
other elements cease, to be supplanted by an increased level of the 
as 
certificated use, as iWipperman v LB Barking [1965] 17 P&CR 225282
then that change may still be subject to planning control if, as a matter of 
fact and degree, it is material. 
987. A consideration of the level of use specified in an L
correct DC was discussed in 
(oao North Wiltshire) v Cotswold DC [2009]. This case emphasises the 
importance of precision in the definition of uses when granting LDCs.  The 
LPA had granted a s191 certificate for use
Only   of Kemble Airfield for “general 
aviational purposes”.  The Court held that the certificate could not be 
impugned.  Although the judge considered that an LDC should be issued in 
terms no wider than the use which the evidence suggests is the lawful use, 
he accepted that there was nothing in then Government policy or case law 
which established any obligation in 
updated.   law to include the fine details.  
988. IWestminster CC v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 23 (Admin), an LDC was sought 
for the use of a defined area of pavement in front of a restaurant for 
placing tables and chairs in connection with the restaurant.  The use only 
occurred when the restaurant was open and when closed, the furniture 
was stored inside. There was a variable number of between two and six 
freequently 
tables and chairs.  
is 
989. The Court held that the LDC clearly and correctly defined the use.  It 
defined the location precisely and the nature of the use, being the placing 
of tables and chairs.  It would be unduly restrictive to further define the 
use. The use was subject to fluctuation but it could only take place whilst 
the restaurant was open.    
publication 
Issues in LDC Cases 
990. In s191 cases, the issues will generally be the same as in s174 cases when 
This 
grounds (c) and /or (d) are pleaded; see paras 635 and 682 above.  
991. S192 cases will often involve only legal submissions as to the 
interpretation of the statutory provisions, and these can generally be dealt 
                                       
282 J.59 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 162 of 203 

with by written representations, sometimes with no need for a site visit or 
any Inspector involvement. In some s192 cases, however, it will be 
necessary to investigate the lawfulness of the existing use or operations 
before deciding whether what is proposed is lawful.  
992. No issues of planning merit are relevant to any LDC appeal. The planning 
merits of what has been applied for cannot be taken into account, unless 
the LDC application for a proposed use is accompanied by an application 
for planning permission; see Kensington and Chelsea RBC v SSCLG & Reis 
& Tong
 [2016] EWHC 1785 (Admin).
There is no deemed planning 
2019
application, even if a caravan or waste disposal site is involved.  
993. At the inquiry or hearing this should be made clear if there is any doubt 
from the way the statements have been written or when the public are 
present. Human Rights Act articles are not engaged in the context of an 
LDC appeal as an LDC is merely declaratory of certain rights in law and the 
November 
refusal to grant one is merely a refusal to grant the declaration sought;’ 
Massingham v SSTLR & Havant BC [2002] QBD283. Of course it may be 
that, for example, the right to a fair trial is engaged in the broad
26th  er context 
of the procedure. 
at: 
LDC Applications Involving a Change or Proposed Change of Use  
as 
994. For LDC appeals which involve a change or proposed change of use, and 
where the appellant contends that the change is not or would not be 
material and therefore not development, Inspectors must consider the 
planning consequences of any change, in order to determine whether a 
correct 
material change of use and thus development is involved.  
995. In considering this issue, the extent to which the existing use fulfils a 
Only 
proper planning purpose such as housing need and the consequences of its 
loss are capable of being relevant considerations irrespective of whether or 
not the change of use has support from local plan policy. 
Value of LDC 
996.
updated.  
 The LDC under s191 is tangible proof that the immunities from 
enforcement in s171B apply to the specific use(s), operation(s) or 
breach(es) of condition as at the date of the application. The lawfulness of 
the matters certified is to be conclusively presumed; s191(6). It is a 
protection from enforcement unless and until there is a further breach of 
planning control, or some other material change in circumstances occurs.  
freequently 
997. IStaffordshire CC v Challinor [2007] EWCA Civ 864, [2008] JPL 392, an 
is 
enforcement notice in respect of the whole of the site had not been 
appealed on ground (c) or (d) but there was an LDC in existence for part 
of the site. Since under s285(1) an enforcement notice is not to be 
questioned in any proceedings on any grounds on which an appeal may be 
brought, other by way of an appeal under Part VII, it was held that the 
LDC could no longer be relied upon, the EN not having been appealed on 
publication 
ground (c) or (d). What was lawful before the EN was no longer lawful and 
the effect of s285(1) was that lawful rights could be taken away by an EN 
This 
in these circumstances. (See also Wokingham BC v Scott [2017] EWHC 
294)
.  
                                       
283 J.1093 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 163 of 203 

998. This is subject to the caveat that an EN will be interpreted so as not to 
interfere with PD rights under the GPDO or with rights to use land for a 
purpose ancillary to a principle use which is itself not being enforced 
against.  It is therefore incumbent upon an Inspector to decide a s.192 
LDC application for proposed development whilst interpreting an earlier EN 
as not interfering with any claimed PD rights.  The question to be 
determined is simply whether the various conditions under the relevant PD 
class have been met by the proposal.   
999. An LDC under s192 is not the equivalent in law of a planning permission, 
2019
although s191(7) provides that it is the equivalent of a grant of planning 
permission for the purposes of the CSCDA and EPA. S192(4) provides that 
the lawfulness of any use or operation covered by the certificate shall be 
conclusively presumed, unless there is a change in the law or other 
circumstances affecting the status of the land, e.g. an Article 4 Direction, 
before the use commences or the operation is begun.  
November 
1000. ISaxby v SSE [1998] JPL 1132284, it was held that the only procedure 
to determine whether permission was required was contained in 
26th  s192, and 
that the old law whereby every planning application was also said to 
at: 
include an implied application for a determination, Property Investment 
Holdings v SSE [1984] JPL 587, no longer applied. Like a certificate under 
as 
s191 it is no more and no less than a statement of what was or would 
have been lawful at the date the application was made.  
1001. However, iPitt v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 1931 (Admin) Robin Purchas QC 
correct 
criticised the Inspector for holding that the LDC in that case only certified 
lawfulness at the date of the application. He had confused the LDC for 
existing use or development under s191. The LDC for the proposed 
Only 
development under s192 was conclusive unless there was a material 
change before the development began; see s192(4). The provisions of 
ss191-2 do not negate any EUC or s53/64 Determination given under the 
old law. However, neither these documents nor LDCs are conclusive in 
respect of any subsequent happenings. A lawful use can still be 
updated.  
abandoned, or superseded, or supplanted by the implementation of a 
permission in a way wholly incompatible with the continuation of the 
certificated use; see para 609. It is open to any landowner to apply to 
convert an EUC to an LDC using the same application procedures as set 
out above. 
Breach of Condition 
freequently 
1002.
is 
 S191(3) deals with lawfulness in relation to breaches of condition. The 
failure to comply with a continuing requirement condition becomes lawful 
once there has been non-compliance for 10 years. If non-compliance 
ceases within the 10 year period then that breach is at an end, and any 
further breach starts the 10 year period running again. The particular non-
compliance which is the subject of the application must be in existence at 
publication 
the date the application is made; see Nicholson v SSE and Maldon DC 
[1998] JPL 553285
 and also para 685 above.  
This  1003. In the light of the Nicholson and Rottenbury decisions, particular care 
needs to be exercised in the wording of the LDC in these “continuing 
requirement” condition cases, such as agricultural occupancy conditions. 
                                       
284 J.1005 
285 J.992 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 164 of 203 

What is to be certified is the particular breach of the condition and the 
effect of the LDC is not to discharge the condition, which remains in force, 
but merely to provide protection against enforcement for as long as that 
breach continues. It does not provide protection against a future breach 
after a period of compliance with the condition.  
1004. It is in the nature of an LDC that it only certifies that a particular matter 
was lawful on a particular date but for the avoidance of doubt where an 
appeal succeeds in respect of a continuing requirement condition the LDC 
should be worded to reflect that should that breach come to an end the 
2019
LDC does not provide immunity against enforcement of a fresh breach of 
the condition. The following wording is an example of how the situation 
might be accurately reflected. 
“occupation of the dwelling by any person continuing the same breach, which 
started more than 10 years before the date of the application for this certificate, 
November 
of the agricultural occupancy condition number #, attached to planning 
permission number #, dated……… for the erection of a dwelling.”  
1005. S193(5) provides that an LDC in respect of a failure to comply 
26th with a 
condition extends only to “the matter” described in the certificate. It does 
at: 
not necessarily relate to the condition as a whole. For example if one 
occupier on an open plan estate puts up a fence which becomes lawful 
as 
after the condition has been breached in that respect for 10 years, any 
LDC should relate to that fence only and not affect the enforceability of 
other breaches of the same condition; see para 692. 
correct 
Multiple LDC Applications and “Creeping Lawfulness” 
1006. Sometimes multiple applications are made under s192. Examples are use 
of a dwellinghouse for six, seven and eight
Only   persons living together as a 
single household, or use of the land as a caravan site for eight, ten or 15 
caravans. In the former example, the existing lawful use may well be as a 
large dwellinghouse occupied by a small family and in the latter a caravan 
site on which lawfulness has been established at a lower base level. The 
objective of the applicant is to ratch
updated.   et up the numbers on the back of the 
next lowest number that can be shown to be lawful.  
1007. The underlying premise of such an argument is incorrect. In SSETR v 
Waltham Forest LBC [2002] EWCA Civ 330286 the CoA held that the correct 
comparison to be made is between the actual existing use and the 
proposed use. The Court distinguished between the actual use, a notional 
freequently 
use within the same use class – and by extension a notional use that 
is 
would be lawful when compared with the actual use and the proposed use. 
The notional use was not relevant, for example the occupation of a 
dwellinghouse by a very large family. Thus it is unlikely to be possible to 
grant an LDC under s192 without evidence about the character of an 
existing use, even within a Use Class. 
1008. Where an LDC is being granted under s192 for a marginal increase on a 
publication 
lower lawful base level careful wording of the certificate is necessary so as 
to avoid creating a new point of reference and thus facilitating the process 
This 
of “creeping lawfulness”.  
1009. For example, an increase from eight to nine caravans might have the 
stated reason that “the use is lawful because, and only because, the use is 
                                       
286 J.1077 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 165 of 203 

not materially different from the use for the stationing of eight caravans 
for human habitation as described in LDC ref … dated …”, and the 
description of the new use being certified might be, “use as a caravan site 
for [an absolute maximum of] nine caravans, being a use of land that does 
not constitute a material change of use from the use as a caravan site for 
eight caravans described in LDC ref … dated …”. 
Any Enforcement Notice “then in force” 
1010. In the absence of any definition within the Act, the terms “in effect” and 
“in force” should be given their ordinary meaning and, as a matter of 
2019
simple language, there is no distinction to be made.   
1011. It is thus occasionally argued that, since s191(2)(b) and 3(b) include in 
the definition of lawfulness the requirement that the use, operation or 
breach of condition should not be in contravention of an enforcement 
notice then in force, that an LDC can be granted while an appeal against 
November 
an enforcement notice is continuing but not yet determined – because the 
notice has not come into effect due to the provisions of s175(4) and so is 
26th 
not in force. To ensure that the recipient of a notice issued within the 
relevant period in s171B is not able to avoid its outcome by continuing to 
at: 
appeal it until an application under s191 could succeed, the second bite 
under s171B(4)(b) is available. 
as 
1012. For four years after the issue of the notice the lawfulness test in 
s191(2)(a) and (3)(a) could not be satisfied even if the initial time periods 
for taking action set out in s171B(1), (2) or (3) passed.  This is because 
correct 
the time for taking enforcement action would not expire for four years 
upon the planning authority having taken or purported to have taken 
enforcement action because of the availa
Only bility of the second bite under 
s171B(4)(b).   
1013. From the date of taking that second bite the LPA would then have a 
further four years within which to take further action, and so on, thus 
continuing to prevent the breach from becoming lawful before the notice 
updated.  
took effect because of protracted appeal or court proceedings.  In cases 
where the LPA does not take such preventative action a situation could 
arise where a use or operations become lawful before an appeal against an 
enforcement notice is finally determined.   
1014. If proceedings are unusually protracted, the LPA has the power under 
s289(4A) to apply to the courts for the notice to take effect in full or to 
freequently 
such extent as may be specified so that immunity could not be acquired by 
is 
default under s191(2) or (3). 
Revocation 
1015. S193(7) provides for the revocation by the LPA of a certificate in the 
event of it being found to be based on materially false statements or 
documents or the withholding of material information. SoS has no 
publication 
equivalent power, but an LPA could revoke an LDC granted by the SoS. 
15. The Approach to Evidence and Conduct of Inquiries and 
This 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 166 of 203 

Hearings 
Introduction 
1016. This section deals with the special considerations arising from s174 and 
s195 appeals.287    
The Burden of Proof 
1017. The burden of proof is on the appellant in LDC appeals, and in 
enforcement appeals in respect of the legal grounds; Nelsovil v SSE 
[1962] 13 P&CR.151288
. The standard of proof is the balance of 
2019
probabilities; in no circumstances should reference be made to the 
criminal standard, which is "beyond reasonable doubt"Thrasyvoulou v 
SSE
 [1984] JPL 732289
.  
1018. The same standard of proof applies regardless of the appeal procedure or 
the form the evidence takes.  Evidence should not be rejected simply 
November 
because it is uncorroborated, particularly if it is unchallenged, see 
Gabbitas v SSE & Newham BC [1985] JPL 630290.  
26th 
1019. There may be good reasons to why an appellant’s sworn evidence may 
need corroborating in a particular case – for example, beca
at:  use the 
appellant appears to be an unconvincing or self-serving witness. Where 
as 
the Inspector concludes that corroboration is required, however, the 
reasons why should be clearly explained in the decision.  
1020. Experience suggests that the High Court is not prepared to accept 
generalised references, whether to the balance of p
correct  robability or a need for 
corroboration, as sufficient for rejecting sworn testimony which has not 
been contradicted by other evidence in the appeal. Some specific 
Only 
explanation is required.  
1021. Evidence on ground (a) and the deemed application contained within it 
should be heard in the same way as a s78 appeal. References to the 
burden of proof are inappropriate in the context of the planning merits. 
Statutory Declarations, Affidavits an
updated.   d Other Documents 
1022. The Statutory Declarations Act 1835 provided for the use of declarations 
in place of oaths in specified circumstances. There are many situations 
now in which statements about particular matters have to be verified by 
statutory declaration, made in front of a person with appropriate authority 
as set out in the 1835 Act (usually an independent lawyer) before or 
freequently 
outside of the inquiry or hearing; these are classed as sworn evidence.  
is 
1023. It should be noted that not all documents which purport to be Statutory 
Declarations actually fall within that category.  It is advisable to check that 
they include the form of words in the Schedule to the 1835 Act, namely, “I 
A.B. do solemnly and sincerely declare, that and I make this solemn 
declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true, and by virtue of 
the p
publication  rovisions of an Act made and passed in the year of the reign of his 
present Majesty, intituled “An Act(here insert the title of this Act).”   That 
declaration should also have been witnessed by an authorised person as 
This 
mentioned above who should add his or her signature and details.  
                                       
 
288 J.13 
289 J.490 
290 J.505 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 167 of 203 

link to page 25 link to page 25 1024. In the planning context, evidence may be given orally or in writing. Oral 
evidence is often required to be given on oath, see below, and written 
evidence is often volunteered in the form of a statutory declaration in 
enforcement and LDC appeals.  
1025. By using a statutory declaration, evidence can be treated as given first 
hand without the presence of the declarant. The contents of a declaration 
or oral statement before you may still be hearsay, but, as regards all types 
of evidence, tribunals are entitled to act on any material which is logically 
probative; T A Miller Ltd v MHLG [1968] 1 W.L.R. 992.   
2019
1026. An affidavit is a sworn statement that complies with certain formal 
requirements, and is used in certain court proceedings where required by 
law. The Perjury Act, discussed below, is wide in scope; penalties in 
respect of false written statements on oath in judicial proceedings are 
similar to those for false statements made on oath at an inquiry.  
November 
1027. There may be a difference in the circumstances of a particular case but in 
general terms a hierarchy in terms of weight to be attached to evidence 
26th 
given in different forms can be applied. The best evidence being that 
which is given orally on oath at Inquiry and tested by cross-examination.  
at: 
A statutory declaration has not been tested by cross-examination in the 
same way but it can be given appropriate weight as a 
as solemn declaration 
made under the 1835 Act with all that that implies. Unsworn letters or 
written statements submitted in support do not have the same status and 
authority.  
correct 
1028. A key factor in terms of weight both for oral and written evidence is 
whether any personal sanctions apply to the individual concerned should 
what is said subsequently prove to be un
Only truthful.  A signed statement to 
which no sanctions apply could be afforded slightly but not much more 
weight than a letter.  That would be the case even if signed in the 
presence of a solicitor.  If such a document purports to have been sworn 
but does not appear on its face to be a statutory declaration then that 
would be something to go back to the parties on in order to clarify its 
updated.  
status (if the case were to turn on it).  Normal principles of fairness apply. 
1029. Whilst the hierarchy mentioned above provides a useful starting point, 
weight may be affected by other factors such as precision, consistency – 
including too much consistency where one would not expect it – and 
corroboration. 
freequently 
1030. When considering corroborating evidence, regard should be had to 
is 
whether documents being deposed to are contemporaneous, and how well 
they stand up to questioning etc.  It is understood that websites may offer 
appellants forged utility bills or bank statements. Unless the LPA can 
demonstrate that a bill is forged, or there is an obvious error with a 
document, any issue of forgery that is raised should be dealt with on the 
balance of probabilities. 
publication 
1031. IR v SSE & Leeds CC ex parte Ramzan (QBD 18.12.97 CO/2202/97)291
an appeal on ground (d) had proceeded on WR at the appellant’s request. 
This 
The Inspector was entitled to find the evidence inconsistent and unreliable, 
and give it little weight, without making any further offer of an inquiry or 
seeking more information. However, if the WR procedure is followed in 
                                       
291 J.1011 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 168 of 203 

ground (d) and LDC cases, it is insufficient to dismiss written evidence as 
untested; see Mahajaand above.  
Hearings and Inquiries: Entitlement to Appear 
1032. The concept of the “statutory party” in s78 appeals does not apply to the 
EIPR. Rule 11(1)(e)-(f) provides that any person on whom a copy of an EN 
has been served, and any person who has an interest in the land affected 
by a s195 appeal is entitled to appear at the inquiry or hearing; EHPR9(1).  
1033. There is no provision for a Parish or Community Council to appear as of 
2019
right, unless they have been required to serve a Statement of Case under 
Rule 6(6), but their representatives are entitled to appear by permission of 
the Inspector; EIPR11(2) or EHPR9(2). In practice, permission should 
always be granted. 
Notification of the Inquiry or Hearing 
November 
1034. It is the responsibility of the LPA to give notification of the inquiry in 
accordance with EIPR9(5), EHPR6(5). If this has not been done, then in 
26th 
the case of a small inquiry or a hearing, where it is unlikely that anyone 
who has not been notified will be significantly affected, then the Inspector 
at: 
may be able to overcome the problem by asking the LPA to give 
notification of the appeal, explaining that by an oversig
as  ht it has not been 
given before, and inviting written representations.  
1035. If however it is clear that there is a significant body of local opinion which 
has not been informed of the date, or the Inspector is advised that there 
correct 
are people who would certainly have wished to attend had they been told 
of the inquiry or hearing, then an adjournment would be fully justified. The 
decision to proceed where notification ha
Only s not been done properly should 
be taken with caution since inquiries and hearings are events to which the 
public are entitled to attend. 
Site Visits during the Inquiry 
1036. In enforcement cases, an Inspector is likely to be at a considerable 
updated.  
disadvantage if he or she has been unable to see the site before the 
inquiry. However, there is no provision in the Rules for an accompanied 
site visit to take place before the inquiry has opened and there is potential 
for third parties to be disadvantaged should  such a visit take place 
without their knowledge; EIPR18.   
1037.
freequently 
 For that reason, particularly where the site is not visible from the public 
highway, the Inspector may be justified in adjourning the inquiry 
is 
immediately after opening submissions, or at any time during the course 
of the inquiry, to make an accompanied visit before hearing all the 
evidence. Otherwise, if the Inspector finds on a post-inquiry site visit that 
there are discrepancies in the plan, or material matters which have not 
been adduced, it may be necessary to invite representations or re-open 
the inq
publication  uiry before the decision can be issued.  
1038. With hearings it is always desirable not to close the hearing until after 
This 
the site visit for these reasons.  However, it is important to ensure that 
third parties who have taken part in the discussion at the hearing should 
not be disadvantaged by their inability to attend and take part in any 
discussion at the site visit.  In those circumstances, the best course of 
action would be to close the hearing before the site visit takes place.    
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 169 of 203 

Opening Procedures 
1039. There are a number of important differences in the opening procedures 
between s174/s195 inquiries or hearings and s78:  
• 
The reference to conditions should relate to the deemed application 
under s177(5), where considered. It does not arise in s195 appeals. 
• 
The Inspector should check the Enforcement Notice plan and verify the 
grounds of appeal. If any of the grounds seem not to be justified by 
the facts, or there has been some misunderstanding about them, it is 
2019
best to resolve this as early in the proceedings as possible, but 
without appearing to dictate to the parties how they should present 
their case.  
• 
In s195 appeals, the plan and terms of the application should be 
clarified as well as any reasons for refusal. Any discrepancy between 
November 
the terms of the description of what is sought and what was refused 
should be resolved. This is particularly important in s192 applications; 
R v Thanet DC ex parte Tapp [2001] JPL 1436292. It is helpful to clarify 
26th 
to members of the public that planning merits play no part in LDC 
decisions – and in s174 appeals where there is no groun
at:  d (a). 

as 
 
Where the appeal is concerned primarily with planning merits, the 
Inspector should take the initiative in defining what they see as the 
main issues, as part of the opening, in the same way as in a s78 case.  
• 
Where legal issues are involved the Inspector should likewise give a 
correct 
lead in saying what he or she considers the main arguments to be 
from studying the papers along with relevant case law if it has not 
already been identified by the parties,
Only   without being seen to lay down 
the law or give any indication of pre-judgement at that stage.  
• 
Where ground (d) is pleaded, the relevant time period should be 
established. In use cases, the relevance of the planning unit may need 
to be explained. Although ground (d) use appeals will frequently be 
based on a 10 year period, in som
updated.   e circumstances the appellant may 
intend to cover a longer period. This is a matter for them, subject to 
the Inspector being satisfied the evidence would be relevant. An 
argument that there is a right to revert to a previous lawful use under 
s57(4) or that there has been a succession of different uses without a 
material change occurring may affect the time period that is relevant. 
freequently 
• 
If legal grounds of appeal are pleaded the Inspector should decide and 
is 
announce whether evidence will be taken on oath. This is not 
appropriate for hearings because the provisions of the Perjury Act 
1911 do not apply to hearings and so there is no criminal sanction for 
giving false evidence.  Where, at a hearing, it becomes clear that 
evidence on oath is necessary to resolve disputed facts it will be 
appropriate to abort the hearing and arrange for an inquiry to be held. 
publication 
• 
The normal procedure in inquiries is for the appellant to go first; 
EIPR17(4). This is important where legal grounds are involved since 
This 
the burden of proof is on the appellant. Where there are only grounds 
(a), (f) and (g), there is no objection to adopting the s78 order of 
events of hearing the LPA first, provided all parties are content. 
                                       
292 J.1074 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 170 of 203 

Occasionally, an unrepresented appellant shows no grasp of what the 
issues are and in those circumstances it may be appropriate to hear 
the LPA first or at least to ask them to make a full opening statement. 
• 
The LPA and a represented appellant may come expecting to make 
brief opening statements. It is good practice to clarify this and allow it. 
It can be particularly helpful where there is public attendance and 
interest in the inquiry as a means of scene setting. Where there are 
likely to be legal submissions parties should be encouraged to outline 
these at this stage, without prejudice to later changes based on the 
2019
evidence adduced. 
1040. Enforcement appeals are often made by householders or small business 
proprietors who have a great deal at stake on the outcome of the appeal, 
and cannot afford legal representation. Where agents are employed they 
may be professionals in general practice who do not have an in-depth 
November 
knowledge of the comparatively complex procedures involved. This applies 
to an even greater extent to interested parties. It is of great importance 
therefore that at the opening of the inquiry the Inspector should
26th  explain 
the procedures simply and clearly, including what the grounds of appeal 
at: 
mean, and as fully as necessary. 
1041.
as 
 Inspectors should be as helpful as possible to unrepresented appellants 
and third parties, but helpfulness must not extend to a point where it 
might be seen as partiality. When an appellant in person puts forward an 
ill-prepared case at an enforcement inquiry, it may be necessary for the 
correct 
Inspector to take the lead in obtaining all the necessary information, 
adopting a procedure similar to that at a hearing. Whilst it is desirable that 
parties who wish to speak should be present at the opening, when the 
Only 
Inspector programmes the inquiry, late comers should never be prevented 
from speaking before the inquiry is closed.   
Identification of Defects in the Notice 
1042. Where the notice is obviously flawed the Inspector should draw attention 
updated.  
to the matter at the end of the opening. He or she should say that if the 
notice is to be upheld it will be necessary to make corrections or 
variations, and make or invite suggestions and seek agreement, making it 
clear that this is without prejudice to the other arguments.  
1043. It may be that appropriate corrections to the allegation only emerge 
during the inquiry when, for example, evidence about the actual use has 
freequently 
been clarified. Whenever this occurs it is right to highlight it at the earliest 
is 
opportunity so that the parties proceed in the knowledge of possible 
changes to the notice.  
1044. Where the notice is to be corrected or varied it is essential that the 
Inspector gets a agreement from the parties that no injustice would arise. 
This should be noted in the decision. If there is dispute, the arguments will 
need
publication  to be heard and resolved in the decision. Occasionally a ruling on the 
matter may be sought and where necessary given at the inquiry. 
This  General Conduct of Proceedings 
1045. Once the inquiry or hearing is under way the Inspector should intervene 
to pick up points where there seems to be a misunderstanding, and give 
an indication of their thoughts on a particular point, if only to stimulate 
further discussion. In particular, it is important throughout the inquiry to 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 171 of 203 

review the emerging evidence on the main legal issues because these may 
change and the parties should have the opportunity to comment.  
1046. In general, the conduct of the parties is not a planning matter, although 
it may be relevant to claims for costs. If allegations of bad faith, ulterior 
motives or impropriety directly related to the subject of the inquiry are 
made, the Inspector is under a duty to deal with them and make a clear 
finding. If such grounds were made out they could invalidate the notice; 
see Davy v Spelthorne BC [1984] AC 262, and Wass v SSE & Stoke-on-
Trent CC 
[1986] JPL 120293

2019
Proofs of Evidence and other Inquiry Documents294 
1047. Where evidence is to be given by a proof of evidence it is to be provided 
four weeks before the inquiry, along with a summary if appropriate. There 
is no obligation on witnesses to produce a proof and reliance upon oral 
evidence is not unusual for witnesses of fact. However the definition of a 
November 
“statement of case” in the EIPR requires it to contain “full particulars” of 
the case to be put forward and a list of documents that are to be referred 
26th 
to or put in evidence.  
1048.
at: 
 The parties can request copies of documents referred to in the statement 
of case, Rule 6(5). The SoS may require further information about the 
as 
matters contained in the statement of case; Rule 6(8). Statements of 
common ground are also required. Rule 12 requires the parties to provide 
four weeks before the inquiry an estimate of the time required to present 
their evidence and the number of witnesses to be called.  
correct 
1049. The aim of the Rules is to obtain full disclosure of the evidence to be 
relied on in advance of the inquiry to reduce the areas of dispute and the 
Only 
time taken at the inquiry. If the Rules are followed there should be no 
surprises at the inquiry. Where one party takes another by surprise to an 
extent that an adjournment is necessary that may constitute unreasonable 
behaviour justifying an award of costs.  
1050. In LDC appeals and in connection with the legal grounds of s174 appeals, 
updated.  
it is sometimes suggested by appellants that evidence should only be led, 
and the decision taken on the basis of the LPA’s stated reasons for issue of 
the notice or reasons for refusing the LDC. This is not so. The appeal 
decision is taken in the public interest and the Inspector needs to be 
acquainted with all relevant facts.  
1051.
freequently 
 ICotterell v SSE & Tonbridge and Malling BC [1982] JPL 443295, a case 
on the ol
is  d EUC provisions, it was held that the SoS was concerned with 
whether the refusal was well founded or not, and not just the stated 
reasons for refusal.  
1052. Similarly, LPAs may claim that only evidence on matters referred to in 
the application or grounds of appeal should be taken into account. This 
again is wrong. Evidence available at the date of the application may be 
publication 
contradicted by later evidence compiled in preparation for the inquiry or 
hearing, pointing to a different decision on the balance of probability. 
This  Audio and Video Recordings and other Electronically Created Material as 
                                       
293 J.516 
294 The advice in relation to advocates, witnesses, evidence, proofs and documents set out in Inquiries 
(England & Wales) 
and Hearings (England & Wales) 
295 J.391 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 172 of 203 

Evidence 
1053. In enforcement and LDC cases, Inspectors may be asked to view, and 
accept as evidence, a video recording or other electronically created 
material, for example, to demonstrate lorry movements or noise 
associated with the use in question.  It is generally reasonable to do so at 
an Inquiry or Hearing, so long as all others appearing at the event have 
the opportunity to view and hear the recording.   
1054. It should be made clear that such material is to be viewed without 
prejudice to the Inspector’s consideration of its relevance, on which others 
2019
will be allowed to comment. Oral evidence, and the Inspector’s own 
inspection, must be given appropriate weight and are likely to be 
preferred.  It can be helpful for the witness presenting the recording to be 
asked afterwards to identify the main points made so that they can be the 
subject of cross-examination or discussion, depending on the procedure.  
November 
The Inspector should, however, satisfy him or herself that the conditions 
shown are reasonably typical.  
26th 
1055. In relation to audio recordings, Inspectors should be satisfied, before 
accepting any evidence of this kind that the recording is authentic.  Where 
at: 
objections are raised to the admission of such evidence, Inspectors should 
hear the arguments and, unless the evidence is patent
as  ly irrelevant, 
indicate that the substance of the objections will be taken into account in 
judging what weight, if any, should be attached to the recordings.  Further 
guidance in relation to the acceptance of such material is set out in 
correct 
Procedure Guidance Note 4 – Conduct of Inquiries. 
1056. Where the case is being dealt with by written representations, it would 
not be appropriate to rely upon evidence 
Only in this form and any material 
submitted should immediately be returned to the party presenting it. The 
same considerations apply where the intention may originally have been 
for the case to have been dealt with by way of an Inquiry or Hearing but 
the procedure has subsequently been changed to written representations.  
Any such evidence which had originally been accepted would then need to 
updated.  
be returned and the evidence immediately discounted by the Inspector 
and/or another Inspector appointed.             
Taking of Evidence on Oath296 
1057. Where there is clearly a dispute of fact, which will apply in many s174 
appeals on legal grounds, and almost all s195 existing use cases, then 
freequently 
evidence should be taken on oath. However, in cases where the legal 
is 
issues are dealt with entirely in submissions it may not be necessary. 
Where there is any doubt it is better that witnesses be sworn. If either 
party asks that evidence should be taken on oath the Inspector should 
agree, unless it is patently unnecessary.   
1058. The sanction behind the administration of an oath or affirmation is 
prov
publication ided by the Perjury Act 1911. This states that where a person lawfully 
sworn as a witness in a judicial proceeding wilfully makes a statement 
material in that proceeding, which he knows to be false or does not believe 
This 
to be true, he shall be guilty of perjury. Seven years imprisonment is the 
maximum penalty for perjury in a “judicial proceeding” – which includes a 
                                       
296 The advice in Inquiries (England & Wales) applies in general to enforcement and LDC inquiries. Further 
advice is also given in Human Rights and the PSED 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 173 of 203 

proceeding before any court, tribunal or person having, by law, power to 
hear, receive, and examine evidence on oath.   
1059. The other potential sanction is that a decision may be overturned in the 
High Court if it is subsequently found to have been based upon false or 
misleading evidence that was given at the inquiry.      
1060. The statutory authority of an inspector to take evidence on oath applies 
only to statutory inquiries – held under a duty imposed or a power given 
by a statute. Most planning inquiries are included but not hearings as the 
power to administer the oath derives from the statutory nature of the 
2019
inquiry rather than the office of inspector.  The source of the power is 
s250 of the Local Government Act 1972 which is applied by s319A and 
Schedule 6 of the 1990 Act to local inquiries in the planning sphere.  
1061. Since there is no statutory power for an Inspector to administer the oath 
at hearings, Inspectors should not purport to do so when following this 
November 
procedure. Taking evidence on oath would be inappropriate in any event 
for hearings, since they are more informal.  Furthermore, they do not 
26th 
normally involve cross-examination even though the relevant procedure 
rules enable this to take place when appropriate to do so.  
at: 
1062. It is very important that parties should be seen to be treated equally. If, 
as 
for example, several witnesses as to fact, called on behalf of the appellant, 
are sworn, and the LPA call only a planning officer with no personal 
knowledge of the site, who gives evidence on the history from the files, he 
or she should still be sworn, if only to preserve equality.  
correct 
1063. Likewise if third parties give factual evidence they should also be sworn. 
The Inspector should ascertain at an early stage the nature of third 
Only 
parties’ evidence with this point in mind. Where there are also professional 
witnesses dealing solely with matters of policy and opinion on the planning 
merits, they need not be sworn. If the case is being presented by an 
appellant in person, or an agent appearing as advocate and witness, then 
if factual evidence is to be included he or she should be sworn at the 
updated.  
earliest opportunity before making an opening submission. 
1064. Members of the Bar should follow the Bar Council Code of Conduct and 
the stipulations concerning contact with witnesses are relevant to all those 
who appear at the inquiry. Members of the Bar should inform the 
Inspector of all relevant legislative provisions and case law of which they 
are aware, whether they are favourable or unfavourable to their case.  
freequently 
1065. Advoca
is  tes should not communicate with their witness, including the lay 
client, outside the inquiry room once cross-examination of that person has 
commenced, unless they need to clarify some technical issue and the 
Inspector consents. When an inquiry is adjourned before a witness has 
finished being cross-examined and re-examined, the Inspector should 
warn that witness not to discuss their evidence with anyone else during 
the a
publication  djournment.  
1066. When taking the oath, witnesses should be asked to come up to a 
This 
convenient point close to the Inspector's table, leaving their papers at the 
witness table. Others in the room should be asked to be silent while the 
oath is administered. It is critical that the person taking an oath should do 
so in a manner which they regard as binding on their conscience.  
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 174 of 203 

link to page 34 1067. In most cases, it will be enough to enquire whether the witness wishes to 
swear on the Bible or make an affirmation but it may be necessary to 
explore with the witness how they wish to take the oath if they consider 
neither appropriate. The forms of oath that should be used for range of 
more common religions are reproduced in Annex 3. 
1068. The Inspector should stand and face the witness and read out the form of 
oath in clear and audible tones, for the witness to repeat phrase by 
phrase. Where the Bible is held it should be in the witness’s right hand. At 
the end the witness should be asked to state their full name.  
2019
1069. Alternatively, the full name of the witness should be obtained before 
administering the oath and the witness asked to repeat “I, John William 
Bloggs, swear …”. Since some witnesses may not appreciate the 
seriousness of giving evidence on oath or, in this respect, the similarity of 
an inquiry and a court, it is good practice when a decision is announced to 
November 
take evidence on oath for the Inspector to make a general statement to 
remind all witnesses that, regardless of the form of oath, failure to tell the 
truth leaves them at risk of prosecution for perjury. 
26th 
1070. It is common practice for witnesses to read from a proof whether or not 
at: 
evidence is taken on oath, and for the Inspector to retain a copy of the 
as 
proof. However, where evidence is on oath, and any other party objects to 
the witness having a proof before him, the Inspector should require that 
the advocate take the witness through the evidence by question and 
answer. An appellant in person may be allowed to read from a prepared 
correct 
statement. If a witness has difficulty in reading then he or she should be 
sworn, the advocate should be allowed to read the statement, and the 
witness should verify the truth of it. 
Only 
1071. There is no obligation upon the LPA to provide an interpreter for the 
Appellant’s witnesses.  If needed, it is a matter for the Appellant to 
provide one for them (see permission hearing Salem Mussa Patel v SSCLG 
CO/2301/2015).    
updated.  
1072. Where there are a number of witnesses as to fact, the Inspector may be 
requested to exclude them until they give their evidence, so they are not 
tempted to repeat what previous witnesses have said. However, this may 
be difficult for practical or natural justice reasons. For example, there may 
be no convenient place for witnesses to wait outside the inquiry room, 
some witnesses may be hostile to others, and there may be no way of 
freequently 
preventing witnesses who have already given their evidence from 
discussi
is ng it with others.  
1073. Care should also be taken, in selecting which witnesses to exclude, that 
one side is not disadvantaged more than the other; it would never be right 
to exclude an appellant from any part of the inquiry, except for extremely 
disruptive behaviour. Likewise, it would not be right to exclude interested 
persons, even if they are prospective witnesses, unless there are very 
publication 
special circumstances. Nevertheless, it remains open to Inspectors to 
exercise their discretion in the matter, if it can be done fairly and without 
This 
undue difficulty. 
1074. Third parties at enforcement inquiries are generally heard as objectors to 
the grant of planning permission, speaking after the appellant and the 
LPA. Where they also give factual evidence on legal grounds, it often 
improves the flow of the inquiry if they can be called by the party they 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 175 of 203 

link to page 29 support or their evidence interposed with that of other factual witnesses, 
at an earlier stage than they would be heard otherwise. 
1075. In non-statutory inquiries or hearings, evidence can only be given under 
oath if the witness provides a statutory declaration or sworn affidavit as 
discussed above.  This means that the responses of that witness to any 
subsequent cross examination would not (and could not) be made under 
oath. Any discrepancies arising as a result of witness cross-examination of 
evidence given under oath may amount to a breach of that oath.  The 
Inspector should warn the witness where such discrepancies arise and 
2019
consider whether the evidence can be relied on.   
Witness Summonses297 
1076. These are rather more likely to be encountered at enforcement inquiries, 
because sometimes a past owner or ex-LPA employee is the only person 
who can provide information about the previous history.  
November 
1077. Before issuing a summons, the Inspector must be reasonably satisfied 
that the evidence to be given by the witness is likely to be material to the 
26th 
case; the witness is the appropriate person to give the evidence; they will 
not come unless a summons is served and the production 
at: of a sworn 
affidavit would not obviate the need for personal attendance.  Inspectors 
as 
should have a form available; blank form at Annex 1.    
Conduct of Enforcement and LDC Site Visits298 
1078. The following paragraphs relate to both inquiry and WR enforcement 
correct 
appeals. Enforcement cases are often sensitive, and Inspectors should be 
extremely careful to avoid being seen in the company of one party, or 
talking to a representative of one party, w
Only  ithout the others being there. If 
any potentially embarrassing situation seems to be developing, a tactful 
reminder to the parties is usually all that is necessary. If it is necessary to 
go into neighbouring property, e.g. a third party's house, representatives 
of the main parties should be asked to accompany the Inspector. 
updated.  
1079. If one or other party is unwilling to accompany the Inspector, or the third 
party refuses to admit one or other of the main parties to the premises, 
then the Inspector should ask for the agreement of all parties before 
viewing the adjacent site with only the third party present. He or she 
should make it clear that there will be no conversation with the third party 
apart from what is necessary to guide the Inspector to the right viewpoint. 
If any potentially emb
freequently arrassing situation is likely the Inspector should 
decline 
is to visit the adjacent site. In no circumstances should the Inspector 
ever be seen entering or leaving the site in the company of one party only. 
1080. If the file shows that a third party wishes the Inspector to see the site 
from his or her property, or if a request is made at the inquiry, the 
Inspector should be sure to do so, even if last minute arrangements have 
to be made. In cases involving Sunday markets, boot fairs, or other 
publication 
seasonal or occasional activities, Inspectors should always try to see the 
site when the activity is in operation – and must do so if so requested. 
This  1081. Where information is provided at an early stage in an appeal that 
difficulties may arise at the site visit, the case officer should seek the 
                                       
297 Requests for witness summonses are dealt with fully in Inquiries (England & Wales). 
298 Advice on site visits is set out in Site visits (England & Wales) and Inquiries (England & Wales) 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 176 of 203 

advice of the appropriate Group Manager (GM) for a determination on 
whether or not a police presence at the site visit is considered to be 
appropriate. This will be done in consultation with the LPA and, if required, 
the local police force.  
1082. If such information comes to light at a later stage, when the Inspector 
has been appointed, he or she should contact the GM immediately and 
discuss the matter. 
1083. If it is appropriate to have a police presence at the site visit, it will 
automatically become an ASV and the following options will be considered:  2019
Low profile: non-uniformed officers in a vehicle near the site.  
Medium profile: uniformed officers present in a vehicle near the site.  
High profile: uniformed officers in attendance at the site during the visit. 
1084.
November 
 Arrangements for the appropriate police presence will then be made and 
co-ordinated through the GM. A briefing note will be issued to both the LPA 
and to the police in an effort to avoid any problems which have arisen in 
26th 
the past. Notification of a high level police presence will be given to the 
principal parties in advance of the site visit. 
at: 
1085. The enforcement notice plan should be verified at the site visit. If there is 
as 
any discrepancy, or if the representations are obviously incomplete, or if 
any necessary documents are not on file, the Inspector should mention the 
matter, but insist that all further representations or necessary information 
should be sent in writing to the case officer, for onward transmission to 
correct 
the Inspector.  
1086. In no circumstances should an Inspector raise or get involved in 
Only 
discussions about locus standi or any other validity or legal point at the 
site visit. This advice does not apply at hearings where the hearing is still 
open at the site visit. 
1087. If an Inspector is denied entry to an appeal site by an uncooperative 
appellant, he or she should first consider whether everything necessary 
updated.  
can be seen from vantage points on the public highway. If this cannot be 
done, the site visit should be aborted as quickly as possible. The Inspector 
should then consult with the GM as to whether it may be possible for the 
LPA to authorise representatives, including the Inspector, to inspect the 
site in accordance with s196A-C TCPA 90 as amended.  
1088.
freequently 
 An Inspector is entitled to base their conclusions on what they see on the 
site; se
is e Winchester CC v SSE [1979] 39 P&CR 1299, but he should not rely 
on evidence, e.g. as to highway conditions, obtained on an additional 
unaccompanied site inspection without giving the parties the opportunity 
to comment on any circumstances which they consider may have 
pertained at that particular time; Southwark LBC v SSE [1987] JPL 36. 
ANNEX 1
publication  : Witness Summons 
A blank witness summons form is attached on the next page. 
This 
 
 
                                       
299 J.228 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 177 of 203 


 
 
 
 
WITNESS SUMMONS  
issued under  
Section 250 of the Local Government Act 1972 
 and 
2019
Section 320(2) of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 
 
 
 
To:       
November 
 
 
In  exercise  of  the  powers  conferred  upon  me  by  Section  250  of 
26th  the  Local 
Government Act 1972, I hereby require you to attend at:  at: 
 
                    
as 
at 10 am on:                    
 
to  give  evidence  in  the  Inquiry  then  and  here  proceeding  by  direction  of  the 
Secretary of State in the matter of: 
correct 
 
 
 
Only 
You are also required to produce at the said Inquiry the following documents:- 
 
 
 
 
updated.  
 
 
Given under my hand, this day of                                Two thousand and 
 
 
 
freequently 
Signed:  is 
 
 
The person appointed by the Secretary of State to hold the Inquiry. 
publication 
This 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 178 of 203 

Section 250(2) and (3) of the Local Government Act 1972, which 
apply for the purpose of the Inquiry, enact as follows:-  

 
(2) For the purpose of any such local inquiry, the person appointed to 
hold the inquiry may by summons require any person to attend, at a 
time and place stated in the summons, to give evidence or to produce 
any documents in his custody or under his control which relate to any 
matter in question at the inquiry, and may take evidence on oath, and 
2019
for that purpose administer oaths, or may, instead of administering an 
oath, require the person examined to make a solemn affirmation: 
Provided that-  
a. no person shall be required, in obedience to such summons to 
attend to give evidence or to produce any such documents, unless 
November 
the necessary expenses of his attendance are paid or tendered to 
him; and 
26th 
b. nothing in this section shall empower the person holding the 
at: 
inquiry to require the production of the title, or any instrument 
relating to the title, of any land not being the property
as  of a local 
authority. 
(3) Every person who refuses or deliberately fails to attend in 
obedience to a summons issued under this section, or to give 
correct 
evidence, or who deliberately alters, suppresses, conceals, destroys or 
refuses to produce any book or other document which he is required 
or is liable to be required to produce for th
Only e purposes of this section, 
shall be liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding £100 or 
to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months, or to both. 
 
 
updated.  
 
 
 
 
freequently 
 
is 
 
 
 
 
publication 
 
This 
 
 
 
 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 179 of 203 

ANNEX 2: Useful references in the EPL 
 
The paragraph references relate to the start of the appropriate paragraphs 
 
Abandonment ................................................................................ P57.08 
Breach of condition - time limits .................................................... P171B.16 
Breach of condition or development without pp ................................... P56.13 
Breach of planning control ............................................................ P171A.22 
Building: definition ......................................................................... P55.14  2019
Building: internal works .................................................................. P55.15 
Building: purpose for which it may be used ........................................ P75.05 
Conditions: power to impose ............................................................ P72.06 
Conditions: unenforceable ............................................................... P72.19 
Content of EN: the breach of planning control ...................... P173.05, P173.12 
Content of EN: steps to be taken .................................................... P173.14 
November 
Content of EN: compliance period ................................................... P173.22 
Content of EN: restricting lawful uses .............................................. P179.15 
Correction/variation ......................................................................
26th   P176.04 
Curtilage: use of land in curtilage of dwelling ...................................... P55.54 
at: 
Curtilage: definition ........................................................... P55.54, 3B-2055 
Curtilage and planning unit ............................................................
as 
 3B-2055 
Definition of Development (s55) ....................................................... P55.10 
Dwellinghouse: use as a single (4 year rule) .................................... P171B.11 
Dwellinghouse: “Definition” of (GPDO) ............................................. 3B-2054 
Dwellinghouse: continuing breach/lawfulness ................................
correct 
.. P171B.15 
Dwellinghouses: use as 2 or more separate ........................................ P55.61 
Estoppel ..................................................................................... P172.19 
Only 
Existing use, retention of ................................................................. P70.19 
Fall-back position ................................................................ P70.19, P70.30 
Further enforcement action ........................................................... P171B.18 
General Introduction to enforcement ........................................... P171A.01.2 
Grounds of appeal ...................................................................... P174.04.3 
High Court appeal ................................
updated.   ........................... P174.24, P289.04 
Horses and agriculture .................................................................. 3B-2100 
Human Rights ................................................. P174.04.1, P187B.12, 2-3851 
Implementation of use (UCO) ........................................................ 3B-959.3 
Intensification of use ........................................................ P55.53, 3B-959.4 
Issue of enforcement notice ........................................................... P172.06 
Lawful and unlawful uses un
freequently  der the UCO and GPDO .. P57.06, 38754, 3B-2016.2 
Lawful and un
is  lawful uses ....................................... P191.05, P192.04, P57.04 
Lawful use: continuing breach ..........................................P171B.15, P191.05 
Limitation - breach of .................................................................. P171A.22 
Loss of existing use rights ............................................................... P57.08 
LPA power to withdraw or modify EN .............................................. P173A.03 
Mansi doctrine/protection of lawful use ................. P176.05, P179.15, P57.05.2 
Material Ch
publication  ange of Use ................................................................... P55.33 
Material considerations in planning applications................................... P70.16 
MCU: ancillary uses ........................................................................ P55.39 
This  MCU: use within the same use class .................................... P55.58, 3B-950.1 
MCU: agriculture and forestry .......................................... P55.56, 3B-2094.5 
MCU: allowed by the GPDO and ratchet effect ......... 3B-955, 3B-965.1, 3B-2078 
MCU: hostel/residential/dwellinghouse ............................................... 3B-979 
MCU: incidental operational development ........................................ P171B.09 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 180 of 203 

MCU: intensification ........................................................................ P55.53 
Nil use............................................................................... P55.51, P57.08  
Nullity, validity and invalidity - the concepts ..................................... P173.08 
Onus of proof .............................................................................. P174.22 
Operational Development ..................................................... P55.10, P55.14 
Ops: engineering operations ............................................................ P55.19 
Ops: building operations ................................................................. P55.13 
Ops: demolition ............................................................................. P55.27 
Ops: mining: modification of 4 year rule ......................................... P171B.10  2019
Ops: mining operations ................................................................... P55.23 
Ops: other operations ..................................................................... P55.26 
Ops: substantial completion .......................................................... P171B.08 
Planning unit .................................................................... P55.44, P192.15 
Planning permission - grant of on deemed application ........................ P177.04 
Planning unit: extent of enforcement notice ...................................... P173.25 
November 
Primary and ancillary uses ..................................................... P55.35, 38754 
Refuse tips .................................................................................... P55.62 
Right of appeal ............................................................................
26th   P174.04 
Second bite provision ................................................................... P171B.18 
at: 
Service of enforcement notice ........................................................ P172.23 
Sui generis uses.............................................................................. 38759 
as 
Temporary buildings and uses ........................................................ 3B-2084 
Time when development begun (s56) ................................................ P56.02 
Timeliness of enforcement action ................................................... P171B.06 
Under enforcement ................................................................
correct 
....... P173.26 
Variations and corrections ............................................................. P176.04 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 181 of 203 

ANNEX 3: Forms of Oath 
 
See also the Social Inclusion and Diversity chapter. 
 
FORMS OF OATH 

 
 
Jew
 (Taken on the Old Testament) or Christian (Taken on both Testaments or  2019
the  
New Testament alone):  
 
"I swear by Almighty God that the evidence I shall give shall be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth”. 
 
November 
General Affirmation: 
 
"I do solemnly, sincerely and truly declare and affirm that the evide
26th nce I shall 
give shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth”. 
at: 
 
Scottish Form:  
as 
 
“I swear by Almighty God as I shall answer to God at the Great Day of Judgement, 
that I will speak the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. the truth”. 
 
correct 
Oath of a Hindu: (Taken on the GITA) 
 
Only 
"I swear by the Gita that the evidence I shall give shall be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth”. 
 
Oath of a Sikh: (Taken on the Sunder Gutka) 
 
"I swear by the Waheguru that the evid
updated.   ence I shall give shall be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth” 
 
(An alternative form of Sikh oath originally given in PINS Note 634 may be used 
- swear by the Guru Nanak that the evidence I shall give shall be the truth the 
whole truth and nothing but the truth.)  
 
freequently 
Oath of a Muslim/Follower of Islam:  (Taken on the Qur'an/Koran) 
is 
 
"I swear by Allah that the evidence I shall give shall be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth”. 
 
A Buddhist: 
A  Buddhist 
publication  should be invited to make the general form of solemn affirmation. 
 
Tibetan Buddhists wishing to take an oath should be invited to state the form of 
This  oath they regard as binding on the conscience. 
 
Oath for an Interpreter: 
 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 182 of 203 

"I  swear  by  Almighty  God  that  I  will  well  and  faithfully  interpret  and  true 
explanation make of all such matters and things as shall be required of me to the 
best of my skill and understanding”. 
 
 
 
NOTES 
 
If a witness has a glove on the right hand, he or she should be asked to remove  2019
it,  so  that  the  Book  is  held  in  the  ungloved  hand.   It  is  usual  to  say  to  the 
witness:- 
 
"Take the Book in your right hand and hold it up. 
 
Now say after me: "I ............ swear etc," 
November 
 
Christian men take the oath with their heads uncovered. 
 
26th 
Jews cover their heads to take the oath. 
at: 
 
"Kissing the Book" is unnecessary. 
as 
 
It is usual for the person administering the oath to stand whilst doing so. 
 
 
correct 
 
 
 

Only 
 
 
 
 
 

updated.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

freequently 
 
is 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

publication 
 
 

This   
 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 183 of 203 

ANNEX 4: Enforcement Related Sections of the LOCALISM ACT 
 
These sections do not involve procedures affecting the determination of appeals 
resulting  from  the  Act  (these  being  set  out  earlier  in  the  guide)  and  are  for 
information purposes. The sections to follow were commenced by SI 2012/628 

on 6 April 2012. 
 
s126  Assurance  as  regards  prosecution  for  person  served  with  enforcement 
notice 
 
2019
This section gives the authority a power to give assurances in writing about the risk of 
prosecution in respect of an enforcement notice served on a person. This section also 
sets out the authority’s obligations should they wish to subsequently withdraw the 
assurances.  Details are set out in a new s172A. 
 
Commentary:  
November 
This section was a later addition, the intention here being to give some protection for 
those that have unwittingly become involved in land, property or an ongoing use that 
has previously been subject to enforcement action but out of necessity have been 

26th 
served with a copy of the enforcement notice.  
 
at: 
 
s126 Planning offences: time limits and penalties 
as 
 
This section adds various sections/sub-sections to the 1990 Act (all of which specify 
different rules for England and Wales) - s187A(12)(a) and (b) to s187(12); ss(4A) to 
(4E) to s 210 and ss(7) to (11) to s224.  
correct 
 
S187A(12)(a) provides a revised maximum penalty limits for failure to comply with a 
breach of condition notice; (b) leaves Wales as it is now.  
Only 
 
Additions to s210 and s224 state that it will be possible to bring prosecutions for the 
lopping or damaging of protected trees (s210) or displaying an illegal advertisement 
(s224) in the magistrates, court within 6 months of sufficient evidence being compiled 
to bring a prosecution, instead of within 6 months of commission of the offence.  There 
is a long-stop of 3 years from the commissi
updated.  on of the offence for bringing prosecutions 
in both cases and in relation to advertisements it only applies to offences committed 
after the amendment to the section has come into force. 
 
Commentary: 
This section is largely self explanatory in terms of changes to both the monetary fines 
involved and time limits. 
freequently 
 
is 
 
s127 Powers in relation to unauthorised advertisements and the defacement of 
premises 
 
This section adds ss225A to 225K to the 1990 Act giving wide ranging powers to LPAs to 
remove structures which, in the LPAs’ opinion, are being used for the display of illegal 
advertisements.    Sections  225F  onward  deal  with  defacement  of  premises  and  some 
publication 
sections deal with particular structures such as post boxes, bus shelters and other street 
furniture.  There are sections dealing with the powers in relation to operational land of 
This  statutory undertakers.  All appeals are to magistrates courts. 
 
 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 184 of 203 

ANNEX 5: Checklists for Enforcement Decisions 
 
1) The Enforcement Notice 
 

Part of the EN  Legislative 
Questions 
(PPG model) 
source 
Header 
 
 Does the EN include a header specifying the 
type of EN – and is that right? 
Paragraph 1  
 
 Is the reference to s171A(1)(a) or (b) 
2019
right? 
Paragraph 2 
S173(10)  
 Does the EN properly identify the 
(and plan) 
ENAR 4(c) 
boundaries of the land? Is the written 
 
address consistent with the plan? 
Paragraph 3 – 
S173(1)(b) 
 Does the EN properly set out the matters 
the alleged 
 
said to constitute the alleged breach? 
November 
breach of 
 Is it clear whether the breach relates to ops, 
planning control 
a MCU or breach of condition?  
 Is the EN specific about what has taken 
26th 
place and where?  
 Is the allegation correct?  
at: 
 Has there been a breach?  
as 
 Is the allegation confused with the RFEN? 
 Does the allegation satisfy s173(1) & (2)?  
 Can any errors in the allegation be corrected 
without causing injustice? 
correct 
Paragraph 3 or 
 
 Does the EN set out the s171B immunity 

period? 
 If not, does that matter in the context of the 
Only 
appeal?  
Paragraph 4 
s173(10)  
 Does the EN include reasons for issue? 
ENAR 4(a) 
 Do the reasons refer to policies and 
ENAR 4(b) 
proposals in the development plan? 
Paragraph 5 – 
S173(3) 
 Does the EN properly set out the steps 
the steps or 
S173(4) 
to b
updated.   e taken/activities to cease?  
requirements 
S173(5) 
 Is the purpose of the EN to remedy the 
breach and/or injury?  
 Are the steps sufficiently precise to comply 
with s173(3)? 
 Are the steps clear and reasonable? Do they 
accord with s174(4) and (5)? 
freequently 
 Is there a risk of s173(11)? Is the use 
is 
required to cease? 
 If the allegation is a breach of condition, 
would the steps lead to compliance? 
 If the allegation is development which does 
not accord with a PP, would the steps ensure 
compliance with the PP and its terms and 
publication 
conditions? 
 Is any such PP extant and capable of 
implementation in accordance with its terms 
This 
and conditions? 
 Can any errors in the requirements be 
corrected without causing injustice?  
Paragraph 6 
S173(9) 
 Does the EN specify a period for 
compliance? 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 185 of 203 

Paragraph 7 
S173(8) 
 Does the EN specify when it will take effect?  
 Is this at least 28 days after the date of 
issue? 
 
 
 Does the EN specify the date of issue? 
 
 
 Is the EN signed? 
Annex 
s173(10)  
 Is an explanatory note attached? 
ENAR 5 
 
 
 
 Is any plan/photo/drawing/informative 
cited in the EN attached? 
 
2019
 
2) The Grounds of Appeal 
 

Ground  Type 
Provision of s174(2) 
(e)  
Legal 
that copies of the EN were not served as required by s172 
November 
(b) 
Legal 
that those matters [stated in the EN] have not occurred 
26th 
(c) 
Legal 
that those matters (if they occurred) do not constitute a 
breach of planning control 
at: 
(d) 
Legal 
that, at the date when the EN was issued, no enforcement 
as 
action could be taken in respect of any breach of planning 
control which may be constituted by those matters 
(a) 
Planning 
that, in respect of any breach of planning control which may 
merits 
be constituted by the matters stat
correct  ed in the notice, planning 
permission ought to be granted or, as the case maybe, the 
condition or limitation concerned ought to be discharged 
Only 
(f) 
Mitigation   that the steps required by the notice to be taken, or the 
activities required by the notice to cease, exceed what is 
necessary to remedy any breach of planning control which 
may be constituted by those matters or, as the case may 
be, to remedy any injury to amenity which has been caused 
updated.  
by any such breach 
(g) 
Mitigation 
that any period specified in the notice in accordance with 
section 173(9) falls short of what should reasonably be 
allowed 
 
 
freequently 
 
is 
 
 
 
 
 
 
publication 
 
 
This     
 
 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 186 of 203 

ANNEX 6: “Mr & Mrs” Enforcement Appeals 
 
S172(2) requires that enforcement notices are served on the owner and occupier of 
the land, and all those having an interest in the land which is materially affected by 
the notice.  Under s174(1), a person having an interest in the land may appeal 
against the notice, whether or not a copy has been served on them. 
 
Thus, two or more appeals are often made against the notice, and these will often 
be on the same grounds. Where ground (a) is pleaded, it is only necessary to pay 
one fee in order for the DPA and ground (a) to be considered. However, it is still 
2019
sensible and necessary to link such appeals. 
 
Where separate appeals are made on ground (a) against an enforcement notice, 
and a linked s78 appeal is proceeding in the names of both appellants, such that 
the development is fee-exempt, then there will be two DPAs although planning 
permission will be granted once as set out below. 
November 
 
However, where there are ‘Mr & Mrs’ appeals and one (at least) seems to be fee-
26th 
exempt, care should be taken to ensure not only that the planning application was 
for the development being enforced against but also that the appellant(s) 
at: 
benefitting from the exemption is/are the applicant(s) who made the application. 
 
as 
Header 
 
The grounds of appeal would be recorded in the header as per this example: 
 
correct 
•  Appeal A is proceeding on the grounds set out in section 174(2)(a), (c) and (g) of 
the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 as amended. Since an appeal has been 
brought on ground (a), an application for plann
Only ing permission is deemed to have 
been made under section 177(5) of the Act. 
•  Appeal B is proceeding on the grounds set out in s174(2)(c) and (g) of the 1990 
Act. 
 
Where both appeals are fee exempt: 
updated.  
 
 
 
•  Appeals A and B are proceeding on the grounds set out in section 174(2)(a) and (f) 
of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 as amended. Since an appeal has been 
brought on ground (a), an application for planning permission is deemed to have 
been made under section 177(5) of the Act. 
 
Conclusion freequently 
 
is 
Where the grounds of appeal are identical with the exception of (a), and there is 
success on (a), it would follow that Appeal A alone will succeed – but the notice 
subject to both appeals will be quashed.   
 
After considering Appeal A on ground (a), the following conclusion would therefore 
be made: Appeal A succeeds on ground (a) and the deemed planning application is 
publication 
approved. The enforcement notice will be quashed, and it follows that Appeals A 
and B on grounds (f) and (g) do not fall to be considered.  
 
This  Formal Decisions 
 
Legal Grounds: 
If legal grounds pleaded for Appeals A and B fail, but Appeal A 
alone succeeds on ground (a), the decision in respect of Appeal B will be to dismiss 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 187 of 203 

the appeal but not uphold the notice. This gives the second appellant a 
determination on legal grounds that they can challenge by way of s289. 
 
No Legal Grounds: Where Appeal A succeeds on ground (a), and Appeal B was 
only pleaded on grounds (f) and/or (g), the decision on Appeal B would be: I take 
no further action in respect of Appeal B. This ensures that, in the event of a 
successful challenge to Appeal A, Appeal B may also be re-determined. 
 
Success on Ground (a) where “Mr & Mrs” are fee-exempt: the decision will 
be. …the appeals are allowed, the enforcement notice is quashed and planning 
2019
permission is granted on the applications deemed to have been made under 
s177(5) of the 1990 Act as amended for the development already carried out, 
namely… 
 
 
 
November 
 
 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 188 of 203 

2019
ANNEX 7: Enforcement Appeals – Beginnings  
 
NB. – text highlight in yellow differs from DRDS v9.1 
 
November 
Appeal type 
Authority 
Appellant 
Detail 
PLG enf – 
The appeal is made under 
The appeal is made by 
The notice was issued on [] 
MCU/ops 
section 174 of the Town and 
[name 1] against an 
 
26th 
*single 
Country Planning Act 1990 as  enforcement notice 
The breach of planning control as alleged in the notice 
appeal 
amended. 
issued by [authority
is: [] 
at: 
 
 
 
 
as 
 
 
 
The requirements of the notice are [to]: [] 
 
The period[s] for compliance with the requirement[s] 
is [are]: 
  correct 
AND – there is no ground (a) 
The appeal is proceeding on the ground[s] set out in 
sec
Only  tion 174(2)[] of the Town and Country Planning Act 
1990 as amended.  
 
OR – ground (a) is brought and the fees is paid 
or the development is fee-exempt 
The appeal is proceeding on the ground[s] set out in 
updated.   section 174(2)[] of the Town and Country Planning Act 
1990 as amended. Since an appeal has been brought 
on ground (a), an application for planning permission 
is deemed to have been made under section 177(5) of 
the Act. 
 
OR – ground (a) is brought but no fee is paid 
freequently 
The appeal is proceeding on the ground[s] set out in 
is 
section 174(2)[] of the Town and Country Planning Act 
1990 as amended. Since the prescribed fees have not 
been paid within the specified period, the appeal on 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 189 of 203 
This 

2019
Appeal type 
Authority 
Appellant 
Detail 
ground (a) and the application for planning permission 
deemed to have been made under section 177(5) of 
the Act have lapsed. 
PLG enf – 
The appeals are made under 
The appeals are made by  As above except: 
November 
MCU/ops 
section 174 of Town and 
[name 1] (Appeal A) and   
*two+ 
Country Planning Act as 
[name 2] (Appeal B) 
No ground (a) 
appeals 
amended 
against an enforcement 
Appeals A and B are proceeding on the ground[s] set 
26th 
 
notice issued by 
out in section 174(2)[] of the Town and Country 
[authority]  
Planning Act 1990 as amended.  
at: 
 
OR – ‘Mr & Mrs’
as  appeals, with Appeal A only on 
ground (a)  
Appeal A is proceeding on the ground[s] set out in 
section 174(2)[] of the Town and Country Planning Act 
1990 as amended. Since… 
correct 
Appeal B is proceeding on the ground[s] set out in 
section 174(2)[] of the Act. 
 
Only OR – ‘Mr & Mrs’ appeals, with both proceeding on 
ground (a) since both are fee-exempt 
Appeals A and B are proceeding on the ground[s] set 
out in section 174(2)[] of the Town and Country 
Planning Act 1990 as amended. Since… 
updated.  
PLG enf – 
The appeal is made under 
The appeal is made by 
The notice was issued on [] 
breach of 
section 174 of the Town and 
[name 1] against an 
 
condition 
Country Planning Act 1990 as  enforcement notice 
The breach of planning control as alleged in the notice 
 
amended. 
issued by [authority
is failure to comply with condition[s] imposed on a 
 
 
planning permission ref [] granted on [] 
 
 
The development to which the permission relates is: [] 
freequently 
 
is 
The condition[s] in question [is/are] no[s] which 
state[s] that: 
 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 190 of 203 
This 

2019
Appeal type 
Authority 
Appellant 
Detail 
The notice alleges that the condition[s] [has/have] not 
been complied with in that: [] 
 
The requirements of the notice are [to]: [] 
November 
 
The period[s] for compliance with the requirement[s] 
is [are]: 
26th 
 
AND 
at: 
As above for grounds of appeal 
 
as 
 
 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 191 of 203 
This 

2019
ANNEX 8: Enforcement Appeals – Endings  
 
Appeal type 
Conclusion 
Decision 
Summary Decision 
PLG enf – notice  I conclude that the notice is a nullity.  Since the notice is found to be a 
No further action is taken. 
a nullity 
In these circumstances, the 
nullity, no further action will be taken 
November 
appeal[s] on the ground[s] set out in  in connection with the appeal[s]. In 
section 174(2)[] of the 1990 Act as 
the light of this finding the Local 
amended [and the application for 
Planning Authority should consider 
26th 
planning permission deemed to have  reviewing the register kept under 
been made under section 177(5) of 
section 188 of the 1990 Act as 
at: 
the 1990 Act as amended [does] 
amended. 
as 
[do] not fall to be considered. 
PLG enf – notice  For the reasons given above, I 
The enforcement notice is quashed. 
The enforcement notice is 
not correctable 
conclude that the enforcement notice 
quashed. 
does not specify with sufficient clarity 
correct 
[the alleged breach of planning 
control] [the steps required for 
compliance] [the period for 
compliance] [the land where the 
Only 
breach of planning control is alleged 
to have taken place].  
 
It is not open to me to correct the 
error in accordance with my powers 
updated.  
under section 176(1)(a) of the 1990 
Act as amended, since injustice 
would be caused were I to do so. The 
enforcement notice is invalid and will 
be quashed.  
 
In these circumstances, the 
freequently 
appeal[s] on the ground[s] set out in 
is 
section 174(2)[] of the 1990 Act as 
amended [and the application for 
planning permission deemed to have 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 192 of 203 
This 

2019
Appeal type 
Conclusion 
Decision 
Summary Decision 
been made under section 177(5) of 
the 1990 Act as amended [does] 
[do] not fall to be considered. 
PLG enf –
For the reasons given above, I 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] allowed and 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] allowed 
November 
discharge 
conclude that the condition the 
the enforcement notice is quashed. 
and the enforcement notice is 
invalid condition  subject of the notice is invalid. It 
quashed. 
follows that no breach of planning 
26th 
control can arise from any failure to 
comply with it. The matters alleged 
at: 
in the enforcement notice do not 
constitute a breach of planning 
as 
control [and the [hidden] appeal 
made on ground (c) succeeds]. 
 
Since a condition which is invalid is 
correct 
not a condition, I cannot exercise the 
powers contained in section 
177(1)(b) of the 1990 Act as 
Only 
amended to discharge the condition.  
 
In these circumstances, the 
appeal[s] on the ground[s] set out in 
section 174(2)[] of the 1990 Act as 
updated.  
amended [and the application for 
planning permission deemed to have 
been made under section 177(5) of 
the 1990 Act as amended [does] 
[do] not fall to be considered. 
PLG enf – 
I conclude that [appellant[s]] [and] 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] allowed and 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] allowed 
defective 
[other][s] [has] [have] been 
the enforcement notice is quashed 
and the enforcement notice is 
freequently 
service  
substantially prejudiced by the non-
quashed. 
is 
service of the enforcement notice 
and this is not a case when I can 
exercise the power to disregard that 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 193 of 203 
This 

2019
Appeal type 
Conclusion 
Decision 
Summary Decision 
non-service in accordance with 
section 176(5) of the 1990 Act as 
amended. The appeal on ground (e) 
succeeds and the enforcement notice 
November 
will be quashed.  
 
In these circumstances, the 
26th 
appeal[s] on the ground[s] set out in 
section 174(2)[] to the 1990 Act as 
at: 
amended [and the application for 
planning permission deemed to have 
as 
been made under section 177(5) of 
the 1990 Act as amended [does] 
[do] not fall to be considered. 
PLG enf – 
For the reasons given above, I 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] dismissed and  The appeal[s] [is] [are] dismissed 
correct 
dismiss  
conclude that the appeal[s] should 
the enforcement notice is upheld. 
and the enforcement notice is 
*no ground (a) 
not succeed. I shall uphold the 
upheld. 
*no corrections 
enforcement notice.  
Only 
or variations 
PLG enf – 
For the reasons given above, I 
It is directed that the enforcement 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] dismissed 
dismiss  
conclude that the appeal[s] should 
notice is [corrected] [and] [varied] 
and the enforcement notice is 
*no ground (a) 
not succeed. I shall uphold the 
by:  
upheld with [a] [correction][s] 
*corrections 
enforcement notice [with [a] 
 
[and] [variation][s] in the terms 
updated.  
&/or variations 
[correction][s] [and] [variation][s]].   the deletion of the words "edged red" 
set out below in the Formal 
 
and the substitution of the words 
Decision. 
 
"edged [and hatched] black" in []  
 
the deletion of the words "[]" [and the 

substitution of the words "[]"] in [] 
 

freequently the deletion of [] and the substitution 
is 
of [] as the time for compliance 
 

publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 194 of 203 
This 

2019
Appeal type 
Conclusion 
Decision 
Summary Decision 
the substitution of the plan annexed to 
this decision for the plan attached to 
the enforcement notice 

 
November 
Subject to the [correction][s] [and] 
[variation][s], the appeal[s] [is] [are] 
dismissed and the enforcement notice  26th 
is upheld. 
PLG enf – 
For the reasons given above, I 
[It is directed that the enforcement 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] dismissed 
at: 
dismiss & PP 
conclude that the appeal[s] should 
notice is [corrected] [and] [varied] by  and the enforcement notice is 
refused 
not succeed. I shall uphold the 
[]] 
as  upheld [with [a] [correction][s] 
 
enforcement notice [with [a] 
 
[and] [variation][s]] in the terms 
[correction][s] [and] [variation][s]] 
[Subject to the [correction][s] [and] 
set out below in the Formal 
and refuse to grant planning 
[variation][s],] the appeal[s] [is] 
Decision. 
permission on the application 
[are] dismissed, the enforcement 
correct 
deemed to have been made under 
notice is upheld and planning 
section 177(5) of the 1990 Act as 
permission is refused on the 
amended  
application deemed to have been 
Only 
made under section 177(5) of the 
1990 Act as amended. 
PLG enf – 
For the reasons given above, I 
It is directed that the enforcement 
The appeal[s] succeed[s] in part 
dismiss: (f) 
conclude that [the requirements of 
notice is varied by:  
and the enforcement notice is 
and/or (g) only 
the notice are excessive to remedy 
 
upheld with [a] variation[s] in the 
updated.  
[the breach of planning control] [the  by the deletion of [] and the 
terms set out below in the Formal 
injury to amenity]] [and] [the period  substitution of [] in [] 
Decision. 
for compliance with the notice falls 
 
short of what is reasonable]. I shall 
by the deletion of [] and the 
vary the enforcement notice prior to 
substitution of [] as the period for 
upholding it. The appeal[s] on 
compliance.  
ground[s] [(f)] [and] [(g)] 
 
freequently 
succeed[s] to that extent. 
Subject to the variations, the 
is 
enforcement notice is upheld. 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 195 of 203 
This 

2019
Appeal type 
Conclusion 
Decision 
Summary Decision 
PLG enf – allow 
For the reasons given above, I 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] allowed and 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] allowed 
on legal 
conclude that the appeal[s] should 
the enforcement notice is quashed. 
and the enforcement notice is 
grounds 
succeed on ground [(b)] [(c)] [(d)]. 
 
quashed. 
*no corrections 
The enforcement notice will be 
November 
quashed.  
 
In these circumstances, the 
26th 
appeal[s] on ground[s] [] [and the 
application for planning permission 
at: 
deemed to have been made under 
section 177(5) of the 1990 Act] 
as 
[does] [do] not fall to be considered. 
PLG enf – allow 
From the evidence before me, I 
[It is directed that the enforcement 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] allowed 
on legal 
conclude that the [alleged breach of 
notice is corrected by: []] 
following correction of the 
grounds 
planning control set out in the 
 
enforcement notice in the terms set 
correct 
*with 
enforcement notice] [and] [the plan 
Subject to the correction[s], the 
out below in the Formal Decision. 
corrections 
attached to the notice] [is] [are] 
appeal[s] [is] [are] allowed and the 
incorrect. [The appeal[s] succeed[s] 
enforcement notice is quashed. 
Only 
on ground (b) [to that extent].]  
 
 
[On the balance of probabilities, the 
appeal[s] on ground [(c)] [(d)] 
should succeed in respect of those 
updated.  
matters which, following the 
correction of the notice, are stated 
as constituting the breach of 
planning control.] 
 
The enforcement notice will be 
corrected and quashed. In these 
freequently 
circumstances, the appeal[s] on 
is 
grounds [] [and the application for 
planning permission deemed to have 
been made under section 177(5) of 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 196 of 203 
This 

2019
Appeal type 
Conclusion 
Decision 
Summary Decision 
the 1990 Act as amended] [does] 
[do] not need to be considered. 
PLG enf – allow 
I conclude on the balance of 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] allowed and 
The appeal[s] [is] [are] allowed, 
on legal grounds  probabilities that the [alleged] 
the enforcement notice is quashed. 
the enforcement notice is quashed, 
November 
and find lawful 
[operation][s]] [material change of 
 
and a certificate of lawful use or 
use or 
use] [failure to comply with [a] 
Attached to this decision is a 
development is issued in the terms 
development 
condition[s] or limitation[s]] [does] 
certificate of lawful use or 
set out below in the Formal 
26th 
[do] not represent a breach of 
development, issued in accordance 
Decision. 
planning control [by reason of a 
with the powers under section 
at: 
grant of planning permission]. 
177(1)(c) of the 1990 Act as 
 
amended, in respect of the 
as 
OR 
[operation][s]] [use] [failure to 
I conclude on the balance of 
comply with [a] condition[s] or 
probabilities that the [alleged] 
limitation[s]] which [is] [are] [subject 
[operations] [material change of use]  to a grant of planning permission] 
correct 
[failure to comply with [a] 
[immune from enforcement action] at 
condition[s] or limitation[s]] took 
[land] together with a plan and a note 
place more than [4] [10] years prior 
as to the effect and extent of the 
Only 
to the issue of the enforcement 
certificate. 
notice and so, at the date that the 
enforcement notice was issued, the 
time for taking enforcement action as 
set out in section [171B(1)] 
updated.  
[171B(2)] [171B(3)] of the 1990 Act 
as amended had expired.  
 
The appeal[s] succeed[s] on ground 
[(c)] [(d)]. I further conclude that in 
the exceptional circumstances of this 
case, it is appropriate to exercise the 
freequently 
power available to me under section 
is 
177(1)(c) of the 1990 Act as 
amended to issue a certificate of 
lawful use or development under 
section 191 of the 1990 Act as 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 197 of 203 
This 

2019
Appeal type 
Conclusion 
Decision 
Summary Decision 
substituted by section 10 and 
paragraph 24(1)(b) of Schedule 7 of 
the Planning and Compensation Act 
1991 in relation to the existing [use] 
November 
[operation] [failure to comply with 
condition or limitation] which is found 
to be lawful]. 
26th 
PLG enf – grant  For the reasons given above, I 
[It is directed that the enforcement 
[The appeal] [the appeals] [Appeal 
pp for ops 
conclude that [the appeal] [the 
notice is [corrected] by []] 
A] [is] [are] allowed, the 
at: 
appeals] [Appeal A] succeed[s] on 
 
enforcement notice is quashed, and 
ground (a). I shall grant planning 
[Subject to the [correction][s],] [the 
as  planning permission is granted in 
permission for [the development] as  appeal] [the appeals] [Appeal A] [is] 
the terms set out below in the 
described in the notice [as 
[are] allowed, the enforcement notice  Formal Decision. 
corrected].  
is quashed and planning permission is 
 
granted on the application[s] deemed 
correct 
[The appeal[s] on ground[s] (f) 
to have been made under section 
[and/or] (g) [do] [does] not 
177(5) of the 1990 Act as amended 
therefore fall to be considered.] 
for the development already carried 
Only 
out, namely the [alleged operational 
development] at [land] as shown on 
the plan attached to the notice [and 
subject to the following condition[s]: 
[]]. 
updated.  
PLG enf – grant  For the reasons given above, I 
[It is directed that the enforcement 
[The appeal] [the appeals] [Appeal 
PP for MCU 
conclude that the appeal] [the 
notice is [corrected] by: []] 
A] [is] [are] allowed, the 
appeals] [Appeal A] succeed[s] on 
 
enforcement notice is quashed, and 
ground (a). I shall grant planning 
[Subject to the [correction][s],] [the 
planning permission is granted in 
permission for [the use] as described  appeal] [the appeals] [Appeal A] [is] 
the terms set out below in the 
in the notice [as corrected].  
[are] allowed, the enforcement notice  Formal Decision. 
 
is quashed and planning permission is 
freequently 
[The appeal[s] on ground[s] (f) 
granted on the application[s] deemed 
is 
[and] (g) [do] [does] not fall to be 
to have been made under section 
considered.] 
177(5) of the 1990 Act as amended 
for the development already carried 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 198 of 203 
This 

2019
Appeal type 
Conclusion 
Decision 
Summary Decision 
out, namely [the alleged use] at 
[land] as shown on the plan attached 
to the notice [and subject to the 
following condition[s]: []]. 
November 
PLG enf – grant  For the reasons given above, I 
[The appeal] [the appeals] [Appeal A]  [The appeal] [the appeals] [Appeal 
pp for breach of  conclude that [the appeal] [the 
[is] [are] allowed and the enforcement  A] [is] [are] quashed, and planning 
condition 
appeals] [Appeal A] should succeed 
notice is quashed. In accordance with 
permission is granted in the terms 
26th 
on ground (a) and the enforcement 
section 177(1)(b) and section 177(4) 
set out below in the Formal 
notice should be quashed.  
of the 1990 Act as amended, the 
Decision. 
at: 
 
condition[s] no[s] [] attached to the 
I shall discharge the condition[s] 
planning permission dated [], ref [] a
as  re 
which are subject to the notice, and 
discharged and the following new 
grant planning permission on the 
condition[s] [] are substituted.  
application[s] deemed to have been 
 
made for the [operations] [change of  Planning permission is granted on the 
correct 
use] previously permitted without 
application[s] deemed to have been 
complying with the condition[s] 
made under section 177(5) of the 
enforced against [but subject to [a] 
1990 Act as amended for [describe the 
Only 
new condition[s] as described above].   operations or use set out in the 
 
original permission or, in the case of a 
[The appeal[s] on ground[s] (f) 
permission involving multiple 
[and] (g) [do] [does] not fall to be 
development, the particular part of the 
considered.] 
development the subject of the notice] 
updated.  
without complying with the said 
condition[s] [but subject to the other 
conditions attached to that permission] 
[and the following new condition[s]:  
 
*identical conditions 
PLG enf – split 
For the reasons given above I 
[It is directed that the enforcement 
[The appeal] [the appeals] [Appeal 
freequently 
decision on 
conclude that [the appeal] [the 
notice is [corrected] [and] [varied] by:   A] succeed[s] in part and 
is 
ground (a) 
appeals] [Appeal A]  should succeed 
 
permission for that part is granted, 
in part only, and I will grant planning 
but otherwise the appeal[s] fail[s], 
permission for [specified part of the 
and the enforcement notice is 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 199 of 203 
This 

2019
Appeal type 
Conclusion 
Decision 
Summary Decision 
matters] [and] [specified part of the 
*do not delete any requirements 
upheld as [corrected] [and] [varied] 
land], but otherwise I will uphold the  relating to the development to be 
in the terms set out below in the 
notice [with] [a] correction][s] [and]  granted permission 
Formal Decision. 
[variation][s] and refuse to grant 
 
November 
planning permission in respect of the  [Subject to the [correction][s] [and] 
other [part of the matters] [and] 
[variation][s], [the appeal] [the 
[part of the land]. The requirements 
appeals] [Appeal A] [is] [are] allowed  26th 
of the notice will cease to have effect  insofar as [it] [they] relate[s] to [land 
so far as inconsistent with the 
hatched or edged black on the plan at: 
planning permission which I will 
where permission is granted] [and]  
grant by virtue of s180 of the Act. 
[the specified part of the developme
as nt 
being permitted] and planning 
permission is granted on the 
application[s] deemed to have been 
made under section 177(5) of the 
correct 
1990 Act as amended, for [specify the 
[part of] the alleged development to 
be granted permission] at [specify the 
Only 
[part of] the land subject to the 
permission] [and subject to the 
following conditions:[]. 
 
[The appeal] [the appeals] [Appeal A] 
[is] [are] dism
updated.  issed and the 
enforcement notice is upheld as 
[corrected] [and] [varied] insofar as it 
relates to [land hatched or edged 
black on the plan where permission is 
refused] [and] [the specified part of 
the development being refused]  and 
freequently planning permission is refused in 
is 
respect of [specify the [part of] the 
alleged development to be refused] at 
[specify [the part] of the land subject 
to the refusal] on the application[s] 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 200 of 203 
This 

2019
Appeal type 
Conclusion 
Decision 
Summary Decision 
deemed to have been made under 
section 177(5) of the 1990 Act as 
amended. 
 
November 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 201 of 203 
This 

2019
ANNEX 9: LDC Appeals – Beginnings  
 
Appeal 
Authority 
Appellant(s) 
Detail 
LDC appln - 
made under section 195 of 
The appeal is made by 
The application ref [], dated [], was refused by notice 
refusal 
the Town and Country 
[name 1] against the 
dated []. 
November 
Planning Act 1990 as 
decision of [authority
 
amended against a refusal to 
 
The application was made under section [191(1)(a)] 
grant a certificate of lawful 
OR 
[191(1)(b)] [191(1)(c)] [192(1)(a)] [192(1)(b)] of the 
26th 
use or development (LDC). 
The appeal is made by 
Town and Country Planning Act as amended. 
[names 1 and 2] against 
 
at: 
the decision of 
The [use] [development] [failure to comply with any 
as 
[authority
condition or limitation] for which a certificate of lawful 
 
use or development is sought is: [] 
LDC appln – 
The appeal is made under 
As above 
The application ref [], dated [], was refused in part by 
refusal in part  section 195 of the Town and 
 
notice dated []. 
Country Planning Act 1990 as 
  correct 
amended against a refusal in 
The application was made under section [191(1)(a)] 
part to grant a certificate of 
[191(1)(b)] [191(1)(c)] [192(1)(a)] [192(1)(b)] of the 
lawful use or development 
Tow
Only  n and Country Planning Act as amended. 
(LDC). 
 
The [use] [development] [failure to comply with any 
condition or limitation] for which a certificate of lawful 
use or development is sought is: [] 
LDC appln – 
The appeal is made under 
The appeal is made by 
The application ref [] is dated []. 
updated.  
failure 
section 195 of the Town and 
[name 1] against 
 
Country Planning Act 1990 as  [authority
The application was made under section [191(1)(a)] 
amended against a failure to 
 
[191(1)(b)] [191(1)(c)] [192(1)(a)] [192(1)(b)] of the 
give notice within the 
OR 
Town and Country Planning Act as amended. 
prescribed period of a 
The appeal is made by 
 
decision on an application for 
[names 1 and 2] against 
The [use] [development] [failure to comply with any 
a certificate of lawful use or 
[authority
condition or limitation] for which a certificate of lawful 
freequently 
development (LDC). 
 
use or development is sought is: [] 
is 
 
 
 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 202 of 203 
This 

2019
ANNEX 10: LDC Appeals – Endings  
 
Appeal type 
Conclusion 
Decision 
Summary Decision 
LDC - dismiss  For the reasons given above I 
The appeal is dismissed. 
The appeal is dismissed. 
conclude that the Council’s [refusal] 
November 
[refusal in part] [deemed refusal] to 
grant a certificate of lawful use or 
development in respect of [ ] was 
26th 
well-founded and that the appeal 
should fail. I will exercise accordingly 
at: 
the powers transferred to me in 
section 195(3) of the 1990 Act as 
as 
amended. 
LDC – allow 
For the reasons given above I 
The appeal is allowed and attached 
The appeal is allowed and a 
conclude, on the evidence now 
to this decision is a certificate of 
certificate of lawful use or 
available, that the Council’s [refusal] 
lawful use or development describing  development is issued, in the terms 
correct 
[refusal in part] [deemed refusal] to 
the [extent of the] [existing use] 
set out below in the Formal Decision. 
grant a certificate of lawful use or 
[existing operation] [matter 
development in respect of [ ] was not  constituting a failure to comply with 
Only 
well-founded and that the appeal 
a condition or limitation] [proposed 
should succeed. I will exercise the 
use] [proposed operation] which is 
powers transferred to me under 
found to be lawful. 
section 195(2) of the 1990 Act as 
amended. 
 
updated.  
 
 
 
freequently 
is 
publication 
Version 9 
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement 
Page 203 of 203 
This 


 
ENFORCEMENT CASE LAW 
 
 
What’s New since the Last Version  
March 2019: New judgments and/or commentary in relation to:  

2019
 
Buildings and Operational Development 
•  Conditions (and Breach of) 
•  Dwellinghouse 
•  Existing uses & fallback position 
•  Fixtures & Chattels  
November 
•  GPDO 
•  Intensification 
26th 
•  MCU – Residential use 
at: 
•  Notices – Nullities 
as 
•  Planning unit 
•  Precedent 
•  Procedural fairness 
correct 
•  Re-determinations 
•  Requirements – General, Savings for Lawful Use  
Only 
Hyperlinks revised throughout – links to J Notes deleted where library records 
include transcripts and summaries 
 
 
updated.  
 
 
WARNING 

 
These summaries of important judgments should be used with caution. They do 
not purport to provide more than a brief outline of the key points as a quick 

freequently 
reference. Moreover, this ITM chapter does not provide a conclusive or 
exhaustive list 

is  of all cases. The facts of individual cases vary and if reliance is 
to be placed on a judgment in a decision it would be wise to obtain the 
judgment transcript or at least read a more complete summary first. 
 
Care should be exercised in relying on older judgments since there may be 
more recent case law, and/or the legislation may have changed subsequently.  
 

publication 
It is important to remember that a court is bound by the decisions of a court 
above it and therefore a Supreme Court (previously House of Lords) decision on 
a given issue has more status than a High Court or Court of Appeal decision on 

This  the same point. 
 
If judgments are to be cited in decisions it is important that they do not come 

as a surprise to the parties. 
 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 1 

link to page 71 link to page 82 link to page 83 link to page 85 link to page 86 CONTENTS 
Note:
 left click to go to a Chapter from the page number 
 
INDEX OF JUDGMENTS 
16 
ADVICE ON CITATIONS 
27 
 
 
ABANDONMENT AND EXTINGUISHMENT 
28 
Hartley v MHLG [1970] 2 WLR 1 
 
Petticoat Lane Rentals v SSE [1971] All ER 310 
Iddenden v SSE [1972] 1 WLR 1433 
2019
Nicholls & Nicholls v SSE & Bristol CC [1981] JPL 890 
Young v SSE & Bexley LBC [1983] JPL 465 
Pioneer Aggregates (UK) Ltd v SSE [1984] 2 All ER 358 
Trustees of Castell-y-Mynach Estate v SSW [1985] JPL 40 
White v SSE & Congleton BC [1989] JPL 692 
Hughes v SSETR & South Holland DC [2000] JPL 826 
November 
Fairstate Ltd v FSS & Westminster CC [2005] EWCA Civ 283; JPL 1333  
M & M (Land) Ltd v SSCLG [2007] All ER(D) 55  
Stockton on Tees BC v SSCLG & Ward [2010] EWHC 1766 (Admin) 
26th 
Bramall v SSCLG & Rother DC [2011] EWHC 1531 (Admin) 
 
 
at: 
AGRICULTURAL OCCUPANCY CONDITIONS  
30 
Fawcett Properties Ltd v Buckinghamshire CC [1960] All ER 503; [1
as  961] AC 636   
Kember v SSE & Tunbridge Wells DC [1982] JPL 383 
Newbury DC v SSE & Marsh [1994] JPL 134 
Sevenoaks DC v SSE & Geer [1995] JPL 126  
Banister v SSE & Fordham [1995] JPL 1011 
correct 
North Devon DC v SSE & Rottenbury [1998] EGCS 72  
Shortt & Shortt v SSCLG & Tewkesbury BC [2015] EWCA Civ 1192 
 
 
Only 
BUILDINGS AND OPERATIONAL DEVELOPMENT   
31 
Cardiff Rating Authority v Guest Keens [1949] 1 KB 385 
 
Re St Peter the Great, Chichester [1961] 2 All ER 513 
Chester CC v Woodward [1962] 2 WLR 636, 2 QB 126 
James v MHLG & Brecon CC [1963] 15 P&CR 20 
Street v MHLG & Essex CC [1965] 193 EG 537
updated.    
Barvis v SSE [1971] 22 P&CR 710 
Thomas David (Porthcawl) Ltd & the Trustees of Merthyr Mawr Estates v SSW & 
Penybont RDC & Glamorgan CC [1971] 3 All ER 1092 
Ewen Developments Ltd v SSE [1980] JPL 404 
Scott v SSE & Bracknell DC [1983] JPL 108 
Howes v SSE & Devon CC [1984] JPL 439 
freequently 
Cambridge CC v SSE & Milton Park Investment [1991] 1 PLR 109  
R v Swansea CC
is   ex parte Elitestone [1993] JPL 1019 
Shimizu v Westminster CC [1996] JPL 112  
Burroughs Day v Bristol CC [1996] 1 PLR 78; 1 EGLR 167 
Skerritts of Nottingham Ltd v SSETR & Harrow LBC (No. 2) [2000] EWCA Civ 
5569, JPL 1025 
Sage v SSETR & Maidstone BC [2003] UKHL 22  
R (oao Beronstone Ltd) v FSS [2006] EWHC 2391; [2007] JPL 471 
publication 
R (oao Hall Hunter Partnership) v FSS & Waverley BC [2007] JPL 1023 
Hancock v SSCLG & Windsor and Maidenhead RBC [2012] EWHC 3704 (Admin) 
R (oao Save Woolley Valley Action Group Ltd) v Bath and North East Somerset 
This  Council [2012] EWHC 2161 (Admin) 
Barton v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2017] EWHC 573 
(Admin) 
Dill v SSCLG & Stratford-on-Avon DC [2017] EWHC 2378 (Admin); [2018] 
EWCA Civ 2619 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 2 

link to page 89 link to page 91 link to page 93 link to page 94 link to page 95 Oates v SSCLG v Canterbury CC [2017] EWHC 2716 (Admin), [2018] EWCA Civ 
2229 
Hargrave House Ltd & Reiner v Highbury Corner Magistrates Court & Islington
 
LBC [2018] EWHC 279 (Admin)  
 
 
BURDEN OF PROOF AND EVIDENCE 
34 
Nelsovil v MHLG [1962] 1 WLR 404 
 
R v Deputy Industrial Injuries Commissioner ex parte Moore [1965] 1 QB 456 
T A Miller Ltd v MHLG [1968] 1 WLR 992 
Knights Motors v SSE [1984] JPL 584 
Thrasyvoulou v SSE & Hackney LBC No 1 [1984] JPL a732 
2019
Gabbitas v SSE & Newham LBC [1985] JPL 630 
K G Diecasting (Weston) Ltd v SSE & Woodspring DC [1993] JPL 925  
Mahajan v SSTLR & Hounslow LBC [2002] JPL 928  
Ravensdale Ltd v SSCLG & Waltham Forest LBC [2016] EWHC 2374 (Admin) 
Doncaster MBC v SSCLG & AB [2016] EWHC 2876 (Admin)  
 
 
November 
CARAVANS 
36 
Woodspring DC v SSE & Goodall [1982] JPL 784 
 
Restormel BC v SSE & Rabey [1982] JPL 785 
26th 
Wealden DC v SSE & Day [1988] JPL 268 
Wyre Forest BC v SSE & Allen’s Caravans [1990] 2 WLR 517 
at: 
Short & Short v SSE & North Dorset DC (QBD CO/227/90) 
Carter v SSE & Carrick DC [1991] JPL 131; [1994] 1 WLR 1212, [1
as 995] JPL 311   
Forest of Dean DC v SSE & Howells [1995] JPL 937 
Pugsley v SSE & North Devon DC [1996] JPL 124 
Byrne v SSE & Arun DC [1998] JPL 122  
Measor v SSETR & Tunbridge Wells DC [1999] JPL 182 
correct 
R (oao Green o/b of the Friends of Fordwich and District] v FSS & Canterbury CC 
& Jones [2005] EWHC 691, [2005] EWCA Civ 1727 
Deakin v FSS [2006] EWHC 3402 (Admin); [2007] JPL 1073 
Only 
Bury MBC v SSCLG & Entwistle [2011] EWHC 2191 (Admin) 
 
 
COMPLETION NOTICES 
38 
Cardiff CC v NAW & Malik [2006] EWHC 1412  
 
 
 
updated.  
CONCEALED DEVELOPMENT  
39 
Welwyn Hatfield BC v SSCLG & Beesley [2011] UKSC 15  
 
R (oao) Fidler v SSCLG & Reigate and Banstead BC [2011] EWCA Civ 1159 
Meecham v SSCLG & Uttlesford DC [2013] HC 
Jackson v SSCLG & Westminster CC; Bonsall v SSCLG & Rotherham MBC [2015] 
EWCA Civ 1246 
Cole & Cole v Lichfield LDC [2016] EWHC 3059 (Admin) 
freequently 
R (oao Matilda Holdings Ltd) v SSCLG [2016] EWHC 2725 (Admin)  
is 
 
 
CONDITIONS – GENERAL  
40 
Fawcett Properties v Buckinghamshire CC [1960] All ER 503; [1961] AC 636 
 
Wilson v West Sussex CC [1963] 2QB 764 
Kingston-on-Thames RBC v SSE [1973] 1 WLR 1549 
R v Hillingdon LBC ex parte Royco Homes [1974] 1QB 720 
Sutton LBC v SSE & Pierpoint and Sons [1975] JPL 222 
publication 
A I and P (Stratford) v Tower Hamlets LBC [1976] JPL 234 
Bizony v SSE [1976] JPL 306 
This  Penwith DC v SSE [1977] 34 P&CR 269 
Hildenborough Village Preservation Society v SSE [1978] JPL 708 
George Wimpey & Co v SSE & New Forest DC [1979] JPL 314 
Newbury DC v SSE [1980] 2 WLR 379, [1981] AC 578 
Peak Park JPB v SSE & ICI [1980] JPL 114 
Wheatcroft v SSE & Harborough DC [1982] JPL 37 
Irlam Brick Co v Warrington BC [1982] JPL 709 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 3 

link to page 100 link to page 102 link to page 104 link to page 105 Jillings v SSE & the Broads Authority [1984] JPL 32 
Wessex Regional Health Authority v SSE [1984] JPL 344 
Bromsgrove DC v SSE [1988] JPL 257 
Camden LBC v SSE & PSP Nominees [1989] JPL 613 
Ashford BC v SSE & Hume [1991] JPL 362 
Turner v SSE & Macclesfield BC [1992] JPL 837 
Dunoon Developments Ltd v SSE & Poole BC [1992] WL 895054, JPL 936 
R v Newbury DC ex parte Stevens & Partridge [1992] JPL 1057  
Christoforou v SSE & Islington LBC [1994] JPL B44  
Forest of Dean DC v SSE & Howells [1995] JPL 937 
Handoll & Suddick v Warner & Goodman & Street & East Lindsay DC [1995] JPL 
2019
930 
Davenport & another v Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [1996] The Times 
26.4.96 
R v Rochdale MBC ex parte Tew [1999] 3 PLR 74  
I'm Your Man Ltd v SSE & North Somerset DC [1999] 4 PLR 107  
Barlow v SSTLR & Uttlesford DC (QBD 14.11.02 Sullivan J)  
November 
Sevenoaks DC v FSS & Pedham Place Golf Centre [2005] 1 P&CR 13 (QBD 
22.3.04)  
Avon Estates Ltd v Welsh Ministers & Ceredigion CC [2011] EWCA Civ 553  
26th 
Telford and Wrekin Council v SSCLG & Growing Enterprises Ltd [2013] JPL 865 
Winchester CC v SSCLG & Others [2013] EWHC 101 (Admin), [2015] EWCA Civ 
at: 
563 
R (oao Royal London Mutual Insurance Society) v SSCLG [2013] EW
as  HC 3597 
(Admin) 
Cotswold Grange Country Park LLP v SSCLG & Tewkesbury DC [2014] EWHC 
1138 (Admin) 
De Souza v SSCLG & Test Valley BC [2015] EWHC 2245 (Admi
correct n) 
Wood v SSCLG & the Broads Authority [2015] EWHC 2368 (Admin) 
Trump International Golf Club Scotland Ltd & Another v the Scottish Ministers 
[2015] UKSC 74  
Only 
Dunnett Investments Ltd v SSCLG & East Dorset DC [2016] EWHC 534 (Admin), 
[2017] EWCA Civ 192 
Lambeth LBC v SSCLG & Others [2017] EWHC 2412 (Admin), [2018] EWCA Civ 
844 
 
 
updated.  
CONDITIONS – BREACH OF 
46 
Clwyd CC v SSW [1982] JPL 696 
 
Newbury DC v SSE & Marsh [1994] JPL 134 
Butcher v SSE & Maidstone BC [1996] JPL 636 
Nicholson v SSE & Maldon DC [1998] JPL 553  
North Devon DC v SSE & Rottenbury [1998] EGCS 72  
St Anselm Development Co Ltd v FSS & Westminster CC [2003] EWHC 1592 
freequently 
Admin  
is 
North Devon DC v FSS & Stokes [2004] JPL 1396  
FSS v Arun DC & Brown [2006] EWCA Civ 1172  
Basingstoke and Deane BC v SSCLG & Stockdale [2009] EWHC 1012 (Admin), 
JPL 1585  
Langmead v SSHCLG & Others [2018] EWHC 2202 (Admin) 
 
 
CONSOLIDATION OF UNDESIRABLE USE 
48 
publication 
W H Tolley and Son Ltd v SSE & Torridge DC [1997] 75 P&CR  
 
 
 
This  CROWN LAND 
49 
Hillingdon LBC v SSE & Others [1999] EWHC Admin 772 
 
Mid Devon DC v FSS & Stevens [2004] EWHC 814 (Admin)   
R (oao KP JR Management Co Ltd) v Richmond LBC & Others [2018] EWHC 84 
(Admin) 
 
 
CURTILAGE 
50 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 4 

link to page 107 link to page 109 link to page 111 link to page 111 link to page 112 link to page 112 Sinclair-Lockhart’s Trustees v Central Land Board (1950) 1 P&CR 195 
 
Brutus v Cozens [1973] AC 854 
Methuen-Campbell v Walters [1979] 1 QB 525  
Attorney-General ex rel Sutcliffe & Rouse & Hughes v Calderdale BC [1983] JPL 
310 
Dyer v Dorset CC [1988] 3 WLR 213 
Collins v SSE & Epping Forest DC [1989] EGCS 15 
James v SSE [1991] 1 PLR 58 
Skerritts of Nottingham Ltd v SSETR (1) [2000] EWCA Civ 60, JPL 789  
R (oao Sumption) v Greenwich LBC [2007] EWHC 2276 (Admin) 
O’Flynn v SSCLG & Warwick DC [2016] EWHC 2984 (Admin) 
2019
Burford v SSCLG & Test Valley BC [2017] EWHC 1493 (Admin) 
 
 
DECISIONS AND REASONING 
52 
Hope v SSE [1976] 31 P&CR 120 
 
John Pearcy Transport v SSE & Hounslow LBC [1986] JPL 680 
Hill v SSE & Bromley LBC [1993] JPL 158  
November 
White & Cooper & Phillips v SSE [1996] JPL B108 
R v SSE & Leeds CC ex parte Ramzan (QBD 18.12.97 CO/2202/97)  
South Buckinghamshire DC v SSETR & Gregory (QBD 11.11.98 CO/2291/98)  
26th 
Bury MBC v SSCLG & Entwistle [2011] EWHC 2191 (Admin) 
Arnold v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 1197 (Admin), [2017] EWCA Civ 231 
at: 
Davis v SSCLG & Lichfield DC [2016] EWHC 274 (Admin) 
 
as 
 
DWELLINGHOUSE  
54 
Gravesham BC v SSE & O’Brien [1982] 47 P&CR 142; [1983] JPL 307  
 
Sevenoaks DC v SSE & Dawe (QBD 13.11.97 CO1322-97) 
Moore v SSE & New Forest DC
 [1998] JPL 877  
correct 
Swale BC v FSS & Lee [2005] EWCA Civ 1568; [2006] JPL 886 
FSS v Arun DC & Brown [2006] EWCA Civ 1172  
Grendon v FSS & Cotswold DC [2006] EWHC 1711 (Admin), [2007] JPL 275 
Only 
R (oao Gore) v SSCLG & Dartmoor NPA [2008] EWHC 3278 (Admin) 
R (oao Townsley) v SSCLG [2009] EWHC 3522 (Admin) 
 
 
ESTOPPEL AND LEGITIMATE EXPECTATION 
56 
Res Judicata or Issue Estoppel 
Thrasyvoulou v SSE & Hackney LBC [1988] JP
updated.   L 689; [1990] 2 WLR 1; (HL 
 
14/12/89) 
Watts v SSE & South Oxfordshire DC [1991] 1 PLR 61 
R v SSE & Wychavon DC ex parte Saunders [1992] JPL 753 
A and T Investments v SSE & Kensington and Chelsea RBC [1996] JPL B94  
Porter v SSETR [1996] 3 All ER 693 
R (oao East Hertfordshire DC) v FSS [2007] EWHC 834 (Admin) 
freequently 
Estoppel by Representation or Proprietary Estoppel 
57 
Southend–on-S
is ea Corporation v Hodgson (Wickford) [1961] 12 P&CR 165  
 
Wells v MHLG [1967] 1 WLR 1000 
Saxby v SSE & Westminster CC [1998] JPL 1132  
R v East Sussex CC ex parte Reprotech (Pebsham) Ltd [2002] UKHL 8  
Keevil v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2012] EWHC 322 
(Admin) 
Legitimate Expectation 
57 
publication 
Henry Boot Homes Ltd v Bassetlaw DC [2002] EWCA Civ 983; [2003] JPL 1030  
 
Coghurst Wood Leisure Park Ltd v SSTLR [2002] EWHC 1091 Admin; [2003] JPL 
206  
This  Keevil v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2012] EWHC 322 
(Admin) 
Estoppel by Convention 
58 
Hillingdon LBC v SSE & Others [1999] EWHC Admin 772 
 
R v Caradon DC ex parte Knott [2000] 3 PLR 1 
 
 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 5 

link to page 114 link to page 116 link to page 117 link to page 118 link to page 120 link to page 120 EXISTING USES, FALLBACK POSITION AND S57(4) 
59 
Clyde & Co v SSE & Guildford BC [1977] JPL 521 
 
Finn v SSE & Barnet LBC [1984] JPL 734 
Westminster CC v British Waterways Board [1985] JPL 102 
Vikoma International v SSE & Woking BC [1987] JPL 38 
London Residuary Body v SSE & Lambeth LBC [1988] JPL 637 
Haven Leisure Ltd v SSE & North Cornwall DC [1994] JPL 148 
Bylander Waddell Partnership v SSE & Harrow LBC [1994] JPL 440 
Sefton MBC v SSTLR & Morris [2003] JPL 632   
Mid Suffolk DC v FSS & Lebbon [2006] JPL 859  
Hillingdon LBC v SSCLG & Autodex Ltd [2008] EWHC 198   
2019
Simpson v SSCLG [2011] EWHC 283 
Kensington and Chelsea RBC v SSCLG & 38 Cathcart Ltd (CO/4492/2016) 
Parvez v SSCLG & Bolton MBC [2017] EWHC 3188 (Admin) 
Sharma v SSCLG & Others [2018] EWHC 2355 (Admin) 
Oates v SSCLG v Canterbury CC [2017] EWHC 2716 (Admin), [2018] EWCA Civ 
2229 
November 
 
 
EXPEDIENCY 
61 
Donovan v SSE [1987] JPL 118 
 
26th 
Ferris v SSE & Doncaster MBC [1988] JPL 777 
R v Rochester-upon-Medway CC ex parte Hobday [1990] JPL 17  at: 
Britannia Assets v SSCLG & Medway Council [2011] EWHC 1908 (Admin) 
Silver v SSCLG & Camden LBC & Tankel [2014] EWHC 2729 (Admi
as n) 
 
 
FIXTURES AND CHATTELS 
62 
Holland v Hodgson [1872] LR 7 CP 
 
Norton v Dashwood [1896] 2 Ch 497 
correct 
Leigh v Taylor [1902] AC 157 
Re Whaley [1908] 1 Ch 615 
Re Lord Chesterfield’s Settled Estates [1910] C.97 
Only 
Spyer v Phillipson [1931] 2 Ch 183 
Copthorn Land and Timber Co Ltd v MHLG & Another [1965] QB 490 
Berkley v Poultett & Others [1977] 241 EG 911 
Debenhams Plc v Westminster CC [1987] AC 396 
TSB v Botham [1996] EGCS 149 
updated.  
R v SSW ex parte Kennedy [1996] JPL 645 
Dill v SSCLG & Stratford-on-Avon DC [2017] EWHC 2378 (Admin); [2018] 
EWCA Civ 2619 
 
 
GPDO/GDO 
64 
General 
Cole v Somerset CC [1957] 1 QB 23 
 
freequently 
Garland v MHLG [1968] 20 P&CR 93 
is 
Clwyd CC v SSW [1982] JPL 696 
Fayrewood Fish Farms v SSE & Hampshire CC [1984] JPL 287 
Cawley v SSE & Vale Royal DC [1990] JPL 742 
R v Tunbridge Wells BC ex parte Blue Boys Developments Ltd [1990] 1 PLR 55 
Dunoon Developments Ltd v SSE & Poole BC [1992] WL 895054, JPL 936 
Williams Le Roi v SSE & Salisbury DC [1993] JPL 1033  
Watts v SST
publication LR & Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [2002] EWHC 993 (Admin) 
R (oao Orange Personal Communication Services Ltd & Othersv Islington LBC 
[2006] EWCA 157 
This  R (oao Save Woolley Valley Action Group Ltd) v Bath and North East Somerset 
Council [2012] EWHC 2161 (Admin) 
Evans v SSCLG [2014] EWHC 4111 (Admin) 
Noquet & Noquet v SSCLG & Cherwell DC [2016] EWHC 209 (Admin)  
Dunnett Investments Ltd v SSCLG & East Dorset DC [2016] EWHC 534 (Admin); 
[2017] EWCA Civ 192 
Prior Approval 
65 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 6 

link to page 121 link to page 124 link to page 126 Murrell v SSCLG & Broadland DC [2010] EWCA Civ 1367   
 
Walsall MBC v SSCLG; Dartford BC v SSCLG [2012] EWHC 1756 (Admin) 
Pressland v Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [2016] EWHC 1763(Admin) 
Keenan v SSCLG & Woking BC [2016] EWHC 427; [2017] EWCA Civ 438 
Winters v SSCLG & Havering LBC [2017] EWHC 357 (Admin) 
R (oao Marshall) v East Dorset DC & Pitman [2018] EWHC 226 (Admin) 
Part 1 
66 
Sainty v MHLG [1964] 15 P&CR 452 
 
Street v MHLG & Essex CC [1965] 193 EG 537 
Scurlock v SSE [1977] 33 P&CR 102 
Larkin v SSE & Basildon DC [1980] JPL 407 
2019
Emin v SSE & Mid Sussex DC [1989] JPL 909 
Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSE & Neale [1991] 2 PLR 107 
Hammersmith and Fulham LBC v SSE & Davison [1994] JPL 957  
Tower Hamlets LBC v SSE & Nolan [1994] JPL B44 & 1112  
Pêche d’Or Investments v SSE & Another [1996] JPL 311 
Rambridge v SSE & East Herts DC (QBD 22.11.96 CO-593-96) 
November 
R (oao Watts) v SSETR & Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [2002] JPL 1473 
R (oao Gore) v SSCLG & Dartmoor NPA [2008] EWHC 3278 (Admin) 
R (oao Townsley) v SSCLG 
[2009] EWHC 3522 (Admin) 
26th 
Mohamed v SSCLG [2014] EWHC 4045 (Admin) 
Evans v SSCLG [2014] EWHC 4111 (Admin) 
at: 
Arnold v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 1197 (Admin), [2017] EWCA Civ 231 
as 
R (oao) Hilton v SSCLG & Bexley LBC [2016] EWHC (Admin)  
Eatherley v Camden LBC & Ireland [2016] EWHC 3108 (Admin) 
Havering LBC v SSCLG [2017] EWHC 1546 (Admin) 
Stanius v SSCLG & Ealing LBC (CO 11.4.17) 
Part 6 (Agriculture only) 
correct 
69 
Belmont Farm v MHLG [1962] 13 P&CR 417 
 
Hidderley v Warwickshire CC [1963] 14 P&CR 134 
Bromley LBC v SSE & George Hoeltschi & Son [1978
Only ] JPL 45 
Jones v Stockport MBC [1984] JPL 274  
Fuller v SSE & Dover DC [1987] JPL 854 
South Oxfordshire DC v SSE & East [1987] JPL 868 
Hancock v SSE & Torridge DC [1989] JPL 99; Tyack v SSE & Cotswolds DC 
[1989] 1 WLR 1392  
updated.  
McKay & Walker v SSE & South Cambridgeshire DC [1989] JPL 590 
Pitman & Others v SSE & Canterbury [1989] JPL 831 
Broughton v SSE [1992] JPL 550  
Clarke v SSE [1993] JPL 32  
Hill v SSE & Bromley LBC [1993] JPL 158  
Millington v SSETR & Shrewsbury and Atcham BC [2000] JPL 297  
Taylor and Sons (Farms) v SSETR & Three Rivers DC [2001] EWCA Civ 1254  
freequently 
Lyons v SSCLG [2010] EWHC 3652 (Admin)  
is 
R (oao Marshall) v East Dorset DC & Pitman [2018] EWHC 226 (Admin) 
Other Parts 
 
71 
Prengate Properties Ltd v SSE [1973] 25 P&CR 311 
 
Tidswell v SSE & Thurrock BC [1977] JPL 104 
Ewen Developments v SSE & North Norfolk DC [1980] JPL 404 
South Buckinghamshire DC v SSE & Strandmill [1989] JPL 351 
Kent CC v S
publication SE & R Marchant & Sons Ltd [1996] JPL 931 
Caradon v SSETR [2000] QBD 12.9.00  
Ramsey v SSETR & Suffolk Coastal DC [2002] JPL 1123  
This  R (oao Hall Hunter Partnership) v FSS & Waverley BC [2007] JPL 1023 
R (oao Wilsdon) v FSS & Tewkesbury BC [2007] JPL 1063  
Miles v NAW & Caerphilly CBC [2007] EWHC 10 (Admin); JPL 1235  
Valentino Plus Ltd v SSCLG & Others [2015] EWHC 19 (Admin) 
Hibbitt v SSCLG & Rushcliffe BC [2016] EWHC 2853 (Admin) 
Barton v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2017] EWHC 573 
(Admin) 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 7 

link to page 127 link to page 128 link to page 130 link to page 132 GPDO – Fallback Position 
72 
Burge v SSE & Chelmsford BC [1988] JPL 497 
 
Brentwood DC v SSE & Gray [1996] JPL 939 
Nolan v SSE & Bury MBC [1998] JPL B72  
 
 
HUMAN RIGHTS 
74 
Massingham v SSTLR & Havant BC [2002] EWHC 1578 (Admin)   
 
Blackburn v FSS & South Holland DC [2002] EWHC 671 (Admin)   
Goodall v Peak District NPA [2008] EWHC 734 (Admin) 
 
 
INTENSIFICATION 
75 
2019
Brooks & Burton Ltd v SSE & Dorset CC [1977] JPL 720 
 
Hilliard v SSE & Surrey CC [1978] JPL 840 
Kensington and Chelsea RBC v Mia Carla Ltd [1981] JPL 50 
Philglow Ltd v SSE & Hillingdon LBC [1985] JPL 318 
Eastleigh BC v FSS & Asda Stores (QBD 28.5.04 Collins J) 
R (oao Childs) v FSS & Test Valley BC [2005] EWHC 2368 (Admin) 
November 
Elvington Park Ltd v SSCLG & York CC [2011] EWHC 3041 (Admin); [2012] JPL 
556 
Hertfordshire CC v SSCLG & Metal and Waste Recycling Ltd [2012] EWCA Civ 
26th 
1473 
Reed v SSCLG [2014] JPL 725 
at: 
Turner v SSCLG & South Buckinghamshire DC [2015] EWHC 1895 (Admin) 
as 
R (oao KP JR Management Co Ltd) v Richmond LBC & Others [2018] EWHC 84 
(Admin) 
 
 
LAWFUL (AND ESTABLISHED) USE AND LDCS 
77 
Glamorgan CC v Carter [1962] All ER 866; [1963] P&CR 88 
correct 
 
Square Meals Frozen Foods v Dunstable BC [1973] JPL 709 
Cottrell v SSE & Tonbridge and Malling BC [1982] JPL 443  
Young v SSE & Bexley LBC [1983] JPL 465  Only 
Denham Developments v SSE & Brentwood DC [1984] JPL 347 
Nash v SSE & Epping Forest DC [1986] JPL 128 
Vaughan v SSE & Mid Sussex DC [1986] JPL 840  
Davies v SSE & South Herefordshire DC [1989] JPL 601  
Panton & Farmer v SSETR & Vale of White Horse DC [1999] JPL 461 
updated.  
R v Thanet DC ex parte Tapp [2001] EWCA Civ 559, [2001] JPL 1436  
Thurrock BC v SSETR & Holding [2002] EWCA Civ 226  
Waltham Forest LBC v SSETR & Tully [2002] EWCA Civ 330  
Sefton MBC v SSTLR & Morris [2003] JPL 632  
Swale BC v FSS & Lee [2005] EWCA Civ 1568; [2006] JPL 886 
Mid Suffolk DC v FSS & Lebbon [2006] JPL 859  
James Hay Pension Trustees Ltd v FSS & South Gloucestershire Council [2006] 
freequently 
EWCA Civ 1387 
is 
M & M (Land) Ltd v SSCLG & Hampshire CC [2007] All ER(D) 55  
R (oao Sumption) v Greenwich LBC [2007] EWHC 2276 (Admin)  
Staffordshire CC v Challinor & Robinson [2007] EWCA Civ 864  
Hillingdon LBC v SSCLG & Autodex Ltd [2008] EWHC 198 (Admin) 
R (oao Colver) v SSCLG & Rochford DC [2008] EWHC 2500 (Admin)   
R (oao Sumner) v SSCLG [2010] EWHC 372 (Admin) 
Bramall v SSCLG & Rother DC [2011] EWHC 1531 (Admin) 
publication 
Keevil v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2012] EWHC 322 
(Admin) 
This  Turner v SSCLG & South Buckinghamshire DC [2015] EWHC 1895 (Admin) 
R (oao Pitt) v SSCLG & Epping Forest DC [2015] EWHC 1931 (Admin) 
Noquet & Noquet v SSCLG & Cherwell DC [2016] EWHC 209 (Admin)  
R (oao Waters) v Breckland DC & Others [2016] EWHC 951 (Admin)  
O’Flynn v SSCLG & Warwick DC [2016] EWHC 2984 (Admin) 
Kensington and Chelsea RBC v SSCLG & 38 Cathcart Ltd (CO/4492/2016) 
Sharma v SSCLG & Others [2018] EWHC 2355 (Admin) 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 8 

link to page 136 link to page 139 link to page 141  
 
MATERIAL CHANGE OF USE – GENERAL  
81 
Vickers Armstrong v Central Land Board [1958] 9 P&CR 33  
 
Wipperman & Buckingham v SSE & Barking LBC [1965] 17 P&CR 225 
G Percy Trentham Ltd v MHLG & Gloucestershire CC [1966] 18 P&CR 225 
Wood v SSE & Uckfield RDC [1973] 25 P&CR 303 
Philip Farrington Properties v SSE & Lewes DC [1982] JPL 638 
Restormel BC v SSE & Rabey [1982] JPL 785 
Westminster CC v SSE & Aboro [1983] JPL 602 
Philglow Ltd v SSE & Hillingdon LBC [1985] JPL 318 
Wivenhoe Port v Colchester BC [1985] JPL 396 
2019
Panayi v SSE & Hackney LBC [1985] 50 P&CR 109  
Lilo Blum v SSE [1987] JPL 278 
Wealden DC v SSE & Day [1988] JPL 268 
Pittman & Others v SSE & Canterbury CC [1988] JPL 391 
Ferris v SSE & Doncaster MBC [1998] JPL 777 
Turner v SSE & Macclesfield BC [1992] JPL 837 
November 
Forest of Dean DC v Howells [1995] JPL 937 
Thames Heliport Ltd v Tower Hamlets LBC [1995] JPL 526; [1997] JPL 448 
Main v SSETR & South Oxfordshire DC [1999] JPL 195 
26th 
Lynch v SSE & Basildon DC [1999] JPL 354 
Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSETR [2001] JPL 84  
at: 
Beach v SSETR & Runnymede BC [2001] EWHC 381 (Admin), [2002] JPL 185  
Waltham Forest LBC v SSETR & Tully [2002] EWCA Civ 330   as 
Stewart v FSS & Cotswold DC (QBD 28.7.04 Jackson J)  
Deakin v FSS [2006] EWHC 3402 (Admin); [2007] JPL 1073 
R (oao) East Sussex CC v SSCLG & Robins & Robins [2009] EWHC 3841 (Admin) 
Winfield v SSCLG [2012] EWHC 469 (Admin) 
correct 
R (oao Westminster CC) v SSCLG & Oriol Badia and Property Investment 
(Development) Ltd [2015] EWCA Civ 482 
Al-Najafi v SSCLG & Ealing LBC [2015] (CO/4899/20
Only  14) 
R (oao Kensington & Chelsea RBC) v SSCLG & Reis & Tong [2016] EWHC 1785 
(Admin)  
 
 
MATERIAL CHANGE OF USE - RESIDENTIAL 
84 
Birmingham Corporation v MHLG & Ullah [1964] 1 QB 178 
 
updated.  
Mayflower Cambridge v SSE & Cambridge CC [1975] 30 P&CR 28 
Lipson & Lipson v SSE & Salford MBC [1976] 33 P&CR 95 
Wakelin v SSE & St Albans DC [1978] JPL 769  
Blackpool BC v SSE & Keenan [1980] JPL 527 
Impey v SSE & Lake District SPB [1981] JPL 363; [1984] P&CR 157 
Backer v SSE & Camden LBC [1983] JPL 167  
Uttlesford DC v SSE & White [1992] JPL 171 
freequently 
R v SSE & Gojkovic ex parte Kensington and Chelsea RBC [1993] JPL 139 
is 
R (oao Hossack) v SSE & Kettering BC & English Churches Housing Group 
[2002] EWCA Civ 886 
Fairstate Ltd v FSS & Westminster CC [2005] EWCA Civ 283; JPL 1333  
Welwyn Hatfield BC v SSCLG & Beesley [2011] UKSC 15  
Moore v SSCLG & Suffolk Coastal DC [2012] EWCA Civ 2101 
Paramaguru v Ealing LBC [2018] EWHC 373 (Admin) 
 
 
publication 
NOTICES – ALLEGED BREACH OF PLANNING CONTROL  
86 
Miller Mead v MHLG [1963] 2 WLR 225 
 
This  Eldon Garages v Kingston-upon-Hull CBC [1974] 1 All ER 358 
Copeland BC v SSE & Ross & Ross [1976] JPL 304 
Bristol Stadium v Brown [1980] JPL 107 
Scott v SSE & Bracknell DC [1982] JPL 108 
Westminster CC v SSE & Aboro [1983] JPL 602 
Coventry Scaffolding Co (London) Ltd v Parker [1987] JPL 127 
Harrogate BC v SSE & Proctor [1987] JPL 288 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 9 

link to page 143 link to page 145 link to page 146 link to page 148 Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSE & Beechgold Ltd [1987] JPL 509 
Ferris v SSE & Doncaster MBC [1998] JPL 777 
R v Rochester-upon-Medway CC ex parte Hobday [1990] JPL 17 
Collins v SSCLG & Hampshire CC [2016] EWHC 5 (Admin) 
Ealing LBC v SSCLG & Zaheer [2016] EWHC 700 (Admin) 
 
 
NOTICES – CORRECTION AND VARIATION 
88 
Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSE [1972] 224 EG 1555 
 
Hammersmith and Fulham LBC v SSE & Sandral [1975] 30 P&CR 19 
Morris v SSE & Thurrock BC [1975] 31 P&CR 216 
TLG Building Materials v SSE & Arthur & Carrick DC [1981] JPL 513 
2019
Woodspring DC v SSE & Goodall [1982] JPL 784 
Hughes and Son v SSE & Fareham BC [1985] JPL 486 
Epping Forest DC v Matthews [1986] JPL 132 
R v SSE & Tower Hamlets LBC ex parte Ahern (London) Ltd [1989] JPL 757 
Wiesenfield v SSE & Barnet LBC [1992] JPL 757 
Bennett v SSE & & East Devon DC [1993] JPL 134 
November 
Simms v SSE & Broxtowe BC [1998] JPL B98 
Dacorum BC v SSETR & Walsh [2000] CO/4895/99 QBD 24.8.00  
Taylor and Sons (Farms) v SSETR & Three Rivers DC [2001] EWCA Civ 1254  
26th 
Pople v SSTLR & Lake District NPA [2002] EWHC 2851 (Admin) 
Howells v SSCLG & Gloucestershire CC [2009] EWHC 2757 (Admin) 
at: 
O’Connor v SSCLG & Epping Forest DC [2014] EWHC 3821 (Admin) 
as 
 
 
NOTICES - MULTIPLE 
90 
Edwick v Sunbury on Thames UDC [1964] 63 LGR 204 
 
Ramsey & Ramsey Sports Ltd v SSE & Suffolk Coastal DC [1991] 2 PLR 122 
Reed v SSE & Tandridge DC [1993] JPL 249 
correct 
Bruschweiller & Others v SSE & Chelmsford DC [1996] JPL 292 
Millen v SSE & Maidstone BC [1996] JPL 735 
Biddle v SSE & Wychavon DC [1999] 4 PLR 31 
Only 
 
 
NOTICES - NULLITIES 
91 
Rhymney Valley DC v SSW [1985] JPL 27 
 
R v SSE ex parte Hillingdon LBC [1986] JPL 363 
Webb v Ipswich BC [1989] EGCS 27 
updated.  
McKay v SSE & Cornwall CC & Penwith DC [1994] JPL 806  
R v Wicks [1996] JPL 743  
South Hams DC v Halsey [1996] JPL 761  
R (oao Lynes & Lynes) v West Berkshire DC [2003] JPL 1137  
Payne v NAW & Caerphilly CBC [2007] JPL 117  
Davenport v The Mayor and Citizens of the City of Westminster [2011] EWCA 
Civ 458; JPL 1325 
freequently 
Britannia Assets v SSCLG & Medway Council [2011] EWHC 1908 (Admin) 
is 
Koumis v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 2966 (Admin); [2014] EWCA Civ 1723  
Silver v SSCLG & Camden LBC & Tankel [2014] EWHC 2729 (Admin) 
Beg v Luton [2017] EWHC 3435 (Admin) 
Oates v SSCLG v Canterbury CC [2017] EWHC 2716 (Admin), [2018] EWCA Civ 
2229 
 
 
NOTICES – SECOND BITE/S171B(4)(B) 
93 
publication 
William Boyer (Transport) Ltd v SSE & Hounslow LBC [1996] JPL B129  
 
Jarmain v SSETR & Welwyn Hatfield DC [2002] PLR 126  
This  Fidler v FSS & Reigate and Banstead BC [2003] EWHC 2003 (Admin), [2004] 
EWCA Civ 1295 
Sanders & Sanders v FSS & Epping Forest DC [2004] EWHC 1194 (Admin)  
R (oao Romer) v FSS [2006] EWHC 3480 (Admin); [2007] JPL 1354 
R (oao Lambrou) v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 325 (Admin) 
Akhtar v SSCLG & Barking and Dagenham LBC [2017] EWHC 1840 (Admin) 
 
 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 10 

link to page 149 link to page 150 link to page 151 link to page 154 link to page 155 link to page 157 NOTICES - SERVICE 
94 
Skinner & King v SSE & Eastleigh BC [1978] JPL 842 
 
Porritt & Williams v SSE & Bromley LBC [1988] JPL 414 
Mayes & White & Oubridge v SSW & Dinefwr BC [1989] JPL 848 
Dyer v SSE & Purbeck DC [1996] JPL 740 
Newham LBC v Miah [2016] EWHC 1043 (Admin) 
 
 
PLANNING CONTRAVENTION NOTICE 
95 
R v Teignbridge DC ex parte Teignbridge Quay Co Ltd [1996] JPL 828 
 
Meecham v SSCLG & Uttlesford DC [2013] HC 
 
 
2019
PLANNING PERMISSIONS – COMMENCEMENT & CONDITIONS PRECEDENT 
96 
Malvern Hills DC v SSE & Barnes and Co Ltd [1982] JPL 439 
 
Thayer v SSE [1992] JPL 264 
F G Whitley & Sons v SSW & Clwyd CC [1990] JPL 678, [1992] JPL 856 
Agecrest v Gwynedd CC [1998] JPL 325 
R v Flintshire CC ex parte Somerfield Stores [1998] PLCR 336 
November 
Leisure GB Plc v Isle of Wight Council [1999] 80 P&CR 370 
South Gloucestershire Council v SSETR & Alvis Bros Ltd [1999] JPL B99 
Riordan Communications Ltd v South Buckinghamshire DC [2000] 1 PLR 45  
26th 
Connaught Quarries Ltd v SSETR & East Hants DC [2001] JPL 1210  
Commercial Land Ltd v SSTLR & Kensington and Chelsea RBC [2002] EWHC 
at: 
1264 (Admin), [2003] JPL 358   
Henry Boot Homes Ltd v Bassetlaw DC [2002] EWCA Civ 983; [200
as  3] JPL 1030  
Field v FSS & Crawley BC [2004] EWHC 147 (Admin)  
R (oao Hart Aggregates Ltd) v Hartlepool BC [2005] EWHC 840 (Admin)  
Bedford BC v SSCLG & Murzyn [2008] EWHC 2304 (Admin) 
Rastrum & Benge v SSCLG & Rother DC [2009] EWCA Civ 1340 
correct 
Greyfort Properties Ltd v SSCLG & Torbay Council [2011] EWCA Civ 908 
Ellaway v Cardiff CC [2014] EWHC 836 (Admin) 
 
 
Only 
PLANNING PERMISSIONS – EFFECT ON NOTICE 
99 
R v Chichester Justices ex parte Chichester DC [1990] 60 P&CR 342 
 
Cresswell v Pearson [1997] JPL 860 
Rapose v Wandsworth LBC [2010] EWHC 3126 (Admin) 
Goremsandu v SSCLG & Harrow LBC [2015] EWHC 2194 (Admin) 
 
updated.  
 
PLANNING PERMISSIONS – IMPLEMENTATION 
100 
Pilkington v SSE & Lancashire CC [1973] 1 WLR 1527 
 
Prestige Homes (Southern) Ltd v SSE & Shepway DC [1992] JPL 842 
British Railways Board v SSE & Others [1994] JPL 32 
Handoll & Suddick v Warner & Goodman & Street & East Lindsay DC [1995] JPL 
930 
freequently 
Butcher v SSE & Maidstone BC [1996] JPL 636 
is 
Singh v SSCLG & Sandwell BC [2010] EWHC 1621 (Admin) 
R (oao Robert Hitchens Ltd) v Worcestershire CC [2015] EWCA Civ 1060 
Hussein v SSCLG [2017] EWCA Civ 1060 
Stanius v SSCLG & Ealing LBC (CO 11.4.17) 
 
 
PLANNING PERMISSIONS – INTERPRETATION  
102 
Slough Estat
publication  es v Slough BC [1969] 21 P&CR 573 
 
R v SSE ex parte Reinisch [1971] 22 P&CR 1022 
Manning v SSE & Harrow LBC [1976] JPL 634 
This  Centre Hotels (Cranston) Ltd v SSE & Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [1982] JPL 
108 
Wivenhoe Port v Colchester BC [1985] JPL 396 
Calder Gravels v Kirklees MBC (1989) 60 PLR 322, [1990] 2 PLR 26 
R v Elmbridge BC ex parte Oakimber [1991] 3 PLR 35 
R (oao Oury) v SSE ex parte Slough BC [1995] JPL 1128 
R (oao Shepway DC) v Ashford BC [1998] EWHC Admin 488, JPL 1073  
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 11 

link to page 159 link to page 161 link to page 161 link to page 163 Barnett v SSCLG & East Hants DC [2008] EWHC 1601 (Admin), [2009] EWCA 
Civ 476 
Lawson Builders Ltd & Lawson & Lawson v SSCLG & Wakefield MDC [2013] 
EWHC 3388 (Admin), [2015] EWCA Civ 122  
Wood v SSCLG & the Broads Authority [2015] EWHC 2368 (Admin) 
R (oao Kemball) v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 3368 (Admin)  
Trump International Golf Club Scotland Ltd & Another v The Scottish Ministers 
[2015] UKSC 74  
University of Leicester v SSCLG & Oadby & Wigston BC [2016] EWHC 476 
(Admin) Lambeth LBC v SSCLG & Others [2017] EWHC 2412 (Admin) 
 
 
2019
PLANNING UNIT 
104 
Vickers Armstrong v Central Land Board [1958] 9 P&CR 33  
 
G Percy Trentham Ltd v MHLG & Gloucestershire CC [1966] 18 P&CR 225 
Hawkey & Others v SSE & Mid Sussex DC [1971] 22 P&CR 610 
Burdle & Williams v SSE & New Forest RDC [1972] 1 WLR 1207 
Wood v SSE & Uckfield RDC [1973] 25 P&CR 303 
November 
De Mulder v SSE [1973] 27 P&CR 379 
Johnston & Johnston v SSE & Haringey LBC [1974] 28 P&CR 424 
Joyce Shopfitters Ltd v SSE & Bromley LBC [1976] JPL 236 
26th 
Frank Vyner & Son Ltd v SSE & Hammersmith LBC [1977] 243 EG 597 
Newbury DC v SSE [1980] 2 WLR 379, [1981] AC 578 
at: 
TLG Building Materials v SSE & Arthur & Carrick DC [1981] JPL 513 
as 
Jennings Motors Ltd v SSE & New Forest DC [1982] 2 WLR 131  
Fuller v SSE & Dover DC [1987] JPL 854 
Thames Heliport v Tower Hamlets LBC [1995] JPL 526; [1997] JPL 448 
Church Commissioners v SSE & Gateshead MBC [1996] JPL 669  
Deakin v FSS [2006] EWHC 3402 (Admin); [2007] JPL 1073 
correct 
R (oao Winchester CC) v SSCLG [2007] EWHC 2303 (Admin) 
Stone & Stone v SSCLG & Cornwall Council [2014] EWHC 1456 (Admin) 
R (oao KP JR Management Co Ltd) v Richmond LBC &
Only   Others [2018] EWHC 84 
(Admin) 
 
 
PRECEDENT 
106 
Collis & Eclipse Radio & TV Services v SSE & Dudley MBC [1975]  
 
Tempo District Warehouses v SSE & Enfield LBC [1979] JPL 98 
updated.  
Poundstretcher Ltd & Harris Queensway PLC v SSE & Liverpool CC [1989] JPL 90 
South Hams DC v Rule [1990] (HC 50) 
Precedent – as in Consistency in Decision-Making 
106 
Chelmsford BC v SSE & E R Alexander Ltd [1985] JPL 316 
 
Barnet Meeting Room Trust v SSE [1989] EGCS 141 
North Wiltshire DC v SSE & Clover [1992] JPL 955, (1993) 65 P&CR 137 
R v SSE ex parte Baber [1996] JPL 1034 
freequently 
R (oao) Fox Strategic Land and Property Ltd v SSCLG & Another [2012] EWCA 
is 
Civ 1198 
Baroness Cumberlege of Newick & Cumberlege v SSCLG & DLA Delivery Ltd 
[2017] EWHC 2057 (Admin), [2018] EWCA 1305 
R (oao Tate) v Northumberland CC & Leffers-Smith [2018] EWCA Civ 1519 
 
 
PROCEDURAL FAIRNESS 
108 
Morris v SSE & Thurrock BC [1975] 31 P&CR 216 
 
publication 
Performance Cars Ltd v SSE [1977] JPL 585 
Gill v SSE [1978] JPL 373 
This  Greycoat Commercial Estates v Radmore [1981] The Times 14.7.81 
Wheatcroft v SSE & Harborough DC [1982] JPL 37 
R v SSE ex parte Mistral Investments [1984] JPL 516 
Knights Motors v SSE [1984] JPL 584 
Blight v SSE & Mid Sussex DC [1988] JPL 565 
Majorpier Ltd v SSE & Southwark LBC [1990] 59 P&CR 453 
K G Diecasting (Weston) Ltd v SSE & Woodspring DC [1993] JPL 925  
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 12 

link to page 166 link to page 167 link to page 168 link to page 170 R v SSE & Leeds CC ex parte Ramzan (QBD 18.12.97 CO/2202/97)  
West Lancashire DC v SSE [1999] JPL 890  
Mahajan v SSTLR & Hounslow LBC [2002] JPL 928  
Hopkins Developments Ltd v SSCLG [2014] EWCA Civ 470  
Turner v SSCLG & the Mayor of London [2015] EWHC 375 (Admin), [2015] 
EWCA Civ 582 
Turner v SSCLG & South Buckinghamshire DC [2015] EWHC 1895 (Admin) 
R (oao Pitt) v SSCLG & Epping Forest DC [2015] EWHC 1931 (Admin) 
Brown v SSCLG & Others [2015] EWHC 2502 (Admin) 
Engbers v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 3541 (Admin); [2016] EWCA Civ 1183 
Akhtar v SSCLG & Barking and Dagenham LBC [2017] EWHC 1840 (Admin) 
2019
Dill v SSCLG & Stratford-on-Avon DC [2017] EWHC 2378 (Admin); [2018] 
EWCA Civ 2619 
Chesterton Commercial (Bucks) Limited v Wokingham DC [2018] EWHC 1795 
(Admin) 
Benson v SSCLG & Hertsmere BC [2018] EWHC 2354 (Admin) 
Farlingaye Investments Ltd v SSHCLG & Braintree DC – 1 August 2018 
November 
 
 
REDETERMINATION – S288 & S289 
111 
South Buckinghamshire DC v SSETR & Gregory (QBD 11.11.98 CO/2291/98)  
 
26th 
Oxford CC v SSCLG & One Folly Bridge Ltd [2007] EWHC 769 (Admin)  
R (oao Perrett) v SSCLG & West Dorset DC [2009] EWCA Civ 1365  
at: 
Bowring v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 1027 (Admin)  
De Souza v SSCLG & Test Valley DC [2015] EWHC 2245 (Admin) 
as 
Wood v SSCLG & the Broads Authority [2015] EWHC 2368 (Admin) 
North Norfolk DC v SSHCLG & Others [2018] EWHC 2076 (Admin) 
 
 
RELEVANT OCCUPIER 
112 
correct 
R v SSE & South Shropshire DC ex parte Davies [1991] JPL 540 
 
Buckinghamshire CC v SSE & Brown [1997] 23 QBD 19.12.97 
Flynn & Sheridan v SSCLG & Basildon BC [2014] EWHC 390 (Admin) 
Only 
 
 
REQUIREMENTS – ‘ANCILLARY’ OPERATIONS 
113 
Murfitt v SSE & East Cambridgeshire CC [1980] JPL 598 
 
Worthy Fuel Injection Ltd v SSE & Southampton CC [1983] JPL 173 
Somak Travel v SSE & Brent LBC [1987] JPL 630 
updated.  
Hereford CC v SSE & Davies [1994] JPL 448 
Newbury DC v SSE & Mallaburn [1994] JPL B79 
Bowring v SSCLG & Waltham Forest LBC [2013] EWHC 1115 (Admin) 
Makanjuola v SSCLG & Waltham Forest LBC [2013] EWHC 3528 (Admin) 
Mohamed v SSCLG [2014] EWHC 4045 (Admin) 
Kestrel Hydro v SSCLG & Spelthorne BC [2015] EWHC 1654 (Admin), [2016] 
EWCA Civ 784 freequently 
 
 
is 
REQUIREMENTS - GENERAL 
115 
Ormston v Horsham RDC [1965] 17 P&CR 105 
 
Lipson & Lipson v SSE & Salford MBC [1976] 33 P&CR 95 
Hounslow LBC v Indian Gymkhana Club [1981] JPL 510 
Bath CC v SSE & Grosvenor Hotel (Bath) Ltd [1983] JPL 937 
R v Runnymede BC ex parte Seehra [1986] LGR 250 
Kaur v SSE [
publication  1989] EGCS 142 
Millen v SSE & Maidstone BC [1996] JPL 735 
Taylor and Sons (Farms) v SSETR & Three Rivers DC [2001] EWCA Civ 1254  
This  Pople v SSTLR & Lake District NPA [2002] EWHC 2851 (Admin)  
Fidler v FSS & Reigate and Banstead BC [2003] EWHC 2003 (Admin), [2004] 
EWCA Civ 1295 
Payne v NAW & Caerphilly CBC [2007] JPL 117  
Moore v SSCLG & Suffolk Coastal DC [2012] EWCA Civ 2101 
Williams v SSCLG & Chiltern DC [2013] EWCA Civ 958; JPL 692 
Elmbridge BC v SSCLG & Giggs Hill Green Homes [2015] EWHC 1367 (Admin) 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 13 

link to page 171 link to page 175 link to page 177 link to page 179 Al-Najafi v SSCLG & Ealing LBC [2015] (CO/4899/2014) 
Camden LBC v Galway-Cooper (CO/5519/2017 22 May 2018) 
Oates v SSCLG v Canterbury CC [2017] EWHC 2716 (Admin), [2018] EWCA Civ 
2229 
 
 
REQUIREMENTS – GROUND (F) & GROUND (A) 
118 
Wyatt BrOthers (Oxford) Ltd v SSETR [2001] PLCR 161  
 
Tapecrown Ltd v FSS & Vale of White Horse DC [2006] EWCA Civ 1744  
Mata v SSCLG [2012] EWHC 3473 (Admin) 
Ahmed v SSCLG & Hackney LBC [2014] EWCA Civ 566 
Ioannou v SSCLG & Enfield LBC [2014] EWCA Civ 1432 
2019
Humphreys v SSCLG & Essex CC [2016] EWHC 4152 (Admin)  
Miaris v SSCLG & Bath and NE Somerset Council [2015] EWHC 1564 (Admin), 
[2016] EWCA Civ 75 
Keenan v SSCLG & Woking BC [2016] EWHC 427; [2017] EWCA Civ 438 
 
 
REQUIREMENTS – SAVINGS FOR LAWFUL OR ESTABLISHED USE 
120 
November 
Mansi v Elstree RDC [1964] 16 P&CR 154 
 
Bromley LBC v SSE & George Hoeltschi and Son [1977] 244 Eg 49 
Day & Mid Warwickshire Motors v SSE & Solihull MBC [1979] JPL 538  26th 
Cord v SSE & Torbay BC [1981] JPL 40 
at: 
Denham Developments Ltd v SSE & Brentwood DC [1984] JPL 347 
Burge v SSE & Chelmsford BC [1988] JPL 497 
as 
South Ribble BC v SSE & Swires [1990] JPL 808 
Wallington v SSE & Montgomeryshire DC [1990] JPL 112; [1991] JPL 942  
R v Runnymede BC ex parte Singh [1991] JPL 542 
John Kennelly Sales Ltd v SSE & North East Derbyshire DC [1994] JPL B83 
correct 
Lynch v SSE & Basildon DC [1999] JPL 354 
Kinnersley Engineering Ltd v SSETR [2001] JPL 1082 
Duguid v SSETR & West Lindsey DC [2001] JPL 323  
Only 
Lough & Others v FSS [2004] 1 WLR 2557  
Chas Storer Ltd v SSCLG & Hertfordshire CC [2009] EWHC 1071 (Admin); 
[2010] JPL 83 
Elvington Park Ltd v SSCLG & York CC [2011] EWHC 3041 (Admin); [2012] JPL 
556 
Hancock v SSCLG & Windsor and Maidenhead RBC [2012] EWHC 3704 (Admin) 
updated.  
Mohamed v SSCLG [2014] EWHC 4045 (Admin) 
Turner v SSCLG & South Buckinghamshire DC [2015] EWHC 1895 (Admin) 
Stanius v SSCLG & Ealing LBC (CO 11.4.17) 
Oates v SSCLG v Canterbury CC [2017] EWHC 2716 (Admin), [2018] EWCA Civ 
2229 
 
 
USES – INCIDENTAL OR ANC
freequently  ILLARY 
123 
Bromley LBC v SSE & George Hoeltschi and Son [1977] 244 Eg 49 
 
is 
Emma Hotels Ltd v SSE & Southend-on-Sea BC [1980] 41 P&CR 255 
Allen v SSE & Reigate and Banstead BC [1990] JPL 340 
Wallington v SSE & Montgomeryshire DC [1990] JPL 112; [1991] JPL 942  
Croydon LBC v Gladden [1994] 1 PLR 30  
Millington v SSETR & Shrewsbury and Atcham BC [2000] JPL 297  
Harrods Ltd v SSETR & Kensington and Chelsea RBC [2002] JPL 1258  
publication 
 
 
USE CLASSES ORDER 
124 
Vickers Armstrong v Central Land Board [1958] 9 P&CR 33 
 
This  Brazil (Concrete) Ltd v MHLG & Amersham RDC [1967] 18 P&CR 396 
Kwik-Save Discount Group v SSW [1981] JPL 198 
Carpet Decor (Guildford) Ltd v SSE & Guildford DC [1981] JPL 606 
Cawley v SSE & Vale Royal DC [1990] JPL 742 
R v Tunbridge Wells BC ex parte Blue Boys Developments Ltd [1990] 1 PLR 55 
Kalra v SSE & Waltham Forest LBC [1995] JPL 850  
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 14 

Rugby Football Union v SSTLR [2002] EWCA Civ 1169 
R (oao Hossack) v Kettering BC & English Churches Housing Group [2002] JPL 
1206 
North Devon DC v FSS & Southern Childcare Ltd [2003] EWHC 157 (Admin)  
Belmont Riding Centre v FSS & Barnet LBC [2003] EWHC 1895 
Eastleigh BC v FSS & Asda Stores [2004] EWHC 1408 (Admin) 
R (oao Crawley BC) v FSS & the Evesleigh Group [2004] EWHC 160 (Admin)  
Fidler v FSS & Reigate and Banstead BC [2003] EWHC 2003 (Admin), [2004] 
EWCA Civ 1295  
R (oao Winchester CC) v SSCLG [2007] EWHC 2303 (Admin) 
R (oao Tendring DC) v SSCLG [2008] EWHC 2122 (Admin); [2009] JPL 350 
2019
R (oao Harbige) v SSCLG [2012] EWHC 1128 (Admin) 
R (oao Royal London Mutual Insurance Society) v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 3597 
(Admin) 
 
November 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 15 

link to page 111 link to page 151 link to page 171 link to page 173 link to page 95 link to page 148 link to page 165 link to page 178 link to page 178 link to page 138 link to page 171 link to page 107 link to page 123 link to page 121 link to page 123 link to page 96 link to page 105 link to page 98 link to page 139 link to page 85 link to page 97 link to page 161 link to page 157 link to page 161 link to page 88 link to page 127 link to page 86 link to page 101 link to page 170 link to page 137 link to page 152 link to page 146 link to page 146 link to page 124 link to page 180 link to page 143 link to page 165 link to page 117 link to page 145 link to page 139 link to page 95 link to page 129 link to page 139 link to page 163 link to page 94 link to page 168 link to page 166 link to page 84 link to page 134 link to page 179 link to page 127 link to page 136 link to page 141 link to page 116 link to page 146 link to page 155 link to page 175 link to page 178 link to page 95 link to page 96 link to page 130 link to page 125 link to page 164 link to page 145 link to page 105 link to page 105 INDEX OF JUDGMENTS  
 
A and T Investments v SSE & Kensington and Chelsea RBC [1996] JPL B94 
56 
Agecrest v Gwynedd CC [1998] JPL 325 
96 
Ahmed v SSCLG & Hackney LBC [2014] EWCA Civ 566  
116, 
118 
A I and P (Stratford) v Tower Hamlets LBC [1976] JPL 234  
40 
Akhtar v SSCLG & Barking and Dagenham LBC [2017] EWHC 1840 (Admin) 
93, 
110  
Allen v SSE & Reigate and Banstead BC [1990] JPL 340  
93,  
123 2019
Al-Najafi v SSCLG & Ealing LBC [2015] (CO/4899/2014)  
83, 
116 
Arnold v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 1197 (Admin), [2017] EWCA Civ 231  
52, 
66, 
67, 68  
Ashford BC v SSE & Hume [1992] JPL 362  
41 
Attorney-General ex rel Sutcliffe & Rouse & Hughes v Calderdale BC [1983] JPL 310 
50 
November 
Avon Estates Ltd v Welsh Ministers & Ceredigion CC [2010] EWHC 1759 (Admin), [2011] EWCA  43 
Civ 553  
 
 
26th 
Backer v SSE & Camden LBC [1983] JPL 167 
84  
Banister v SSE & Fordham [1995] JPL 1011  
30 
at: 
Barlow v SSTLR & Uttlesford DC (QBD 14.11.02 Sullivan J) 
42 
Barnet Meeting Room Trust v SSE [1989] EGCS 141  
106 
as 
Barnett v SSCLG & East Hants DC [2008] EWHC 1601 (Admin), [2009] EWCA Civ 476 
103 
Baroness Cumberlege of Newick & Cumberlege v SSCLG & DLA Delivery Ltd [2017] EWHC 2057  106 
(Admin), [2018] EWCA 1305 
Barton v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2017] EWHC 573 (Admin) 
33, 72 
correct 
Barvis v SSE [1971] 22 P&CR 710  
31  
Basingstoke & Deane BC v SSCLG & Stockdale [2009] EWHC 1012 Admin; JPL 1585  
47 
Bath CC v SSE & Grosvenor Hotel (Bath) Ltd [1983] JPL 937 
115 
Only 
Beach v SSETR & Runnymede BC [2002] JPL 185  
82 
Bedford BC v SSCLG & Murzyn [2008] EWHC 2304 (Admin) 
97 
Beg v Luton [2017] EWHC 3435 (Admin) 
91, 92 
Belmont Farm v MHLG [1962] 13 P&CR 417  
69 
Belmont Riding Centre v FSS & Barnet LBC [2003] EWHC 1895  
125, 
Bennett v SSE & & East Devon DC [1993] JPL 134 
88  
Benson v SSCLG & Hertsmere BC [2018] EWHC 23
updated.   54 (Admin) 
110 
Berkley v Poultett & Others [1977] EG 911 
62 
Biddle v SSE & Wychavon DC [1999] 4 PLR 31 
90  
Birmingham Corporation v MHLG & Ullah [1964] 1 QB 178  
84 
Bizony v SSE [1976] JPL 306  
40 
Blackburn v FSS & South Holland DC [2002] EWHC 671 (Admin)  
74 
Blackpool BC v SSE & Keenan [1980] JPL 527  
84 
Blight v SSE & Mid Sussex DC [198
freequently 8] JPL 565  
108 
Bonsall v SSCLG & Rotherham MBC [2015] EWCA Civ 1246; [2016] JPL 524 
39 
is 
Bowring v SSCLG & Waltham Forest LBC [2013] EWHC 1115 (Admin)  
113 
Bowring v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 1027 (Admin)  
111 
Bramall v SSCLG & Rother DC [2011] EWHC 1531 (Admin) 
29, 79 
Brazil (Concrete) Ltd v MHLG & Amersham RDC [1967] 18 P&CR 396  
124 
Brentwood DC v SSE & Gray [1996] JPL 939 
72 
Bristol Stadium v Brown [1980] JPL 107  
81, 
86,  
publication 
Britannia Assets v SSCLG & Medway Council [2011] EWHC 1908 (Admin) 
61, 91  
British Railways Board v SSE & Others [1994] JPL 32  
100 
Bromley LBC v SSE & George Hoeltschi and Son [1977] 244 Eg 49 
131, 
This 
134 
Bromsgrove DC v SSE [1988] JPL 257  
51, 52 
Brooks & Burton Ltd v SSE & Dorset CC [1977] JPL 720  
86  
Broughton v SSE [1992] JPL 550 
70  
Brown v SSCLG & Others [2015] EWHC 2502 (Admin)  
109 
Bruschweiller & Others v SSE & Chelmsford DC [1996] JPL 292  
90 
Brutus v Cozens [1973] AC 854 
50  
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 16 

link to page 167 link to page 159 link to page 106 link to page 127 link to page 175 link to page 87 link to page 92 link to page 107 link to page 101 link to page 155 link to page 114 link to page 91 link to page 157 link to page 87 link to page 96 link to page 171 link to page 126 link to page 93 link to page 86 link to page 179 link to page 91 link to page 119 link to page 179 link to page 157 link to page 176 link to page 161 link to page 86 link to page 165 link to page 97 link to page 160 link to page 125 link to page 101 link to page 119 link to page 114 link to page 112 link to page 94 link to page 119 link to page 141 link to page 105 link to page 145 link to page 152 link to page 152 link to page 141 link to page 117 link to page 175 link to page 98 link to page 132 link to page 141 link to page 154 link to page 178 link to page 143 link to page 144 link to page 120 link to page 97 link to page 146 link to page 132 link to page 108 link to page 175 link to page 130 link to page 159 link to page 166 link to page 92 link to page 137 link to page 118 link to page 118 Buckinghamshire CC v SSE & Brown [1997] 23 QBD 19.12.97 
112 
Burdle & Williams v SSE & New Forest RDC [1972] 1 WLR 1207  
104  
Burford v SSCLG & Test Valley BC [2017] EWHC 1493 (Admin) 
51 
Burge v SSE & Chelmsford BC [1988] JPL 497  
72, 
120 
Burroughs Day v Bristol CC [1996] 1 PLR 78; 1 EGLR 167  
32  
Bury MBC v SSCLG & Entwistle [2011] EWHC 2191 (Admin) 
36, 52 
Butcher v SSE & Maidstone BC [1996] JPL 636  
46, 
100 
Bylander Waddell Partnership v SSE & Harrow LBC [1994] JPL 440  
59 
Byrne v SSE & Arun DC [1998] JPL 122  
36 
 
 
2019
Calder Gravels v Kirklees MBC (1989) 60 PLR 322, [1990] 2 PLR 26 
102 
Cambridge CC v SSE & Milton Park Investment [1991] 1 PLR 109  
32 
Camden LBC v SSE & PSP Nominees [1989] JPL 613  
41 
Camden LBC v Galway-Cooper (CO/5519/2017 22 May 2018) 
116 
Caradon v SSETR [2000] QBD 12.9.00 
71 
Cardiff CC v NAW & Malik [2006] EWHC 1412  
38 
November 
Cardiff Rating Authority v Guest Keens [1949] 1 KB 385  
31 
Carpet Decor (Guildford) Ltd v SSE & Guildford DC [1981] JPL 606  
124 
Carter v SSE & Carrick DC [1991] JPL 131; [1994] 1 WLR 1212, [1994] 1 WLR 1212, [1995] 
36 
26th 
JPL 311   
Cawley v SSE & Vale Royal DC [1990] JPL 742  
64, 
at: 
124 
Centre Hotels (Cranston) Ltd v SSE & Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [1982] JPL 108  
102 
as 
Chas Storer Ltd v SSCLG & Hertfordshire CC [2009] EWHC 1071 (Admin); [2010] JPL 83  
121 
Chelmsford BC v SSE & E R Alexander Ltd [1985] JPL 316  
106 
Chester CC v Woodward [1962] 2 WLR 636  
31 
Chesterton Commercial (Bucks) Ltd v Wokingham DC [2018] EWHC 1795 (Admin) 
110 
Christoforou v SSE & Islington LBC [1994] JPL B44 
correct 
42 
Church Commissioners v SSE & Gateshead MBC [1996] JPL 669 
105 
Clarke v SSE [1993] JPL 32 
70 
Clwyd CC v SSW [1982] JPL 696 
46, 64 
Only 
Clyde & Co v SSE & Guildford BC [1977] JPL 521  
59 
Coghurst Wood Leisure Park Ltd v SSTLR [2002] EWHC 1091 Admin; [2003] JPL 206 
57 
Cole & Cole v Lichfield LDC [2016] EWHC 3059 (Admin) 
39 
Cole v Somerset CC [1957] 1 QB 23 
64 
Collins v SSCLG & Hampshire CC [2016] EWHC 5 (Admin) 
86 
Collins v SSE & Epping Forest DC [1989] EGCS 15 – [1989] CO 1590/88 – on System 
50 
updated.  
Collis and Eclipse Radio and TV Services v SSE & Dudley MBC [1975] 29 P&CR 390 
90 
Commercial Land Ltd v SSTLR & Kensington and Chelsea RBC [2003] JPL 358 
97 
Connaught Quarries Ltd v SSETR & East Hampshire DC [2001] JPL 1210 
97 
Copeland BC v SSE & Ross & Ross [1976] JPL 304 
86 
Copthorn Land and Timber Co Ltd v MHLG & Another [1965] QB 490 
62 
Cord v SSE & Torbay BC [1981] JPL 40 
120 
Cotswold Grange Country Park LLP v SSCLG & Tewkesbury DC [2014] EWHC 1138 (Admin) 
43 
freequently 
Cottrell v SSE & Tonbridge and Malling BC [1982] JPL 443  
77 
is 
Coventry Scaffolding Co (London) Ltd v Parker [1987] JPL 127 
86 
Cresswell v Pearson [1997] JPL 860 
99 
Croydon LBC v Gladden [1994] 1 PLR 30 
123 
 
 
Dacorum BC v SSETR & Walsh [2000] CO/4895/99 QBD 24.8.00 
88, 89 
Dartford BC v SSCLG [2012] EWHC 1756 (Admin) 
66 
Davenport & Another v Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [1996] The Times 26.4.96  
42 
publication 
Davenport v The Mayor and Citizens of the City of Westminster [2011] EWCA Civ 458; JPL 
91 
1325 
Davies v SSE & South Herefordshire DC [1989] JPL 601  
77 
This  Davis v SSCLG & Lichfield DC [2016] EWHC 274 (Admin) 
53 
Day & Mid Warwickshire Motors v SSE & Solihull MBC [1979] JPL 538 
120 
De Mulder v SSE [1973] 27 P&CR 379 
75, 
104 
De Souza v SSCLG & Test Valley DC [2015] EWHC 2245 (Admin)  
111 
Deakin v FSS [2006] EWHC 3402 (Admin); [2007] JPL 1073 
37, 82 
Debenhams Plc v Westminster CC [1987] AC 396 
63 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 17 

link to page 132 link to page 88 link to page 118 link to page 165 link to page 89 link to page 89 link to page 116 link to page 176 link to page 99 link to page 119 link to page 105 link to page 149 link to page 142 link to page 180 link to page 124 link to page 145 link to page 141 link to page 153 link to page 171 link to page 130 link to page 176 link to page 122 link to page 178 link to page 164 link to page 143 link to page 120 link to page 123 link to page 126 link to page 83 link to page 139 link to page 165 link to page 85 link to page 119 link to page 116 link to page 151 link to page 148 link to page 152 link to page 114 link to page 167 link to page 91 link to page 97 link to page 137 link to page 159 link to page 85 link to page 101 link to page 124 link to page 125 link to page 160 link to page 89 link to page 119 link to page 127 link to page 175 link to page 95 link to page 163 link to page 132 link to page 129 link to page 154 link to page 159 link to page 159 link to page 109 link to page 110 link to page 163 link to page 153 Denham Developments v SSE & Brentwood DC [1984] JPL 347 
77 
Dill v SSCLG & Stratford-on-Avon DC [2017] EWHC 2378 (Admin); [2018] EWCA Civ 2619 
33, 
63,   
110 
Doncaster MBC v SSCLG & AB [2016] EWHC 2876 (Admin)  
34, 35 
Donovan v SSE [1987] JPL 118 
61 
Duguid v SSETR & West Lindsey DC [2001] JPL 323  
121 
Dunnett Investments Ltd v SSCLG & East Dorset DC [2016] EWHC 534 (Admin), [2017] EWCA 
44 
Civ 192 
Dunoon Developments Ltd v SSE & Poole BC [1992] JPL 936  
64 
Dyer v Dorset CC [1988] 3 WLR 213 
50 
Dyer v SSE & Purbeck DC [1996] JPL 740 
94  2019
 
 
Ealing LBC v SSCLG & Zaheer [2016] EWHC 700 (Admin) 
87 
Eastleigh BC v FSS & Asda Stores [2004] EWHC 1408 (Admin) 
125 
Eatherley v Camden LBC & Ireland [2016] EWHC 3108 (Admin) 
69 
Edwick v Sunbury on Thames UDC [1964] 63 LGR 204 
90  
Eldon Garages v Kingston-upon-Hull CBC [1974] 1 All ER 358 
86 
November 
Ellaway v Cardiff CC [2014] EWHC 836 (Admin) 
98 
Elmbridge BC v SSCLG & Giggs Hill Green Homes [2015] EWHC 1367 (Admin) 
98 
Elvington Park Ltd v SSCLG & York CC [2011] EWHC 3041 (Admin); [2012] JPL 556 
75,  
26th 
121 
Emin v SSE & Mid Sussex DC [1989] JPL 909 
67 
at: 
Emma Hotels Ltd v SSE & Southend-on-Sea BC [1980] 41 P&CR 255 
123 
Engbers v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 3541 (Admin); [2016] EWCA Civ 1183 
110 
as 
Epping Forest DC v Matthews [1986] JPL 132 
88 
Evans v SSCLG [2014] EWHC 4111 (Admin) 
65, 68 
Ewen Developments v SSE & North Norfolk DC [1980] JPL 404 
71 
 
 
Fairstate Ltd v FSS & Westminster CC [2005] EWCA Civ 283; JPL 133
correct 3  
28,  
84 
Farlingaye Investments Ltd v SSHCLG & Braintree DC – 1 August 2018 
110 
Fawcett Properties Ltd v Buckinghamshire CC [1960] All ER 503; [1961] AC 636 
30 
Only 
Fayrewood Fish Farms v SSE & Hampshire CC [1984] JPL 287 
64  
Ferris v SSE & Doncaster MBC [1988] JPL 777 
61 
F G Whitley & Sons v SSW & Clwyd CC [1990] JPL 678, [1992] JPL 856 
96 
Fidler v FSS & Reigate and Banstead BC [2003] EWHC 2003 (Admin), [2004] EWCA Civ 1183 
93 
Field v FSS & Crawley BC [2004] EWHC 147 (Admin) 
97 
Finn v SSE & Barnet LBC [1984] JPL 734 
59 
updated.  
Flynn & Sheridan v SSCLG & Basildon BC [2014] EWHC 390 (Admin) 
112 
Forest of Dean DC v SSE & Howells [1995] JPL 937 
36, 
42, 82 
Frank Vyner & Son Ltd v SSE & Hammersmith LBC [1977] 243 EG 597 
104 
FSS v Arun DC & Brown [2006] EWCA Civ 1172 
30, 46 
Fuller v SSE & Dover DC [1987] JPL 854 
69, 
71, 
freequently 
105 
 
is 
 
Gabbitas v SSE & Newham LBC [1985] JPL 630 
34 
Garland v MHLG [1968] 20 P&CR 93 
64, 
72, 
102 
George Wimpey & Co v SSE & New Forest DC [1979] JPL 314 
40 
Gill v SSE [1978] JPL 373 
108 
publication 
Glamorgan CC v Carter [1962] All ER 866; [1963] P&CR 88 
77 
Goodall v Peak District NPA [2008] EWHC 734 (Admin) 
74 
Goremsandu v SSCLG & Harrow LBC [2015] EWHC 2194 (Admin) 
99 
This  G Percy Trentham Ltd v MHLG & Gloucestershire CC [1966] 18 P&CR 225 
81, 
104 

Gravesham BC v SSE & O’Brien [1982] 47 P&CR 142; [1983] JPL 307 
54 
Grendon v FSS & Cotswold DC [2006] EWHC 1711 (Admin), [2007] JPL 275 
54 
Greycoat Commercial Estates v Radmore [1981] The Times 14.7.81 
108 
Greyfort Properties Ltd v SSCLG & Torbay Council [2011] EWCA Civ 908 
98 
 
 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 18 

link to page 122 link to page 143 link to page 87 link to page 176 link to page 124 link to page 97 link to page 155 link to page 89 link to page 178 link to page 141 link to page 83 link to page 114 link to page 124 link to page 159 link to page 112 link to page 168 link to page 130 link to page 138 link to page 127 link to page 124 link to page 95 link to page 107 link to page 125 link to page 130 link to page 159 link to page 133 link to page 104 link to page 113 link to page 117 link to page 107 link to page 164 link to page 170 link to page 144 link to page 86 link to page 83 link to page 143 link to page 173 link to page 173 link to page 155 link to page 83 link to page 97 link to page 139 link to page 163 link to page 96 link to page 94 link to page 86 link to page 105 link to page 133 link to page 148 link to page 160 link to page 96 link to page 176 link to page 107 link to page 159 link to page 124 link to page 159 link to page 179 link to page 170 link to page 174 link to page 111 link to page 134 link to page 85 link to page 130 link to page 135 link to page 135 Hammersmith and Fulham LBC v SSE & Davison [1994] JPL 957 
67 
Hammersmith and Fulham LBC v SSE & Sandral [1975] 30 P&CR 19 
88 
Hancock v SSCLG & Windsor and Maidenhead RBC [2012] EWHC 3704 (Admin) 
33, 
121 
Hancock v SSE & Torridge DC [1989] JPL 99 
70 
Handoll & Suddick v Warner & Goodman & Street & East Lindsay DC [1995] JPL 930 
42, 
100 
Hargrave House Ltd & Reiner v Highbury Corner Magistrates Court & Islington LBC [2018] 
33  
EWHC 279 (Admin)  
Harrods Ltd v SSETR & Kensington and Chelsea RBC [2002] JPL 1258  
123 
Harrogate BC v SSE & Proctor [1987] JPL 288 
86 
Hartley v MHLG [1970] 2 WLR 1 
28  2019
Haven Leisure Ltd v SSE & North Cornwall DC [1994] JPL 148 
59 
Havering LBC v SSCLG [2017] EWHC 1546 (Admin) 
69 
Hawkey & Others v SSE & Mid Sussex DC [1971] 22 P&CR 610 
104 
Henry Boot Homes Ltd v Bassetlaw DC [2002] EWCA Civ 983; [2003] JPL 1030 
57 
Hereford CC v SSE & Davies [1994] JPL 448 
113 
Hertfordshire CC v SSCLG & Metal and Waste Recycling Ltd [2012] EWCA Civ 1473 
75, 83 
November 
Hibbitt v SSCLG & Rushcliffe BC [2016] EWHC 2853 (Admin) 
72 
Hidderley v Warwickshire CC [1963] 14 P&CR 134 
69 
Hildenborough Village Preservation Society v SSE [1978] JPL 708 
40 
26th 
Hill v SSE & Bromley LBC [1993] JPL 158 
52, 70 
Hilliard v SSE & Surrey CC [1978] JPL 840 
75, 
at: 
104 
Hillingdon LBC v SSCLG & Autodex Ltd [2008] EWHC 198 (Admin) 
79 
as 
Hillingdon LBC v SSE & Others [1999] EWHC 772 (Admin) 
49, 58 
Holland v Hodgson [1872] LR 7 CP 
62 
Hope v SSE [1976] 31 P&CR 120 
52 
Hopkins Developments Ltd v SSCLG [2014] EWCA Civ 470 
109 
Hounslow LBC v Indian Gymkhana Club [1981] JPL 510  correct 
115 
Howells v SSCLG & Gloucestershire CC [2009] EWHC 2757 (Admin) 
89 
Howes v SSE & Devon CC [1984] JPL 439 
31 
Hughes v SSETR & South Holland DC [2000] JPL 826 
28 
Only 
Hughes and Son v SSE & Fareham BC [1985] JPL 486 
88 
Humphreys v SSCLG & Essex CC [2016] EWHC 4152 (Admin)  
118, 
119 
Hussein v SSCLG [2017] EWCA Civ 1060 
100 
 
 
Iddenden v SSE [1972] 1 WLR 1433 
28 
updated.  
I'm Your Man Ltd v SSE & North Somerset DC [1999] 4 PLR 107 
42 
Impey v SSE & Lake District SPB [1981] JPL 363; [1984] P&CR 157 
84 
Ioannou v SSCLG [2014] EWCA Civ 1432 
108 
Irlam Brick Co v Warrington BC [1982] JPL 709 
41 
 
 
Jackson v SSCLG & Westminster CC [2015] EWCA Civ 1246; [2016] JPL 524 
39 
James v MHLG & Brecon CC [1963] 15 P&CR 20 
31 
freequently 
James v SSE [1991] 1 PLR 58 
50 
is 
James Hay Pension Trustees Ltd v FSS & South Gloucestershire Council [2006] EWCA Civ 1387 
78 
Jarmain v SSETR & Welwyn Hatfield DC [2002] PLR 126  
93 
Jennings Motors Ltd v SSE & New Forest DC [1982] 2 WLR 131 
105 
Jillings v SSE & the Broads Authority [1984] JPL 32 
41 
John Kennelly Sales Ltd v SSE & North East Derbyshire DC [1994] JPL B83 
121 
John Pearcy Transport v SSE & Hounslow LBC [1986] JPL 680 
52 
Johnston & Johnston v SSE & Haringey LBC [1974] 28 P&CR 424 
104 
publication 
Jones v Stockport MBC [1984] JPL 274  
69 
Joyce Shopfitters v SSE & Bromley LBC [1976] JPL 236 
104 
 
 
This  Kalra v SSE & Waltham Forest LBC [1995] JPL 850 
124 
Kaur v SSE [1989] EGCS 142 
115 
Keenan v SSCLG & Woking BC [2016] EWHC 427; [2017] EWCA Civ 438 
66 
Keevil v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2012] EWHC 322 (Admin) 
57, 79 
Kember v SSE & Tunbridge Wells DC [1982] JPL 383 
30 
Kensington and Chelsea RBC v Mia Carla Ltd [1981] JPL 50 
75 
Kensington and Chelsea RBC v SSCLG & 38 Cathcart Ltd (CO/4492/2016) 
80 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 19 

link to page 126 link to page 168 link to page 89 link to page 163 link to page 95 link to page 176 link to page 89 link to page 163 link to page 147 link to page 179 link to page 99 link to page 99 link to page 101 link to page 121 link to page 158 link to page 117 link to page 151 link to page 136 link to page 139 link to page 170 link to page 114 link to page 168 link to page 137 link to page 176 link to page 125 link to page 83 link to page 89 link to page 163 link to page 137 link to page 163 link to page 168 link to page 151 link to page 157 link to page 175 link to page 129 link to page 173 link to page 149 link to page 139 link to page 125 link to page 146 link to page 146 link to page 94 link to page 150 link to page 105 link to page 174 link to page 104 link to page 114 link to page 133 link to page 127 link to page 143 link to page 145 link to page 145 link to page 141 link to page 125 link to page 178 link to page 123 link to page 168 link to page 176 link to page 140 link to page 171 link to page 109 link to page 143 link to page 163 link to page 163 Kent CC v SSE & R Marchant & Sons Ltd [1996] JPL 931 
71 
Kestrel Hydro v SSCLG & Spelthorne BC [2015] EWHC 1654 (Admin), [2016] EWCA Civ 784 
114 
K G Diecasting (Weston) Ltd v SSE & Woodspring DC [1993] JPL 925 
34, 
108 
Kingston-on-Thames RBC v SSE [1973] 1 WLR 1549 
40 
Kinnersley Engineering Ltd v SSETR [2001] JPL 1082 
121 
Knights Motors v SSE [1984] JPL 584 
34, 
108 
Koumis v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 2966 (Admin); [2014] EWCA Civ 1723 
92 
Kwik-Save Discount Group v SSW [1981] JPL 198 
124 
 
 
Lambeth LBC v SSCLG & Others [2017] EWHC 2412 (Admin), [2018] EWCA Civ 844 
44, 45 
2019
Langmead v SSHCLG & Others [2018] EWHC 2202 (Admin) 
47 
Larkin v SSE & Basildon DC [1980] JPL 407 
67 
Lawson Builders Ltd & Lawson & Lawson v SSCLG & Wakefield MDC [2013] EWHC 3388 
103 
(Admin), [2015] EWCA Civ 122 
Leigh v Taylor [1902] AC 157 
62 
Leisure GB Plc v Isle of Wight Council [1999] 80 P&CR 370 
96 
November 
Lilo Blum v SSE [1987] JPL 278 
81 
L ipson & Lipson v SSE & Salford MBC [1976] 33 P&CR 95 
84, 
115 
26th 
London Residuary Body v SSE & Lambeth LBC [1988] JPL 637 
59 
Lough & Others v FSS [2004] 1 WLR 2557 
113 
at: 
Lynch v SSE & Basildon DC [1999] JPL 354 
82, 
121 
as 
Lyons v SSCLG [2010] EWHC 3652 (Admin)  
70 
 
 
M & M (Land) Ltd v SSCLG [2007] All ER(D) 55 
29 
Mahajan v SSTLR & Hounslow LBC [2002] JPL 928 
34, 
109 
correct 
Main v SSETR & South Oxfordshire DC [1999] JPL 195 
82 
Majorpier Ltd v SSE & Southwark LBC [1990] 59 P&CR 453 
108 
Makanjuola v SSCLG & Waltham Forest LBC [2013] EWHC 3528 (Admin) 
113 
Only 
Malvern Hills DC v SSE & Barnes and Co [1982] JPL 439 
96 
Manning v SSE & Harrow LBC [1976] JPL 634 
102 
Mansi v Elstree RDC [1964] 16 P&CR 154 
120 
Massingham v SSTLR & Havant BC [2002] EWHC 1578 (Admin) 
74 
Mata v SSCLG [2012] EWHC 3473 (Admin) 
118 
Mayes & White & Oubridge v SSW & Dinefwr BC [1989] JPL 848 
94 
updated.  
Mayflower Cambridge v SSE & Cambridge CC [1975] 30 P&CR 28 
84 
McKay & Walker v SSE & South Cambridgeshire DC [1989] JPL 590 
70 
McKay v SSE & Cornwall CC & Penwith DC [1994] JPL 806 
91 
Measor v SSETR & Tunbridge Wells DC [1999] JPL 182 
36 
Meecham v SSCLG & Uttlesford DC [2013] HC 
39, 95 
Methuen-Campbell v Walters [1979] 1 QB 525  
50 
Miaris v SSCLG & Bath and NE Somerset Council [2015] EWHC 1564 (Admin), [2016] EWCA 
119 
freequently 
Civ 75 
is 
Mid Devon DC v FSS & Stevens [2004] EWHC 814 (Admin)   
49 
Mid Suffolk DC v FSS & Lebbon [2006] JPL 859 
59, 78 
Miles v NAW & Caerphilly CBC [2007] EWHC 10 (Admin); JPL 1235 
72 
Millen v SSE & Maidstone BC [1996] JPL 735 
88, 
90, 
115 
Miller Mead v MHLG [1963] 2 WLR 225 
86 
publication 
Millington v SSETR & Shrewsbury and Atcham BC [2000] JPL 297  
70, 
123 
Mohamed v SSCLG [2014] EWHC 4045 (Admin) 
68, 
This 
113, 
121 
Moore v SSCLG & Suffolk Coastal DC [2012] EWCA Civ 2101 
85, 
116 
Moore v SSE & New Forest DC [1998] JPL 877  
54 
Morris v SSE & Thurrock BC [1975] 31 P&CR 216 
88, 
108 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 20 

link to page 168 link to page 120 link to page 132 link to page 58 link to page 57 link to page 95 link to page 159 link to page 168 link to page 85 link to page 101 link to page 149 link to page 83 link to page 83 link to page 101 link to page 127 link to page 175 link to page 120 link to page 180 link to page 101 link to page 101 link to page 101 link to page 166 link to page 161 link to page 117 link to page 88 link to page 115 link to page 147 link to page 171 link to page 176 link to page 144 link to page 106 link to page 135 link to page 170 link to page 166 link to page 136 link to page 132 link to page 140 link to page 115 link to page 146 link to page 170 link to page 96 link to page 122 link to page 95 link to page 163 link to page 83 link to page 130 link to page 136 link to page 136 link to page 83 link to page 155 link to page 83 link to page 125 link to page 136 link to page 144 link to page 170 link to page 149 link to page 111 link to page 161 link to page 126 link to page 121 link to page 155 link to page 91 link to page 87 link to page 130 link to page 134 link to page 134 Murfitt v SSE & East Cambridgeshire CC [1980] JPL 598 
113 
Murrell v SSCLG & Broadland DC [2010] EWCA Civ 1367 
65 
 
 
Nash v SSE & Epping Forest DC [1986] JPL 128 
77 
Nelsovil v MHLG [1962] 1 WLR 404 
34 
Newbury DC v SSE [1980] 2 WLR 379, [1981] AC 578 
28, 
41, 
104 
Newbury DC v SSE & Mallaburn [1994] JPL B79 
113 
Newbury DC v SSE & Marsh [1994] JPL 134 
30, 46 
Newham LBC v Miah [2016] EWHC 1043 (Admin) 
94 
Nicholls & Nicholls v SSE & Bristol CC [1981] JPL 890 
28  2019
Nicholson v SSE & Maldon DC [1998] JPL 553 
28,  
46 
Nolan v SSE & Bury MBC [1998] JPL B72 
72, 
120 
Noquet & Noquet v SSCLG & Cherwell DC [2016] EWHC 209 (Admin) 
65 
North Devon DC v FSS & Southern Childcare Ltd [2003] EWHC 157 (Admin)  
125 
November 
North Devon DC v FSS & Stokes [2004] JPL 1396 
46 
North Devon DC v SSE & Rottenbury [1998] EGCS 72 
30, 46 
North Norfolk DC v SSHCLG & Others [2018] EWHC 2076 (Admin) 
111 
26th 
North Wiltshire DC v SSE & Clover [1992] JPL 955 
106 
Norton v Dashwood [1896] 2 Ch 497 
62 
at: 
 
 
Oates v SSCLG v Canterbury CC [2017] EWHC 2716 (Admin), [2018] EWCA Civ 2229 
33, 
as 
60, 
92,  
116, 
122 
O’Connor v SSCLG & Epping Forest DC [2014] EWHC 3821 (Admin) 
89 
correct 
O’Flynn v SSCLG & Warwick DC [2016] EWHC 2984 (Admin) 
51, 80 
Ormston v Horsham RDC [1965] 17 P&CR 105 
115 
Oxford CC v SSCLG & One Folly Bridge Ltd [2007] EWHC 769 (Admin) 
111 
Only 
 
 
Panayi v SSE & Hackney LBC [1985] 50 P&CR 109 
81,  
Panton & Farmer v SSETR & Vale of White Horse DC [1999] JPL 461 
77 
Paramaguru v Ealing LBC [2018] EWHC 373 (Admin) 
85 
Parvez v SSCLG & Bolton MBC [2017] EWHC 3188 (Admin) 
60 
Payne v NAW & Caerphilly CBC [2007] JPL 117 
91, 
updated.  
116 
Peak Park JPB v SSE [1980] JPL 114 
41 
Pêche d’Or Investments v SSE [1996] JPL 311 
67 
Penwith DC v SSE [1977] 34 P&CR 269 
40 
Performance Cars Ltd v SSE [1977] JPL 585 
108 
Petticoat Lane Rentals v SSE [1971] All ER 310 
28 
Philglow Ltd v SSE & Hillingdon LBC [1985] JPL 318 
75, 81 
freequently 
Philip Farrington Properties v SSE & Lewes DC [1982] JPL 638 
81 
Pilkington v SSE 
is & Lancashire CC [1973] 1 WLR 1527 
28, 
100 
Pioneer Aggregates (UK) Ltd v SSE [1984] 2 All ER 358 
28 
Pitman & Others v SSE & Canterbury [1989] JPL 831 
70, 82 
Pople v SSTLR & Lake District NPA [2002] EWHC 2851 (Admin) 
89, 
115 
Porritt & Williams v SSE & Bromley LBC [1988] JPL 414 
94 
Porter v SSET
publication R [1996] 3 All ER 693 
56 
Poundstretcher Ltd & Harris Queensway PLC v SSE & Liverpool CC [1989] JPL 90 
106 
Prengate Properties Ltd v SSE [1973] 25 P&CR 311 
71 
This  Pressland v Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [2016] EWHC 1763 (Admin) 
66 
Prestige Homes (Southern) Ltd v SSE & Shepway DC [1992] JPL 842 
100 
Pugsley v SSE & North Devon DC [1996] JPL 124 
36 
 
 
R (oao Beronstone Ltd) v FSS [2006] EWHC 2391; [2007] JPL 471 
32 
R (oao Childs) v FSS & Test Valley BC [2005] EWHC 2368 (Admin) 
75 
R (oao Colver) v SSCLG & Rochford DC [2008] EWHC 2500 (Admin) 
79 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 21 

link to page 180 link to page 111 link to page 138 link to page 138 link to page 161 link to page 92 link to page 123 link to page 126 link to page 181 link to page 66 link to page 123 link to page 179 link to page 138 link to page 104 link to page 131 link to page 160 link to page 148 link to page 146 link to page 121 link to page 125 link to page 94 link to page 120 link to page 157 link to page 166 link to page 135 link to page 166 link to page 155 link to page 148 link to page 59 link to page 181 link to page 88 link to page 88 link to page 157 link to page 114 link to page 133 link to page 134 link to page 105 link to page 133 link to page 161 link to page 180 link to page 110 link to page 121 link to page 123 link to page 135 link to page 122 link to page 138 link to page 126 link to page 160 link to page 180 link to page 113 link to page 154 link to page 89 link to page 112 link to page 151 link to page 157 link to page 151 link to page 95 link to page 96 link to page 95 link to page 97 link to page 97 link to page 116 link to page 141 link to page 68 link to page 175 link to page 175 R (oao Crawley BC) v FSS & the Evesleigh Group [2004] EWHC 160 (Admin) 
125 
R (oao East Hertfordshire DC) v FSS [2007] EWHC 834 (Admin) 
56 
R (oao East Sussex CC) v SSCLG & Robins & Robins [2009] EWHC 3841 (Admin) 
83 
R (oao Fidler) v SSCLG [2011] EWCA Civ 1159 – Further names in title 
39 
R (oao Fox Strategic Land and Property Ltd) v SSCLG & Another [2012] EWCA Civ 1198 
106 
R (oao Green o/b of the Friends of Fordwich and District) v FSS & Canterbury CC & Jones 
37 
[2005] EWHC 691, [2005] EWCA Civ 1727 
R (oao Gore) v SSCLG & Dartmoor NPA [2008] EWHC 3278 (Admin) 
68 
R (oao Hall Hunter Partnership) v FSS & Waverley BC [2007] JPL 1023 
71 
R (oao Harbige) v SSCLG [2012] EWHC 1128 (Admin) 
126 
R (oao Hart Aggregates Ltd) v Hartlepool BC [2005] EWHC 840 (Admin) 
97 
R (oao Hilton) v SSCLG & Bexley LBC [2016] EWHC (Admin)  
68  2019
R (oao Hossack) v Kettering BC & English Churches Housing Group [2002] JPL 1206 
124 
R (oao Kemball) v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 3368 (Admin) 
102 
R (oao Kensington & Chelsea RBC) v SSCLG & Reis & Tong [2016] EWHC 1785 (Admin) 
83 
R (oao KP JR Management Co Ltd) v Richmond LBC & Others [2018] EWHC 84 (Admin) 
49, 
76, 
105 
November 
R (oao Lambrou) v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 325 (Admin) 
93 
R (oao Lynes & Lynes) v West Berkshire DC [2003] JPL 1137 
91 
R (oao Marshall) v East Dorset DC & Pitman [2018] EWHC 226 (Admin) 
66, 71 
26th 
R (oao Matilda Holdings Ltd) v SSCLG [2016] EWHC 2725 (Admin)  
39 
R (oao Orange Personal Communication Services Ltd & Others) v Islington LBC [2006] EWCA 
65 
at: 
157 
R (oao Oury) v SSE ex parte Slough BC [1995] JPL 1128  
102 
as 
R (oao Perrett) v SSCLG & West Dorset DC [2009] EWCA Civ 1365 
111 
R (oao Pitt) v SSCLG & Epping Forest DC [2015] EWHC 1931 (Admin) 
80, 
109 
R (oao Robert Hitchens Ltd) v Worcestershire CC [2015] EWCA Civ 1060 
100 
R (oao Romer) v FSS [2006] EWHC 3480 (Admin); [2007] JPL 1354 
93 
correct 
R (oao Royal London Mutual Insurance Society) v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 3597 (Admin) 
43, 
126 
R (oao Save Woolley Valley Action Group Ltd) v Bath and North East Somerset Council [2012] 
33, 65 
Only 
EWHC 2161 (Admin) 
R (oao Shepway DC) v Ashford BC [1998] EWHC Admin 488, JPL 1073  
102 
R (oao Sumner) v SSCLG [2010] EWHC 372 (Admin) 
59 78, 
79 
R (oao Sumption) v Greenwich LBC [2007] EWHC 2276 (Admin) 
50,  
78 
updated.  
R (oao Tate) v Northumberland CC & Leffers-Smith [2018] EWCA Civ 1519 
107 
R (oao Tendring DC) v SSCLG [2008] EWHC 2122 (Admin); [2009] JPL 350 
125 
R (oao Townsley) v SSCLG [2009] EWHC 3522 (Admin) 
55, 
66, 68 
R (oao Waters) v Breckland DC & Others [2016] EWHC 951 (Admin) 
80 
R (oao Watts) v SSETR & Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [2002] JPL 1473 
67 
R (oao Westminster CC) v SSCLG & Oriol Badia and Property Investment (Development) Ltd 
83 
freequently 
[2015] EWCA Civ 482 
R (oao Wilsdon) v
is   FSS & Tewkesbury BC [2007] JPL 1063 
71 
R (oao Winchester CC) v SSCLG [2007] EWHC 2303 (Admin) 
105, 
125 
R v Caradon DC ex parte Knott [2000] 3 PLR 1 
58 
R v Chichester Justices ex parte Chichester DC [1990] 60 P&CR 342 
99 
R v Deputy Industrial Injuries Commissioner ex parte Moore [1965] 1 QB 456 
34 
R v East Sussex CC ex parte Reprotech (Pebsham) Ltd [2002] UKHL 8 
57 
R v Elmbridge
publication   BC ex parte Oakimber [1991] 3 PLR 35 
96, 
102 
R v Flintshire CC ex parte Somerfield Stores [1998] PLCR 336 
96 
This  R v Hillingdon LBC ex parte Royco Homes [1974] 1QB 720 
40 
R v Newbury DC ex parte Stevens & Partridge [1992] JPL 1057 
42 
R v Rochdale MBC ex parte Tew [1999] 3 PLR 74 
40,  
41, 42 
R v Rochester-upon-Medway CC ex parte Hobday [1990] JPL 17 
61, 86 
R v Runnymede BC ex parte Seehra [1986] LGR 250 
115 
R v Runnymede BC ex parte Singh [1991] JPL 542 
120 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 22 

link to page 139 link to page 163 link to page 167 link to page 143 link to page 111 link to page 161 link to page 146 link to page 163 link to page 157 link to page 118 link to page 87 link to page 150 link to page 132 link to page 119 link to page 179 link to page 146 link to page 117 link to page 86 link to page 117 link to page 122 link to page 145 link to page 126 link to page 154 link to page 152 link to page 58 link to page 130 link to page 145 link to page 91 link to page 136 link to page 146 link to page 143 link to page 141 link to page 122 link to page 137 link to page 151 link to page 179 link to page 87 link to page 121 link to page 148 link to page 112 link to page 86 link to page 121 link to page 114 link to page 133 link to page 97 link to page 109 link to page 85 link to page 115 link to page 135 link to page 91 link to page 85 link to page 116 link to page 147 link to page 143 link to page 143 link to page 105 link to page 66 link to page 87 link to page 149 link to page 157 link to page 168 link to page 126 R v SSE & Gojkovic ex parte Kensington and Chelsea RBC [1993] JPL 139 
84 
R v SSE & Leeds CC ex parte Ramzan (QBD 18.12.97 CO/2202/97) 
108 
R v SSE & South Shropshire DC ex parte Davies [1991] JPL 540 
112 
R v SSE & Tower Hamlets LBC ex parte Ahern (London) Ltd [1989] JPL 757 
88 
R v SSE & Wychavon DC ex parte Saunders [1992] JPL 753 
56 
R v SSE ex parte Baber [1996] JPL 1034 
106 
R v SSE ex parte Hillingdon LBC [1986] JPL 363 
91 
R v SSE ex parte Mistral Investments [1984] JPL 516 
108 
R v SSE ex parte Reinisch [1971] 22 P&CR 1022 
102 
R v SSW ex parte Kennedy [1996] JPL 645 
63 
R v Swansea CC ex parte Elitestone [1993] JPL 1019 
32 
R v Teignbridge DC ex parte Teignbridge Quay Co Ltd [1996] JPL 828 
95  2019
R v Thanet DC ex parte Tapp [2001] JPL 1436 
77 
R v Tunbridge Wells BC ex parte Blue Boys Developments Ltd [1990] 1 PLR 55 
64, 
124 
R v Wicks [1996] JPL 743  
91 
Re Lord Chesterfield’s Settled Estates [1910] C.97 
62 
Re St Peter the Great, Chichester [1961] 2 All ER 513 
31 
November 
Re Whaley [1908] 1 Ch 615 
62 
 
 
Rambridge v SSE & East Hertfordshire DC (QBD 22.11.96 CO-593-96) 
67 
26th 
Ramsey & Ramsey Sports Ltd v SSE & Suffolk Coastal DC [1991] 2 PLR 122 
90 
Ramsey v SSETR & Suffolk Coastal DC [2002] JPL 1123  
71 
at: 
Rapose v Wandsworth LBC [2010] EWHC 3126 (Admin) 
99 
Rastrum & Benge v SSCLG & Rother DC [2009] EWCA Civ 1340 
98 
as 
Ravensdale Ltd v SSCLG & Waltham Forest LBC [2016] EWHC 2374 (Admin) 
34 
Reed v SSCLG [2014] JPL 725 
75 
Reed v SSE & Tandridge DC [1993] JPL 249 
90 
Restormel BC v SSE & Rabey [1982] JPL 785 
36, 81 
Rhymney Valley DC v SSW [1985] JPL 27 
correct 
91 
Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSE [1972] 224 EG 1555 
88 
Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSE & Beechgold Ltd [1987] JPL 509 
86 
Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSE & Neale [1991] 2 PLR 107 
67 
Only 
Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSETR [2001] JPL 84 
82 
Riordan Communications Ltd v South Buckinghamshire DC [2000] 1 PLR 45 
97 
Rugby Football Union v SSTLR [2002] EWCA Civ 1169 
124 
 
 
Sage v SSETR & Maidstone BC [2003] UKHL 22 
32 
Sainty v MHLG [1964] 15 P&CR 452 
66 
updated.  
Sanders & Sanders v FSS & Epping Forest DC [2004] EWHC 1194 (Admin) 
93 
Saxby v SSE & Westminster CC [1998] JPL 1132  
57 
Scott v SSE & Bracknell DC [1983] JPL 108 
31  
Scurlock v SSE [1977] 33 P&CR 102 
66 
Sefton MBC v SSTLR & Morris [2003] JPL 632 
59,  
78 
Sevenoaks DC v FSS & Pedham Place Golf Centre [2005] 1 P&CR 13 (QBD 22.3.04) 
43, 
freequently 
Sevenoaks DC v SSE & Dawe (QBD 13.11.97 CO1322-97) 
54 
is 
Sevenoaks DC v SSE & Geer [1995] JPL 126 
30 
Sharma v SSCLG & Others [2018] EWHC 2355 (Admin) 
60, 80 
Shimitzu v Westminster CC [1996] JPL 112 
32 
Short & Short v SSE & North Dorset DC (QBD CO/227/90) 
36 
Shortt & Shortt v SSCLG & Tewkesbury BC [2015] EWCA Civ 1192 
30  
Silver v SSCLG & Camden LBC & Tankel [2014] EWHC 2729 (Admin) 
61, 92 
Simms v SSE & Broxtowe BC [1998] JPL B98 
88 
publication 
Simpson v SSCLG [2011] EWHC 283 
59 
Sinclair-Lockhart’s Trustees v Central Land Board (1950) 1 P&CR 195 
50  
Singh v SSCLG & Sandwell BC [2010] EWHC 1621 (Admin) 
100 
This  Skerritts of Nottingham Ltd v SSETR (No. 1) [2000] EWCA Civ 60, JPL 789  
50 
Skerritts of Nottingham Ltd v SSETR & Harrow LBC (No. 2) [2000] EWCA Civ 5569, JPL 1025 
32 
Skinner & King v SSE & Eastleigh BC [1978] JPL 842 
94 
Slough Estates v Slough BC [1969] 21 P&CR 573 
102 
Somak Travel v SSE & Brent LBC [1987] JPL 630 
113 
South Buckinghamshire DC v SSE & Strandmill [1989] JPL 351 
71 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 23 

link to page 166 link to page 166 link to page 107 link to page 146 link to page 161 link to page 124 link to page 125 link to page 175 link to page 112 link to page 117 link to page 132 link to page 101 link to page 133 link to page 124 link to page 155 link to page 176 link to page 64 link to page 84 link to page 160 link to page 86 link to page 121 link to page 95 link to page 109 link to page 89 link to page 171 link to page 125 link to page 144 link to page 170 link to page 59 link to page 161 link to page 137 link to page 151 link to page 86 link to page 89 link to page 111 link to page 132 link to page 126 link to page 143 link to page 159 link to page 122 link to page 99 link to page 158 link to page 83 link to page 118 link to page 131 link to page 134 link to page 164 link to page 176 link to page 164 link to page 96 link to page 137 link to page 124 link to page 158 link to page 139 link to page 127 link to page 132 link to page 136 link to page 159 link to page 179 link to page 114 link to page 139 South Buckinghamshire DC v SSETR & Gregory (QBD 11.11.98 CO/2291/98) 
52, 
111 
South Gloucestershire Council v SSETR & Alvis Bros Ltd [1999] JPL B99 
96 
South Hams DC v Halsey [1996] JPL 761 
91 
South Hams DC v Rule [1990] (HC 50) 
106 
South Oxfordshire DC v SSE & East [1987] JPL 868 
69, 70 
South Ribble BC v SSE & Swires [1990] JPL 808 
120 
Southend–on-Sea Corporation v Hodgson (Wickford) [1961] 12 P&CR 165  
57 
Spyer v Phillipson [1931] 2 Ch 183 
62 
Square Meals Frozen Foods v Dunstable BC [1973] JPL 709 
77 
St Anselm Development Co Ltd v FSS & Westminster CC [2003] EWHC 1592 Admin 
46 
Staffordshire CC v Challinor & Robinson [2007] EWCA Civ 864 
78  2019
Stanius v SSCLG & Ealing LBC (CO 11.4.17) 
69, 
101, 
122 
Stewart v FSS & Cotswold DC (QBD 28.7.04 Jackson J) 
82 
Stockton on Tees BC v SSCLG & Ward [2010] EWHC 1766 (Admin) 
29 
Stone & Stone v SSCLG & Cornwall Council [2014] EWHC 1456 (Admin) 
105 
November 
Street v MHLG & Essex CC [1965] 193 EG 537 
31, 66 
Sutton LBC v SSE & Pierpoint and Sons [1975] JPL 222 
40 
Swale BC v FSS & Lee [2005] EWCA Civ 1568; [2006] JPL 886 
54, 78 
26th 
 
 
T A Miller Ltd v MHLG [1968] 1 WLR 992 
34 
at: 
Tapecrown v FSS & Vale of White Horse DC [2006] EWCA Civ 1744 
116 
Taylor and Sons (Farms) v SSETR & Three Rivers DC [2001] EWCA Civ 1254 
70, 
as 
89, 
115 
Telford and Wrekin Council v SSCLG & Growing Enterprises Ltd [2013] JPL 865 
43 
Tempo District Warehouses v SSE & Enfield LBC [1979] JPL 98 
106 
Thames Heliport Ltd v Tower Hamlets LBC [1995] JPL 526; [1997] JPL 448  
82 
correct 
Thayer v SSE [1992] JPL 264 
96 
Thomas David (Porthcawl) Ltd & the Trustees of Merthyr Mawr Estates v SSW & Penybont RDC 
31 
& Glamorgan CC [1971] 3 All ER 1092 
Only 
Thrasyvoulou v SSE & Hackney LBC (No. 1) [1984] JPL a732 
34 
Thrasyvoulou v SSE & Hackney LBC (No. 2) [1988] JPL 689; [1990] 2 WLR 1; (HL 14/12/89) 
56 
Thurrock BC v SSETR & Holding [2002] EWCA Civ 226 
77 
Tidswell v SSE & Thurrock BC [1977] JPL 104 
71 
TLG Building Materials v SSE & Arthur & Carrick DC [1981] JPL 513 
88, 
105 
updated.  
Tower Hamlets LBC v SSE & Nolan [1994] JPL B44 & 1112 
67 
Trump International Golf Club Scotland Ltd & Another v the Scottish Ministers [2015] UKSC 74   44, 
103 
Trustees of Castell-y-Mynach Estate v SSW [1985] JPL 40 
28  
TSB v Botham [1996] EGCS 149 
63 
Turner v SSCLG & South Buckinghamshire DC [2015] EWHC 1895 (Admin)  
76,  
80, 
freequently 
109, 
is 
122 
Turner v SSCLG & the Mayor of London [2015] EWHC 375 (Admin), [2015] EWCA Civ 582 
109 
Turner v SSE & Macclesfield BC [1992] JPL 837  
41, 82 
Tyack v SSE & Cotswolds DC [1989] 1 WLR 1392 
70 
 
 
University of Leicester v SSCLG & Oadby & Wigston BC [2016] EWHC 476 (Admin) 
103 
Uttlesford DC v SSE & White [1992] JPL 171 
84 
 
publication 
 
Valentino Plus Ltd v SSCLG & Others [2015] EWHC 19 (Admin) 
72 
Vaughan v SSE & Mid Sussex DC [1986] JPL 840 
77 
This  Vickers Armstrong v Central Land Board [1958] 9 P&CR 33 
81, 
104, 
124 
Vikoma International v SSE & Woking BC [1987] JPL 38 
59 
 
 
Wakelin v SSE & St Albans DC [1978] JPL 769  
84 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 24 

link to page 175 link to page 178 link to page 120 link to page 132 link to page 137 link to page 111 link to page 111 link to page 91 link to page 136 link to page 146 link to page 112 link to page 94 link to page 114 link to page 133 link to page 140 link to page 96 link to page 163 link to page 114 link to page 136 link to page 141 link to page 96 link to page 163 link to page 58 link to page 107 link to page 107 link to page 83 link to page 103 link to page 148 link to page 171 link to page 107 link to page 119 link to page 95 link to page 143 link to page 98 link to page 138 link to page 119 link to page 121 link to page 136 link to page 136 link to page 157 link to page 99 link to page 157 link to page 136 link to page 159 link to page 91 link to page 143 link to page 168 link to page 173 link to page 91 link to page 83 link to page 132 Wallington v SSE & Montgomeryshire DC [1990] JPL 112; [1991] JPL 942 
120, 
123 
Walsall MBC v SSCLG [2012] EWHC 1756 (Admin) – Dartford in text 
66 
Waltham Forest LBC v SSETR & Tully [2002] EWCA Civ 330 
78, 82 
Watts v SSE & South Oxfordshire DC [1991] 1 PLR 61 
56 
Watts v SSTLR & Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [2002] EWHC 993 (Admin) 
54 
Wealden DC v SSE & Day [1988] JPL 268 
36, 82 
Webb v Ipswich BC [1989] EGCS 27 
91 
Wells v MHLG [1967] 1 WLR 1000 
57 
Welwyn Hatfield BC v SSCLG & Beesley [2011] UKSC 15 
39, 
59, 
78, 85 
2019
Wessex Regional Health Authority v SSE [1984] JPL 344 
41 
West Lancashire DC v SSE [1999] JPL 890 
108 
Westminster CC v British Waterways Board [1985] JPL 102 
59 
Westminster CC v SSE & Aboro [1983] JPL 602 
81, 86 
Wheatcroft v SSE & Harborough DC [1982] JPL 37 
41, 
108 
November 
White & Cooper & Phillips v SSE [1996] JPL B108 
34, 
52, 
108 
White v SSE & Congleton BC [1989] JPL 692 
26th 
28  
W H Tolley and Son Ltd v SSE & Torridge DC [1997] 75 P&CR48 
48 
at: 
William Boyer (Transport) Ltd v SSE & Hounslow LBC [1996] JPL B129  
93 
Williams v SSCLG & Chiltern DC [2013] EWCA Civ 958; JPL 692 
116 
as 
Williams Le Roi v SSE & Salisbury DC [1993] JPL 1033 
52, 64 
Wilson v West Sussex CC [1963] 2QB 764 
40, 
Wiesenfield v SSE & Barnet LBC [1992] JPL 757 
88 
Winchester CC v SSCLG & Others [2013] EWHC 101 (Admin), [2015] EWCA Civ 563 
43 
Winfield v SSCLG [2012] EWHC 469 (Admin) 
83 
correct 
Winters v SSCLG & Havering LBC [2017] EWHC 357 (Admin) 
64, 66 
Wipperman & Buckingham v SSE & Barking LBC [1965] 17 P&CR 225 
81 
Wivenhoe Port v Colchester BC [1985] JPL 396 
81, 
Only 
102 
Wood v SSCLG & the Broads Authority [2015] EWHC 2368 (Admin) 
44, 
102 
Wood v SSE & Uckfield RDC [1973] 25 P&CR 303 
81, 
104 
Woodspring DC v SSE & Goodall [1982] JPL 784 
36, 88 
updated.  
Worthy Fuel Injection Ltd v SSE & Southampton CC [1983] JPL 173 
113 
Wyatt BrOthers (Oxford) Ltd v SSETR [2001] PLCR 161 
118 
Wyre Forest BC v SSE & Allen’s Caravans [1990] 2 WLR 517 
36 
 
 
Young v SSE & Bexley LBC [1983] JPL 465 
28, 77 
 
 
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 25 

 
 
 
 
Intentionally blank in this version 
 
2019
November 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 26 

link to page 173 link to page 173 link to page 173 link to page 173 ADVICE ON CITATIONS 
Use the neutral or court citation where available. This can be found on the Westlaw case 
transcript and it will have the following convention:  
•  Party v Party [Year of judgment] Court abbreviation Judgment no. for that year  
 
Refer to the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government as ‘SSCLG’ (and 
other Secretaries of State or Ministers accordingly). If there is more than one party on 
one side of a case, use ‘&’ to separate their names. 
•  Elmbridge BC v SSCLG & Giggs Hill Green Homes [2015] EWHC 1367 (Admin) 
 
2019
If the case has received a judgement from the Court of Appeal, add the CoA neutral 
citation after the HC neutral citation, separating the two references with a comma. 
Similarly, if the case has received a judgement from the Supreme Court, add the UKSC 
neutral citation after the CoA neutral citation. Older UKSC cases will have the citation 
UKHL when the Supreme Court was titled ‘House of Lords’ eg Sage
•  Miaris v SSCLG & Bath and NE Somerset Council [2015] EWHC 1564 (Admin), 
November 
[2016] EWCA Civ 75  
 
Publication citations would follow the neutral citation (if given) and be separate
26th d by 
semi-colons. More than one citation may be given: 
at: 
•  Henry Boot Homes Ltd v Bassetlaw DC [2002] EWCA Civ 983; [2003] JPL 1030 
•  Burdle & Williams v SSE & New Forest RDC [1972] 1 WLR 1207; 116 SJ 507; 3 All 
as 
ER 240; 24 P&CR 174; 70 LGR 511; JPL 759 
 
The year should always be cited first, in square brackets. In the JPL, the cited year will 
be that of the report. In publications like P&CR, the year cited will be that of the Court 
correct 
judgment but the citation will include a Volume number. A case decided in 1991 but not 
reported in JPL or P&CR until 1992 would be cited as: 
•  [1992] JPL page… 
Only 
•  [1991] 70 P&CR page…where 70 is one of the volumes produced in 1992. 
 
If authorities are cited to you, relevant extracts should be supplied, but you may also try 
to get copies. The main sources are:  
•  Horizon: Court Judgments 
•  Knowledge Centre/High Court team 
updated.  
•  Encyclopaedia of Planning Law & Practice (Westlaw) 
•  Journal of Planning & Environment Law (Westlaw) 
 
Key findings from judgments are also set out in: 
•  The Enforcement and other Training Manual chapters 
•  Case Law Updates from July 2007  
•  Enforcement Briefings June 2010-December 2015  
freequently 
•  Knowledge Matters from October 2014 
is 
 
Abbreviations 
WLR       Weekly Law Reports 
P&CR    Planning and Compensation Reports 
SJ          Solicitors Journal    
LGR      Local Government Reports 
ALL ER   All England Law Reports   JPL       Journal of Planning & Environment Law 
 
publication 
 
 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 27 

ABANDONMENT AND EXTINGUISHMENT 
Hartley v MHLG [1970] 2 WLR 1 
Where the site remains unused for a time and in such circumstances that a reasonable 
man might conclude that the previous use had been abandoned, it may be found to be 
abandoned. Where a use ceases with no view to resumption, it is abandoned.  
Petticoat Lane Rentals v SSE 
[1971] All ER 310 
If PP is granted and implemented for a new building to be put to a new use, the previous 
use rights on the open site will be expunged. 
2019
Iddenden v SSE [1972] 1 WLR 1433 
A use cannot survive if everything necessary to sustain it – buildings and installations – 
are removed or destroyed by accident.  
Nicholls & Nicholls v SSE & Bristol CC [1981] JPL 890 
November 
The subjective test for abandonment was rejected. Evidence that the appellant had no 
intention to abandon the use did not displace that of the appearance of the site to the 
outside observer.  
26th 
•  See also Hughes v SSETR & South Holland DC [2000] JPL 826 
at: 
Young v SSE & Bexley LBC [1983] JPL 465 
as 
Implementation of a new unlawful use extinguishes previous established and lawful use 
rights. Lawful use rights are preserved under s57(4) if an EN is served.  
•  See also Balco Transport Services Ltd v SSE [1982] JPL 177  
correct 
Pioneer Aggregates (UK) Ltd v SSE [1984] 2 All ER 358 
A PP which is capable of being implemented cannot be abandoned. Where there are two 
Only 
mutually inconsistent permissions, implementation of one prevents that of the other.  
•  See also Pilkington v SSE & Lancashire CC [1973] 1 WLR 1527; Newbury DC v 
SSE [1980] 2 WLR 379, [1981] AC 578 
Trustees of Castell-y-Mynach Estate v SSW [1985] JPL 40 
Four factors for abandonment to be considered
updated.   : the physical condition of the land; the 
period of non-use; any other use; and the owner’s intentions. 
•  See also Hughes v SSETR & South Holland DC [2000] JPL 826 
White v SSE & Congleton BC [1989] JPL 692 
A pre-1948 use can be abandoned.  
freequently 
Nicholson v SSE & Maldon DC [1998] JPL 553  
is 
A lawful use right acquired through a breach of a continuing requirement condition, can 
be lost by subsequent compliance with the condition even if a LDC has been granted. 
Hughes v SSETR & South Holland DC [2000] JPL 826 
The test was the view to be taken by a reasonable man with knowledge of all the 
relevant circumstances. The owner’s intentions were not more significant than other 
publication 
factors and should be objectively assessed. 
Fairstate Ltd v FSS & Westminster CC [2005] EWCA Civ 283; JPL 1333  
This  CoA: while a PP capable of being implemented cannot be abandoned, a use that is lawful 
through the passage of time could be under s25 of the Greater London (General Powers) 
Act 1973. S25 provides that use as temporary sleeping accommodation [less than 90 
consecutive nights] of any residential premises in Greater London involves a MCU of the 
premises and each part thereof which is so used. Such a use could become lawful 
through immunity from enforcement action, but the use would be abandoned if the 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 28 

property was again used for lets in excess of 90 nights. Even if no MCU is involved in the 
change back, it would require PP by virtue of s25. The s57(4) reversion right did not 
apply in absence of enforcement against previous change. 
•  S44 and s45 of the Deregulation Act 2015 served to amend s25 of the 1973 Act 
so that it is subject to s25A, which provides that, notwithstanding s25(1), use as 
temporary sleeping accommodation does not involve a MCU if two conditions are 
met. S44 and s45 came into force on 26 May 2015.
 
M & M (Land) Ltd v SSCLG [2007] All ER(D) 55 
A use certified as lawful through an LDC can be abandoned subsequently. An LDC does 
2019
no more than certify conclusively that the use is lawful at a point in time. Whether it is 
later abandoned is to be assessed according to the objective test of abandonment.  
•  Case Law Update 1 (July 2007) 
•  Confirmation and clarification that lawfulness through an LDC is not in the same 
species of the ‘hardy beast’ of lawfulness in Pioneer Aggregates. 
November 
Stockton on Tees BC v SSCLG & Ward [2010] EWHC 1766 (Admin) 
1961 PP had been implemented. The site was no longer in active use, but there had 
26th 
been no lawful COU. The permitted use had not been abandoned simply because the 
activity had been allowed to dwindle away, and when it had not been extinguished by 
at: 
another use. 
as 
•  Case Law Update 12 (October 2010) 
Bramall v SSCLG & Rother DC [2011] EWHC 1531 (Admin) 
Affirms the four criteria for abandonment set out in Hughes, and that the weight to 
attach to each criterion is a matter of judgment for the decision
correct -maker. 
•  Case Law Update 16 (December 2011) 
 
Only 
 
 
 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 29 

AGRICULTURAL OCCUPANCY CONDITIONS 
Fawcett Properties Ltd v Buckinghamshire CC [1960] All ER 503; [1961] 
AC 636 
‘Dependants’ are persons living in a family with the person defined and dependent on 
him or her in whole or in part for their subsistence and support. 
•  Shortt & Shortt v SSCLG & Tewkesbury DC [2015] EWCA Civ 1192 
Kember v SSE & Tunbridge Wells DC [1982] JPL 383 
2019
The Inspector granted PP for an agricultural worker’s cottage but imposed an AOC on the 
existing cottage occupied by the appellant on his adjacent holding, as well as the new 
dwelling. Decision quashed on the basis that the condition was not imposed for the 
needs of the farm where the cottage was to be built, but of agricultural generally.   
Newbury DC v SSE & Marsh [1994] JPL 134 
November 
The four year rule [s171B(2)] cannot apply to a breach of an occupancy condition. 
•  FSS v Arun DC & Brown [2006] EWCA Civ 1172 
26th 
Sevenoaks DC v SSE & Geer [1995] JPL 126  
PP for residential use subject to an AOC. There was no holding and the a
at:  ppellant did not 
work in farming but the Inspector was wrong to find the AOC ‘inappropriately’ imposed 
as 
and grant PP for the building without compliance with the condition. The circumstances, 
including the need for agricultural workers’ dwellings in the area must be considered.  
•  An enforcement appeal might have succeeded on ground (c) – EN founded on an 
invalid condition. 
correct 
Banister v SSE & Fordham [1995] JPL 1011 
The EN concerned non-compliance with an AOC. The Inspector granted PP on the DPA on 
Only 
the basis that the condition had been inappropriately imposed on the original PP. This 
challenge by a third party succeeded because the Inspector had not considered whether 
retention of the AOC was appropriate, and the circumstances indicated a need for 
agricultural workers’ dwellings. In accordance with Sevenoaks, the Inspector was 
required to look at the planning considerations existing at the time of his decision. 
updated.  
North Devon DC v SSE & Rottenbury [1998] EGCS 72  
A dwelling that was subject to an AOC had been used for more than ten years as holiday 
accommodation, but only in the summer months. The Inspector granted a LDC in respect 
of a ten year breach but failed to distinguish between the seasonal use and lack of 
occupation during the winter periods. A distinction must be drawn between a use which 
is continuous but seasonal, and activities amounting to a breach of the condition. There 
freequently 
would not normally have been a BoC when the property was vacant. 
is 
Shortt & Shortt v SSCLG & Tewkesbury BC [2015] EWCA Civ 1192 
A person can meet the requirement to be employed in agriculture without making money 
from the business. Fawcett does not support the contention that ‘dependents’ referenced 
in an AOC may be restricted to persons who are financially dependent on the agricultural 
worker. As a matter of ordinary language, ‘dependents’ is capable of referring to persons 
in relationships involving non-financial dependency, such as emotional support and care. 
publication 
•  Case Law Updates 26 & 28 (December 2014 & December 2015) 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 30 

BUILDINGS AND OPERATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 
Cardiff Rating Authority v Guest Keens [1949] 1 KB 385 
It is not possible to construct an exhaustive test of what ‘is or is in the nature of a 
building or structure’ – but the main characteristics of a building are: (1) that it is of a 
size that it would normally be constructed, as opposed to being brought ready-made 
onto the site; (2) it would cause a physical change of some permanence; and (3) there 
would be physical attachment to the ground. 
Re St Peter the Great, Chichester [1961] 2 All ER 513 
2019
(Transformer on Consecrated Ground) 
1.  Would the ordinary man think this was a building? 
2.  Does the structure have walls and a roof? 
3.  Can one say the structure is built? 
November 
Chester CC v Woodward [1962] 2 WLR 636, 2 QB 126 
A coal hopper on wheels was not a building; ‘moveability’ is only one of the tests as to 
26th 
whether operational development has taken place. It is necessary to consider whether 
the physical character of the land has been changed by the operations.  
at: 
James v MHLG & Brecon CC [1963] 15 P&CR 20 
as 
There must be some idea of permanency. Swing boats that were capable of being 
removed by six men and dismantled in an hour did not amount to development.  
Street v MHLG & Essex CC [1965] 193 EG 537 
correct 
Whether construction works amount to ‘maintenance’ or ‘rebuilding’ is a matter of fact 
and degree. Works intended to repair the property involved substantial demolition. The 
re-building amounted to development and was not PD by Class I(I) of the GDO.  
Only 
Barvis v SSE [1971] 22 P&CR 710 
An 89’ crane on steel rails which had been installed temporarily until it was needed 
elsewhere was still a building.  
Thomas David (Porthcawl) Ltd & the Trustees of Merthyr Mawr Estates v 
updated.  
SSW & Penybont RDC & Glamorgan CC [1971] 3 All ER 1092 
Mining operations are continuous, with each successive shovelful constituting a further 
act of development.  
Ewen Developments Ltd v SSE [1980] JPL 404 
Engineering operations involve works with some element of pre-planning, which would 
freequently 
normally but not necessarily be supervised by a person with engineering knowledge. 
is 
Earth embankments were not a means of enclosure or PD under the GDO, Schedule 2 
Part 2. If the development as a whole can be enforced against there is no saving for part 
of it which may have been carried out more than four years before the EN. 
•  Fayrewood Fish Farms v SSE & Hampshire CC [1984] JPL 587  
Scott v SSE & Bracknell DC [1983] JPL 108 
publication 
On the facts, the erection of a portakabin involved operational development. 
Howes v SSE & Devon CC [1984] JPL 439 
This  Mining operations are different to building or engineering operations in that the former 
can be seen as activity of destruction with no discernible end, whereas the latter are 
operations of construction which will have a definable end. 
A single building or engineering operation is immune from enforcement under the four 
year rule when it is substantially completed. The removal of part of a hedge and fence, 
and the tipping of hardcore comprised a ‘single operation of construction’ to form an 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 31 

access. The Inspector had to make a finding of fact as to when the operation was 
substantially completed by the laying of the hardcore. If that was after the ‘four year 
date’, the whole operation including the opening of the fence could be enforced against. 
Cambridge CC v SSE & Milton Park Investment Ltd [1991] 1 PLR 109  
CoA: Works for demolition will constitute development if properly regarded as building, 
engineering or other operations. This is a question of fact for the decision maker. 
R v Swansea CC ex parte Elitestone [1993] JPL 1019 
Wooden chalets supported by pillars, in position as permanent holiday homes for more 
than 40 years, were held to be buildings. 
2019
Shimizu (UK) Ltd v Westminster CC [1996] JPL 112 
This LB case helped distinguish between alterations and demolition; held that s336(1) 
had no relevance to the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990. 
•  Barton v SSCLG & Bath and NE Somerset Council [2017] EWHC 573 (Admin) 
November 
Burroughs Day v Bristol CC [1996] 1 PLR 78; 1 EGLR 167 
Alterations to the exterior of a building will fall within development if they materially 
26th 
affect the external appearance of the building. Such judgment will involve consideration 
of the change to the external appearance of the building as a whole and not a part in 
at: 
isolation; the degree of visibility by an observer outside the building; the nature of the 
building; and the nature of the alterations/works.  
as 
Skerritts of Nottingham Ltd v SSETR & Harrow LBC (No. 2) [2000] EWCA 
Civ 5569,
 JPL 1025 
A steel-framed marquee was sited in the grounds of a hotel for eight months each year. 
correct 
‘Permanent’ in the context of planning control did not necessarily mean everlasting. The 
character of the marquee indicated that it remained in place for sufficient time to be 
significant; annual removal did not deprive it of the q
Only uality of permanence. 
Sage v SSETR & Maidstone BC [2003] UKHL 22  
The exception to ‘development’ in s55(2)(a) applies only to a completed building on 
which work was carried out for its maintenance, improvement or other alteration. It does 
not apply to the work involved in completing a structure still subject to planning control. 
updated.  
Even if the work remaining on an uncompleted dwellinghouse affected only the interior, 
that work did not come within the exception and the building could not be regarded as 
substantially completed for the purposes of s171B(1).  
When an application was made for PP for a single operation, it was made in respect of 
the whole of the operation. If a building operation is not carried out, both internally and 
externally, fully in accordance with the PP, the whole operation is unlawful. The EN had 
not been served out of time becau
freequently  se the building had not been substantially completed. 
is 
R (oao Beronstone Ltd) v FSS [2006] EWHC 2391; [2007] JPL 471 
The hammering of 554 marker stakes to define the boundaries of 40 plots and a network 
of access ways was capable, as a matter of fact and degree, of being ‘other operations in 
s55(1). The Inspector was not under any obligation to define a threshold at which a 
conglomeration of stakes became a development. He took account of the extent, 
visibility, patterns and degree of permanence of the posts when finding that they were of 
publication 
sufficient substance, scale and type to amount to development.  
•  Case Law Update 1 (July 2007) 
This  R (oao Hall Hunter Partnership) v FSS & Waverley BC [2006] EWHC 
3482 (Admin), [2007] JPL 1023 
The erection of polytunnels in linked networks over 28ha on a 45ha farm amounted to a 
building operation, not a use of land, given size, permanence and degree of attachment.   
•  Case Law Update 1 (July 2007) 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 32 

Hancock v SSCLG & Windsor and Maidenhead RBC [2012] EWHC 3704 
(Admin) 
Where the original building is demolished and replacement buildings are constructed 
without PP, the only lawful use is the use of the land. There are no existing use rights to 
have buildings on the site.   
•  Case Law Update 21 (March 2013) 
R (oao Save Woolley Valley Action Group Ltd) v Bath and North East 
Somerset Council
 [2012] EWHC 2161 (Admin) 
The Council had found that, despite their ‘size, weight and bulk’, proposed poultry units 
2019
would be chattels rather than buildings because of their lack of attachment to the ground 
and mobility. The Council erred by taking too narrow approach to the meanings of 
‘development’ in s55 and ‘building’ in s336(1), and by failing to direct itself properly on 
the question of permanence. 
•  Case Law Update 19 (September 2012) 
November 
Barton v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2017] EWHC 
573 (Admin) 

26th 
Demolition of a section of wall and a gate in a Conservation Area amounts to relevant 
demolition under s196D of the TCPA90. The s336(1) definition of a ‘build
at:  ing’ as including 
‘any structure or erection’ applies to s196D; Shimizu distinguished. Demolition of part of 
as 
a wall or gate within a CA is not PD. The Inspector made no error in focussing on the 
part of the wall to be removed, rather than the part untouched. 
•  Case Law Update 31 (June 2017) 
•  Knowledge Matters 30 (7 April 2017) 
correct 
Dill v SSCLG & Stratford-on-Avon DC [2017] EWHC 2378 (Admin); 
[2018] EWCA Civ 2619 

Only 
The HC and CoA upheld the dismissal of LBC and LBEN appeals related to the removal of 
limestone piers and lead urns. The items were on the statutory list and presumed to be 
‘buildings’ under s1(5) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 
1990. The grounds of appeal set out in s39(1) enabled an appellant to question the 
merits but not validity of the listing. The items were not listed by reason of being in the 
updated.  
curtilage of a listed building. The law of fixtures and chattels was not relevant. 
•  Knowledge Matters 36 and 50 (13 October 2017 and 17 December 2018) 
•  Case Law Update 34 (December 2018) 
Oates v SSCLG v Canterbury CC [2017] EWHC 2716 (Admin), [2018] 
EWCA Civ 2229 

freequently 
The Inspector was entitled to uphold an EN alleging the construction of ‘new buildings’ 
is 
although the structures incorporated parts of existing buildings. Substantial operational 
development had been undertaken and, as a matter of fact and degree, new buildings 
constructed. The Inspector did not err in failing to consider s336(1); for a structure to be 
‘part of a building’, there must be a building of which it can be part. There was no error 
in concluding that complete demolition was required to remedy the breach.  
•  Knowledge Matters 37 (13 November 2017) 
publication 
•  Case Law Update 34 (December 2018) 
This  Hargrave House Ltd & Reiner v Highbury Corner Magistrates Court & 
Islington LBC [2018] EWHC 279 (Admin)  
On prosecution for failing to comply with a LBEN, the owners argued that removal of 
render as required would damage the bricks and make it necessary to rebuild the entire 
wall – which would go beyond the requirement to ‘repair any damage to the facing 
fabric…’ Held that the meaning of a word like ‘repair’ is context dependant and capable 
of encompassing a requirement to demolish and rebuild a wall.  
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 33 

BURDEN OF PROOF AND EVIDENCE 
Nelsovil v MHLG [1962] 1 WLR 404 
The onus is on the appellant in an enforcement appeal to show that there has been no 
breach of planning control. This case is good law for legal grounds.   
R v Deputy Industrial Injuries Commissioner ex parte Moore [1965] 1 
QB 456 
It is necessary to differentiate between natural justice in terms of appeal proceedings 
and technical rules of evidence applicable to criminal trials. 
2019
The requirement that a person exercising quasi-judicial functions must base his decision 
on evidence means no more than it must be based on material which tends logically to 

show the existence or non-existence of facts relevant to the issue to be determined, or 
to show the likelihood or unlikelihood of some future event, the occurrence of which 
would be relevant…he may take into account any matter which, as a matter of reason, 

has some probative value in the sense mentioned above. If it is capable of having any 
November 
probative value the weight to be attached to it is a matter for the person to whom 
Parliament has attached the responsibility of deciding the issue. The supervisory 
26th 
jurisdiction of the High Court does not entitle it to usurp this responsibility and to 
substitute its own view for hi
s.’ 
at: 
T A Miller Ltd v MHLG [1968] 1 WLR 992 
as 
The contents of a declaration or oral statement may be hearsay, but tribunals are 
entitled to act on any material which is logically probative. 
Knights Motors v SSE [1984] JPL 584 
correct 
Hearsay evidence is admissible at inquiry; an inquiry is not a criminal trial. 
•  Doncaster MBC v SSCLG & AB [2016] EWHC 2876 (Admin) 
Only 
Thrasyvoulou v SSE & Hackney LBC No 1 [1984] JPL a732 
The standard is the ‘balance of probability’, not ‘beyond reasonable doubt’.  
Gabbitas v SSE & Newham LBC [1985] JPL 630 
The appellant’s evidence should not be rejected simply because it is not corroborated. If 
updated.  
there is no evidence to contradict their version of events, or make it less than probable, 
and their evidence is sufficiently precise and unambiguous, it should be accepted.  
K G Diecasting (Weston) Ltd v SSE & Woodspring DC [1993] JPL 925  
If a submission is to be dealt with as a serious possibility, it should be led in evidence-in-
chief and cannot be left to be drawn out only in XX and re-examination. 
freequently 
•  White & Cooper & Phillips v SSE [1996] JPL B108 
is 
Mahajan v SSTLR & Hounslow LBC [2002] JPL 928  
If the written procedure is followed, written evidence on legal grounds cannot be 
dismissed as untested, and thus of little weight, without regard to its source, content, 
consistency with other evidence or reliability. If written evidence is given little weight 
regardless, it is difficult to see how an appellant in a WR case could discharge the onus 
of proof. Such
publication   evidence must be properly analysed on the balance of probability test.  
Ravensdale Ltd v SSCLG & Waltham Forest LBC [2016] EWHC 2374 
(Admin)
 

This  It is for the appellant to make out a lawful use pursuant to ground (d); they must take 
care to provide sufficient evidence which meets the balance of probabilities test. It is not 
for the Inspector to seek out evidence or draw an inference from gaps in evidence.  
•  Case Law Update 30 (December 2016) 
•  Knowledge Matters 22 (5 August 2016) 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 34 

Doncaster MBC v SSCLG & AB [2016] EWHC 2876 (Admin)  
PP granted under s177(5) was challenged on grounds including that the Inspector had 
relied on hearsay evidence to which no weight should be attached, given Knights Motors
Gilbart J rejected the claim: the passages relied on in Knights Motors were ‘entirely 
obiter dicta’ and did not amount to a ‘generally applicable statement of principle’.  
Inspectors dealing with the merits of development hear ‘evidence which ranges from the 
thoroughly researched set of data, through generalised opinion to the anecdotal, some of 
it persuasive and some not. Hearsay evidence is often adduced’. The rules can be 
tougher if there has been a breach of planning control, but strict admissibility tests 
would have the effect of excluding large swathes of perfectly acceptable evidence. The 
2019
correct approach is to determine what weight should attach to a piece of evidence. 
•  Case Law Update 30 (December 2016)  
•  Knowledge Matters 26 (2 December 2016) 
 
November 
 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 35 

CARAVANS 
Woodspring DC v SSE & Goodall [1982] JPL 784 
Where an EN alleges the stationing of a caravan, it should be corrected to specify the 
purpose for which the caravan is used.  
•  Hammond v SSETR & Maldon DC [1997] 74 PCR 134 
Restormel BC v SSE & Rabey [1982] JPL 785 
It is not possible to know whether the stationing of a caravan amounts to a MCU without 
2019
knowing the purpose for which the caravan was used, and whether that purpose fitted in 
with the existing use of the land.  
Wealden DC v SSE & Day [1988] JPL 268 
The stationing of a caravan is not a MCU, it is necessary to identify the purpose for which 
the caravan is sited. No development is involved if the use is incidental.  
November 
Wyre Forest BC v SSE & Allen’s Caravans [1990] 2 WLR 517 
The statutory definition of caravan in the Caravan Sites Act 1968 (CSA68) applies in 
26th 
construing all permissions relating to caravans. 
Short & Short v SSE & North Dorset DC (QBD CO/227/90) 
at: 
‘Permahomes’ fall outside the definition of a caravan but should be co
as  mpared with the 
caravans that could lawfully be stationed on the land, in deciding whether the ‘extra’ 
involved demonstrable harm.  
Carter v SSE & Carrick DC [1991] JPL 131; [1994] 1 WLR 1212, [1994] 1 
correct 
WLR 1212, [1995] JPL 311   
Held in the HC
 that a structure which was originally in prefabricated sections did not fall 
within s13(1) of the CSA68 because it could not lawfully be moved on the road. The CoA 
Only 
[no link] clarified that, to be a caravan for purpose of s29(1) of the Caravan Sites and 
Control of Development Act 1960, the assembled unit must be capable of being towed or 
transported as a whole by a single vehicle. It does not matter whether the caravan can 
be so transported lawfully, or the roads by the site could accommodate it.  
Forest of Dean DC v SSE & Howells [1995] JPL 937 
updated.  
PP granted for ‘holiday’ caravans with no condition to restrict the use. There may be no 
material difference between caravans occupied as holiday or permanent residences, but 
it is a matter of fact and degree, and off-site effects should not be disregarded. 
•  Devon CC v Allen’s Caravans [1962] 14 P&CR 440  
Pugsley v SSE & North Devon DC [1996] JPL 124 
freequently 
Where a caravan has permanent appendages, eg, blockwork surround or extension, it is 
is 
necessary to assess whether what is on the site as a whole has become a building as a 
matter of fact and degree.  
Byrne v SSE & Arun DC [1998] JPL 122  
A structure did not meet the CSA68 definition of a caravan in part because the s13(1)(b) 
requirement for the caravan to be ‘physically capable of being moved by road’ would be 
publication 
failed if it was possible to lift the caravan onto a trailer by crane but moving it would 
‘carry a very real risk of structural damage’.  
This 
•  Byrne concerned a cabin at risk of structural damage from its size and intrinsic 
design. This case can be distinguished where such a risk would arise from moving 
a caravan that meets the CSA68 definition but has been allowed to fall derelict. 

Measor v SSETR & Tunbridge Wells DC [1999] JPL 182 
The Deputy Judge stated that he would be wary of holding, as a matter of law, that a 
structure which satisfied the s13(1) definition could never be deemed a building for the 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 36 

purposes of the TCPA90. However, a mobile home would not generally satisfy the well-
established definition of a building, with regard to permanence and attachment. It would 
be contrary to the purposes of the TCPA90 to hold that because caravans are ‘structures’ 
for the CSA68, they must fall within the s336(1) definition of ‘building’.  
R (oao Green o/b of the Friends of Fordwich and District] v FSS & 
Canterbury CC & Jones 
[2005] EWHC 691, [2005] EWCA Civ 1727 
The construction of features such as porches and conservatories will normally be 
operational development but would not normally affect the status of the siting of a 
caravan as a use or the land or take the caravan outside of the statutory definition.  
2019
Deakin v FSS [2006] EWHC 3402 (Admin); [2007] JPL 1073 
The EN alleged the siting of caravan for a use unconnected with agriculture and of a 
mobile home for residential purposes. The correct approach would be to determine the 
lawful use of the planning unit; establish the effect of the introduction of the caravans 
and their use on the use of the PU; and assess whether that effect amounted to a MCU.  
November 
•  Case Law Update 1 (July 2007) 
Bury MBC v SSCLG & Entwistle [2011] EWHC 2191 (Admin) 
26th 
There was no evidential basis to support the Inspector’s finding that the structure was a 
caravan, and there was no rational way in which that conclusion could have been 
at: 
reached. The appellant had suggested that the appropriate way to move the structure 
was to dismantle it; that could not be treated as a formal admission
as  that the structure 
could not be moved in one piece, but it was clearly relevant. 
•  Case Law Update 17 (March 2012) 
 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 37 

COMPLETION NOTICES 
Cardiff CC v NAW & Malik [2006] EWHC 1412  
The incomplete operations remaining on land after a failure to comply with a s94 
completion notice are lawful and cannot be enforced against. Serving a s102 
discontinuance notice is the only remedy available to the LPA.  
2019
November 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 38 

CONCEALED DEVELOPMENT 
Welwyn Hatfield BC v SSCLG & Beesley [2011] UKSC 15  
Law should serve the public interest; there is a public policy principle that one cannot 
benefit from the application of a statutory rule for which qualification was procured by 
fraud (the Connor principle). Planning law is a comprehensive code but the principle may 
apply in extreme cases where there was ‘positive deception in matters integral to the 
planning process…[which] was directly intended to and did undermine the regular 

operation of that process’. Mr Beesley's deliberate concealment of his dwellinghouse 
meant that he could not rely on the time limits for taking enforcement action in s171B.  
2019
•  Case Law Updates 7, 10, 14 & 15 (June 2009, April 2010, June 2011 
September 2011) 
R (oao) Fidler v SSCLG & Reigate and Banstead BC [2011] EWCA Civ 
1159 
The clandestine building of a house behind straw bales, with the intention of concealing 
November 
it from the LPA for four years, amounted to a ‘paradigm case of deception’ and fell 
squarely within exemptions to s171B(2) delineated by the Supreme Court in Welwyn.    
26th 
•  Case Law Updates 10, 11, 12 & 17 (April 2010, July 2010, October 2010 & March 
2012) 
at: 
Meecham v SSCLG & Uttlesford DC [2013] HC 
as 
It is a question of fact as to whether there has been positive deception in the planning 
process and, if so, whether the immunity provisions are ten or four years. It was good 
practice for the Inspector to draw the parties’ attention to Welwyn before the inquiry, 
although the judgment had not been raised by the Council.  
correct 
•  Case Law Update 13 (March 2011) 

Only 
 
This does not mean that the Inspector ought to cast around for evidence of 
deliberate concealment in order to rely on the Welwyn principle. 

Jackson v SSCLG & Westminster CC; Bonsall v SSCLG & Rotherham MBC 
[2015] EWCA Civ 1246 
The language used by Parliament to insert s171BA-s171BC does not indicate an intention 
updated.  
to alter the scope of s171B, so that concealment can only be dealt with via Planning 
Enforcement Order (PEO). There is not a complete overlap between the Welwyn principle 
and the PEO procedure; the latter could not displace the meaning given to s171B in 
Welwyn, or application of Welwyn to ensure compliance with the HRA98. The PEO code is 
a supplementary procedure available to LPAs, not replacement for the Welwyn principle.  
The Welwyn principle is not confined to cases where the owner uses the building for a 
freequently 
different purpose from completion; it also applies to MCU of an existing building.  
is 
•  Case Law Updates 25, 26, 27 & 28 (June 2014, December 2014, June 2015 
December 2015) 
•  Knowledge Matters 16 (5 February 2016) 
Cole & Cole v Lichfield LDC [2016] EWHC 3059 (Admin) 
The HC upheld a PEO granted by the Magistrates Court. 
publication 
R (oao Matilda Holdings Ltd) v SSCLG [2016] EWHC 2725 (Admin)  
This  The Inspector was right to reject the claim that Welwyn could not apply because the use 
had not been physically concealed and the caravans could be seen. The four matters 
identified by Lord Mance are sufficient for Welwyn to apply, but not necessary tests. 
There are no ‘exceptionality’ or ‘egregious’ tests for determining whether there has been 
deliberate concealment.   
•  Case Law Update 30 (December 2016) 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 39 

CONDITIONS – GENERAL 
Fawcett Properties v Buckinghamshire CC [1960] All ER 503; [1961] AC 
636 
Per Lord Denning: ‘…a planning condition is only void for uncertainty if it can be given no 
meaning or no sensible or ascertainable meaning, and not merely because it is 
ambiguous or leads to absurd results. It is the daily task of the Courts to resolve 
ambiguities of language and to choose between them, and to construe words so as to 

avoid absurdities or to put up with them…as with by-laws so with planning conditions.  
The Courts can declare them void for unreasonableness, but they must remember that 

2019
they are made by a public representative body in the public interest. When planning 
conditions are made, as here, so as to maintain the green belt against those who would 
invade it, they ought to be supported if possible. And credit ought to be given to those 
who have to administer them, that they will be reasonably administered
.’ 
Wilson v West Sussex CC [1963] 2QB 764 
November 
There is no doctrine of an implied condition in planning law; an ‘agricultural permission’ 
is limited in scope, but it does not impose any enforceable condition or limitation. 
26th 
•  Trump International Golf Club Scotland Ltd v the Scottish Ministers [2015] UKSC 
74 and Lambeth LBC v SSCLG [2017] EWHC 2412 (Admin), [2018] EWCA Civ 844 
at: 
Kingston-on-Thames RBC v SSE [1973] 1 WLR 1549 as 
Conditions can validly restrict existing use rights.  
R v Hillingdon LBC ex parte Royco Homes [1974] 1QB 720 
A condition requiring that dwellings on a new housing estate be reserved for those on a 
correct 
Council waiting list was invalid.   
Sutton LBC v SSE & Pierpoint and Sons [1975] JPL 222 
Only 
A condition requiring the approval of materials imposed to safeguard visual amenity did 
not contain or imply any obligation on the standard of completion of works. 
A I and P (Stratford) v Tower Hamlets LBC [1976] JPL 234 
PP granted for warehouse and industrial units subject to a condition that the existing 
updated.  
office accommodation should be used only for purposes ancillary to the business on the 
site, to prevent an increase in office floor space contrary to policy. The condition was 
held to be valid since, if the offices could be used for ‘outside’ purposes, the firm might 
use part of the newly built warehouse and industrial units as offices.   
Bizony v SSE [1976] JPL 306 
Difficulties in enforcement do not render a condition invalid. 
freequently 
•  Bromsgrove DC v SSE [1988] JPL 257; R v Rochdale MBC ex parte Tew [1999] 3 
is 
PLR 74 
Penwith DC v SSE [1977] 34 P&CR 269 
A condition may regulate the use of land within the appellant’s control outside the site.  
Hildenborough Village Preservation Society v SSE [1978] JPL 708 
publication 
If a condition is imposed pursuant to an undertaking given by the developer, the 
developer cannot then claim the undertaking is unenforceable.  
This  George Wimpey & Co v SSE & New Forest DC [1979] JPL 314 
A condition may be imposed in respect of land in the applicant’s ‘control’ through 
ownership or an agreement or licence sufficient to allow compliance with the condition.  
•  Applies to land outside of the site, if it can be shown that the appellant had 
control at the date of the decision; Atkinson v SSE & Leeds CC [1983] JPL 599  
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 40 

Newbury DC v SSE [1980] 2 WLR 379, [1981] AC 578 
HoL: conditions must be imposed for a planning and no other purpose, however socially 
desirable; be fairly and reasonably related to the development permitted; and not so 
unreasonable that no reasonable authority would impose them. There is a duty of the 
Inspector to interpret the condition in order to give it a sensible meaning if he can. 
Peak Park JPB v SSE & ICI [1980] JPL 114 
Conditions may derogate from an existing PP. 
•  Not where the Newbury principle applies; if the PP is not required, the condition 
does not bite or is not valid 
2019
Wheatcroft v SSE & Harborough DC [1982] JPL 37 
An amendment to the plans can accepted on appeal and approved through a conditional 
PP, provided there is no substantial difference between what was originally applied for 
and the amended scheme. It is necessary to ask whether accepting the amendments 
would deprive those who should have been consulted of an opportunity for comment.  
November 
•  Ioannou v SSCLG [2014] EWCA Civ 1432 
Irlam Brick Co v Warrington BC [1982] JPL 709 
26th 
A condition requiring the cessation of tipping after 10 years if the site had not been re-
at: 
instated by that time was valid and did not derogate from the grant of PP itself. 
as 
Jillings v SSE & the Broads Authority [1984] JPL 32 
SoS (or Inspector) should not impose conditions without first canvassing the parties. 
If in the calm of his study, writing up his report, the Inspector is suddenly inspired by 
correct 
the thought that all the planning problems can be solved by an ingenious use of 
conditions, he will have to suppress the thought, or go back to the parties before 
finishing his decision
.’  
Only 
Wessex Regional Health Authority v SSE [1984] JPL 344 
A condition limiting the number of permitted dwellings to 37 was invalid when the 
application had been made for 48 dwellings. A condition cannot be imposed which allows 
development different from that applied for.  
updated.  
Bromsgrove DC v SSE [1988] JPL 257 
While difficulty in enforcement does not invalidate a condition, a condition that is 
impossible to enforce or otherwise incomplete, and thus absurd, will be invalid.  
•  R v Rochdale MBC ex parte Tew [1999] 3 PLR 74 
Camden LBC v SSE & PSP Nominees [1989] JPL 613 
freequently 
A condition can exclude the operation of s55(2)(f) and Article 3(1) of the UCO to fulfil a 
is 
planning policy purpose.  
Ashford BC v SSE & Hume [1991] JPL 362 
If a condition does not pass all the six policy tests, it does not necessarily follow that the 
condition is invalid. To be invalid, a condition must have no ascertainable meaning.  
Turner v SSE & Macclesfield BC [1992] JPL 837  
publication 
CoA: a condition limiting the number of parking spaces at a recreational fishing lake was 
valid; it did not derogate from the PP and would not be unduly difficult to enforce. 
This  Dunoon Developments Ltd v SSE & Poole BC [1992] WL 895054, JPL 936 
CoA: a condition can only exclude the operation of the GDO/GPDO by express reference 
and not by implication.  
•  Dunnett Investments Ltd v SSCLG & East Dorset DC [2016] EWHC 534 (Admin); 
[2017] EWCA Civ 192 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 41 

R v Newbury DC ex parte Stevens & Partridge [1992] JPL 1057  
At the reserved matters stage, further conditions may be imposed provided they arise 
directly from the RM application and do not materially derogate from the outline PP. 
Christoforou v SSE & Islington LBC [1994] JPL B44  
An Inspector is under no obligation to cast around for solutions to overcome a planning 
objection and impose a condition not suggested by either of the main parties.  
•  Ludlam v SSTLR & Derbyshire Dales DC (QBD 18.7.02)  
•  It was also held in Christoforou that there is no duty on the Inspector to consider 
2019
a limited [temporary/personal] grant of PP when not suggested by a party. That 
point needs to be treated with care, particularly in GT cases or where personal 
circumstances are raised, because the judgment predates the HRA98. 

Forest of Dean DC v SSE & Howells [1995] JPL 937 
PP granted for ‘holiday’ caravans with no condition to restrict the use. There may be no 
November 
material difference between caravans occupied as holiday or permanent residences, but 
it is a matter of fact and degree, and off-site effects should not be disregarded.  
Handoll & Suddick v Warner & Goodman & Street & East Lindsay 
26th  DC 
[1995] JPL 930  
at: 
CoA: dwelling subject to AOC was not built as approved. The PP was not implemented 
and the AOC did not apply. The building itself was immune from enf
as orcement action. 
Davenport & Another v Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [1996] The Times 
26.4.96 
A condition relating to land outside the site and the applicant’s co
correct  ntrol is not invalid 
unless it requires the carrying out of works on such land or the applicant could not be 
assured of securing compliance. The applicants faced no difficulty in complying with the 
condition since all it required was for them not to use
Only  land not in their control. 
R v Rochdale MBC ex parte Tew [1999] 3 PLR 74  
Conditions pertaining to land within the site but outside the applicant’s control; 
the development could only have taken place if a CPO was made for land 
updated.  
assembly. It would be unreasonable to enforce compliance with the conditions 
against those who might derive no benefit from and be opposed to the 
development. A condition which is not reasonably enforceable is not reasonable 
for the purposes of the Newbury test. 
I'm Your Man Ltd v SSE & North Somerset DC [1999] 4 PLR 107  
A planning application for the pe
freequently rmanent use of buildings was made after a 1995 grant 
of PP for a similar use for ‘a temporary period of seven years’. No condition was imposed 
is 
on the 1995 PP requiring cessation of the use after that time, and so the 1995 PP was 
not restricted to a temporary use. It was a permanent PP and a condition could not be 
implied in the reference to seven years in the description.  
•  Winchester CC v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 101 (Admin), [2015] EWCA Civ 56; Wood 
v SSCLG & the Broads Authority [2015] EWHC 2245 (Admin) 
publication 
Barlow v SSTLR & Uttlesford DC (QBD 14.11.02 Sullivan J)  
Condition required demolition of the existing bungalow within one month of the first 
This  residential occupation and rating of the proposed development. There is public interest in 
ensuring that conditions are construed as workable whenever possible. The purpose of 
referring to ‘rating’ was not to require any specific local government taxation but 
establish residential occupation. The Inspector gave reasons for finding that Council Tax 
fell within ‘rating’ for the purpose of the condition; the condition still had effect. 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 42 

Sevenoaks DC v FSS & Pedham Place Golf Centre [2005] 1 P&CR 13 
(QBD 22.3.04) 
 
The condition did not expressly require the works to be carried out in accordance with 
the approved details and no implied requirement could be read. Since a PP is a public 
document, any obligation withiin it should be clearly and expressly imposed. Where the 
language of the condition is unambiguous, no extraneous words are to be implied to aid 
construction or for any other purpose.  
•  Trump International Golf Club Scotland Ltd v the Scottish Ministers [2015] UKSC 
74 & Lambeth LBC v SSCLG [2017] EWHC 2412 (Admin), [2018] EWCA Civ 844 
2019
Avon Estates Ltd v Welsh Ministers & Ceredigion CC [2011] EWCA Civ 
553 
 
LDC appeal for the use of a dwellinghouse. PP had been granted subject to a seasonal 
occupancy condition and a ‘temporary’ condition. An interpretation that the occupancy 
condition could live beyond the specified date would make the PP itself internally 
inconsistent. Once a temporary and implemented PP ‘expires’ because of a time-limiting 
November 
condition, it ceases to exist. The conditions attached, other than that limiting the 
duration of the PP, have no life, no longer bind the land and cannot be enforced.   
26th 
‘It is very difficult to conceive of a condition on a temporary permission…which could 
sensibly relate to a development…that…has ceased to be authorised…I do regard it as 
at: 
very unlikely that the statutory scheme allows for what can be described as a permanent 
condition on a temporary permission, other than the time condition 

as itself.’ 
•  Case Law Updates 12 & 14 (October 2010 & June 2011) 
•  Knowledge Matters 25 (4 November 2016) 
correct 
Telford and Wrekin Council v SSCLG & Growing Enterprises Ltd [2013] 
JPL 865 
A condition which required the submission and approv
Only  al of details of products to be sold 
was discharged by the provision of the details required. The condition did not limit the 
products that could be sold to those on the approved list.  
•  Case Law Update 22 (July 2013) 
Winchester CC v SSCLG & Others [2013] EWHC 101 (Admin), [2015] 
updated.  
EWCA Civ 563 
PP for use of land as a ‘travelling showpeople’s site’ was a limited grant of PP for that 
use. It could not be interpreted as PP for a residential caravan site and no conditions 
were necessary for the LPA to enforce against use by people who were not travelling 
showpeople. The Inspector relied on I’m Your Man to find the use unrestricted in 
principle – but the restriction in I’m Your Man related to the manner in which the use 
freequently 
could be exercised, not the extent of the use. 
is 
•  Case Law Update 21 (March 2013) 
R (oao Royal London Mutual Insurance Society) v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 
3597 (Admin) 
A condition that ‘the retail consent shall be for non-food sales only in bulky trades 
normally found on retail parks which are…’ imposed a restriction on the nature of the 
non-food sale
publication s permitted. The words ‘shall be for’ permit no discretion; ‘only’ means 
solely or exclusively. The list of trades whose goods were permitted to be sold was 
defined. The condition excluded the operation of s55(2)(f) and Article 3(1) of the UCO.  
This 
•  Case Law Update 24 (February 2014) 
Cotswold Grange Country Park LLP v SSCLG & Tewkesbury DC [2014] 
EWHC 1138 (Admin) 
PP for a caravan park described the number of caravans on the land, but no condition 
was imposed to limit the number. Only a condition can impose a limitation as a matter of 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 43 

law. PP will be required for any MCU from a permitted use. An LPA may only prevent a 
non-material change by restricting a use as described in the PP by way of condition.  
•  Case Law Update 25 (June 2014) 
De Souza v SSCLG & Test Valley BC [2015] EWHC 2245 (Admin) 
Where the development has commenced – as in enforcement appeals – care is needed 
to ensure that an enforceable condition is imposed when a scheme of works is required 
to be submitted, agreed by the LPA and implemented within a set period. Grampian 
conditions are not appropriate. 
•  Case Law Update 28 (December 2015) 
2019
Wood v SSCLG & the Broads Authority [2015] EWHC 2368 (Admin) 
A limitation can only be placed on an express PP by way of condition. The principle 
applies to substantive and not just temporal limitations, as in I’m Your Man, but it does 
not displace the effect of s75(3). If PP for operational development does not specify the 
use of the building in the description, the absence of a condition precluding a use cannot 
November 
serve as an approval of a use materially different in character from the use for which the 
building is designed. In the context of s75(3), the word ‘designed’ refers to the purpose 
for which the building is intended, rather than architecturally designed. 26th 
•  Case Law Update 28 (December 2015) 
at: 
Trump International Golf Club Scotland Ltd & Another v the Scottish 
as 
Ministers [2015] UKSC 74  
Lord Hodge: “While the court will, understandably, exercise great restraint in implying 
terms into public documents which have criminal sanctions, I see no principled reason 
for excluding implication altogether.” 
correct 
When the court is concerned with the interpretation of words in a condition in a public 
document, it asks itself what a reasonable reader would understand the words to mean 
Only 
when reading the condition in the context of the other conditions and the consent as a 
whole. This is an objective exercise; the court will have regard to the natural and 
ordinary meaning of the relevant words, the overall purpose of the consent, any other 
conditions which cast light on the purpose of the relevant words, and common sense.  
Whether the court may look at other documents connected with the application or 
referred to in the consent will depend on the ci
updated.   rcumstances of the case, particularly the 
wording of the document being interpreted. Other documents may be relevant if they are 
incorporated into the consent by reference, or there is ambiguity in the consent. 
Lord Carnwath, in agreement: it is not right to regard the process of interpreting a PP as 
differing materially from that appropriate to other legal documents [which] must be 
interpreted in it particular legal and factual context. A PP is a public document which 
may be relied on by parties unrelated to those originally involved. Planning conditions 
freequently 
may also be used to support criminal proceedings.  
is 
•  Obiter remarks cited in Dunnett Investments v SSCLG & East Dorset DC [2017] 
EWCA Civ 192, and Lambeth LBC v SSCLG & Others [2017] EWHC 2412 (Admin), 
[2018] EWCA Civ 844; the CoA accepted in Lambeth that the strictly “obiter” 
comments of the UKSC in Trump were now part of the law relating to planning 
conditions – albeit the principle did not apply on the facts of that case.
 

publication 
 
The condition in Trump was imposed on a s36 consent under the Electricity Act 
1989 and considered to be an ‘incomplete’ condition.
 
Dunnett Investments Ltd v SSCLG & East Dorset DC [2016] EWHC 534 
This  (Admin), [2017] EWCA Civ 192 
Useful summary (paragraph 37 of the HC judgment) of the principles of planning law in 
relation to conditions: 
1.  Planning conditions need to be construed in the context of the PP as a whole; 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 44 

2.  Conditions should be construed in a common sense way, so that the Court should 
give the condition a sensible meaning if possible; 
3.  Consistent with that, a condition should not be construed narrowly or strictly; 
4.  There is no reason to exclude an implied condition but a PP is a public document 
which may be relied upon by parties unrelated to those originally involved; 
5.  The fact that breach of a condition may be used to support criminal trials means that 
a ‘relatively cautious approach’ should be taken; 
6.  A condition is to be construed objectively and not by what the parties may or may 
not have intended at the time – but by what a reasonable reader construing the 
2019
condition in the context of the PP as a whole would understand; 
7.  A condition should be clearly and expressly imposed; 
8.  A condition is to be construed in conjunction with the reason for its imposition so that 
its purpose and meaning can be properly understood; 
9.  The process of interpreting a condition, as for a PP, does not differ materially from 
November 
that appropriate to other legal documents. 
A condition restricting use to B1 and ‘no other purpose whatsoever, without express 
26th 
planning consent from the LPA first being obtained’ is clear and emphatic and excludes 
the grant of permission by the GPDO. An ‘express planning consent from the LPA’ means 
at: 
a PP granted by the LPA on application. The reason for the condition made it clear that 
the LPA sought to retain control.  
as 
•  Case Law Updates 29 & 31 (April 2016 & June 2017) 
•  Knowledge Matters 18 & 30 (1 April 2016 & 7 April 2017) 
correct 
Lambeth LBC v SSCLG & Others [2017] EWHC 2412 (Admin), [2018] 
EWCA Civ 844 
The HC and CoA upheld an Inspector’s decision to gra
Only  nt a LDC ‘for open/unrestricted 
retail purposes’ in respect of a ‘DIY retail unit’. The Council had granted PP in 2014 
under s73 for ‘variation’ of the condition that restricted the range of goods sold. The 
range of goods was set out in the description of development but not a new condition.  
I’m Your Man applies; if a limitation is to be imposed on a PP, it must be done by 
condition accompanied by a reason, a limited description is not sufficient. There was 
updated.  
nothing in the PP which could amount to a reason for treating the description of use as a 
condition. While Trump did not expressly rule this out, an implication in the context of 
planning law could only be made into an incomplete condition. The implication of a 
condition unaccompanied by a reason would contravene the statutory code. 
•  Knowledge Matters 36 & 43 (13 October 2017 & 4 May 2018) 
 
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 45 

CONDITIONS – BREACH OF 
Clwyd CC v SSW [1982] JPL 696 
Where there is a failure to comply with a condition imposed by the GPDO on permitted 
development, the EN can only be directed against the breach of condition (BoC).  
•  Except that development undertaken without compliance with a prior notification 
(pre-commencement) condition is development without PP. 
•  R v Elmbridge BC ex parte Oakimber [1992] JPL 48; F G Whitley & Sons v SSW & 
Clwyd CC [1992] JPL 856 
2019
Newbury DC v SSE & Marsh [1994] JPL 134 
The s171B(2) four year rule cannot apply to a breach of an occupancy condition. 
•  FSS v Arun DC & Brown [2006] EWCA Civ 1172 
Butcher v SSE & Maidstone BC [1996] JPL 636 
November 
A PP granted on a DPA must be implemented before it can come into effect; whether it is 
implemented is a matter of fact and degree. Some conscious action is required to 
26th 
implement the PP, so that the conditions bite. If it can be shown that a PP has not been 
implemented, there may be success on ground (c) in respect of an EN aimed at a BOC. 
at: 
Nicholson v SSE & Maldon DC [1998] JPL 553  
as 
If a breach of a ‘continuing requirement’ condition ceases because of discontinuance of 
the offending activity, that breach is at an end. The clock starts again and future non-
compliance amounts to a new, separate breach subject to enforcement action for ten 
years. Non-compliance with the condition must exist at the date of the LDC application.  
correct 
•  Ellis v SSCLG [2009] EWHC 634 (Admin), Basingstoke and Deane BC v SSCLG & 
Stockdale [2009] EWHC 1012 (Admin) Only 
North Devon DC v SSE & Rottenbury [1998] EGCS 72  
A dwelling subject to an AOC was used for over ten years as holiday accommodation but 
only in the summer months. The Inspector granted an LDC for a BoC without properly 
addressing the seasonal nature of the use. A distinction must be drawn between a use 
that is continuous but seasonal, and activities in BoC. There would not normally have 
updated.  
been a BoC when the property was vacant in winter. 
•  Any LDC granted in respect of a breach of a ‘continuing requirement’ condition 
should be worded to reflect the fact that, if the breach comes to an end, the LDC 
does not provide immunity against enforcement of a fresh breach: “occupation of 

the dwelling by any person continuing the same breach, which started more than 
ten years before the date of the application for this certificate, of condition no. x, 

freequently 
attached to the PP ref: … dated … for …” 
is 
St Anselm Development Co Ltd v FSS & Westminster CC [2003] EWHC 
1592 (Admin) 
 
Condition required retention of a car park for use by certain occupiers. Most but not all 
spaces were used by others for over ten years. Claim that this made all spaces immune 
from the BoC was rejected; there must be a ‘purposive’ interpretation of the condition.  
publication 
North Devon DC v FSS & Stokes [2004] JPL 1396  
A breach of a seasonal occupancy condition can become lawful through the passage of 
This  time, even though the breach could not be continuous. The condition, by definition, 
would not be breached when the property is occupied during the permitted season. This 
principle would apply equally, for instance, to an opening hours condition.  
FSS v Arun DC & Brown [2006] EWCA Civ 1172  
The four year rule under s171B(2) applies to both development without PP and a breach 
of condition relating to a change of use to use as a single dwellinghouse.  
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 46 

Basingstoke and Deane BC v SSCLG & Stockdale [2009] EWHC 1012 
(Admin), JPL 1585 
 
In considering whether the ten year clock had been re-started in relation to a breach of 
an occupancy condition, it is necessary to focus on whether there has been a continuous 
BoC, rather than significant breaks in occupation. If there were gaps in occupation to 
refurbish/market the dwelling, ie, to undertake activities specifically to further the 
breach, enforcement action taken in those periods could have succeeded.  
•  Case Law Updates 7 & 9 (June 2009 & January 2010) 
Langmead v SSHCLG & Others [2018] EWHC 2202 (Admin) 
2019
Conditions 4 and 5 prevented the occupation of caravans on a site other than by 
agricultural workers between certain dates, and removal of the caravans outside of those 
dates. EN alleged BOC/4 in that the caravans were not occupied as required. 
The appellants argued that the Inspector failed to have regard to proposed landscape 
and visual mitigation measures. Held that the scope of this ground (a) appeal was 
November 
limited to whether condition 4 should be removed (or replaced), and regard should be 
had to condition 5. No mitigation measures had been put forward which might enable 
the caravans to be occupied by someone unconnected with the farm.   26th 
•  Case Law Update 34 (December 2018) 
at: 
 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 47 

CONSOLIDATION OF UNDESIRABLE USE 
W H Tolley and Son Ltd v SSE & Torridge DC [1997] 75 P&CR  
PP was refused on grounds that the development would consolidate an undesirable, but 
not unlawful, business use in a residential area. The concept of consolidation did not 
imply an increase or intensification in the current use, but a strengthening of the 
features that supported it. The development would have made it less likely that the use 
would diminish or be replaced by a less undesirable use. It was reasonable to seek to 
ensure that the prospect of the diminution or replacement would not be reduced by a 
development intended to make the undesirable use more efficient or convenient. 
2019
November 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 48 

CROWN LAND 
Hillingdon LBC v SSE & Others [1999] EWHC 772 (Admin)  
The Council had approved details of an incinerator on the assumption by both parties 
that non-statutory arrangements for Crown development applied. Later it transpired that 
they did not; the Council could not resile from views previously expressed and was 
estopped from issuing an EN.  
Mid Devon DC v FSS & Stevens [2004] EWHC 814 (Admin)   
Immunity to persons other than the Crown applies to the Crown’s successors in title to 
2019
land which was Crown Land at the time the development took place. Such immunity 
does not apply to the private holders of an interest in land that was never Crown land, 
even where the development itself was carried out by the Crown – in this case, an 
emergency excavation to bury BSE-infected cattle.  
R (oao KP JR Management Co Ltd) v Richmond LBC & Others [2018] 
EWHC 84 (Admin) 

November 
Challenge to (1) failure to issue an EN (2) grant of a LDC for the mooring of boats. The 
proper PU is a matter of judgment. It was open to the Council to find that there was one 
26th 
PU, being the ownership area of the Crown Estates, and not that each mooring was a PU.  
at: 
 
as 
 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 49 

CURTILAGE 
NB: various definitions of ‘curtilage’ are set out in the GPDO 2015 for the purposes of 
specific Parts and Classes. For Part 1 of the Schedule 2 of the GPDO, see also the 
definition of curtilage in Permitted Development for Householders: Technical Guidance.
 
Sinclair-Lockhart’s Trustees v Central Land Board (1950) 1 P&CR 195 
The ground used for the comfortable enjoyment of a house or other building may be 
regarded as being within the curtilage of the house or building and…an integral part of 

the same even though it has not been marked off in any way…It is enough that it serves 
2019
the purpose of the house or building in some necessary or reasonably useful way.’ 
Brutus v Cozens
 [1973] AC 854 
Interpretation of the word ‘curtilage’ is not a matter of law but should be based upon the 
ordinary meaning of the word.  
Methuen-Campbell v Walters [1979] 1 QB 525 
November 
CoA: for land to fall within the curtilage of a building, it must be intimately associated 
with the building to support the conclusion that it forms part and parcel of the building. 
26th 
Attorney-General ex rel Sutcliffe & Rouse & Hughes v Calderdale BC 
at: 
[1983] JPL 310 
as 
Listed building case; three tests of (i) physical layout, (ii) ownership (past and present) 
and (iii) use or function (past and present) applied ‘whatever may be the strict 
conveyancing interpretation’. There is little difficulty in putting a structure near to or 
away from a building when it is in the curtilage, there is common ownership and the 
correct 
structure is used in conjunction with the building.  
The boundaries of the area are to be determined by such factors as may be relevant to 
the circumstances of the particular case and by the manner in which the listed building, 

Only 
any related objects or structures, and the land have been, or are being, used.’ 
Dyer v Dorset CC [1988] 3 WLR 213 
Curtilage is constrained to a small area about a building: ‘the area attached to and 
containing a dwellinghouse and its outbuildings’. The size of that area appears to be a 
question of fact and degree. 
updated.  
•  Skerritts of Nottingham Ltd v SSETR (1) [2000] JPL 789 
Collins v SSE & Epping Forest DC [1989] CO 1590/88 
[An area of rough grass, beyond the well-cut lawns of a dwellinghouse, was outside the 
curtilage because it did not serve the purpose of the dwellinghouse in some necessary or 
useful manner.]  freequently 
is 
•  If the case is cited by the parties, refer to the transcript rather than summary. 
James v SSE [1991] 1 PLR 58 
A tennis court at the end of a field 100m from the dwelling was not within the curtilage. 
Skerritts of Nottingham Ltd v SSETR (1) [2000] EWCA Civ 60, JPL 789  
The curtilage 
publication  of a substantial listed building was likely to extend to what were or had 
been, in terms of ownership and function, ancillary buildings. The curtilage within which 
a mansion’s satellite buildings were found was bound to be limited, but the concept of 
This  smallness was, in this context, so completely relative as to be almost meaningless. Size 
is not a conclusive test of curtilage. 
R (oao Sumption) v Greenwich LBC [2007] EWHC 2276 (Admin) 
The LPA’s decision to grant a LDC for the erection of a boundary wall and gates was 
quashed on the basis that the land was within the curtilage of a listed building and not 
PD. Held that a lack of historic connection between the land and the listed building is a 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 50 

relevant fact but not determinative. Over the years, land may be acquired which serves 
to extend a garden. It is necessary to determine the status of the land from the factual 
situation existing at the date of the application.  
In this case, land had been acquired in 2004 and fenced; it was usable and intended to 
be used as an extension to the garden. It was not relevant that the garden use had not 
been formally approved. The reference in the application to ‘recently extended garden’ 
was accurate and fatal to the grant of the LDC. 
O’Flynn v SSCLG & Warwick DC [2016] EWHC 2984 (Admin) 
In refusing to grant a LDC for the existing use of land as incidental to the enjoyment of 
2019
the dwellinghouse, the Inspector erred by discounting the appellant’s gardening activities 
and use of the land for walking and sitting out. While maintenance and/or recreational 
use do not necessarily denote incidental residential use, it will depend on the facts of the 
case. These activities are quintessentially carried out by householders on land as 
incidental to their use of a dwelling and ought to be taken into account. 
The Inspector also erred by addressing whether the land had been used for residential 
November 
purposes for ten years, and not whether the use was lawful within s55(2)(d). 
•  Case Law Update 30 (December 2016) 
26th 
Burford v SSCLG & Test Valley BC [2017] EWHC 1493 (Admin) 
at: 
The criteria laid down in Calderdale were applied to non-listed building case. EN alleging 
the construction of a building was appealed on the ground that the building was within 
as 
the curtilage of the dwellinghouse and PD under Part 1, Class E. The Inspector was 
entitled to conclude that land was not curtilage because it was physically separated from 
that which was curtilage by hedges and fences. An LDC for ‘the keeping of horses for 
recreational purposes…incidental to the enjoyment of the dwellinghouse as such’ did not 
correct 
denote that the land was within the curtilage or part of the garden of the dwelling. 
•  Knowledge Matters 33 (7 July 2017) 
Only 
 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 51 

DECISIONS AND REASONING 
Hope v SSE [1976] 31 P&CR 120 
An appellant is entitled to know what conclusions the decision maker has reached on the 
‘principal controversial issues’.  
•  Applied by the HL in Bolton MBC v SSE [1995] JPL 1043  
John Pearcy Transport Ltd v SSE & Hounslow LBC [1986] JPL 680 
It is the Inspector’s duty to be up to date as to the law and ensure that it is applied 
2019
correctly to the facts as found.  
Hill v SSE & Bromley LBC [1993] JPL 158  
While an agricultural development might not satisfy the tests of GPDO Part 6, a 
justification might exist for it when considering the planning merits in an appeal on 
ground (a), based on the use of the land for agriculture as defined in s336(1). November 
White & Cooper & Phillips v SSE [1996] JPL B108 
A suggestion that a temporary PP might cause less harm than a permanent one, which 
26th 
was raised for the first time in cross-examination of the LPA’s witness, was a ‘principal 
controversial issue’ and should have been dealt with in the decision letter.  
at: 
R v SSE & Leeds CC ex parte Ramzan (QBD 18.12.97 CO/2202/97)  
as 
An appeal proceeding on ground (d) was dealt with by WR at the appellant’s request.  
Their witnesses gave different dates for the completion of works. All dates were more 
than four years before the issue of the EN but the Inspector was entitled to find the 
evidence inconsistent and unreliable, and give it little weight. The appellant had declined 
correct 
an inquiry; it was not unreasonable to find their case not made out on the evidence 
without making any further offer of an inquiry or seeking more information.  
Only 
South Buckinghamshire DC v SSETR & Gregory (QBD 11.11.98 
CO/2291/98)  
Ground (a) lapsed on s174 appeal. The Inspector allowed a linked s78 appeal, granted 
PP and found that, because of the effect of s180, the requirements of the EN would 
cease to have effect, and it was unnecessary to consider ground (g). The PP was 
updated.  
quashed on a successful s288 application by the LPA. S180 no longer applied, but the 
appellant was refused leave to appeal, for being out of time, in relation to ground (g).  
•  It is therefore essential that, in linked cases, any appeals on grounds (f) and/or 
(g) are dealt with, before upholding the EN, even if PP is granted under s78. 
Bury MBC v SSCLG & Entwistle [2011] EWHC 2191 (Admin) 
S174(f)(c) is worded in the prese
freequently  nt tense: ‘those matters…do not constitute a breach of 
planning control’. The language of ground (c) does not prevent it from covering a case 
is 
where, by the time of the appeal, there is no breach. An appellant can, if necessary, rely 
upon matters occurring since the date of the EN to show, and only to show, that the 
development which has occurred does not amount to a breach. The Inspector did not err 
in law in examining the planning control situation at the time of the appeal. 
•  This does not apply in ground (c) where it is claimed that the development is 
permitted by the GPDO; Williams Le Roi v SSE & Salisbury DC [1993] JPL 1033 
publication 
•  Case Law Update 17 (March 2012) 
This  Arnold v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 1197 (Admin), [2017] EWCA Civ 231 
Works undertaken to dwellinghouse resulting in almost complete demolition were beyond 
scope of LDC and PD rights. EN alleged the erection of a building to be used as a 
dwelling. Four applications had been made to the LPA for alternative forms of 
development, but no decisions had been made on them. The Inspector expressed doubts 
as to whether he was in a position, as a matter of law, to consider the alternative 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 52 

schemes in relation to ground (a). He found in any event found that it was not possible 
to sever the dwelling into acceptable and not acceptable parts. He did not misdirect 
himself to his power to grant PP for an alternative scheme or fail to make adequate 
assessment of the alternatives before him. 
•  Case Law Updates 27 & 31 (June 2015 & June 2017) 
•  Knowledge Matters 31 (5 May 2017) 
Davis v SSCLG & Lichfield DC [2016] EWHC 274 (Admin) 
The Inspector was not bound to make a split decision on ground (a), since the power to 
do so under s177(1)(a) is discretionary. The Inspector could only have erred if their 
2019
failure to exercise the power was Wednesbury unreasonable. If no alternative scheme is 
put, the Inspector cannot devise one by making a selection from the elements, especially 
where it is said that all elements are necessary for the use. 
•  Case Law Update 29 (April 2016) 
 
November 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 53 

DWELLINGHOUSE 
Gravesham BC v SSE & O’Brien [1982] 47 P&CR 142; [1983] JPL 307  
Whether a chalet limited by condition to occupation for part of the year was a 
dwellinghouse for GDO purposes; the distinctive characteristic of a dwellinghouse was its 
ability to afford to those who used it the facilities required for day to day private 
domestic existence. It did not lose that characteristic if it was occupied for only part of 
the year, or at infrequent intervals, or by a series of different persons.  
•  The chalet did not have an inside WC or bathroom but stood within its own 
2019
planning unit where, it is understood, there was a separate external WC. 
Sevenoaks DC v SSE & Dawe (QBD 13.11.97 CO1322-97) 
A detached outbuilding may be considered as part of a dwellinghouse where it is a 
‘normal domestic adjunct’. 
Moore v SSE & New Forest DC [1998] JPL 877 (CoA)  
November 
CoA: concerned the use of a house and complex as ten holiday homes. There was no 
requirement that a dwellinghouse had to be occupied as a permanent home; nor did the 
26th 
units, which could otherwise be described as single dwellinghouses, cease to be used as 
such because they were managed as a whole for commercial holiday or other temporary 
at: 
purposes. The units were single dwellinghouses subject to the four year rule.  
as 
Swale BC v FSS & Lee [2005] EWCA Civ 1568; [2006] JPL 886 
There is a difference between an established dwellinghouse where an occupier does not 
have to be continuously or even regularly present for the dwelling to remain in use as 
such, and where there is no established use. The use must be ‘affirmatively established’ 
correct 
over the four year period.  
The correct approach is to ask whether there was any period during the four years when 
the building was not physically occupied, although av
Only ailable for such, and the LPA could 
not have taken enforcement action against the use. It is also necessary to make a 
finding as to whether the periods of non-occupation were de minimis.  
FSS v Arun DC & Brown [2006] EWCA Civ 1172  
The four year rule under s171B(2) applies to both development without PP and a breach 
updated.  
of condition relating to a change of use to use as a single dwellinghouse.  
•  But see Newbury DC v SSE & Marsh [1994] JPL 134 
Grendon v FSS & Cotswold DC [2006] EWHC 1711 (Admin), [2007] JPL 
275 
The use of the word ‘building’ in s171B(2) makes it necessary to consider whether the 
freequently 
building is physically capable of being a dwellinghouse, has the attributes of a dwelling 
is 
and is used as such. The Court also endorsed Backer v SSE [1983] JPL 167 in that use of 
a dwellinghouse has to be more than just ‘camping out’. 
•  Case Law Update 2 (October 2007) 
•  Grendon should be considered with caution, since the question of whether a 
building is physically a dwellinghouse appears to go beyond s171B(2). Martin 
Edwards argued in [2007] JPL 275: “There is something unsettling about this 

publication 
decision. The factual background is far from unusual. However, the words of the 
relevant sub-section are clear and…the central consideration is simply whether 

This 
any building is being used as a dwellinghouse. Yet for some reason the judge and 
counsel adopted a slightly different approach, i.e. first to consider whether the 
building is a dwellinghouse and then, if it is, whether it has been used as a single 
dwellinghouse for the requisite period. This difference in approach is, in my view, 

important and it is arguable that if the court had followed the wording of the 
subsection more closely a different outcome may have resulted.”  

Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 54 

•  It should also be noted that the Inspector in Grendon addressed the appearance 
of the dwelling. Subsequent cases relating to deliberate concealment have shown 
that a building may not “look like a house” but still be used as such. 

R (oao Gore) v SSCLG & Dartmoor NPA [2008] EWHC 3278 (Admin) 
PD rights under the GPDO, Part 1 claimed for a building which had a LDC for ‘use of 
forestry store as residential’. The Court supported the Inspector’s view that, although 
the building was a dwelling, it was not a dwellinghouse for PD purposes. The LDC was 
not concerned with the definition of the term in relation to the GPDO. To benefit from 
Part 1 PD rights, the building must be a dwellinghouse and have a curtilage.  
2019
•  Case Law Updates 6 & 8 (April 2009 & September 2009) 
R (oao Townsley) v SSCLG [2009] EWHC 3522 (Admin) 
A dwellinghouse must be in existence for PD rights to be exercised. A building under 
construction is not a dwellinghouse for PD purposes. The appropriate test is substantial 
completion as described in Sage – the development must be carried out internally and 
externally in accordance with the PP. While that prescription could be taken too far, it 
November 
would apply to any material variation to the PP that was granted.  
•  Case Law Updates 11 & 12 (July 2010 & October 2010) 
26th 
 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 55 

ESTOPPEL AND LEGITIMATE EXPECTATION 
Res Judicata or Issue Estoppel 
Thrasyvoulou v SSE & Hackney LBC (No. 2)
 [1988] JPL 689; [1990] 2 
WLR 1; (HL 14/12/89) 
If a conclusive finding has been made on planning status and there has been no material 
change of circumstances, the LPA is estopped from denying and re-litigating that finding. 
It is likely that the principle applies to appellants; it does apply to the decision maker. 

2019
 
This principle does not apply to judgments on planning merits; an Inspector may 
disagree with a previous decision so long as the reasons are clear and general 
policies regarding consistency in decision-making are not offended; Rockhold Ltd 

v SSE & South Oxfordshire DC [1986] JPL 130 and North Wiltshire DC v SSE & 
Clover (1993) 65 P&CR 137, [1992] JPL 955, 

Watts v SSE & South Oxfordshire DC [1991] 1 PLR 61 
November 
For a previous appeal decision to operate as an issue estoppel, with the relevant issue 
determined on the facts and law, the whole matter must have been fairly and squarely 
before the previous Inspector, who must have fully addressed the matter and m
26th  ade an 
unequivocal decision on it. It must be clear from the face of the decision that these 
at: 
conditions have been fulfilled.  
R v SSE & Wychavon DC ex parte Saunders [1992] JPL 7
as  53 
The SoS quashed an EN under s176(3)(b) after the LPA failed to submit copies of the 
EN. The appellant sought to show that the Council was estopped from issuing a further 
EN. The Court held that, since the appeal had not been allowed on the grounds pleaded, 
correct 
but through non-compliance with procedural rules, this could not confer rights on the 
development. Thrasyvoulou was not relevant where merits had not been considered.  
A and T Investments v SSE & Kensington an
Only  d Chelsea RBC [1996] JPL 
B94  
For issue estoppel from a previous decision to be relied upon, it is necessary to show 
that there had been a finding which was ‘the essential foundation’ for the decision.  
The appropriate steps should include: identification of the question determined by the 
updated.  
first Inspector; identification of the findings of fact and/or law that provided the essential 
foundation for that determination; and consideration of whether the finding(s) would be 
contradicted by the contentions advanced in the second proceedings.  
Porter v SSETR [1996] 3 All ER 693 
1.  The issue must have been decided by a Court or Tribunal of Competent Jurisdiction (a 
previous Inspector); 
freequently 
2.  The issue mu
is st be one between parties who are parties to the decision; 
3.  The issue must have been decided and be of a type to which issue estoppel applies; 
4.  Issue estoppel must be claimed for the same issue as previously decided. 
•  Forrester v SSE & South Bucks DC [1997] JPL B154  
R (oao East Hertfordshire DC) v FSS [2007] EWHC 834 (Admin) 
publication 
EN quashed on the basis of a fundamental lack of information as to whether there had 
been a breach. The Inspector referred to the second bite provisions under s171B(4), but 
This  also used the standard phrase ‘the appeal should succeed on ground (c)’. Second EN 
also appealed on ground (c) with claim that s171B(4) was not available.  
Held that issue estoppel is applicable to decisions on grounds (b) to (d) but was not in 
this case. It was clear from the decision that the first Inspector had not found that there 
was no breach; they did not know and there was no determination.  
•  Case Law Update 1 (July 2007) 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 56 

Keevil v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2012] EWHC 
322 (Admin) 
Upheld Inspector’s finding that the LPA was not estopped from contending that an LDC 
did not apply to where the caravans in question were sited, even though no plan was 
attached to the LDC and there was a site licence. The Inspector’s decision was based on 
the evidence and the balance of probabilities; the situation was distinguished from 
Thrasyvoulou, where a conclusive finding had already been made on the same issue.  
 
Estoppel by Representation or Proprietary Estoppel 

2019
Southend–on-Sea Corporation v Hodgson (Wickford) [1961] 12 P&CR 
165  
A LPA may not fetter its discretion to issue an EN by any form of agreement. 
Wells v MHLG [1967] 1 WLR 1000 
November 
A determination in writing that PP is not required, that is set out in terms indicative of 
the ostensible authority, cannot be retracted subsequently.  
26th 
•  NB – pre-dates the TCPA71 and TCPA90 
at: 
Saxby v SSE & Westminster CC [1998] JPL 1132  
The provisions under ss191-196 are ‘an entirely new and fully comp
as rehensive code’ and 
it is no longer possible to have an informal determination as to whether PP is required. 
R v East Sussex CC ex parte Reprotech (Pebsham) Ltd [2002] UKHL 8  
HoL confirmation that the concept of estoppel by representation is not appropriate in the 
correct 
context of statutory planning control; an application must be made under s191 or s192 
for a binding determination. The public law concept of legitimate expectation may be 
available as a remedy against a public authority, but 
Only account must be taken of the public 
interest. Any representation by a LPA as to how it will or will not exercise its powers 
under s172 will not give rise to a binding estoppel by representation. 
•  This judgment supersedes Lever Finance v Westminster LBC [1971] 1 WLR 732 
and Western Fish Products v Penwith DC [1978] JPL 623.  
updated.  
 
Legitimate Expectation 
Henry Boot Homes Ltd V Bassetlaw Dc
 [2002] Ewca Civ 983; [2003] JPL 
1030  
There was an informal agreement between developers and LPA, but the statutory code 
freequently 
has primacy in determining planning applications. Legitimate expectation is applicable to 
is 
town planning, but it would be difficult in practice for there to be a legitimate expectation 
that the comprehensive statutory code would not be applied.  
•  Flattery, Japanese Parts Centre Ltd v SSCLG & Nottinghamshire CC [2010] EWHC 
2868 (Admin) 
Coghurst Wood Leisure Park Ltd v SSTLR [2002] EWHC 1091 Admin; 
[2003] JPL

publication  206  
The Courts would be slow to find that the principle of legitimate expectation operated to 
keep alive a PP that had on its face expired.  
This  Keevil v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2012] EWHC 
322 (Admin) 
There was no legitimate expectation that the siting of caravans would be lawful.  No plan 
was attached to the LDC, and the appellant had taken a risk in not clarifying on its 
extent before stationing the caravans in question. An administrative and genuine 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 57 

mistake on the part of the LPA should not automatically provide the appellant with a 
benefit, and the Inspector had not erred in finding this.  
 
Estoppel by Convention 
Hillingdon LBC v SSE
 & Others [1999] EWHC 772 (Admin) 
The authority had approved details of an incinerator on the assumption by both parties 
that non-statutory arrangements for Crown development applied. Later it transpired that 
they did not; the council could not resile from views previously expressed and were 
estopped from issuing an EN. They had been in possession of all the facts and the 
2019
procedures had been followed which also gave similar protection to third parties whether 
the non-statutory or statutory process was followed. 
R v Caradon DC ex parte Knott [2000] 3 PLR 1 
Revocation and discontinuance orders had been made and confirmed, and discussions on 
compensation had begun, then the LPA found that the dwelling had been erected outside 
November 
the site boundaries. EN issued alleging the erection of a dwelling without PP.  
The avoidance of compensation was not on its own a proper planning purpose making it 
26th 
expedient to issue the notice. Estoppel case made on three grounds: by representation – 
the appellants had relied on the council’s representations when they withdrew a s73 
at: 
application and their objection to the revocation order; by issue estoppel – in earlier HC 
proceedings, to which the LPA were a party, the judge had reached 
as a clear conclusion 
that the PP was still alive and could be implemented; and by convention – the parties 
had conducted their dealings on the basis that the PP had been implemented and it 
would be wholly unjust for the LPA to proceed in a different manner. 
correct 
 
 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 58 

EXISTING USES, FALLBACK POSITION AND S57(4) 
Clyde & Co v SSE & Guildford BC [1977] JPL 521  
CoA: the desirability of retaining an existing use was a material consideration. A refusal 
of PP for a change of use could not ensure that a current permitted use would continue, 
but there is a ’fair chance’ that if Use B was refused, Use A would be resumed.  
Finn v SSE & Barnet LBC [1984] JPL 734 
The SSE failed to consider whether there would be a reversion to residential use in 
practice; given the practicalities of any residential use/the economics of conversion. 
2019
Westminster CC v British Waterways Board [1985] JPL 102 
The House of Lords imposed a stiffer test; whether it was likely ‘on the balance of 
probability’ that the existing or preferred use would be resumed. 
Vikoma International v SSE & Woking BC [1987] JPL 38 
November 
‘Fair chance’ test applied; the Inspector erred in considering whether the premises were 
‘necessary’ rather than ‘desirable’ for the appellant’s business. 
26th 
London Residuary Body v SSE & Lambeth LBC [1988] JPL 637 
There is no ‘competing needs’ test – it is not necessary to show that one 
at:  use is 
preferable to the other. This is not the same as ‘fair chance’ - likelihood on the balance 
as 
of probability that the favoured use will be implemented or resumed.  
Haven Leisure Ltd v SSE & North Cornwall DC [1994] JPL 148 
The fallback position need not attract much weight unless there is a real likelihood that, 
correct 
even if PP is refused, the same or similar planning consequences would flow. 
Bylander Waddell Partnership v SSE & Harrow LBC [1994] JPL 440 
Only 
An appellant’s reluctance and practical difficulties in implementing a preferred use are 
material considerations to be taken into account in a ground (a) or planning appeal. 
Sefton MBC v SSTLR & Morris [2003] JPL 632   
A material fallback position could be established by applying common sense. If no 
enforcement action had been taken, bringing s57(4) into play, this did not mean that 
updated.  
s57(4) should be ignored, especially where the LPA had resolved to take such action.  
Mid Suffolk DC v FSS & Lebbon [2006] JPL 859  
If the construction of a building has become lawful through the passage of time and the 
operation of s171B(1) and s191(2), its use may be liable to enforcement action. S75 
applies to buildings with PP. It is possible to have a lawful building with no lawful use.  
freequently 
•  R (oao Sumner) v SSCLG [2010] EWHC 372 (Admin); Welwyn Hatfield BC v 
is 
SSCLG & Beesley [2011] UKSC 15  
Hillingdon LBC v SSCLG & Autodex Ltd [2008] EWHC 198   
There is a right to revert to the last lawful use after the issue of an EN. S57(4) applies to 
uses that are lawful through the passage of time and the effect of s171B and s191(2) 
which makes certain uses lawful for ‘the purposes of’ or the entirety of the Act. 
publication 
•  Case Law Update 4 (October 2008) 
•  The rights to reversion to the ‘normal’ use under s57(2) and s57(3) do not apply 
This 
to uses which have only become immune from enforcement over time. 
Simpson v SSCLG [2011] EWHC 283 
Summary of ‘fallback’ principles in paragraph 10: “a fall-back position clearly has two 
elements that need to be established before it can be brought into the evaluation. The 

first is the nature and content of the alternative uses or operations. These need to be 
identified with sufficient particularity to enable the comparison that the fall-back 

Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 59 

contention involves to be made. The second element is the likelihood of the alternative 
use or operations being carried on or carried out.” 
Kensington and Chelsea RBC v SSCLG & 38 Cathcart Ltd 
(CO/4492/2016) 
Inspector granted PP for a change of use on the basis that a LDC previously granted 
under s192 for the use was a ‘fallback position’ – but the evidence indicated that there 
had been a ‘material change’ in circumstances since then. Held, with regard to s192(4), 
that the Inspector had erred in assuming that there was a continued right to make the 
COU pursuant to the LDC without giving due consideration to submissions that this 
would no longer be lawful. It was necessary to address whether the factors raised by the 
2019
Council meant that the LDC could not be relied upon to have continuing effect. 
•  Knowledge Matters 34 (7 August 2017) 
Parvez v SSCLG & Bolton MBC [2017] EWHC 3188 (Admin) 
COU from a working men’s club (WMC) to a function suite; the Inspector found that the 
November 
lawful and alleged uses were both sui generis uses; there had been a MCU; and reversion 
to the lawful use would have a lower impact on the locality.  
The HC held that the Inspector had not failed to consider a fallback position of reversion to 
26th 
a WMC use with activities including wedding functions. If the lawful use is a mixed use, as 
with a WMC, the fallback position is reversion to a mixed use that is not m
at: aterially different 
from that formerly carried on. The appellant did not describe a mixed use materially the 
as 
same as that previously undertaken at the WMC. The Inspector considered the correct 
fallback position and was entitled to not deal with the irrelevant argument.  
Sharma v SSCLG & Others [2018] EWHC 2355 (Admin) 
correct 
EN alleged the use of land for airport parking; the appellant claimed that the Inspector 
had failed to address whether the LDC fallback use would be carried out to its ‘full’ 
extent in accordance with the LDC. When the decision was read fairly, the Inspector had 
Only 
properly applied the fallback approach. Whether the land would be used to its ‘fullest’ 
extent was not to be assumed from the LDC but was a matter of evidence.  
•  Case Law Update 34 (December 2018) 
Oates v SSCLG v Canterbury CC [2017] EWHC 2716 (Admin), [2018] 
EWCA Civ 2229 

updated.  
Lawful use rights attached to a building are lost when the building ceases to exist as 
such and is replaced. A requirement to demolish the new building cannot deprive the 
appellant of pre-existing lawful use rights or breach the ‘Mansi’ principle. 
•  Knowledge Matters 37 (13 November 2017) 
•  Case Law Update 34 (December 2018) 
freequently 
 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 60 

EXPEDIENCY 
Donovan v SSE [1987] JPL 118 
No requirement that all breaches of planning control are enforced against consistently. 
Ferris v SSE & Doncaster MBC 
[1988] JPL 777 
The LPA does not need to satisfy itself beyond doubt that a breach has occurred or that 
there are no possible grounds of appeal. 
R v Rochester-upon-Medway CC ex parte Hobday [1990] JPL 17 
2019
The matters subject to enforcement action must have taken place; an EN cannot be 
issued in relation to a prospective breach. 
Britannia Assets v SSCLG & Medway Council [2011] EWHC 1908 (Admin) 
A challenge to the Council’s decision to issue an EN on the grounds of expediency can 
only be made by way of judicial review. An Inspector has no jurisdiction to determine 
November 
whether the LPA had complied with its obligation under s172. 
•  Case Law Update 16 (December 2011) 
26th 
Silver v SSCLG & Camden LBC & Tankel [2014] EWHC 2729 (Admin) 
at: 
The RFEN failed to specify why the Council considered it expedient to issue the EN. The 
Court held that it was impermissible to look beyond the EN where th
as  e reasons for it were 
maintained by the LPA in substance and had been articulated as required by s172(1)(b). 
 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 61 

FIXTURES AND CHATTELS 
Holland v Hodgson [1872] LR 7 CP 
Looms nailed to the floor of a woollen mill were fixtures rather than chattels, being 
affixed to the land other than by their own weight. In circumstances where an article so 
affixed was intended to be a chattel, the onus to demonstrate this would lie with those 
contending it to be a chattel.  
Norton v Dashwood [1896] 2 Ch 497 
Tapestries cut to fit the walls of a room and hung by battens let into the plaster and 
2019
nailed to the brickwork were fixtures rather than chattels, since they could not be 
removed from the walls without injury through tearing, or injury to the brickwork. 
Leigh v Taylor [1902] AC 157 
Tapestries fixed to walls by a lifetime tenant for the purpose of ornament and which 
could be removed without causing structural injury were chattels. Their only function 
November 
was to decorate the room, for the enjoyment of the tenant while occupying the house, 
and they were never intended to remain part of the house. 
26th 
Re Whaley [1908] 1 Ch 615 
Tapestries and pictures fitted to the walls of a room in order to create a 
at: specimen of an 
Elizabethan room were fixtures; they were not intended for mere display and enjoyment 
as 
but fitted for the purpose of creating the room as a whole. The position of an owner in 
fee, who attaches things even by way of ornament to the freehold is different in 
character to the position of a tenant for life or years. 
Re Lord Chesterfield’s Settled Estates [1910] C.97 
correct 
Wood carvings attached to the walls by nails or pegs driven through them into stiles built 
into the walls were fixtures. 
Only 
Spyer v Phillipson [1931] 2 Ch 183 
Panelling, ornamental chimney pieces and period fireplaces installed in rooms without 
the consent of the landlord, and which had involved slight structural alteration, were 
‘tenant’s fixtures’ and could be removed. 
Copthorn Land and Timber Co Ltd v MH
updated.   LG & Another [1965] QB 490 
Panelling and decorative items attached to the interior of a building of great architectural 
interest as part of an overall architectural scheme were fixtures. 
Berkley v Poultett & Others [1977] 241 EG 911 
CoA: pictures fitted into recesses in panelling were chattels. Scarman LJ said: 
freequently 
“The early law attached great importance to [the degree of annexation]. It proved harsh and 
is 
unjust both to limited owners who had affixed valuable chattels of their own to settled land 
and to tenants for years. The second test [the purpose of annexation] was evolved to take 
care primarily of the limited owner, for example the tenant for life… 
In other words, a degree of annexation which in earlier times the law would have treated as 
conclusive may now prove nothing. If the purpose of the annexation be for the better 
enjoyment of the object itself, it may remain a chattel, notwithstanding a high degree of 
physical annex
publication  ation. Clearly, however, it remains significant to discover the extent of the 
physical disturbance of the building or the land involved in the removal of the object. If an 
object cannot be removed without serious damage to, or destruction of, some part of the 

This  realty, the case for its having become a fixture is a strong one. The relationship of the 2 tests 
…to each other requires consideration.  
If there is no physical annexation there is no fixture… Nevertheless an object resting on the 
ground by its own weight alone can be a fixture, if it be so heavy that there is no need to tie 
it into a foundation, and if it were put in place to improve the realty.  
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 62 

Prima facie, however, an object resting on the ground by its own weight alone is not a 
fixture…conversely, an object affixed to realty but capable of being removed without much 
difficulty may yet be a fixture if, for example, the purpose of its affixing be that 'of creating a 
beautiful room as a whole…  
Today, so great are the technical skills of affixing and removing objects to land or buildings 
that the second test is more likely than the first to be decisive. Perhaps the enduring 
significance of the first test is a reminder that there must be some degree of physical 
annexation before a chattel can be treated as part of the realty… 

…It is enough to ask that the pictures were firmly affixed and that their removal needed skill 
and expertise if it were to be done without damage to the wall and panelling. Certainly, they 
2019
were firmly enough affixed to become fixtures if that was the object and purpose of their 
affixing. But if ordinary skill was used, as it was, in their removal they could be taken down 
and in the event were taken down without much trouble and without damage to the structure 
of the room. The decisive question is therefore as to the object and purpose of their affixing.” 
Debenhams Plc v Westminster CC [1987] AC 396 
HoL: a listing only applies to ancillary structures fixed to the listed building; a second 
November 
building joined to a listed building by a bridge and subway was not listed. In the TCPA71 
[and TCPA90], the meaning of ‘building’ excludes plant and machinery, and certain items 
that would otherwise be ‘fixtures’. The word ‘fixed’ is intended to have the sam
26th e 
connotation as the law of fixtures such that, for the purposes of the Act, any object or 
at: 
structure attached to a building should be treated as part of it. The question is whether 
certain things, namely objects or structures, are to be treated as part of the building.   
as 
TSB v Botham [1996] EGCS 149 
Bathroom fittings and white goods in a flat were fixtures, being necessary accessories for 
the room to be used as a bathroom; “viewed objectively, they were intended to be 
correct 
permanent and to afford a lasting improvement to the property” (Roch LJ). 
R v SSW ex parte Kennedy [1996] JPL 645 
Only 
Heavy Carillon clock, formerly located within the entrance tower of a listed house, was 
held to be a fixture.  Ognall J said: 
“It was accepted that the definition of ‘fixture’ was the same for the purposes of the 
listed building legislation as for any other area of law, whether common law or 
statute…the definitive pronouncement most recently was to be found in the observations 

updated.  
of the Court of Appeal in the case of Berkley…[where it was] indicated that the 
application of the test in question [degree of annexation or purpose of annexation] was 
essentially a question of fact and degree…Invariably and necessarily the inferences to be 
drawn depended as much on an overall impression as any detailed analysis.” 
Dill v SSCLG & Stratford-on-Avon DC
 [2017] EWHC 2378 (Admin); 
[2018] EWCA Civ 2619 

freequently 
The HC and CoA upheld the Inspector’s decisions to dismiss LBC and LBEN appeals 
is 
related to the removal of two limestone piers and lead urns. The items were on the 
statutory list and presumed to be ‘buildings’ under s1(5) of the LBCA Act 1990. The 
grounds of appeal set out in s39(1) enabled an appellant to question the merits but not 
validity of the listing. The items were not listed by reason of being in the curtilage of 
another listed building – and the law of fixtures and chattels was not relevant. 
•  Knowledge Matters 36 and 50 (13 October 2017 and 17 December 2018) 
publication 
•  Case Law Update 34 (December 2018) 
 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 63 

GPDO/GDO 
NB: Where relevant references are given to the current version of the GPDO [with 
references in square brackets to the Order pertinent to the judgment] 
NB:
 See also case law cited in the GPDO and Prior Approval Appeals Training Manual 
General 
Cole v Somerset CC
 [1957] 1 QB 23 
An Article 4 Direction cannot be made after PD rights are implemented. 
2019
Garland v MHLG [1968] 20 P&CR 93 
If a development exceeds PD limits, the whole development is unauthorised.  
Clwyd CC v SSW [1982] JPL 696 
Where there is failure to comply with a condition imposed by the GPDO, other than a 
November 
prior notification condition, the EN must be directed against the breach of condition.  
•  Development undertaken without compliance with a prior notification (pre-
26th 
commencement) condition is development without PP; see Winters v SSCLG & 
Havering LBC [2017] EWHC 357 (Admin) 

at: 
•  R v Elmbridge BC ex parte Oakimber [1992] JPL 48 & F G Whitley & Sons v SSW 
as 
& Clwyd CC [1992] JPL 856 
Fayrewood Fish Farms v SSE & Hampshire CC [1984] JPL 287 
If development breaches any GDO conditions or limitations, PDR cannot apply.  
correct 
Cawley v SSE & Vale Royal DC [1990] JPL 742 
Headings in secondary legislation may be used as an aid to interpretation. 
Only 
R v Tunbridge Wells BC ex parte Blue Boys Developments Ltd [1990] 1 
PLR 55 
A condition excluding the benefits of the 1972 UCO has a continuing effect in respect of 
the new order.  
updated.  
•  The same applies in relation to the GDO/GPDO, even if the condition does not 
expressly refer to ‘any order revoking and re-enacting that Order with or without 
modification’, given the provisions of s17(2) of the Interpretation Act 1978.  

Dunoon Developments Ltd v SSE & Poole BC (1993) 65 P&CR 101, 
[1992] JPL 936 
A condition must exclude the operation of the GDO/GPDO expressly, not by implication.  
freequently 

is 
 
Dunnett Investments Ltd v SSCLG & East Dorset DC [2016] EWHC 534 (Admin); 
[2017] EWCA Civ 192 

Williams Le Roi v SSE & Salisbury DC [1993] JPL 1033  
The date on which the development commenced determines which GDO/GPDO the 
development is to be judged against.  

publication 
 
Where it is claimed on ground (c) or in a s191 LDC appeal that the development 
or use is PD, it is necessary to look at the Order in force when the development 
or use was begun, not the Order in force when the EN was issued/application was 

This 
made, or when the appeal is determined. 
Watts v SSTLR & Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [2002] EWHC 993 
(Admin) 
The GPDO is not drafted to deal with simultaneous works or the banking of a specific PP 
when PDR are exercised first. In considering whether something would be PD on a 
particular date, it is not permissible to take account of prospective additions to the 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 64 

building. The resulting building is that which exists at the actual date of substantial 
completion of the work.  
R (oao Orange Personal Communication Services Ltd & Others
Islington LBC 
[2006] EWCA 157 
The effect of the Interpretation Act 1978 is that permission granted by the GPDO is 
‘crystallised’ when the development begins or, in the case of prior approval, when the 
LPA states that prior approval is not required or when the LPA has failed to make a 
determination at the end of the specified period.  
R (oao Save Woolley Valley Action Group Ltd) v Bath and North East 
2019
Somerset Council [2012] EWHC 2161 (Admin) 
It may be necessary to determine not only whether something is development for the 
purposes of s55, but also for the EIA Regulations or EIA Directive. 
•  Did not concern the GPDO but may be relevant given Article 3(10), (11) and (12).  
•  Case Law Update 19 (September 2012) 
November 
Evans v SSCLG [2014] EWHC 4111 (Admin) 
Article 3(5): in addressing whether ‘the building operations involved in the cons
26th  truction 
of that building are unlawful’, regard should be had to [Article 1(2) in the GPDO 1995 or 
at: 
now] Article 2(1) in the GPDO 2015, which defines the word 'building' as including 'part 
of a building'. On a simple construction of the words, if the building operations involved 
as 
in the construction of any part of an existing building are unlawful, the PD rights granted 
in connection with the existing building do not apply. 
Noquet & Noquet v SSCLG & Cherwell DC [2016] EWHC 209 (Admin)  
correct 
Article 3(5) is concerned with changes from ‘existing’ use not potential alternative uses. 
Whether a notional change of use would be lawful is not relevant as to whether the 
GPDO would permit a proposed change of use for the purposes of a s192 application.  
Only 
•  Case Law Update 29 (April 2016)  
•  Knowledge Matters 17 (4 March 2016) 
Dunnett Investments Ltd v SSCLG & East Dorset DC [2016] EWHC 534 
(Admin); [2017] EWCA Civ 192 

updated.  
A condition restricting use to B1 and ‘no other purpose whatsoever, without express 
planning consent from the LPA first being obtained’ is clear and emphatic and excludes 
the grant of PP by the GPDO. An ‘express planning consent from the LPA’ means PP 
granted on application. The reason for the condition was clear that the LPA sought to 
retain control.  
•  Case Law Updates 29 & 31 (April 2016 & June 2017) 
freequently 
•  Knowledge
is   Matters 18 & 30 (1 April 2016 & 7 April 2017) 
 
Prior Approval 
Murrell v SSCLG & Broadland DC
 [2010] EWCA Civ 1367   
The statutory
publication  period starts from the date the valid application is made. Mistakes made 
by the LPA when handling the application and the fact that the appellant submitted new 
forms and plans at the LPA’s request did not stop the clock from running.  
This  The prior approval procedure is attended by the minimum of formalities. It is not 
mandatory to use a standard form or provide information beyond that specified [here, 
under Part 6, A.2(2)(ii)]. On expiry of the [28 day] period, PP is deemed to be granted. 
The assessment of siting, design and external appearance must be made in a context 
where the principle of the development is not, itself, an issue.   
•  Case Law Update 13 (March 2011)  
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 65 

Walsall MBC v SSCLGDartford BC v SSCLG [2012] EWHC 1756 (Admin) 
The authorities posted notices requiring prior approval of telecoms masts within the 
relevant period. On appeal, the Inspector in each case accepted the operators’ evidence 
that the notices had not been received. The presumption under s7 of the Interpretation 
Act 1978 that service is deemed to be effected by properly addressing, pre-paying and 
posting a notice is rebuttable by evidence that the notice was not in fact received. 
Pressland v Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [2016] EWHC 1763(Admin) 
Where prior approval is granted subject to conditions, the PP granted by the GPDO is 
subject to those conditions and there is a right of appeal under s78(1)(c). 
2019
Keenan v SSCLG & Woking BC [2016] EWHC 427; [2017] EWCA Civ 438 
The HC and CoA held that, for development to be permitted under Article 3(1), it must 
come fully within the relevant description of PD. If it does not, the conditions applicable 
to PD cannot apply. In this case, the provisions of Part 6, paragraph A.2(2)(i), which 
required the developer to apply for a determination as to whether prior approval is 
November 
required, did not impose a duty on the LPA to decide whether the development is PD. 
•  Case Law Update 29 (April 2016) 
26th 
•  Knowledge Matters 33 (7 July 2017) 

at: 
 
R (oao Marshall) v East Dorset DC & Pitman [2018] EWHC 226 (Admin)  
Winters v SSCLG & Havering LBC [2017] EWHC 357 (Ad
as min) 
Prior approval cannot be granted for development which has been commenced. 
•  Knowledge Matters 29 (6 March 2017) 
correct 
R (oao Marshall) v East Dorset DC & Pitman [2018] EWHC 226 (Admin)  
When dealing with an application for prior approval relating to Part 6, a LPA ‘does not 
have power under the prior approval…or indeed any other provision of the GPDO, to 
Only 
determine whether or not the proposed development comes within the description of the 
relevant class in the GPDO…the appropriate time for the [LPA] to consider this issue is in 
response to an application for a certificate of lawfulness of existing use or 
development…or an application for planning permission.’ 
•  Applies to Parts 6, 9, 11 and 16 (‘Part 6 type cases’) but not Parts 1, 3, 4, 7 and 
updated.  
14 (‘Part 1 type cases’) as described in the GPDO and Prior Approval Appeals 
 
Part 1  
Sainty v MHLG
 [1964] 15 P&CR 452 
freequently 
To benefit from PDR, the dwellinghouse must exist when the operations are carried out.   
is 
•  Larkin v Basildon DC [1980] JPL 407; R (oao Townsley) v SSCLG [2009] EWHC 
3522 (Admin); Hewlett v SSE [1983] JPL 155; Arnold v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 
1197 (Admin), [2017] EWCA Civ 231 

Street v MHLG & Essex CC [1965] 193 EG 537 
Whether construction works amount to ‘maintenance’ or ‘rebuilding’ is a matter of fact 
and degree. W
publication  orks intended to repair the property involved substantial demolition. The 
re-building amounted to development and was not PD by Class I(I) of the GDO. 
This  Scurlock v SSE [1977] 33 P&CR 102 
A building in mixed use (estate agent’s office with flat above) is not a dwellinghouse for 
the purposes of GDO rights or the 1971 Act.  
•  Part 3, Class F sets out PDR for the MCU of buildings in A1 use to a mixed use for 
A1 and two flats, but Article 2(1) affirms that a dwellinghouse for Part 1 purposes 
would not include a building containing flats. 

Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 66 

Larkin v SSE & Basildon DC [1980] JPL 407 
A dwellinghouse that fell down was incapable of being ‘enlarged, improved or altered’.  
•  Hewlett v SSE & Brentwood DC [1983] JPL 155; Arnold v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 
1197 (Admin), [2017] EWCA Civ 231 
Emin v SSE & Mid Sussex DC [1989] JPL 909 
An outbuilding must be ‘required for some incidental purpose’ to be PD under Class E, 
but its size is not relevant. It is necessary to identify the purpose and incidental quality 
in relation to the enjoyment of the dwellinghouse, and whether the building is genuinely 
and reasonably required to accommodate the use and thus achieve that purpose. 
2019
Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSE & Neale [1991] 2 PLR 107 
Parapet walls, railings, trellises and other barriers are generally to be regarded as 
additions or alterations to a roof, to be considered under Classes B or C rather than A. 
Walls around a flat roof can be an enlargement consisting of an addition or alteration to 
a roof, and so PD within Class B, even though they do not enclose a volume.   November 
•  R (oao Cousins) v Camden LBC [2002] EWHC 324; railings did not enlarge the 
external appearance of the dwelling and so fell within Class C. The test is whether 
26th 
the house appears larger to those outside looking at it. 
Hammersmith and Fulham LBC v SSE & Davison [1994] JPL
at:   957  
EN alleged the construction of railings and a trellis to the perimeter 
as of a flat roof, and an 
external staircase to that terrace. It was open to the Inspector to find that the staircase 
came within the terms of Class A, but had the works altered the roof, they would have 
fallen within Class C and not B as claimed by the LPA. The Inspector’s finding that the 
railings and trellis were permitted under Class B was also supported.  
correct 
Tower Hamlets LBC v SSE & Nolan [1994] JPL B44 & 1112  
Judicial decision as to what constitutes ‘stone cladding’ under Class A. In this instance, a 
Only 
dressing of stone chips added to a render did not.  
Pêche d’Or Investments v SSE & Another [1996] JPL 311 
It cannot be assumed, as a matter of law, that a study or any other building is excluded 
from Class E. It is a matter of fact and degree, having regard to the particular building 
updated.  
and accommodation. Siting and design are among the relevant considerations.  
Rambridge v SSE & East Hertfordshire DC (QBD 22.11.96 CO-593-96) 
The appellant sought an LDC to use a partially completed building as a residential 
annexe, on completion or one day afterwards. Class E permits a building only if it is 
required for a purpose incidental to a dwellinghouse, not for a primary residential use. 
The proposal was a sham involving no genuine compliance with Class E, but Class E does 
freequently 
allow a householder to erect a building genuinely required for an incidental purpose and 
is 
then later change its use.  
•  Where a residential annexe contains primary living accommodation, a judgment 
should be made on whether the use is part and parcel of the use of the dwelling 
or there has been an MCU to create a new self-contained dwelling in its own PU. 

Primary living accommodation is not incidental to the use of a dwellinghouse and, 
to benefit from Class E PDR, an annexe must be used for incidental purposes. 

publication 
R (oao Watts) v SSETR & Hammersmith and Fulham LBC [2002] JPL 
1473 

This  PP granted for side and rear extension. The appellant started to build a roof extension as 
PD under Part 1, Class B. The LPA and Inspector found that the roof extension had not 
been completed before the side/rear extension had been begun; it was comprised in a 
single operation with the side/rear extension and exceeded the 50m3 allowance.  
Held, the Inspector failed to determine whether the cubic content of the house when the 
GPDO works were substantially complete exceeded that of the original house by more 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 67 

than 50m3. The test of whether there had been a single building operation did not reflect 
the statutory wording. Whether the roof extension was PD did not depend on whether it 
was part of a larger operation, but on the cubic content.  
The GPDO ‘is not well cast so as to deal with simultaneous works’ but the best sense 
could be made of it by measuring the roof extension at the time of its completion against 
the existing cubic content, not prospective cubic content, however imminent. 
R (oao Gore) v SSCLG & Dartmoor NPA [2008] EWHC 3278 (Admin) 
PDR under the GPDO, Part 1 claimed for a building which had a LDC for ‘use of forestry 
store as residential’. The Court supported the Inspector’s view that, although the 
2019
building was a dwelling, it was not a dwellinghouse for PD purposes. The LDC was not 
concerned with the definition of the term in relation to the GPDO. To benefit from Part 1 
PD rights, the building must be a dwellinghouse and have a curtilage.  
•  Case Law Updates 6 & 8 (April 2009 & September 2009) 
R (oao Townsley) v SSCLG [2009] EWHC 3522 (Admin) 
November 
A dwellinghouse must be in existence for PD rights to be exercised. A building under 
construction is not a dwellinghouse for PD purposes. The appropriate test is substantial 
completion as described in Sage – the development must be carried out internally and 
26th 
externally in accordance with the PP. While that prescription could be taken too far, it 
would apply to any material variation to the PP that was granted.   at: 
•  Case Law Updates 11 & 12 (July 2010 & October 2010)  as 
Mohamed v SSCLG [2014] EWHC 4045 (Admin) 
EN alleged the erection of a dwelling, but the appellant argued that an existing garage 
had been refurbished. The Inspector addressed whether the building was in residential 
correct 
use and not whether there had been unlawful operations. The fundamental issues were 
the nature of the operations and application of the GPDO, and whether the building fell 
outside of PD. If the operations were unlawful, the question of use was irrelevant.  
Only 
•  Case Law Update 27 (June 2015) 
Evans v SSCLG [2014] EWHC 4111 (Admin) 
The effect of paragraph A.2(c) is that, in the case of a dwellinghouse on Article 1(5) 
land, an extension of more than one storey which extends beyond the rear wall of the 
updated.  
original dwelling, being that part of the wall immediately adjacent to the extension at the 
same vertical level as the extension, is not PD. No extension of more than one storey 
beyond the rear wall of the original dwellinghouse has the benefit of PD rights if the 
dwellinghouse is on Article 1(5) land. 
Arnold v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 1197 (Admin), [2017] EWCA Civ 231 
LDC granted for extensions but w
freequently  orks went beyond what was described, and only part of 
one wall was left standing of the original dwelling. Whether the structure was a new or 
is 
remodelled dwellinghouse was question of fact. The Inspector was entitled to find that 
what remained, given the scale of demolition and intervention, was a new building. The 
availability of PDR is not set in stone merely by starting the works. The dwellinghouse 
must be retained for PD rights to be relied upon.  
•  This ground was not re-heard by the CoA  

publication 
 
Case Law Updates 27 & 31 (June 2015 & June 2017) 
•  Knowledge Matters 31 (5 May 2017) 
This  R (oao) Hilton v SSCLG & Bexley LBC [2016] EWHC (Admin)  
The ‘enlarged part of the dwellinghouse’ is only the part included in the proposal.  
•  Overturns Kensington and Chelsea RBC v SSCLG [2015] EWHC 2458 (Admin), 
where it was held that the ‘enlarged part…’ includes previous enlargements.  
•  Knowledge Matters 22 (5 August 2016) 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 68 

•  The GPDO has been amended through the addition of limitation A.1(ja) such that 
‘any total enlargement (being the enlarged part together with any existing 
enlargement of the original dwellinghouse to which it will be joined) exceeds or 
would exceed the limits set out in sub-paragraphs (e) to (j)’ is not PD. 

Eatherley v Camden LBC & Ireland [2016] EWHC 3108 (Admin) 
It may be necessary to assess whether any engineering works required for a basement 
extension would be permitted under Class A. There had to be a point where the 
excavation, underpinning and support for a basement became different in character from 
the enlargement, improvement and alteration of a dwelling. It is for the decision maker 
to ask whether there are two activities or one, and whether the engineering operations 
2019
constitute a separate activity of substance as a matter of fact and degree.  
Havering LBC v SSCLG [2017] EWHC 1546 (Admin) 
There is no definition of ‘roof space’, but Article 2(1) defines ‘cubic content’ as meaning 
‘the cubic content of a structure or building measured externally’. When applying B.1(d) 
‘what…is clearly intended is that one looks at the roof rather than any question of roof 
November 
space, and space is simply added not to…what might have been originally under the roof, 
but the roof itself and any addition or extension to that roof as it originally stood’.  
26th 
•  Case Law Update 31 (June 2017) 
Stanius v SSCLG & Ealing LBC (CO 11.4.17) 
at: 
The Inspector erred in concluding they could not issue a LDC on the basis that the 
as 
development would contravene an EN in force, when they had failed to interpret the EN 
so that it did not interfere with lawful use rights. The sole question had been whether the 
development complied with Article 3 and Schedule 2, Part 1, Class E of the GPDO.  

correct 
 
Case Law Update 31 (June 2017) 
 
Only 
Part 6: Agriculture  
Belmont Farm v MHLG
 [1962] 13 P&CR 417 
Equestrian activities are related to leisure not agriculture. To be designed for agriculture, 
a building must look like an agricultural building.  
updated.  
Hidderley v Warwickshire CC [1963] 14 P&CR 134 
‘For the purposes of agriculture’ means the productive processes of agriculture; it does 
not include the buying and selling of agricultural products.  
Bromley LBC v SSE & George Hoeltschi and Son [1978] JPL 45 
The use of a building as a farm shop may be incidental to agriculture, but it is likely to 
freequently 
become a separate retail use once a significant proportion of produce is imported, as a 
matter of fact an
is  d degree. 
Jones v Stockport MBC [1984] JPL 274   
CoA: the activities must constitute a trade or business within ‘agriculture’ as defined and 
be taking place before the works are begun.  
Fuller v SSE & Dover DC [1987] JPL 854 
publication 
An agricultural unit may comprise more than one planning unit.  
South Oxfordshire DC v SSE & East [1987] JPL 868 
This  No single factor is decisive as to whether the activities constitute a trade or business. 
Consideration should be given to whether this is the occupation by which the person 
concerned earns a living; whether the activity is carried out for pleasure or the person is 
an enthusiastic amateur; the keeping of accounts; turnover; and any profit made. 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 69 

Hancock v SSE & Torridge DC [1989] JPL 99; Tyack v SSE & Cotswolds 
DC [1989] 1 WLR 1392 
 
Whether land forms a ‘separate parcel’ is a matter of fact and degree. If the ‘primary 
area’ is so closely linked to some adjoining agricultural land that no sensible distinction 
can be drawn between the two parcels, the total area must be measured.  
If the primary area is divided from other land by some distinguishing feature, or if it 
does not adjoin the other agricultural land, it may be right to conclude that only the 
primary area is to be measured, even if the other is in the same occupation.  
McKay & Walker v SSE & South Cambridgeshire DC [1989] JPL 590 
2019
If an attempt is being made to establish a farming enterprise, and there is nothing to 
suggest that the activity is as an eccentricity or a hobby, then lack of profit does not 
prevent the enterprise from being a trade or business.  
Size is irrelevant in deciding whether a building is ‘reasonably necessary’ because the 
GPDO permits agricultural buildings up to 465m2. 
November 
•  In relation to trade or business, see also Kerrier DC v SSE & Stevens [1995] 
EGCS 40; low level of income is not conclusive 
26th 
•  The scale of engineering operations was held to be significant in Macpherson v 
SSS [1985] JPL 788. See also Emin v SSE [1989] JPL 909 where, in relation to 
at: 
Part 1, Class E, it may be necessary to consider the scale as well as nature of the 
proposed use, so as to adjudge whether the development is reasonably required. 

as 
Pitman & Others v SSE & Canterbury [1989] JPL 831 
A ‘leisure plot’ is not an agricultural use; the use of farmland as such involves a MCU.  
correct 
Broughton v SSE [1992] JPL 550  
It is necessary to have regard to what agricultural use the land might be reasonably put 
to and take account of more than just the appellant’s intentions. Their intentions might 
Only 
change, or a future occupier might carry out different activities. 
Clarke v SSE [1993] JPL 32  
In deciding whether the building is reasonably necessary, the Inspector should consider 
what agricultural use the land might reasonably be put to, and whether the building is 
updated.  
designed – as a matter of fact and degree – for the purposes of such agricultural 
activities that might reasonably be conducted on the unit. It is unnecessary to 
contemplate some possible but unlikely agricultural use not suggested by the appellant.  
Hill v SSE & Bromley LBC [1993] JPL 158  
Agricultural development might not satisfy the tests of Part 6 but be justified in terms of 
planning merits, based on the agricultural use of the land as defined in s336(1).  
freequently 
Millington v S
is SETR & Shrewsbury and Atcham BC [2000] JPL 297 
For activities to be ‘for the purposes of agriculture’, it is necessary to consider whether 
they could be regarded as ordinarily and reasonably incidental to agriculture, or 
consequential on the agricultural operations. 
Taylor and Sons (Farms) v SSETR & Three Rivers DC [2001] EWCA Civ 
1254 
 
publication 
Paragraph A.1(d) applies to all works to accommodate livestock, not just to buildings or 
structures, and so may permit a hardstanding. 
This  Lyons v SSCLG [2010] EWHC 3652 (Admin)  
A PU in a mixed use for agriculture and other use does not benefit from Part 6 PDR.  
•  May supersede Rutherford & another v Maurer [1962] 1 QB 16 and South 
Oxfordshire DC v SSE & East [1987] JPL 868 where it was held that PD rights 
under Part 6 applied where there were mixed uses.   

Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 70 

•  But see also Fuller v SSE & Dover DC [1987] JPL 854; Part 6 does not refer to the 
planning unit. The requirement is that the PD is carried out on ‘agricultural land’ 
in an ‘agricultural unit’ and ‘for the purposes of agriculture’.
 
•  Equally, the limitations to PD under Part 3, Classes Q, R and S relate to the use of 
‘the site’ and/or building as part of an ‘established agricultural unit’. 
R (oao Marshall) v East Dorset DC & Pitman [2018] EWHC 226 (Admin)  
Paragraph A.1(i) excludes proposed development to be used for the accommodation of 
livestock i.e. where accommodation of livestock is the purpose of the development. 
Paragraph A.1(i) must be distinguished from A.2(1)(a) which imposes a condition on 
2019
development already carried out, recognises that there may be circumstances where the 
use of existing development for the accommodation of livestock is legitimate and so 
‘provides for the exception in paragraph D.1(3)’. Paragraph D.1(3) cannot be read into 
paragraph A.1(i), which is not subject to the same exception as condition A.2(1)(a).  
 
Other Parts 
November 
Prengate Properties Ltd v SSE [1973] 25 P&CR 311 
Part 2, Class A: PDR do not apply to walls without some function of enclosure. 
26th A wall 
that does enclose will not lose that quality if it is also a structural or retaining wall.  
at: 
Tidswell v SSE & Thurrock BC [1977] JPL 104 
as 
Part 4: PDR for ‘temporary use’ cannot apply if there is an intention to hold a permanent 
market, evidenced by promotional literature.  
Ewen Developments v SSE & North Norfolk DC [1980] JPL 404 
correct 
Part 2: Earth embankments were not a means of enclosure or, therefore, PD. 
South Buckinghamshire DC v SSE & Strandmill [1989] JPL 351 
Only 
Part 4 [Class IV]: Each exercise of the 14 day permission is a separate act of 
development, so an Article 4 direction can be issued at any stage between markets. 
Kent CC v SSE & R Marchant & Sons Ltd [1996] JPL 931 
Part 7, Class K [Part 8, Class D]: PD rights are granted for the deposit of waste resulting 
from an industrial process. The industrial proce
updated.   ss does not need to take place on the 
site; the reference to ‘industrial process’ is descriptive of the waste material permitted to 
be deposited. Demolition is an industrial process.  
Caradon v SSETR [2000] QBD 12.9.00  
Part 11, Class C [Part 31, Class B]: PD rights relating to the whole or part of any gate, 
fence, wall or other means of enclosure are for building and not engineering operations.  
freequently 
Ramsey v SSETR & Suffolk Coastal DC [2002] JPL 1123   
is 
Part 4, Class B: Agricultural land used for leisure purposes. PD rights are available for 
temporary uses, even if these are facilitated by permanent physical changes to the land, 
provided the works do not prevent the normal permanent use from continuing for most 
of the year, and it does so continue. The critical factors are the duration of the 
temporary use and reversion to the normal use in between times.  
R (oao Hall
publication  Hunter Partnership) v FSS & Waverley BC [2007] JPL 1023 
Part 5: The housing of some 230 seasonal workers in 45 caravans did not meet the 
This  relevant tests. The infrastructure serving the caravans remained in place. Removal of the 
caravans did not bring the use of the land as a caravan site to an end. 
•  Case Law Update 1 (July 2007) 
R (oao Wilsdon) v FSS & Tewkesbury BC [2007] JPL 1063  
Part 4, Class A: The size and means of construction of a building is relevant; the larger 
and more permanent the building, the less likely it is to be ‘required temporarily’ in 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 71 

connection with development. An appellant must show that the building is reasonably 
required for the temporary use; intentions are relevant to that, but an Inspector is 
entitled to accept or reject the explanation. Was it realistic to expect that the building 
would be removed, or had a permanent building been erected without PP?   
•  Case Law Update 1 (July 2007) 
Miles v NAW & Caerphilly CBC [2007] EWHC 10 (Admin); JPL 1235  
Part 4, Class B: LDC application made for the use of land for recreational motorcycling 
activities and farming. The Inspector found that two motorcycling activities were taking 
place: individual pleasure riding, practice and testing, and event-based use. Class B 
2019
distinguishes between these two categories. The event-based use had not taken place 
for more than 14 days pa (Class B.2(b)) for a continuous ten year period and could not 
be aggregated with the individual use. 
•  Case Law Update 1 (July 2007) 
Valentino Plus Ltd v SSCLG & Others [2015] EWHC 19 (Admin)  November 
Part 3, Class F: the GPDO does not define ‘mixed use’ but it does define ‘flat’; PP is 
granted for two flats which, by definition, must be self-contained. It cannot be said that 
Class F contemplates a physical relationship between the retail use and flats permitted.  
26th 
•  Case Law Update 27 (June 2015) 
at: 
Hibbitt v SSCLG & Rushcliffe BC [2016] EWHC 2853 (Admin) 
as 
Part 3, Class Q: For a COU to be PD under Q(b), the building must be capable of 
conversion without complete or substantial re-building or, in effect, the creation of a new 
building. It is necessary to assess the extent of the works and decide whether they fall 
within or go beyond the statutory limits. 
correct 
•  Knowledge Matters 26 (2 December 2016) 
Barton v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2017] EWHC 
Only 
573 (Admin) 
Part 11, Class C: Demolition of a section of wall and a gate in a Conservation Area 
amounts to relevant demolition under s196D of the TCPA90. The s336(1) definition of a 
‘building’ as including ‘any structure or erection’ applies to s196D. Demolition of part of a 
wall or gate in a CA is not PD. The Inspector made no error in focussing on the part of 
updated.  
the wall to be removed, rather than the part untouched. 
•  Case Law Update 31 (June 2017) 
•  Knowledge Matters 30 (7 April 2017) 
 
GPDO – Fallback Position

freequently   
is 
Burge v SSE & Chelmsford BC [1988] JPL 497 
The extent of GDO/GPDO rights is a material consideration, although development in 
excess of GDO/GPDO limits is, as a whole, without PP.  
•  Garland v MHLG [1968] 20 P&CR 93; Nolan v SSE & Bury MBC [1998] JPL B72  
•  PDR will be a material consideration as a fallback position for ground (a), and PP 
publication 
can be granted for ‘part of the matters’.  If the appeal proceeds on (f) but not 
(a), whether the EN can be varied will depend on the purpose of the EN. 

This  Brentwood DC v SSE & Gray [1996] JPL 939 
It is necessary to address the realistic likelihood of ‘fallback’ PDR being exercised.  
Nolan v SSE & Bury MBC [1998] JPL B72  
EN requiring the removal of a 4m retaining wall was upheld despite the appellant’s 
assertion that he would rebuild a 2m wall as PD. The merits of retaining the lower 2m 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 72 

portion were claimed against the background that it was expensive to demolish the 4m 
wall and build a new 2m wall, but this case was not considered.  The Inspector failed to 
apply the principle that the existence of a valid PP was a material consideration.  
•  The appeal was made on grounds (a) and (f). The Inspector did not refer to the 
GPDO in his reasoning on (a), and then found under (f) that it was reasonable for 
the Council to seek to remedy the breach. The correct approach would have been 
to consider the PP granted by the GPDO as a fallback position under (a). 

2019
November 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 73 

HUMAN RIGHTS 
NB: Summaries of enforcement-specific cases only; see Human Rights & PSED Training 
Manual 
for comprehensive HR case law 
Massingham v SSTLR & Havant BC [2002] EWHC 1578 (Admin)   
HRA Articles cannot be engaged in the context of a LDC appeal, because the grant of a 
LDC neither creates nor remove rights. An LDC is a declaration of certain existing lawful 
use rights; a refusal to issue a LDC is merely a refusal to grant the declaration sought.  
2019
Blackburn v FSS & South Holland DC [2002] EWHC 671 (Admin)   
The same principle applies to the legal grounds of appeal against an EN.  
Goodall v Peak District NPA [2008] EWHC 734 (Admin) 
The NPA did not deprive the claimant of his civil rights by seeking a conviction for a 
failure to comply with an EN. The claimant had been deprived by his own failure to make 
November 
a timely appeal. He had been aware that a second EN would be issued, and should have 
made arrangements to receive it when out of the country.  
26th 
 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 74 

INTENSIFICATION 
Brooks & Burton Ltd v SSE & Dorset CC [1977] JPL 720 
Intensification cannot be material if the pre- and post-intensification uses are within the 
same Use Class. 
Hilliard v SSE & Surrey CC [1978] JPL 840 
For a breach through intensification to be substantiated, there must be evidence of the 
previous and present situations in respect of the whole PU. It is not open to the LPA to 
arbitrarily divide the PU and serve separate EN to achieve a more restrictive effect than 
2019
by serving one EN covering the whole unit. 
•  De Mulder v SSE [1973] 27 P&CR 379 
Kensington and Chelsea RBC v Mia Carla Ltd [1981] JPL 50 
If an EN relies on a MCU by intensification it must say so. The EN was not correctable 
because a completely different breach would then be involved.  
November 
•  Would there be injustice if the parties could address corrections to the EN?  
26th 
Philglow Ltd v SSE & Hillingdon LBC [1985] JPL 318 
CoA: the cessation of one element of a composite use is not in itself an 
at: MCU. There must 
be evidence that the remaining use has intensified such as to amount to a material 
as 
change in character over the whole or part of the planning unit. 
•  Wipperman & Buckingham v Barking LBC [1965] 17 P&CR 275 
Eastleigh BC v FSS & Asda Stores (QBD 28.5.04 Collins J) 
correct 
The doctrine of intensification for uses within the UCO is qualified by Article 3(1). There 
is no development if the intensified use remains within the same use class. 
R (oao Childs) v FSS & Test Valley BC [2005
Only  ] EWHC 2368 (Admin) 
A simple increase in the number of caravans may involve a MCU.  
•  Previously held in Guildford RDC v Fortescue [1959] 2 QB 112 and Glamorgan CC 
v Carter [1962] All ER 866, [1963] P&CR 88 that an increase in the number of 
caravans on land with a lawful use as caravan site did not involve an MCU. 

updated.  
•  Hertfordshire CC v SSCLG & Metal and Waste Recycling Ltd [2012] EWCA Civ 
1473; Reed v SSCLG [2014] JPL 725 
Elvington Park Ltd v SSCLG & York CC [2011] EWHC 3041 (Admin); 
[2012] JPL 556 
The intensification of a use after 2000, from a benchmark position that had been 
freequently 
established by a 1993 PP, amounted to an MCU. 
is 
•  Case Law Update 18 (June 2012) 
Hertfordshire CC v SSCLG & Metal and Waste Recycling Ltd [2012] EWCA 
Civ 1473 
The intensification of a use is capable of constituting a MCU. The test for whether there 
has been an MCU is whether there had been a change in the character of the use. 
publication 
•  Case Law Updates 17 & 20 (March 2012 & December 2012) 
Reed v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 787 (Admin), [2014] EWCA Civ 241 
This  Inspector found that PP for a mixed use traveller site had been implemented but there 
was a difference in the number of caravans and there had been an MCU. He ought to 
have addressed whether there had been a BoC or development without PP against the 
correct test. On the facts, the uses of the site remained the same. 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 75 

•  If the increase in caravan numbers contravened a condition on the PP, the EN 
should have been corrected to allege a BoC and require steps accordingly. 
•  Case Law Update 26 (December 2014) 
Turner v SSCLG & South Buckinghamshire DC [2015] EWHC 1895 
(Admin) 
EN alleged intensification over a use certified by an LDC. The law permits intensification 
of a lawful use provided this does not amount to an MCU. If an appellant claims they can 
use land more intensively than the LDC permits, they can apply for PP or object that the 
EN is too wide. Neither the LPA nor Inspector should be required to investigate ‘the 
2019
whole range of speculative hypotheses’ as to what would amount to an MCU. The Mansi 
principle did not preclude the LPA from issuing an EN based on the existing LDC. 
The Inspector upheld the EN after taking account of off-site impacts when the parties 
had agreed that this was not an issue and further submissions had not been sought. 
Whether there had been an MCU by intensification would need to be re-determined, but 
what factors the new Inspector would consider and what conclusions they would reach 
November 
would be for them. 
•  Case Law Update 28 (December 2015) 
26th 
R (oao KP JR Management Co Ltd) v Richmond LBC & Others [2018] 
EWHC 84 (Admin) 

at: 
Challenge to (1) failure to issue an EN (2) grant of a LDC for the mo
as  oring of boats. In 
deciding whether there had been an intensification of the lawful use, it was proper for 
the Council to take account of changes since 2009 and their impact on the area. As the 
definable character of the site was not derived from or contributed to by planning policy, 
there was no obligation on the Council to specifically refer to planning policy.  
correct 
 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 76 

LAWFUL (AND ESTABLISHED) USE AND LDCS 
Glamorgan CC v Carter [1962] All ER 866; [1963] P&CR 88 
A landowner cannot acquire use rights through illegal as opposed to unlawful use.  
•  This principle is limited to ‘planning’ illegality. 
•  See also article at JPL 239 [1988].  
Square Meals Frozen Foods v Dunstable BC [1973] JPL 709 
Any challenge to an EN other than by way of s174 is precluded by s285, even where 
2019
proceedings for a declaration have begun.  
Cottrell v SSE & Tonbridge and Malling BC [1982] JPL 443  
The SoS is not compelled to issue an LDC when finding that one should not be granted. 
There is a distinction between the LPA’s reasons for refusing to grant an LDC and 
decision to refuse; the SoS is only required to grant a LDC if satisfied that the decision of 
November 
the LPA was not well-founded. 
If a LDC is granted in respect of part of the land covered by an application, the SoS has 
26th 
no jurisdiction at appeal stage to revoke the certificate relating to the part. 
at: 
Young v SSE & Bexley LBC [1983] JPL 465 
as 
Implementation of a new unlawful use extinguishes previous established and lawful use 
rights. Lawful use rights are preserved under s57(4) if an EN is served.  
Denham Developments v SSE & Brentwood DC [1984] JPL 347 
An EN should make a saving for an established as well as lawful
correct  use. When uses are 
intermingled, the saving for a degree of use at a certain date may be appropriate. The 
EN cannot properly bite on that part of the land where the use had gone on since 1963.  
Only 
•  See also Lee v Bromley LBC [1983] JPL 778   
Nash v SSE & Epping Forest DC [1986] JPL 128 
‘Lost’ lawful use rights can be a material consideration, but a minor one. 
Vaughan v SSE & Mid Sussex DC [1986] JPL 840  
updated.  
Glamorgan applied in respect of a use continuing in contravention of an effective EN; the 
EUC application and appeal were not valid where there was a pre-existing effective EN. 
Davies v SSE & South Herefordshire DC [1989] JPL 601  
CoA; it may be found that no breach of planning control has taken place during a period 
where the use was only of a ‘casual intermittent and insignificant nature’. 
freequently 
Panton & Farmer v SSETR & Vale of White Horse DC [1999] JPL 461 
is 
Lawful use rights could only be lost by evidence of abandonment; by the formation of a 
new planning unit; or by being superseded by a further change of use. A use which was 
merely dormant or inactive could still be considered as ‘existing’, so long as it had 
already become lawful and not been extinguished in one of those three ways.  
•  Thurrock BC v SSETR & Holding [2002] EWCA Civ 226 
publication 
R v Thanet DC ex parte Tapp [2001] EWCA Civ 559, [2001] JPL 1436  
There is no power for LPAs or the Secretary of State/Inspector to amend the description 
This  of a proposal under s192(2) as there is under s191(4), but the terms may be modified 
by the LPA or SoS where the applicant agrees. 
Thurrock BC v SSETR & Holding [2002] EWCA Civ 226  
A use could only become lawful if it continued throughout the ten year period, to the 
extent that the LPA could have taken enforcement action at any time. If the use ceased 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 77 

during that period, the time could not count towards immunity. The Panton & Farmer 
principle only applied when lawful use rights had been accrued. 
Waltham Forest LBC v SSETR & Tully [2002] EWCA Civ 330  
Where lawfulness is established at a base level, and the objective is to ratchet up the 
numbers, for example, of persons living together (with cover by carers) as a single 
household, the correct comparison to be made is between the actual existing use and 
the proposed use, rather than any notional use. 
Sefton MBC v SSTLR & Morris [2003] JPL 632  
The effect of s57(4) should not be ignored even if an EN has not been issued. 
2019
Swale BC v FSS & Lee [2005] EWCA Civ 1568; [2006] JPL 886 
There is a difference between an established dwellinghouse when an occupier does not 
have to be continuously or even regularly present in order for it to remain in use as a 
dwellinghouse – and where there is no established use. The use has to be ‘affirmatively 
established’ over the four year period.  
November 
The correct approach is to ask whether there was any period during the four years when 
the building was not physically occupied, even though available, when the LPA could not 
26th 
have taken enforcement action against the use. It is also necessary to make a finding as 
to whether the periods of non-occupation were de minimis.  
at: 
Mid Suffolk DC v FSS & Lebbon [2006] JPL 859  
as 
If the construction of a building has become lawful through time and the operation of 
s171B(1) and s191(2), the use of the building may not have become lawful. The building 
may be immune, but its use may be liable to enforcement action. S75 applies to 
buildings with PP, and it is possible to have a lawful building with no lawful use. 
correct 
•  R (oao Sumner) v SSCLG [2010] EWHC 372 (Admin); Welwyn Hatfield BC v 
SSCLG & Beesley [2011] UKSC 15 
Only 
James Hay Pension Trustees Ltd v FSS & South Gloucestershire Council 
[2006] EWCA Civ 1387 
An LDC must substantially be in the form prescribed by statute. The LPA had issued a 
‘certificate’ headed ‘Permission for development’ which was ambiguous, had no reference 
to s192 or clear description of the proposal. CoA held it did not comply with s192 and 
updated.  
was therefore invalid. 
M & M (Land) Ltd v SSCLG & Hampshire CC [2007] All ER(D) 55  
A use certified as lawful through an LDC can be abandoned subsequently. An LDC does 
no more than certify conclusively that the use is lawful at a point in time. Whether it is 
later abandoned is to be assessed according to the objective test of abandonment.  
freequently 
•  Case Law Update 1 (July 2007) 
is 
•  Confirmation and clarification that lawfulness through an LDC is not in the same 
species of the ‘hardy beast’ of lawfulness in Pioneer Aggregates 
R (oao Sumption) v Greenwich LBC [2007] EWHC 2276 (Admin)  
The LPA’s decision to grant a LDC under s192 for the erection of a boundary wall and 
gates less than 1m in height was quashed on the basis that the land was within the 
publication 
curtilage of a listed building. The works would not be PD under Article 3 and Schedule 2, 
Part 2 of the GPDO, but would involve development as defined under s55.  
This  Staffordshire CC v Challinor & Robinson [2007] EWCA Civ 864  
LDC in force did not prevent dismissal of EN appeal but did lead HC to deny injunction. 
The CoA held that an EN can take away lawful use rights in some circumstances, since 
s285(1) provides that an EN is not to be questioned in any proceedings on any grounds 
on which an appeal may be brought, other by way of an appeal under Part VII of the Act. 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 78 

Lawful use rights can be lost if an EN is served and those rights are not raised as a 
ground of appeal [(c) or (d)].  An LDC is only ‘conclusive’ on the day of the application.  
Hillingdon LBC v SSCLG & Autodex Ltd [2008] EWHC 198 (Admin) 
There is a right to revert to the last use if it was lawful, following the issue of an EN.  
S57(4)) applies to uses that have become lawful because of the passage of time and the 
operation of s171B and s191(2). The effect of s191(2) is to make certain uses lawful for 
‘the purposes of this Act’, ie, the entirety of the Act. 
There is no legal requirement, despite s191(5), for the Inspector to specify the quantity 
of any particular item or items that are lawful. 
2019
•  Case Law Update 4 (October 2008) 
•  The rights to reversion to the ‘normal’ use under s57(2) and s57(3) do not apply 
to uses which have only become immune from enforcement over time. 
•  The importance  of precision in the definition of uses when granting LDCs was 
emphasised in R (oao North Wiltshire DC) v Cotswolds DC [2009] EWHC 3702 
November 
(Admin); Case Law Update 11 (July 2010) 
R (oao Colver) v SSCLG & Rochford DC [2008] EWHC 2500 (Admin)   
26th 
The provisions of s191 and s171B, which came into force on 27 July 1992, cannot be 
applied retrospectively. A use which commenced after 1963 and continu
at: ed for a ten year 
period, but was not active on 27 July 1992, cannot attain lawfulness. The unlawful use 
as 
would have ceased and not been dormant. In effect, the earliest ten year period that can 
count towards lawfulness is 27 July 1982 to 27 July 1992. 
•  Case Law Update 5 (January 2009) 

correct 
 
The same does not apply to operations, change of use to a dwellinghouse or 
conditions relating to the same, subject to a four year rule prior to 27 July 1992 

R (oao Sumner) v SSCLG [2010] EWHC 372 (Admin) 
Only 
ENs alleged: (1) the MCU of and (2) the erection of the building. The Inspector found 
that the building was lawful on the four year rule but the use had begun within the past 
ten years. The Court rejected the claim that the immunity of the building should carry 
immunity for the intended use; it could not be ancillary to the operations. S75(3) is not 
relevant, it relates to where PP is granted for a building and the use is not specified. 
updated.  
‘A distinction is drawn and intended to be drawn between change of use and operational 
development that is entirely consistent with the Act’. If a building is erected without PP 
and used for a purpose with no PP, there is a risk that the building will need to be 
removed or the use will need to cease if enforcement action is not taken in time.  
•  Case Law Updates 10 & 11 (April 2010 & July 2010) 
freequently 
•  Welwyn Hatfield v SSCLG & Beesley [2011] UKSC 15 
is 
Bramall v SSCLG & Rother DC [2011] EWHC 1531 (Admin) 
For s57(2) to be engaged, a proximate temporal nexus must exist between the former 
and proposed use. The right to resume a former use following a grant of PP could be 
abandoned. Wyn Williams J (para 23): “there must come a point where, as a matter of 
interpretation, it simply cannot be said that the resumed use occurred at the end of the 
period during which an alternative use was authorised
”. 
publication 
•  Case Law Update 16 (December 2011) 
•  Adopts and extends Smith v SSE & Bristol CC [1984] 47 P&CR 
This  Keevil v SSCLG & Bath and North East Somerset Council [2012] EWHC 
322 (Admin) 
Upheld Inspector’s finding that the LPA was not estopped from contending that an LDC 
did not apply to where the caravans in question were sited, even though no plan was 
attached to the LDC and there was a site licence.  
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 79 

Turner v SSCLG & South Buckinghamshire DC [2015] EWHC 1895 
(Admin) 
The power to issue an LDC under s177(1)(c) is discretionary (“may”) and the power can 
only be exercised in respect of a lawful existing use. There is no provision to issue an 
LDC setting out a use which is not the existing use but would be lawful. 
•  Case Law Update 28 (December 2015) 
R (oao Pitt) v SSCLG & Epping Forest DC [2015] EWHC 1931 (Admin) 
A LDC issued under s192 is conclusive unless there is a material change before the 
development begins. 
2019
•  Case Law Update 28 (Dec 2015) 
Noquet & Noquet v SSCLG & Cherwell DC [2016] EWHC 209 (Admin)  
Whether a notional use could be implemented without PP is not relevant as to whether 
the GPDO would permit a proposed change of use for the purposes of s192.  November 
•  Case Law Update 29 (Apr 2016) 
R (oao Waters) v Breckland DC & Others [2016] EWHC 951 (Admin)  
26th 
The Council did not err in law in granting an LDC under s191 for buildings and other 
at: 
structures without first having considered whether the uses of the site were lawful. 
O’Flynn v SSCLG & Warwick DC [2016] EWHC 2984 (Ad
as min) 
In considering whether an LDC ought to be granted under s191 for the existing use of 
land as incidental to the enjoyment of the dwellinghouse, the Inspector erred by simply 
addressing whether the land had been used as such for a ten year period, and not also 
correct 
whether the use was lawful within the meaning of s55(2)(d). 
•  Case Law Update 30 (December 2016)  Only 
•  R (oao Sumption) v Greenwich LBC [2007] EWHC 2776 (Admin)  
Kensington and Chelsea RBC v SSCLG & 38 Cathcart Ltd 
(CO/4492/2016) 
Inspector granted PP for a change of use on the basis that a LDC previously granted 
under s192 for the use was a ‘fallback position’ – but the evidence indicated that there 
updated.  
had been a ‘material change’ in circumstances since then. Held, with regard to s192(4), 
that the Inspector had erred in assuming that there was a continued right to make the 
COU pursuant to the LDC without giving due consideration to submissions that this 
would no longer be lawful. It was necessary to address whether the factors raised by the 
Council meant that the LDC could not be relied upon to have continuing effect. 
•  Knowledge Matters 34 (7 August 2017) 
freequently 
Sharma v SSC
is  LG & Others [2018] EWHC 2355 (Admin) 
EN alleged the use of land for airport parking; the appellant claimed that the Inspector 
had failed to address whether the LDC fallback use would be carried out to its ‘full’ 
extent in accordance with the LDC. When the decision was read fairly, it was clear that 
the Inspector had properly applied the fallback approach. Whether the land would be 
used to its ‘fullest’ extent was not to be assumed but was a matter of evidence.  
publication 
 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 80 

MATERIAL CHANGE OF USE – GENERAL 
Vickers Armstrong v Central Land Board [1958] 9 P&CR 33  
Changes may be made between ancillary uses, such as canteens and offices in a large 
factory complex, without there necessarily being a MCU of the PU as a whole. 
Wipperman & Buckingham v SSE & Barking LBC [1965] 17 P&CR 225 
The cessation of one element in a composite use will not necessarily result in an MCU; it 
is a matter of fact and degree as to whether the subsequent use is materially different to 
the earlier composite use.  
2019
•  Philglow v SSE & Hillingdon LBC [1985] JPL 318 
G Percy Trentham Ltd v MHLG & Gloucestershire CC [1966] 18 P&CR 225 
To determine whether there has been a MCU, consider the whole area occupied and used 
for a particular purpose, including any part of that area put to incidental uses. Storage in 
a farm building was part of the farm, not an independent storage (B8) use. 
November 
Wood v SSE & Uckfield RDC [1973] 25 P&CR 303 
26th 
If an incidental use expands to a point that it becomes a primary use on its own, within a 
separate PU, or the PU takes on a new mixed use, there has likely been a MCU. 
at: 
•  Trio Thames Ltd v SSE & Reading DC [1989] JPL 914 
as 
Philip Farrington Properties v SSE & Lewes DC [1982] JPL 638 
A change in identity of the person carrying out activities does not result in an MCU. What 
matters is the character of the use. 
correct 
Restormel BC v SSE & Rabey [1982] JPL 785 
Whether the stationing of a caravan amounts to a MCU depends on the use for which the 
Only 
caravan is sited, and whether that is consistent with the existing lawful use of the land.  
Westminster CC v SSE & Aboro [1983] JPL 602 
It is not necessary to specify the use from which it is alleged there has been a MCU. 
•  Bristol Stadium v Brown [1980] JPL 107; Ferris v SSE & Doncaster MBC [1988] 
JPL 777 
updated.  
Philglow Ltd v SSE & Hillingdon LBC [1985] JPL 318 
CoA: the cessation of one element of a composite use is not in itself an MCU. There must 
be evidence that the remaining use has intensified such as to amount to a material 
change in character over the whole or part of the planning unit. 

freequently 
 
Wipperman & Buckingham v Barking LBC [1965] 17 P&CR 275 
is 
Wivenhoe Port v Colchester BC [1985] JPL 396 
PP for an MCU does not confer PP for incidental operational development. 
Panayi v SSE & Hackney LBC [1985] 50 P&CR 109  
Considers case law on the meaning of the term ‘hostel’ 

publication 
 
Cited in Westminster CC v SSCLG & Oriol Badia and Property Investment 
(Development) Ltd [2015] EWCA Civ 482 

Lilo Blum v SSE [1987] JPL 278 
This  A livery and a riding stable could be materially different. 
There was a ‘start’ and a ‘finish’ to the process of deciding whether an MCU had occurred 
and it was not necessary to rely on the concept of intensification. 
 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 81 

Wealden DC v SSE & Day [1988] JPL 268 
The stationing of a caravan is not a MCU, it is necessary to identify the purpose for which 
the caravan is sited. No development is involved if the use is incidental. 
Pitman & Others v SSE & Canterbury [1989] JPL 831 
A ‘leisure plot’ is not an agricultural use; the use of farmland as such involves a MCU.  
Ferris v SSE & Doncaster MBC [1998] JPL 777 
An EN is not invalid if it alleges a MCU and recites the ‘base use’ incorrectly; it is for the 
appellant to establish that there has been no MCU, whatever the nature, character or 
2019
status of the base use. 
Turner v SSE & Macclesfield BC [1992] JPL 837  
CoA: recreational fishing amounts to a MCU of a lake. 
Forest of Dean DC v SSE & Howells [1995] JPL 937 
November 
PP granted for ‘holiday’ caravans with no condition to restrict the use. There may be no 
material difference between caravans occupied as holiday or permanent residences, but 
it is a matter of fact and degree, and off-site effects should not be disregarded.  
26th 
Thames Heliport v Tower Hamlets LBC [1995] JPL 526; [1997] JPL 448  
at: 
CoA: a mobile floating heliport was only moored at night, but this went beyond the use 
of the river for transport. There had been a MCU of land, because th
as  e water rested on 
land. The length of the river was one PU which could be used under the 28 day rule. 
Main v SSETR & South Oxfordshire DC [1999] JPL 195 
Separate activities on land should not be regarded as incidental
correct  simply because they are 
small in relation to other uses. 
Lynch v SSE & Basildon DC [1999] JPL 354 
Only 
Material change from a low-key, limited use to a use which had more components, was 
more intensive and covered a wider area.  The limited use had not subsisted for ten 
years before being superseded by a mixed use of which it was but one component; it 
had not become lawful and did not have to be protected under the Mansi principle. 
Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSETR 
updated.  [2001] JPL 84  
The extent to which a use fulfills a legitimate or recognised planning purpose is relevant 
in deciding whether there has been a material change of use.  
•  Kensington and Chelsea RBC v SSCLG & Reis & Tong [2016] EWHC 1785 (Admin) 
Beach v SSETR & Runnymede BC [2001] EWHC 381 (Admin)  
freequently 
If an additional component was added to a mixed use, there was a MCU of the whole 
planning unit to 
is a different mixed use, although the original uses continued unchanged. 
The original uses were not to be regarded as distinct and unaffected by the new use. 
Waltham Forest LBC v SSETR & Tully [2002] EWCA Civ 330  
The correct comparison to be made, in determining whether a change of use was or 
would be material, is with the actual present or last use, and not just the general class of 
uses within which the actual use might have fallen. 
publication 
Stewart v FSS & Cotswold DC (QBD 28.7.04 Jackson J)  
This  Whether a MCU has occurred is an objective test, the application of which is unaffected 
by the personal circumstances of the user. 
Deakin v FSS [2006] EWHC 3402 (Admin); [2007] JPL 1073 
The EN alleged the stationing of caravan for a use unconnected with agriculture and of a 
mobile home for residential purposes. The correct approach would be to determine the 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 82 

lawful use of the planning unit; the effect of the introduction of the caravans and their 
use on the use of the PU; and whether that effect amounted to a MCU.  
•  Case Law Update 1 (July 2007) 
R (oao) East Sussex CC v SSCLG & Robins & Robins [2009] EWHC 3841 
(Admin) 
Where land is in mixed use, it is not open to the LPA to decouple elements of it. The use 
of the site is the single mixed use with all its component activities.  
•  Case Law Update 13 (March 2011) 
2019
Winfield v SSCLG [2012] EWHC 469 (Admin) 
Where an unauthorised use ceases in order to avoid threatened enforcement action by a 
LPA, then only a short period of non-use is required to establish cessation of the 
unauthorised use, with any resumption representing a new chapter in the planning 
history and a fresh breach of planning control. 
November 
•  Case Law Update 18 (June 2012) 
R (oao Westminster CC) v SSCLG & Oriol Badia and Property Investment 
(Development) Ltd
 [2015] EWCA Civ 482 

26th 
EN alleged MCU of property from hotel (C1) to a mixed use as a hotel and hostel (sui 
at: 
generis). Held that a mixed use can subsist where the different elements are not 
associated with particular parts of the premises, and where the uses
as   fluctuate; on 
occasions, the hostel use might be minimal compared to the hotel use. 
The DL described the Panayi factors but did not take account of evidence related to off-
site impacts in relation to whether there had been a material change to the character of 
correct 
the use. Hertfordshire CC v SSCLG & Metal and Waste Recycling Ltd [2012] EWCA Civ 
1473 applied; consideration of off-site impacts is permissible and a relevant factor in 
assessing whether there had been a MCU.    Only 
•  Case Law Update 27 (June 2015)  
Al-Najafi v SSCLG & Ealing LBC [2015] (CO/4899/2014) 
A sui generis mixed use is not a ‘tri-partite’ use but a single mixed use. 
•  Case Law Update 28 (December 2015) 
updated.  
R (oao Kensington & Chelsea RBC) v SSCLG & Reis & Tong [2016] EWHC 
1785 (Admin) 
Richmond did not decide that any planning consideration relevant as to whether a MCU is 
involved must be supported by a planning policy. It may be or may not be. The absence 
of support from a planning policy does not necessarily suggest that a planning 
freequently 
consequence is of no significance. 
is 
•  Case Law Update 30 (December 2016) 
•  Knowledge Matters 22 (5 August 2016) 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 83 

MATERIAL CHANGE OF USE – RESIDENTIAL 
Birmingham Corporation v MHLG & Ullah [1964] 1 QB 178 
The judge coined the phrase ‘multiple (paying) occupation’.  A change from a single 
dwellinghouse to let-in lodgings could be a MCU. 
Mayflower Cambridge v SSE & Cambridge CC [1975] 30 P&CR 28 
This case concerned whether a property was used as bedsits or a hotel, given the 
stability of the population and whether they were transient or permanent. The use of the 
top three floors of building as a hotel, when permitted as student accommodation, 
2019
amounted to a MCU of the building as a whole. 
Lipson & Lipson v SSE & Salford MBC [1976] 33 P&CR 95 
Houses separately let in bedsitting rooms with shared bathrooms and WCs were aptly 
described as multiple-paying occupation. The letting of a house in self-contained flats did 
not necessarily exclude multiple-paying occupation and vice versa. 
November 
Wakelin v SSE & St Albans DC [1978] JPL 769 
CoA: the case concerned a large house with a separate block comprising lodge/staff 
26th 
flat/garages. A condition precluded separate residential use of the block but, in any 
event, a change of use of the PU to two separate dwellings would be ma
at: terial. S55(3)(a) 
applies to sub-divisions of a single dwellinghouse. 
as 
Blackpool BC v SSE & Keenan [1980] JPL 527 
No MCU had occurred, on the facts, where a house was used as a holiday home by the 
owner, his friends and staff (non-paying) and by other single households for rent.  
correct 
Impey v SSE & Lake District SPB [1981] JPL 363; [1984] P&CR 157 
The case concerned kennels adapted for but not yet used as holiday accommodation. A 
Only 
change of use could take place as a result of the physical works but it is necessary to 
look in the round. ‘The physical state of these premises is very important but it is not 
decisive. Actual or intended or attempted use is important but not decisive
.’ 
Backer v SSE & Camden LBC [1983] JPL 167  
The Act keeps operations and COU distinct and separate. Building operations cannot give 
updated.  
rise to an MCU, some actual user is required – but physical works can be relevant as to 
whether there has been an MCU. Howell applied: the ‘before’ and ‘after’ physical state of 
the building could not be disregarded. The Inspector had mainly considered actual use 
and so erred in law.  
‘To sleep in particular premises at night…have one’s meals upon them by day, or both, 
ought not ipso facto to have the effect in law of making those premises a dwellinghouse
’. 
freequently 
Uttlesford DC v SSE & White [1992] JPL 171 
is 
A garage used as a residential annex was within the same PU; no MCU had taken place. 
R v SSE & Gojkovic ex parte Kensington and Chelsea RBC (CO/2787/91) 
Self-containment of bed sitting rooms by installation of own showers/sinks etc does not 
bring about a MCU; it is vital to consider the planning unit.  
publication 
R (oao Hossack) v SSE & Kettering BC & English Churches Housing 
Group
 [2002] EWCA Civ 886 

This  Whether there has been a MCU from C3 use involves analysis of whether the new use 
falls within C3, such that there has not been development. If it would not fall within C3, 
the question is whether it would be materially different from the lawful C3 use. 
Fairstate Ltd v FSS & Westminster CC [2005] EWCA Civ 283; JPL 1333  
CoA: while a PP capable of being implemented cannot be abandoned, a use that is lawful 
through the passage of time could be under s25 of the Greater London (General Powers) 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 84 

Act 1973. S25 provides that use as temporary sleeping accommodation [less than 90 
consecutive nights] of any residential premises in Greater London involves a MCU of the 
premises and each part thereof which is so used. Such a use could become lawful 
through immunity from enforcement action, but the use would be abandoned if the 
property was again used for lets in excess of 90 nights. Even if no MCU is involved in the 
change back, it would require PP by virtue of s25. The s57(4) reversion right did not 
apply in absence of enforcement against previous change. 
•  S44 and s45 of the Deregulation Act 2015 served to amend s25 of the 1973 Act 
so that it is subject to s25A, which provides that, notwithstanding s25(1), use as 
temporary sleeping accommodation does not involve a MCU if two conditions are 
2019
met. S44 and s45 came into force on 26 May 2015. 
Welwyn Hatfield BC v SSCLG & Beesley [2011] UKSC 15  
PP granted for a barn but the building was constructed as a dwellinghouse. There was no 
COU within s171B(2), which is not apt to encompass the use of a new building as a 
dwelling. Lord Mance expressed doubt as to whether a COU for the purposes of s171B(2) 
could consist of a simple departure from a permitted use. The word ‘use’ is directed to 
November 
real or material use.  
In respect of the tests for a MCU to a dwellinghouse, Lord Mance concluded: ‘Too much 
26th 
stress, has I think, been placed on the need for “actual use”…it is more appropriate to 
look at the matter in the round and to ask what use the building has or 

at: of what use it is.’  
•  Case Law Updates 7, 10, 14 & 15 (Jun 2009, Apr 2010, Jun 2011 & Sept 2011) 
as 
•  Applied in Lawson Builders Ltd & Lawson v SSCLG & Wakefield MBC [2013] EWHC 
3368 Admin, in an obiter dictum remark by Supperstone J: ‘if a dwellinghouse is 
erected unlawfully and used as a dwellinghouse from the outset…the unlawful use 
can still properly be the subject of enforcement action wi

correct thin ten years, even if 
the building itself…becomes immune from enforcement action after four years’. 
•  NB: allegation of ‘use of a building as…’ may not be a breach of planning control 
Only 
as defined by the Act. ENs have been issued in respect of ‘beds in sheds’ which 
allege the MCU of the land on which the building is sited, not of the building itself.
 
Moore v SSCLG & Suffolk Coastal DC [2012] EWCA Civ 2101 
Whether the use of the dwelling house for commercial letting as holiday accommodation 
amounts to a MCU is a question of fact and degree in each case, and the answer will 
updated.  
depend on the particular characteristics of the use as holiday accommodation.   
•  Case Law Update 20 (December 2012) 
Paramaguru v Ealing LBC [2018] EWHC 373 (Admin) 
Case relating to prosecution for failure to comply with an EN which required appellant to 
stop using the property as a Class C4 HMO; children under 18 counted as residents for 
freequently 
the purposes of Class C4.  
is 
 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 85 

NOTICES – ALLEGED BREACH OF PLANNING CONTROL  
Miller Mead v MHLG [1963] 2 WLR 225 
The EN must tell the recipient what he has done wrong and needs to do to put it right. 
Eldon Garages v Kingston-upon-Hull CBC [1974] 1 All ER 358 
That a use had been taking place in contravention of a condition precluding car sales did 
not invalidate an EN which alleged an MCU. The EN could describe a breach of planning 
control through BoC or MCU; it only had to say which. 
2019
Copeland BC v SSE & Ross & Ross [1976] JPL 304 
Where a building is constructed with material differences from approved plans, and a 
condition was not imposed requiring that the development is carried out in accordance 
with the plans, the EN should allege the construction of a building without PP. 
Bristol Stadium v Brown [1980] JPL 107 
November 
The EN alleged operational development ‘including’ certain particular activities. It was 
sufficient that developer was told the general scope of what was complained about; 
there was no need for the EN to go into every precise detail. A generic description of an 
26th 
operation – or of an existing use (for example, ‘shop’ or ‘office’) is sufficiently clear. 
at: 
Scott v SSE & Bracknell DC [1982] JPL 108 
as 
The EN does not have to specify whether the breach of planning control is operational 
development or an MCU, although the test of injustice applies to making a correction. 
Westminster CC v SSE & Aboro [1983] JPL 602 
correct 
The EN does not have to specify the use from which it is alleged there has been an MCU. 
•  Bristol Stadium v Brown [1980] JPL 107; Ferris v SSE & Doncaster MBC [1988] 
JPL 777 
Only 
Coventry Scaffolding Co (London) Ltd v Parker [1987] JPL 127 
This case concerned an appeal against conviction for non-compliance with an EN. The EN 
did not give a building number or include a plan – but it did name the street, and them 
building number had been given in correspondence. Held that the appellants were fully 
updated.  
aware of which land the EN related to and the EN was not a nullity. 
Harrogate BC v SSE & Proctor [1987] JPL 288 
EN does not have to specify that alleged operations took place within four years.  
Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSE & Beechgold Ltd [1987] JPL 509 
An EN may be directed at an ancillary use but must make the main use clear. 
freequently 
Ferris v SSE &
is   Doncaster MBC [1998] JPL 777 
The LPA does not need to satisfy itself beyond doubt that a breach has occurred or that 
there are no possible grounds of appeal.  
An EN is not invalid if it alleges an MCU and recites the ‘base use’ incorrectly; it is for the 
appellant to establish that there has been no MCU, whatever the nature, character or 
status of the base use. 
publication 
R v Rochester-upon-Medway CC ex parte Hobday [1990] JPL 17 
The matters subject to enforcement action must have taken place; an EN cannot be 
This  issued in relation to a prospective breach. 
Collins v SSCLG & Hampshire CC [2016] EWHC 5 (Admin) 
If the EN alleges the wrong breach, even if that had been a reasonable allegation for the 
LPA to make, the Inspector should correct the EN to reflect what has taken place, 
providing there would be no injustice. 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 86 

•  NB – fact specific case where the form of waste disposal alleged was not that 
which had actually taken place. 
•  Case Law Update 29 (April 2016) 
Ealing LBC v SSCLG & Zaheer [2016] EWHC 700 (Admin) 
Success on ground (b) may lead to correction rather than quashing of the EN, providing 
that there would be no injustice. 
2019
November 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 87 

NOTICES – CORRECTION AND VARIATION 
Richmond upon Thames LBC v SSE [1972] 224 EG 1555 
PP was granted on the DPA for the parking of motor vehicles rather than motor coaches 
as alleged. An EN cannot be corrected so that PP is granted for some alternative form of 
development that differs from the alleged breach. 
•  See also Millen v SSE & Maidstone BC [1996] JPL 735 
Hammersmith and Fulham LBC v SSE & Sandral [1975] 30 P&CR 19 
2019
It is the duty of the Inspector to get the notice in order if he can. 
Morris v SSE & Thurrock BC [1975] 31 P&CR 216 
A requirement that had been omitted in error could be inserted by the Inspector, but 
there is a duty to go back to the parties first. 
TLG Building Materials v SSE & Arthur & Carrick DC [1981] JPL 513 
November 
The power to correct the EN cannot be used to change the planning unit, if that could 
involve different arguments from those made as to the materiality or merits of a COU.  
26th 
Woodspring DC v SSE & Goodall [1982] JPL 784 
at: 
Where an EN alleges the stationing of a caravan, it should be corrected to specify the 
purpose for which the caravan is used.  
as 
•  See also Hammond v SSETR & Maldon DC [1997] 74 PCR 134 
Hughes and Son v SSE & Fareham BC [1985] JPL 486 
correct 
An allegation that operational development has taken place within the past four years 
may be corrected to refer to a MCU in the past ten years, and vice versa, so long as the 
appellant is not deprived of the opportunity to plead ground (d). 
Only 
Epping Forest DC v Matthews [1986] JPL 132 
Where the recitals on the EN refer to a MCU but the particulars of the breach refer to a 
BOC, the recitals can be corrected so that the EN is internally consistent. 
•  But see Dacorum BC v SSETR & Walsh [2000] CO/4895/99 QBD 24.8.00  
updated.  
R v SSE & Tower Hamlets LBC ex parte Ahern (London) Ltd [1989] JPL 
757 
‘The pettifogging has to stop’; virtually any correction can be made, the test is whether 
it would cause injustice. 
Wiesenfield v SSE & Barnet LBC [1992] JPL 757 
freequently 
An EN may be corrected so as to delete an inaccurate plan, leaving the site described in 
is 
words alone, without offending ENAR4(c). 
Bennett v SSE & & East Devon DC [1993] JPL 134 
EN required cessation of use as two dwellinghouses plus restoration of use as a single 
dwellinghouse. The Inspector deleted the second step, but this created uncertainty as to 
whether the use of the original dwelling or annex should cease. The Inspector failed to 
consider correc
publication  ting the EN to require cessation of the use of the annex as a dwelling.  
Simms v SSE & Broxtowe BC [1998] JPL B98 
This  Miller-Mead v MHLG [1963] 2 WLR is no longer binding in the sense that any correction 
can be made to an EN, so long as there is no injustice to either side. It is irrelevant as to 
whether corrections go to the substance of the matter. 
•  Miller-Mead is still the leading case when considering whether an EN meets the 
statutory tests set out in s173(1) and (2).  
 

Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 88 

Dacorum BC v SSETR & Walsh [2000] CO/4895/99 QBD 24.8.00  
Where the requirements of the EN are inconsistent, eg, in requiring the restoration of 
pasture but not the removal of a fence that caused the loss of openness, it is necessary 
to consider whether injustice would be caused by widening the scope of the EN. 
Taylor and Sons (Farms) v SSETR & Three Rivers DC [2001] EWCA Civ 
1254 
 
There was no obligation on an Inspector to conduct his own enquiries as to whether 
varying and what variation of an EN might save some of the works which were in breach 
of planning control. He was not obliged to state how much of a hardstanding was 
2019
reasonably necessary for the purpose of agriculture. The proper course was for the 
appellant to submit what variation should be made to the EN. 
Pople v SSTLR & Lake District NPA [2002] EWHC 2851 (Admin) 
The EN alleged leisure use of a separate outbuilding. The requirement to remove the 
fittings and disconnect services was lawful where the fittings were an integral part of the 
November 
breach. The requirement was essential to put the matter beyond doubt and eliminate the 
obvious difficulties of inspection and enforcement. The Inspector concluded that the 
building had no future use, so there was no purpose in retaining the fittings or services. 
26th 
Howells v SSCLG & Gloucestershire CC [2009] EWHC 2757 (Admin) 
at: 
Inspector corrected the EN by extending the red line on the plan in two directions. The 
appellant relied on cases cited in the EPL at para P173.25 but they w
as  ere related to 
earlier versions of s176 and superseded by the current words. The only test for the 
correction was injustice and in the instant case no injustice was caused. 
•  Case Law Updates 9, 11 & 12 (January 2010, July 2010 & October 2010) 
correct 
O’Connor v SSCLG & Epping Forest DC [2014] EWHC 3821 (Admin) 
The Inspector advised that the LPA had the power under s173A(1)(b) to extend the 
Only 
period for compliance in order to consider HRA98 and equality implications. The SoS 
found that the LPA’s discretion would be an unreliable element in the process; potentially 
contradictory to the principles of certainty and effectiveness in EU law; and a weak 
foundation for undertaking the balance required under Art 8. Held that it was not strictly 
part of the Inspector’s remit to refer to s173A – or for the SoS to offer an opinion on the 
desirability of the LPA invoking its power. Whether to invoke s173A is for the LPA. 
updated.  
•  Case Law Update 26 (December 2014) 
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 89 

NOTICES – MULTIPLE 
Edwick v Sunbury on Thames UDC [1964] 63 LGR 204 
A second EN may be issued even if there is an existing EN in similar terms. 
Ramsey & Ramsey Sports Ltd v SSE & Suffolk Coastal DC [1991] 2 PLR 
122 
Two ENs issued in respect of different parts of the site with some overlap; (1) was issued 
in relation to the whole of a farm; (2) to an area leased to the operator of the alleged 
motor-cross track. There was no reason why two notices should not subsist. Double 
2019
jeopardy would only arise if and when the LPA decided to prosecute on both notices. 
Reed v SSE & Tandridge DC [1993] JPL 249 
One composite EN and nine individual ENs were directed at units in an industrial estate. 
The Inspector was obliged to consider the merits of each development individually and 
not refuse all on the basis of the overall intensity of use and traffic generation.  
November 
•  See also Collis & Eclipse Radio & TV Services v SSE & Dudley MBC [1975] 29 
P&CR 390  
26th 
Bruschweiller & Others v SSE & Chelmsford DC [1996] JPL 292 
at: 
This was a similar case, but there was no composite EN. The Inspector only considered 
the overall impact of the developments. He should have considered 
as the DPAs in respect 
of the individual ENs first and the overall impact last. The Judge accepted that if the 
Inspector had considered the matters individually and then considered the effect of 
precedent, he might have reached the same conclusion. 
correct 
Millen v SSE & Maidstone BC [1996] JPL 735 
Two notices issued, both alleging a MCU to the same mixed use, but each only required 
one element of the mixed use to cease. Held that, as each EN had under-enforced, 
Only 
s173(11) came into operation in each case to give a deemed PP for the element not 
required to cease. But it would have been open to the Inspector to quash one EN and 
combine the requirements in the other. 
Biddle v SSE & Wychavon DC [1999] 4 PLR 31 
updated.  
S172 imposes no restriction on the number of ENs which the LPA may issue in respect of 
the same breach, nor to subsequent ones covering a more extensive area. 
 
 
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 90 

NOTICES – NULLITIES 
Rhymney Valley DC v SSW [1985] JPL 27 
A decision that an EN is a nullity may be challenged by judicial review.  
R v SSE ex parte Hillingdon LBC [1986] JPL 363 
The failure of a LPA to comply with its own s101 standing order under the Local 
Government Act 1972 in relation to the issue of an EN made the EN invalid. The LPA 
could not have considered it expedient to issue the EN.  
2019
Webb v Ipswich BC [1989] EGCS 27 
An ultra vires action could be validated retrospectively where no parties’ existing rights 
were substantially prejudiced.  
McKay v SSE & Cornwall CC & Penwith DC [1994] JPL 806  
An EN requiring works for which Scheduled Ancient Monument Consent was needed but 
November 
not obtained was a nullity, since it required the recipient to carry out a criminal offence.  
•  South Hams DC v Halsey [1996] JPL 761 
26th 
R v Wicks [1996] JPL 743  
at: 
CoA: An EN is only a nullity if the defect is evident on the fact of the document. It is not 
open to the defence in a criminal prosecution to go behind the EN an
as  d challenge the 
vires of the LPA’s decision to issue the EN in relation to mala fides, bias, procedural 
impropriety or expediency (‘residual group of invalidity grounds’). Consideration of such 
matters would involve complex assessment and investigation of the background to the 
issue of the EN, and so should be the subject of an application for judicial review. 
correct 
•  Britannia Assets v SSCLG & Medway Council [2011] EWHC 1908 (Admin); Beg v 
Luton [2017] EWHC 3435 (Admin) 
Only 
South Hams DC v Halsey [1996] JPL 761  
CoA: Carrying out the requirements of the EN would be a criminal offence. Glidewell LJ 
disagreed with the approach taken in McKay on several grounds and held that nullities 
should be confined to the situation where there is a patent defect on the face of the EN. 
R (oao Lynes & Lynes) v West Berkshi
updated.   re DC [2003] JPL 1137  
‘Immediately’ is not a ‘period’ for the purposes of s173(9) and a failure to specify a 
compliance period would make an EN a nullity. 
Payne v NAW & Caerphilly CBC [2007] JPL 117  
An EN containing a requirement that a restoration scheme be submitted for LPA approval 
failed to comply with the require
freequently ment in s173(3) to specify the steps which the authority 
requires to be taken. It was a nullity, incapable of being rectified by the Inspector. 
is 
•  Oates v SSCLG v Canterbury CC [2017] EWHC 2716 (Admin) 
Davenport v The Mayor and Citizens of the City of Westminster [2011] 
EWCA Civ 458;
 JPL 1325 
EN alleged a BOC on a personal PP which restricted the land use at the end of the period. 
The EN shoul
publication d have referred to s57(2) rather than alleging a BOC but, on the facts, was 
not null. The recipient would have known the matters which appeared to constitute the 
breach of planning control and the activities required to cease. 
This 
•  Case Law Update 16 (December 2011) 
Britannia Assets v SSCLG & Medway Council [2011] EWHC 1908 (Admin) 
If asked to determine whether an EN is a nullity, the Inspector’s jurisdiction is confined 
to assessing the scope of the appeal under s174. They do not have jurisdiction to deal 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 91 

with submissions as to whether the LPA acted outside their powers by issuing the notice. 
The proper course to bring that compliant is by way of judicial review. 
•  Case Law Update 16 (December 2011) 
•  Following Gazelle Properties Ltd v Bath and North East Somerset Council [2010] 
EWHC 3127 (Admin) but see also Beg v Luton [2017] EWHC 3435 (Admin) 
Koumis v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 2966 (Admin); [2014] EWCA Civ 1723  
A variation notice issued by the LPA, which purported to vary the compliance period but 
failed to specify a period to commence on the date that the EN took effect, was a nullity. 
This did not render the EN a nullity, which appeared on its face to comply with the 
2019
statutory requirements. A LPA which issues an erroneous s173A variation notice ought to 
be able to apply to withdraw and replace it, without having the EN quashed by the Court.  
•  Case Law Update 26 (December 2014) 
Silver v SSCLG & Camden LBC & Tankel [2014] EWHC 2729 (Admin) 
The RFEN failed to specify why the Council considered it expedient to issue the EN. The 
November 
Court held that it was impermissible to look beyond the EN where the reasons for it were 
maintained by the LPA in substance and had been articulated by s172(1)(b). 
26th 
Beg v Luton [2017] EWHC 3435 (Admin) 
at: 
Whether LPA had the required delegations in place when the EN was issued is not ground 
for treating an EN as a nullity. The point could be pursued either though submissions 
as 
that the EN is invalid or by application for judicial review. The effect of Wicks is that 
such arguments cannot properly be a defence to an allegation under s179. 
The EN did not have to be signed by the person authorised to issue it, so the fact that it 
was signed by a legal assistant did not make it invalid. 
correct 
Oates v SSCLG v Canterbury CC [2017] EWHC 2716 (Admin), [2018] 
EWCA Civ 2229 

Only 
The Inspector corrected the EN to delete the ‘vague and subjective’ requirement (3) 
rather than concluding that the EN was a whole was null. The HC endorsed the approach, 
and this was not pursued in the CoA. Compliance with steps (1) and (2) would suffice to 
remedy the breach and (3) could be deleted without causing injustice. The Inspector was 
entitled to use their corrective powers to remove what she found to be unnecessary. Mr 
updated.  
Waksman QC, sitting as a judge in the HC disagreed with the “strict approach” in Payne 
and distilled the following legal principles from Miller Mead and subsequent case law: 
1.  If an EN does not comply with "the statutory requirements" under s173(1) or (3) 
and (4), it is a nullity and cannot be saved by s176(1). 
2.  To so comply, the EN must inform the recipient with reasonable certainty what 
the breach of planning co
freequently ntrol is and what must be done to remedy it. 
3.
is 
  Some degree of uncertainty or other defect in the relevant section of the EN does 
not mean that there is non-compliance with the statutory requirements. 
4.  A decision by the Inspector as to whether a defect in the EN renders it null is a 
matter of judgment and should be accorded very considerable weight. 
5.  Whether a defect renders the EN null must be viewed in context: the importance 
or otherwise of that part of the EN; whether the defect is bound up with the 
publication 
remainder of that section; whether the EN would be valid in the absence of the 
defect. It is open to an Inspector to conclude that, while part of the relevant 
section of the EN was uncertain and could not stand, the EN as a whole complied 
This 
with the statutory requirements. The Inspector could delete the offending part. 
6.  The Inspector and Courts should approach the exercise in a way which is not 
unduly technical or formalistic. 
•  Knowledge Matters 37 (13 November 2017) 
•  Case Law Update 34 (December 2018) 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 92 

NOTICES – SECOND BITE/S171B(4)(B) 
William Boyer (Transport) Ltd v SSE & Hounslow LBC [1996] JPL B129  
CoA: the 10 year immunity period applies to further EN issued after 27 July 1992, not 
the earlier regime whereby the breach had to have occurred prior to 31 December 1963. 
•  R (oao Colver) v SSCLG & Richmond DC [2008] EWHC 2500 (Admin) 
Jarmain v SSETR & Welwyn Hatfield DC [2002] PLR 126  
CoA: it is the physical reality of the breach that matters. If the first EN described the 
2019
legal reality as a BoC, when in reality there had been unauthorised development, the 
second bite provisions apply as long as the facts of the allegation are the same.  
A second EN can only be issued when the first had been issued within the time limit 
applicable to the proper facts of the case. 
Fidler v FSS & Reigate and Banstead BC [2003] EWHC 2003 (Admin), 
[2004] EWCA Civ 1295 

November 
HC judgement, upheld in the CoA, that the Inspector had erred in finding that Notice I 
was a ‘second bite’ notice under s171B(4)(b). It had encompassed a wider range of 
26th 
components than the aggregate of the uses covered by the earlier notices, B, D and E 
and did not simply describe more accurately what was previously mis-de
at:  scribed. Even if 
the Council had intended in the earlier notices to target the whole of the mixed use on 
as 
the site, the notices themselves fell materially short of doing so, whether viewed 
individually or collectively. S171B(4)(b) did not apply in the circumstances. 
Sanders & Sanders v FSS & Epping Forest DC [2004] EWHC 1194 
(Admin) 
 
correct 
The ’second bite’ provisions do not apply where matters alleged in the second EN are 
less a misdescription, but more an accurate reflection of the range and nature of the 
Only 
uses or operations on the site at the times that the two notices were issued. 
R (oao Romer) v FSS [2006] EWHC 3480 (Admin); [2007] JPL 1354 
The first EN alleged ‘change of use of garages to living accommodation’ at no. 223 when 
the breach was occurring at no. 221; both sites were owned by appellant. The second EN 
alleged ‘change of use of the storage area and garage and the erection of a single storey 
updated.  
building to provide living accommodation’ and got the site right. Held that the second EN 
dealt with the same development and was served on the same owner; that the first EN 
concerned adjacent land did not remove it from the ambit of s171B(4)(b). 
R (oao Lambrou) v SSCLG [2013] EWHC 325 (Admin) 
Case indicating that the Courts will take a liberal view of ‘purported’; held that an EN 
could be issued under s171B(4) 
freequently although the first EN not been properly authorised and 
was technically null, and thus there had been a successful appeal against prosecution. 
is 
Akhtar v SSCLG & Barking and Dagenham LBC [2017] EWHC 1840 
(Admin)
 
EN issued in July 2014 had failed to include an effective date and been declared null. The 
Inspector addressed and was correct that the second EN, issued in identical terms, would 
relate to the immunity period which would have arisen under the first EN. 
publication 
•  Knowledge Matters 34 (7 August 2017) 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 93 

NOTICES – SERVICE 
Skinner & King v SSE & Eastleigh BC [1978] JPL 842 
An EN alleging a MCU of a complex of buildings had been served on the owner; other 
ENs had been served on individual tenants alleging specific activities. It was held that no 
party had been substantially prejudiced by the failure to serve identical notices to all. 
Porritt & Williams v SSE & Bromley LBC [1988] JPL 414 
An EN which only gave 27 days instead of 28 days prior to coming into effect was not 
invalid. The Inspector has discretion to disregard the defect [providing that no recipient 
2019
is substantially prejudiced by it]. 
Mayes & White & Oubridge v SSW & Dinefwr BC [1989] JPL 848 
Individual occupiers were not served with copies of the EN but not been substantially 
prejudiced. They had been given an opportunity to make written representations before 
the appeal was dismissed. 
November 
Dyer v SSE & Purbeck DC [1996] JPL 740 
Notices were not received by the appellant until five days before they were due to take 
26th 
effect. The SSE conceded that the notices had not been served in compliance with 
s172(3), but the appellant had not been substantially prejudiced because 
at:  he had lodged 
his appeal in time. The decision to disregard the bad service under s176(5) was upheld. 
as 
Newham LBC v Miah [2016] EWHC 1043 (Admin) 
A land registry address is proper service if a LPA has not been given another address. 
The LPA does not need to check with other Council departments to see if they have a 
correct 
record of the last known address. The statutory framework points to the knowledge of 
the LPA as relevant for the service of an EN. 
•  This judgment was made in respect of Newham’s appeal against a Magistrate’s 
Only 
Court decision to acquit the respondent of breaches of an EN. The principle should 
nevertheless apply in respect of ground (e) appeals.  

updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 94 

PLANNING CONTRAVENTION NOTICE 
R v Teignbridge DC ex parte Teignbridge Quay Co Ltd [1996] JPL 828 
It must appear to a LPA that there has been a breach of planning control before they are 
justified in issuing a PCN. 
Meecham v SSCLG & Uttlesford DC [2013] HC 
Appeal on ground (d) dismissed on the basis that incorrect information given in response 
to two PCNs amounted to deliberate concealment. Claim that the PCNs related to a 
different breach of planning control to that alleged in the EN was rejected.  The PCNs 
2019
and answers to them needed to be read as a whole.  The Inspector was entitled to take 
the responses into account, which included that land was not being used for the purpose 
alleged. The evidence was relevant to ground (d).  
•  Case Law Update 23 (October 2013) 
 
November 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 95 

PLANNING PERMISSIONS – COMMENCEMENT AND 
CONDITIONS PRECEDENT 

Malvern Hills DC v SSE & Barnes and Co Ltd [1982] JPL 439 
The marking out of a line and the width of a road with pegs amounted to ‘material 
operations’ within s56(4)(d). 
Thayer v SSE [1992] JPL 264 
CoA upheld Malvern Hills in that the test for commencement is not the ‘quantum’ of work 
2019
undertaken, but whether the work was ‘related to the PP involved’. Excavation works 
entailing the removal of 12’ of hedge and a gate to create an opening for access to the 
site were ‘done with the intention of carrying out the PP’ and amounted to a ‘specified 
operation’ within the meaning of s43(1) of TCPA71.  
F G Whitley & Sons v SSW & Clwyd CC
 [1990] JPL 678, [1992] JPL 856 
Quarrying commenced prior to the approval of a scheme required by condition. The 
November 
question was whether the development was permitted by the PP when read with the 
conditions. If the development was in contravention of ‘conditions precedent’, it had not 
commenced in accordance with the PP; the ‘Whitley principle’. Enforcement act
26th ion may 
be taken in respect of development without PP or BoC; either would be correct.  
at: 
An exception (1) to that principle applied since the scheme had been submitted for 
as 
approval on time. The scheme was approved after the date for implementation of the PP 
had passed and before the EN was issued. In these circumstances, the works in BoC 
constituted the ‘beginning’ of development. If, as was the case, details were eventually 
approved, the PP had been implemented.  
correct 
The opening of a 12’ gap in a hedge and limited ground works were sufficient to 
commence development. 
•  See also R v Elmbridge BC ex parte Oakimber 
Only [1991] 3 PLR 35 
Agecrest v Gwynedd CC [1998] JPL 325 
Exception to the Whitley principle (2): conditions required the submission and approval 
of schemes before development commenced, but the LPA subsequently agreed that 
development could start without full compliance with the conditions. 
updated.  
•  This case related to PP granted in 1967, when there was no equivalent in the 
TCPA of s73; Leisure GB Plc v Isle of Wight [1999] 80 P&CR 370 and Henry Boot 
Homes Ltd v Bassetlaw DC [2002] EWCA Civ 983 

R v Flintshire CC ex parte Somerfield Stores [1998] PLCR 336 
Exception to the Whitley principle (3): a condition had been complied with in substance, 
freequently 
since the relevant scheme had been submitted and approved, but the formalities 
including the not
is ice of approval had not been completed by the time that work began. 
Leisure GB Plc v Isle of Wight [1999] 80 P&CR 80 
Roadworks pursuant to a PP were not authorised by the PP and in breach of planning 
control due to non-compliance with conditions requiring the approval of a programme of 
working and tree protection measures before the commencement of development. There 
was no basis for departing from the well-established principle that unauthorised works 
publication 
do not constitute ‘material operations comprised in the development. 
South Gloucestershire Council v SSETR & Alvis Bros Ltd [1999] JPL B99 
This  Works comprising a ‘material operation’ could satisfy s65 of the Land Commission Act 
1967 despite being carried out before the grant of PP. Since the work was part of the 
development applied for, it became permitted once PP was granted. Although begun for 
the purpose of the Land Commission Act, the work was the same as that covered by the 
PP; the work satisfied the sole test, which was whether it was for the purpose of the 
development to which the PP related. 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 96 

Riordan Communications Ltd v South Buckinghamshire DC [2000] 1 PLR 
45  
The test as to whether the works undertaken were for the purpose of the development 
permitted was entirely objective. The intentions of the developer were not relevant. Even 
if the works were carried out solely to keep the PP alive, and with no intention to 
proceed, the works may still suffice to initiate the development comprised in the PP. 
•  East Dumbartonshire Council v SSS & Mactaggart Mickel Ltd [1999] 1 PLR 53 
Connaught Quarries Ltd v SSETR & East Hampshire DC [2001] JPL 1210  
The beginning of a material operation within the meaning s56(2) and s56(4), for the 
2019
purposes of keeping a PP alive, has to be more than de minimis
Commercial Land Ltd v SSTLR & Kensington and Chelsea RBC [2002] 
EWHC 1264 (Admin), [2003] JPL 358  
 
Held that, in considering whether a material operation is ‘comprised in the development’ 
for the purposes of s56(2), it is insufficient to simply consider the material differences 
November 
between what has been built and what was approved. Similarities and the degree of 
compliance with the approved plans are also relevant, together with the extent to which 
the works are substantially usable in implementing the PP.  
26th 
•  The appeal was remitted following the HCC. The same findings were made in the 
at: 
re-determination but with better reasoning – successfully defended in Imperial 
Resources SA v FSS & Kensington & Chelsea RBC [2003] JPL

as  1346. 
Henry Boot Homes Ltd v Bassetlaw DC [2002] EWCA Civ 983; [2003] JPL 
1030  
Conditions imposed on an outline PP set out requirements to be 
correct  complied with ‘before 
any development commences’; works took place before the conditions were complied 
with. The Council had assumed that the development had started under the outline PP, 
but it was held that whether works carried out in BoC
Only  amount to a lawful start on the 
development to which the PP relates is essentially a matter of law, to be determined in 
the last resort by the Courts.  
Field v FSS & Crawley BC [2004] EWHC 147 (Admin)  
An act of demolition preparatory to re-development was the commencement of that 
updated.  
development – in circumstances where the PP being implemented had specifically 
included PP for the demolition (whether or not required). Some types of development 
might never involve a material operation as listed in s56, and so the carrying out of such 
an operation is not a prerequisite to the commencement of development permitted. 
R (oao Hart Aggregates Ltd) v Hartlepool BC [2005] EWHC 840 (Admin)  
A distinction should be drawn between cases where no details are submitted and there is 
freequently 
only a PP in principle, and where there is only a failure to obtain approval for one aspect 
is 
of the scheme. In the former, the PP is not implemented by works undertaken; in the 
latter, the PP has been implemented but enforcement can be taken against BoC.  
Each case must be considered on its facts; the outcome may depend upon the number 
and significance of the conditions not complied with. For there to be a breach of a 
‘condition precedent’ and start of development without PP, the condition must go to the 
heart of the PP and expressly prohibit any development before development commences. 
publication 
Bedford BC v SSCLG & Murzyn [2008] EWHC 2304 (Admin) 
Landscaping and enclosure conditions were not conditions precedent; the Whitley 
This  principle was not engaged. Neither condition stated that no development shall take place 
until a scheme was submitted; neither could be distinguished from the condition in Hart 
which was rejected as a condition precedent; and neither went to the heart of the PP. 
•  Concise summary of relevant case law. 
•  Case Law Updates 5 & 7 (January 2009 & June 2009) 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 97 

Rastrum & Benge v SSCLG & Rother DC [2009] EWCA Civ 1340 
Access works which would normally have come within s56 were commenced when the PP 
was no longer capable of lawful implementation; it had expired before all the required 
details were submitted. Neither Whitley nor Hart were relevant. Where ‘conditions 
precedent’ are not complied with then the whole PP is dead. That the works of 
‘commencement’ were now lawful could not revive the PP. 
•  Case Law Update 7 (June 2009) 
Greyfort Properties Ltd v SSCLG & Torbay Council [2011] EWCA Civ 908 
A condition with the wording ‘before any work is commenced on site’ equated to a 
2019
prohibition on the start of development and would operate as a condition precedent. 
•  Case Law Update 17 (March 2012) 
Ellaway v Cardiff CC [2014] EWHC 836 (Admin) 
The Whitley exception may apply in an EIA case. Whitley is consistent with the Directive 
November 
and the terms of the exception are clear and self-contained; it is obvious when the 
exception will apply. The exceptions are not closed, but it does not follow that these will 
be unpredictable or uncertain. 
26th 
at: 
as 
correct 
Only 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 98 

PLANNING PERMISSIONS – EFFECT ON NOTICE 
R v Chichester Justices ex parte Chichester DC [1990] 60 P&CR 342 
In cases of split decisions, the requirements of an EN should not be varied, but reliance 
should be placed on s180 to mitigate the effect of the EN so far as inconsistent with the 
PP granted, to avoid the rise of an inconsistent deemed PP under s173(11). 
Cresswell v Pearson [1997] JPL 860 
Where a temporary PP is subsequently granted for uses prohibited by the EN, the 
prohibition in the EN does not revive upon coming to the end of the period of the 
2019
temporary PP. Once the PP is granted, the EN shall ‘cease to have effect’; s180. This 
does not prevent an LPA from serving a fresh notice once the temporary PP has expired. 
Rapose v Wandsworth LBC [2010] EWHC 3126 (Admin) 
This case was a judicial review of LPA’s decision to exercise its s178/179 powers to carry 
out works required by an EN. The challenge succeeded because LPA had granted PP for 
November 
‘part of the matters’ and s180 is activated upon the grant, not implementation of PP. 
•  Case Law Update 13 (March 2011) 
26th 
Goremsandu v SSCLG & Harrow LBC [2015] EWHC 2194 (Admin) 
at: 
EN issued in 2008 alleged the erection of an extension and required its demolition. PP 
subsequently granted for works to modify the extension, subject to conditions requiring 
as 
completion within specified periods. LDC appeal for the extension as ‘completed before 
July 2004’ dismissed on the ground that, notwithstanding the effect of s180(1), 
enforcing the 2008 EN would not be inconsistent with the PP, because of the differences 
between what was enforced against and permitted subsequently.  
correct 
Held that s180(1) deals with a situation where PP is granted subsequent to the issue of 
an EN. There is no rule that the requirements of an EN must be exercised in full for the 
EN to be effective. It is unrealistic to expect that an E
Only N would be drafted with a view to a 
future grant of PP which might allow for retention of a building in part.   
 
updated.  
freequently 
is 
publication 
This 
Version 11  
Inspector Training Manual | Enforcement Case Law 
Page 99 

PLANNING PERMISSIONS – IMPLEMENTATION 
Pilkington v SSE & Lancashire CC [1973] 1 WLR 1527 
There can be any number of PPs covering the same area of land. If PP/A is implemented, 
making it physically impossible to implement PP/B in accordance with the terms of PP/B, 
then PP/B cannot be implemented. 
Prestige Homes (Southern) Ltd v SSE & Shepway DC [1992] JPL 842 
Pilkington does not apply where there is no physical impossibility of carrying out works 
that are permitted, and ‘incompatible’ does not mean ‘inconsistent’. Where it was 
2019
physically possible for PP/B to be implemented, mere incompatibility with PP/A and the 
fact that the trees would be lost in BoC did not render PP/B incapable of implementation. 
•  Compare with Orbit Development (Southern) Ltd v SSE & Windsor and 
Maidenhead RBC [1996] JPL B125. 
British Railways Board v SSE & Others [1994] JPL 32 
November 
If a condition is negative in character and appropriate in the light of sound planning 
principles, the fact that it appeared to have no reasonable prospects of being 
26th 
implemented does not mean that the grant of PP is irrational in the Wednesbury sense. 

at: 
 
Stretch v SSE & NW Leicestershire DC [1994] JPL B55 
Handoll & Suddick v Warner & Goodman & Street & East Lindsay DC 
as 
[1995] JPL 930 
CoA: dwelling subject to an AOC was sited 90’ from its permitted location. The PP was 
not implemented and the building was immune from enforcement, free of conditions. 
correct 
Butcher v SSE & Maidstone BC [1996] JPL 636 
Held that a PP granted under s177(5) is no different in character or effect from one 
Only 
granted under Part III. A PP granted on a DPA must be implemented before it can come 
into effect, and whether it is implemented is a matter of fact and degree. The 
continuance of a use for which PP is granted would generally satisfy a conclusion that the 
PP is implemented, but some other factors may be material. Some conscious action is 
required to implement the PP, so that the conditions bite.  
Singh v SSCLG & Sandwell BC [2010] 
updated.  EWHC 1621 (Admin) 
Held that a distinction needs to be made between ‘implementation’ and ‘completion’; a 
development must be regarded holistically. Where some parts are incapable of being 
implemented or completed, the whole development becomes unlawful. 
•  Case Law Update 12 (October 2010) 
R (oao Robert Hitchens Ltd) 
freequently  v Worcestershire CC [2015] EWCA Civ 1060 
is 
The CoA held that, for the purposes of a particular s106, implementati