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CONTENTS
FOREWORD
2
1
THE PURPOSE OF THE DISABILITY EQUALITY SCHEME
3
1.1
What is a Disability Equality Scheme?
3
1.2
Involvement and Consultation of Disabled People
4
1.3
Progress to Date
5
2
THE CITY COUNCIL’S VISION AND PRIORITIES
7
2.1
Our Vision for Birmingham
7
2.2
National Context
8
2.3
The Local Context
9
2.4
Aims of the Disability Equality Scheme for 2007-2010
10
3
THE KEY DRIVERS FOR DISABILITY EQUALITY
11
3.1
Realising the Vision
11
3.2
The Legal Imperatives
11
3.3
Meeting the Equality Standard (BVPI 2a) Requirement
12
4
MANAGING CORPORATE EQUALITY
13
4.1
Planning for Equality
13
4.2
Measuring Equality
13
4.3
Equality Performance
14
4.4
Scheme Responsibility
14
4.5
The Annual Review
15
4.6
Review of the EINA
15
5
DISABILITY EQUALITY IMPLEMENTATION
17
5.1
The Action Plan
17
5.2
Prioritised Functions and Policies
18
6
ACCESS, INFORMATION AND INVOLVEMENT
19
6.1
Access to Information and Services
19
6.2
Reputation and Understanding
20
6.3
Impact Consultation
21
6.4
Impact Monitoring
21
6.5
Information Dissemination
22
7
EMPLOYMENT
24
7.1
Employment Monitoring
24
7.2
Training
24
APPENDICES
25
1:  Disability Equality Scheme Action Plan 2007-2010
25
2:  Organisations involved in developing the Disability 
Equality Scheme
59
3:  Government White Paper, Our Care, Our Health, 
Our Say - 7 outcomes
60
4:  Disability Equality Duty - General and specific duties
61
1

FOREWORD
Birmingham City Council’s vision for the city places support for
equality and diversity amongst our highest priorities.  The Disability
Equality Scheme (2007 –2010) underlines this commitment as well as
fulfilling our statutory duties.  
We recognise the contribution that the diversity of our population has
made to our economic growth and prosperity.  We believe that it is
important, both morally and economically, to accelerate the pace of
change in the area of disability equality.
We are seeking significant improvement in how the impact upon
disabled people is taken account of when developing services or
policies.
We intend to work towards real outcomes and support practical
improvements in the day-to-day life and experience of disabled
people.  We have involved, and will continue to involve, disabled
people in the process of identifying and progressing our priorities for
action.
We are proud of what we have achieved to date.  But we are not
complacent: we will continue to work towards promoting equality of
opportunity for all, whilst ensuring that there is greater cohesion
between the people and communities in the city.
This scheme will continue to develop.  We will monitor progress and
publicise what we find to enable us to learn from, and act on, any
shortcomings.
The success of any scheme clearly requires dedication and support
from our staff, all communities and partner agencies.  I am grateful
to them for the good spirit they bring to the city, and to their
continuing efforts in support of equality, diversity and cohesion.  As
the Cabinet Member for Equalities and Human Resources, with the
responsibility for the City Council’s portfolio for Equality and Diversity,
I will champion the progression of this Disability Equality Scheme and
related corporate priorities for the city.
I welcome your comments and suggestions.
Cllr Alan Rudge                                                               
Cabinet Member for Equalities & Human Resources
Birmingham City Council
2

1  THE PURPOSE OF THE DISABILITY EQUALITY SCHEME
The City Council has a long-standing commitment to disability
equality. We have been active in identifying and acting on best
practice. This scheme reinforces and deepens that commitment.
The Disability Discrimination Act 1995 as amended by the Disability
Discrimination Act 2005 now places a General Duty on all public
authorities, when carrying out their functions, to have due regard to
the need to:
• eliminate discrimination that is unlawful under this Act;
• eliminate harassment of disabled persons that is related to their
disabilities;
• promote equality of opportunity between disabled persons and
other persons;
• take steps to take account of disabled persons' disabilities, even
where that involves treating disabled persons more favourably
than other persons;
• promote positive attitudes towards disabled persons;
• encourage participation by disabled persons in public life.
"Due regard" comprises two linked elements: proportionality and
relevance. In all their decisions and functions authorities should give
due weight to the need to promote disability equality in proportion to
its relevance. Disability equality will be more relevant to some
functions than others. Public authorities will need to take care when
assessing relevance, as many areas of their functioning are likely to
be of relevance to disabled people.
1.1 What is a Disability Equality Scheme?
Under the Disability Discrimination Acts, public authorities are also
subject to additional Specific Duties to support the achievement of
the outcomes required by the General Duty.
The Specific Duties are as follows:
• a public authority should publish a Disability Equality Scheme
demonstrating how it intends to fulfil its general and specific
duties;
• a public authority should involve disabled people in the
development of the Scheme;
• the Scheme should include a statement of:

the way in which disabled people have been involved in the
development of the Scheme;

the authority’s methods for impact assessment;

steps which the authority will take towards fulfilling its general
duty (the "action plan");
3


the authority’s arrangements for gathering information in
relation to employment, and, where appropriate, its delivery
of education and its functions;
o
the authority’s arrangements for putting the information
gathered to use, in particular in reviewing the effectiveness of
its action plan and in preparing subsequent Disability Equality
Schemes;
Extract from Disability Rights Commission publication ‘The Duty to Promote
Disability Equality – Statutory Code of Practice’ (December 2005)
•  a public authority must, within three years of the Scheme being
published, take the steps set out in its action plan (unless it is
unreasonable or impracticable for it to do so) and put into effect
the arrangements for gathering and making use of information;
•  a public authority must publish a report containing a summary of
the steps taken under the action plan, the results of its information
gathering and the use to which it has put the information.
The Disability Equality Scheme covers all relevant services, functions
and policies of Birmingham City Council, bringing them within a single
coherent framework and action plan. The Scheme makes it clear how
Birmingham City Council plans to meet both the General and Specific
Duties. It summarises the City Council’s overall approach to disability
equality and how it links to the corporate aims and objectives.
1.2 Involvement and Consultation of Disabled People
In order to meet one of the Specific Duties placed upon public
authorities, disabled people must be involved in the development of
the Disability Equality Scheme.
In developing this Disability Equality Scheme, the City Council has
actively involved and consulted different groups of disabled people
and the organisations representing them. The Scheme was developed
by involving people from across the City Council, service users,
disabled people, strategic partners and voluntary and community
organisations, including specialist disability groups (see Appendix 2).
These people have contributed to refining and developing the Scheme
through peer reviews and focus groups. The result of our recent
consultation workshops held between April 2006 and August 2006 is
in the document entitled “Person Centred Plan about Birmingham City
Council’s Disability Equality Scheme in Easy Read Format”.
A Consultation Event was held on the 14 September 2006 to discuss
the development of the Equality Schemes and encourage debate
around the key action points being considered by Birmingham City
Council. The consultation period lasted until 16 October 2006.
4

1.3 Progress to Date
Over the last two years Birmingham City Council has had a series of
successes in addressing disability issues. These include the following:
•  Established the “Wayfinder” Talking Signs system throughout the
city centre in 2006, enabling visually impaired people to receive
practical audible information of where they are and brief directions
to find transport, places of interests, shopping, etc.;
•  Established a carers’ one stop support shop in 2006, offering
advice and guidance to carers;
•  Established a Disability Advisory Network (DAN) in 2006. DAN is
supported and facilitated by disabled members of staff from the
directorates and is open to all disabled employees of Birmingham
City Council. DAN aims to provide information, guidance, support
and advice to disabled employees; to promote disability issues
across the City Council and to act as a consultative and
developmental forum for improving the City Council’s policies,
systems and practices;
•  Adopted guidance (in 2005 and 2006) that all planning applications
to the City Council for buildings used by the public have to take
regard of this guidance on access;
•  Established the Birmingham Centre for Inclusive Living (CIL) in
2005. This is a resource centre run and managed by disabled
people to promote independent living;
•  Approved (in 2004) the Cabinet Report on British Sign Language
(BSL). Birmingham City Council was the first authority in the
country to promote BSL as a recognised language. The City Council
employs in-house sign language interpreters, offering an urgent
request service. It is regularly used by a significant number of local
people, and by many visitors to the City;
•  Established regular meetings with a number of disabled service
users and staff groups to ensure that the voices of its citizens and
staff are listened to;
•  Appointed a dedicated HR Adviser within Human Resources, who is
responsible for disability employment issues. Birmingham City
Council was one of the first local authority employers to create
such a post;
•  Provided (for over twenty years) intensive support, customised
training and equality of opportunity to jobs within the city for
disabled people;
•  Supported the Supernumerary Employment Training Scheme for
disabled people which has been in operation for twenty years. The
scheme has grown and developed into a nationally recognised
model of good practice. The scheme offers a 9 month paid training
placement to a disabled person. Trainees are also assigned a
mentor to support them through the programme;
•  Established a comprehensive list of text phones in operation
around the City Council and made full training available to all staff;
•  Actively promoted the use of the Type Talk Service;
5

•  Made available, since 2004, job application forms and supporting
information in various formats, giving disabled people the
opportunity to seek employment with the City Council. They also
offer the opportunity to request a job application pack via SMS text
messaging and have developed a leaflet offering practical support
to disabled people applying for City Council jobs.
This track record is built on the City Council’s firm policy commitment
to disability equality, evidenced by:
•  The fact that the City Council continues to be a disability “Two
Tick” symbol user. The “Two Tick” symbol is awarded to employers
who sign up to five commitments, which includes the recruitment,
retention and development of disabled people.
6

2.  THE CITY COUNCIL’S VISION AND PRIORITIES
2.1 Our Vision for Birmingham
Birmingham City Council has a clear vision for Birmingham, for the
future of the city and its people. We want Birmingham to be a city
with a strong and sustainable economy offering benefits to all its
citizens. A city where people are safe, well housed, healthy and enjoy
a high quality of life within thriving communities. A city where
everyone feels they can play their part to the full. A city where people
want to live and work and businesses choose to invest.
Our aim is for people to:
•  Succeed economically – benefiting from training, jobs and
investment;
•  Stay safe- living without crime and the fear of crime;
•  Be healthy- enjoying long and healthy lives;
•  Enjoy a high quality of life – living in a city which is clean and
green with good sports and leisure opportunities;
•  Make their contribution – valuing one another and playing an
active part in the community.
So our priorities are to:
•  protect and support vulnerable people;
•  ensure everyone has a decent home;
•  make the city cleaner, greener and safer;
•  provide excellent services;
•  ensure services are connected and customer focussed;
•  build the city’s reputation at home, nationally and internationally;
•  maintain a city where communities get on well together;
•  promote the city region.
We will continue to foster understanding between the generations and
between communities. Working alongside our partners, we will
encourage those who feel excluded to make use of the many
opportunities it offers.
We will achieve all of this through:
•  Transforming the way we manage our business and work with
partners as well as support our staff;
•  Improving our approach to customer service by listening to
suggestions from our citizens;
•  By working closer with our communities.
7

2.2 National Context
Disability is categorised by Census 2001 as a Limiting Long-Term
Illness (LLTI). Below is a summary of Census 2001 on LLTI.
% of population with a
Limiting Long- Term Illness
1991
2001
Birmingham
14
19.7
5.7
West Midlands
13
18.9
5.8
England
12.8
17.9
5.1
Table 1. Limiting Long-Term Illness, Census 1991 and Census 2001
Sources: 2001 Census, 1991 Census © Crown Copyright.
Table 1 above shows that the percentage of people with LLTI has
risen significantly from 1991 to 2001 both nationally and locally. A
recent survey showed that over 6.8 million UK disabled people are of
working age, which represents 19 percent of the working population.
Most disabled people develop their impairment during their lives. As a
result, the percentage of disabled people rises with increasing age. Of
the workers aged between 50-64 years, 33% are disabled . About
11% of full-time employees, and 15% of part-time workers, provide
unpaid care for someone with a limiting long-term illness.
The last decade has seen significant improvements for disabled
people in:
• employment;
• education;
•  housing and living independently;
•  access to shops and other buildings providing services to the
public.
Nationally, the gap in employment rates has narrowed in the past five
years: 51% of disabled people in the UK are now in work compared
to 46.6% in 2000 . The total number of disabled students in higher
education rose from 86,250 in 2000/1 to 121,080 in 2003/4. The
number of people receiving direct payments has gone up from 5,500
in 2001 to nearly 20,000 by 2005 . In 2005, 2.9% of the Senior Civil
Service were disabled people compared to 1.5% in 1998.
Much of the way in which society is organised and resourced is still
based on the “Individual Model of Disability”. Under this approach,
disabled people are split for convenience into medical groups, with
their disability acting as their defining attribute and limitation. The
“Social Model of Disability”, on the other hand, states that, in the
8

main, it is not the impairment or the disabled person that is the
issue: rather, it is society's failure to take into account people’s
diverse needs. The Social Model shifts policy away from a medical,
charity, or care agenda into a rights led, equalities agenda. Disabled
people contend that the systematic removal of barriers to their
progress is a more effective approach - socially, morally and
economically. Put simply, it is better and more economical to support
disabled people being independent than to provide services which
foster and maintain dependency.
2.3 The Local Context
Limiting Long-Term Illnesses rise with age. Birmingham’s LLTI
percentage increases from less than 7% of people under 30 years old
to nearly 42% for the age group of 60-64 .
% of population with a
Limiting Long- Term Illness
1991
2001
0-15
3
5.3
2.3
16-29
4.2
7.0
2.8
30-44
7.4
13.2
5.8
45-59
17.8
26.7
8.9
60-64
29.5
41.5
12
65-74
34.8
47.1
12.3
75 or older
54.1
65.5
11.4
Sources: 2001 Census, 1991 Census © Crown Copyright.
Birmingham City Council provides a range of services to disabled
people: 22,000 adult and 4,600 children use Social Care & Housing
disability services. There are 45,000 Blue Badge scheme users. It is
estimated that Birmingham has 4,020 people with a severe or
profound learning disability and 25,115 people with a mild or
moderate learning disability .
The City Council is the largest employer in Birmingham and employs
approximately 52,708 people. Of the total workforce, 1.9% are
disabled people. Within its senior management (above PO7 level),
2.4% are disabled people . However, this percentage depends on self-
declaration. There are likely to be more employees who have chosen
not to declare a disability. Birmingham City Council aims to increase
the percentage to 2.3% by 2007/08. A number of initiatives are being
put in place to achieve this target.
9

2.4 Aims of the Disability Equality Scheme for 2007-2010
Birmingham City Council is committed to the Social Model of
Disability, and this Scheme is our commitment to turning that policy
into practice.
The aims of the City Council Disability Equality Scheme are to:
•  Support the vision for Birmingham outlined above;
•  Mainstream disability equality within the City Council’s service
areas;
•  Prioritise community cohesion, as expressed through the
Community Cohesion Strategy;
•  Develop and extend our consultation and engagement with the
community, partners and stakeholders;
•  Ensure that Equality Impact Needs Assessments have meaning and
impact from a disability equality perspective;
•  Take a joined up perspective to equality - linking disability equality
actions to the other five priority equality strands: age, race,
gender (including trans-gender), sexual orientation, and religion &
belief.
10

3.  THE KEY DRIVERS FOR DISABILITY EQUALITY
3.1 Realising the Vision
Birmingham’s diversity is fundamental to its social and economic
future. Disability equality is critical if we are to achieve our vision of a
city with a strong and sustainable economy, where people play their
full part and enjoy a high quality of life within thriving communities.
We all benefit from living in a society that is inclusive and cohesive –
where different groups live in mutual respect and acceptance of
diversity. Progress and peace result from valuing differences and
harnessing these differences to achieve objectives.
There is a clear moral imperative in working to achieve disability
equality. In addition, as the City Council, the largest employer in the
city, we must demonstrate our commitment to equality and
diversity, setting an example to other employers including those who
provide services on our behalf to mirror our values and beliefs.
There is also a clear business case, based upon the City Council’s
need to attract, recruit and retain good quality staff. The broader the
applicant base, the better the quality. Creativity, innovation and fresh
thinking are encouraged if employees comprise people from all walks
of life. A diverse workforce should be better able to understand the
needs of customers from different backgrounds.
3.2 The Legal Imperatives
A range of legal and best practice frameworks underpin our
commitment to disability equality, as follows.
3.2.1 Disability Discrimination Acts
The Disability Discrimination Act 1995 has been amended by the
Disability Discrimination Act 2005 so that it now places a General
Duty on all public authorities, when carrying out their functions, to
have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination and
harassment of disabled people; to promote equality of opportunity
for, and positive attitudes towards, disabled people; and to encourage
and enable disabled people to play a full part in public life.
The duty covers all functions and activities of the City Council. It is a
positive duty which means that the City Council must think about the
needs of disabled people when they develop their services and
functions, rather than making adjustments after the event.
11

3.2.2 Human Rights Act 1998
The Human Rights Act (1998) came into force in October 2000
bringing into effect, in UK Law, the European Convention on Human
Rights. The implementation and integration of this piece of legislation
will increase the accountability and liability of the City Council to local
citizens as far as equality, social justice and social exclusion issues
are concerned.
3.3 Meeting the Equality Standard (BVPI 2a) Requirement
One of the Best Value Performance Indicators for local authorities is
BVPI 2a, which is the Equality Standard for Local Government. The
Equality Standard sets out a generic ‘quality’ framework to
mainstream equality of opportunities across all parts of the City
Council. There are five levels of the Standard. Level 1 is the lowest
and 5 is the highest. For each of the levels there are list of indicators
that the council has to provide evidence on. Birmingham City Council
was self-assessed and externally audited as Level 3 in 2004.
The outcomes of the assessment against the Equality Standard will
provide information for reviewing the Disability Equality Scheme. The
Equality and Diversity Division is responsible for the Equality
Standard.
12

4. MANAGING CORPORATE EQUALITY
4.1 Planning for Equality
The City Council’s Corporate Equality and Community Cohesion 
Framework, of which this Scheme is a part, provides the strategic and 
policy framework for the delivery of equitable services to the diverse
citizens of Birmingham. The valuing of diversity will be balanced with the    
commitment to scoial and community cohesion.
Each directorate is required to develop equality action plans, which
address the specific needs of communities, and the common issues
which cut across them irrespective of age, race, disability, gender,
religion and belief and sexual orientation. 
In this way, the equalities and diversity agenda is being embedded
systematically in the strategic and business planning processes of the
City Council.
4.2 Measuring Equality
Under the Disability Discrimination Act 2005, Local Authorities are
required to identify all of the functions and policies that have a
disability equality dimension and to carry out an impact assessment
against them. The City Council has reviewed all its functions and
policies against all six equalities dimensions, including disability, and
has prioritised its approach accordingly.
The City Council has also developed a thorough Equality Impact
Needs Assessments (EINA) methodology to address the need for
impact assessments. The EINA examines how a policy, procedure or
service may have an unequal impact on different groups of people. It
will enable service managers to improve proposed or existing
provision. 
All Service areas will go through the process of initial screening,
which will be a required part of the Service Planning process. Cabinet
report checklist will require specific reference to Equality Impact
Needs Assessments. All new strategies, policies, functions, service
developments will be required to have full impact assessment at an
early stage.
The City Council has reviewed and collated its list of primary functions
and policies that have relevance to disability equality as required by the
legislation. EINAs will be conducted for all items on the list. Wherever
possible, the EINA will be included as part of other scheduled reviews.
An EINA toolkit has also been developed to assist service areas in
conducting impact assessment. Supporting advice and guidance will be
provided by the City Council’s Equality and Diversity Division.
13

4.3 Equality Performance
There is little point in mainstreaming equality responsibilities, in
planning for equality, and in measuring the equalities impact of what
we do, if no real improvements result. Each Directorate is therefore
required to show:
•  Evidence of measurable improvements in access for all under-
represented groups;
•  Implementation of the requirements of equality related legislation;
•  Evidence of measurable improvements in respect of widening the
profile of service users having regard to need and relative to the
local population;
•  Evidence of measurable improvements in respect of providing
services that meet the needs of all groups in the communities the
directorate serves.
Where gaps and adverse impact are found through the EINA process,
action plans will be developed and included in the annual service
plans and work programmes. Where there is insufficient data
available about the impact of the service on specific groups, the first
stage will be to establish monitoring and feedback mechanisms to
obtain it on a regular basis.
4.4 Scheme Responsibility
The Disability Equality Scheme requires high-level commitment and
support if it is going to bring the change that it promises.
Responsibility for the effective implementation of duties relating to
this scheme lies with the City Council, which is committed to the
fulfilment of its obligations in the performance of all its functions,
powers and duties.
Cabinet has responsibility for approving, implementing and
monitoring the Disability Equality Scheme on behalf of the City
Council. The Cabinet member for Equalities and Human Resources is
the lead member for the Scheme and has responsibility for updating
Cabinet and the relevant Scrutiny Committees on its implementation
and impact. The Head of Equality and Diversity is responsible
for the delivery and co-ordination of the scheme within the City
Council.
Though Scheme responsibility is as described, responsibility for
equalities outcomes rests firmly with Cabinet members and the
Directorate Management Teams. The City Council recognises that the
Equality Schemes provide the framework for progressing the
equalities agenda, but that results will only be achieved through
mainstream service provision. This is the mainstreaming agenda. In
this context, equality and diversity service is the conscience of
the City Council as a whole: advising on impact; monitoring progress
against action plans; overseeing EINA implementation and responses.
14

4.5 The Annual Review
The City Council recognises that the Disability Equality Scheme has to
be a ‘living’ policy to be effective and therefore it will be monitored
regularly. The City Council will ensure that the Scheme is reviewed on
an annual basis from 2008.
The revised scheme will be published and made available in July on
the City Council’s website. Hard copies will be available in the libraries
and neighbourhood offices.
4.6 Review of the EINA
The City Council revised its Equality Impact and Needs Assessment in
June 2006. Details are available on the City Council’s website and
intranet facilities.
Impact Assessments have also been built into the following:
•  The newly revised Corporate Service Planning Guidance;
• The Risk Management Process;
•  Business Transformation arrangements;
•  The Corporate Consultation and Engagement Strategy;
•  The Communication Plan;
•  The Council Plan;
•  The Local Area Agreement.
The Initial Screening Proforma will further be reviewed, taking into
account the requirements relating to the new Duties for Gender and
Disability. All completed Initial Screening Proformas and Full
Assessment Reports will be published through the internet on an 
ongoing basis throughout the year.
In light of the new duties, a Project Team on EINA has been
established to ensure compliance with the new requirements, to
further enhance the toolkit in view of the City Council’s commitment
to mainstreaming the equalities agenda, and to continue to ensure
that:
•  All service areas have adequate monitoring systems, and where
they do not, what they will do to remedy the situation;
•  All service areas have a clear criteria they will use to measure
equality performance;
•  All service areas are encouraged to use different methods of
consultation;
•  All service areas evidence how adverse impact has been
addressed;
•  All service areas publish result of assessments, consultation and
monitoring.
15

In the revised EINA toolkit, all the City Council officers involved in the
process are requested to assess their functions, services and policies
by answering five questions:
1. Are disabled people being discriminated or harassed?
2. Are there alternatives to help disabled people to reach their
potential?
3. Do we provide good employment opportunities for disabled
people?
4. Have we put positive steps to eliminate barriers faced by disabled
people?
5. Are there alternatives that can encourage disabled people to
participate in public life?
The EINA will be managed by the Corporate EINA Task Group which
will meet regularly to assess the progress of all the EINAs. The Head
of Equality and Diversity will submit a progress report to the Cabinet
Member for Equalities and Human Resources and the Corporate
Management Team to ensure that: (1) service areas are carrying out
EINAs; and (2) as a result of EINA outcomes, the service areas are
making the necessary adjustments.
In April each year, the Equality and Diversity Division will produce a
summary of the Impact Assessments, consultation and monitoring
undertaken. Where monitoring has not been established, the Division
will summarise how the monitoring arrangements will be put in place.
This information will be made available through the internet and the
intranet.
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5. DISABILITY EQUALITY IMPLEMENTATION
5.1 The Action Plan
The Scheme has been developed in consultation with, and with the
involvement of, disabled people. This process resulted in the following
headline areas being identified as priorities in the three year action
plan (see Appendix 1).
•  Involvement of disabled people in designing services
Establishing robust mechanisms to enable disabled people in
influencing the design of services. Building the capacity and raising
the awareness of groups acting on behalf of disabled people.
•  Information
Ensuring that information presented by the City Council is
accessible to disabled people.
•  Social Care and Health Services
Ensuring that the City Council’s social care and health functions
monitor, understand, and act on their disability equalities
responsibilities; ensuring that City Council staff understand this
and are trained accordingly. Working with partner social care and
health service delivery organisations to assist them in meeting
their disability equality responsibilities.
•  Accessible Housing
Ensuring more accessible housing is available for disabled people
including improved adaptations of properties and provision of
housing related support to promote independent living.
•  Transportation
Encouraging investment in the City’s transportation system to
enable disabled people to travel safely and freely.
•  Education
Ensuring that disabled children and young people have fair
access to educational opportunities and services, so reaching their
full potential.
•  Employment
Ensuring a better representation for disabled people in the City
Council workforce. Enabling disabled people participate in
employment representative bodies.
•  Access to Environment and Service
Enabling better access to the environment and City Council
services by disabled people. Ensuring that Council functions such
as planning promote access for disabled people.
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•    Discrimination and Inclusion
Ensuring that the procedures for identifying discrimination and
promoting inclusion are robust and that City Council staff have the
necessary skills to implement the procedures effectively.
•  Involvement in Community Activities
Encouraging the active participation of disabled people in sport,
arts and other community based activities for recreation and
personal development.
5.2 Prioritised Functions and Policies
The Action Plan is further underpinned by the EINA process. The Race
Relations (Amendment) Act 2000 brought with it a requirement for
local authorities to set out their functions, policies and procedures
and screen them for relevance to the promotion of race equality. The
Equality Standard extended that screening to include gender and
disability. Legislation now requires the promotion of equality in six
strands: race; gender; disability; age; sexual orientation; and religion
and belief.
In practice, this means that every three years in all these equality
strands, each service area within Directorates identifies all of their
existing functions, policies, procedures, strategies, plans, and any
that are proposed or are to be reviewed (or are in the process of
change). Due to the disability and gender duties, we have now
reassessed the list previously published in May 2005.
Items on the list relevant to achieving equality are identified, principally
covering: (1) those functions or policies that affect the public; and (2)
those that are related to employment. The list has been approved by each
Directorate’s Senior/ Directorate Management Team/ Leadership Team.
Those items on the list are then prioritised from an equalities
perspective, against the different equality headings. A schedule of
Equality Impact Needs Assessments is then drawn up for listed items,
driven by the priorities allocated.
18

6. ACCESS, INFORMATION AND INVOLVEMENT
6.1 Access to Information and Services
Each service area of the City Council has specific arrangements for
public access to information and services. More formal methods
include:
•  Scrutiny committee reviews;
• Cabinet 
reports;
•  Core cities (sharing good practice and trends);
•  Reports through the Best Value Performance Plan;
•  Each service area being required to publish a schedule of every
impact assessment and monitoring exercise.
The City’s Consultation and Engagement Strategy provides a strategic
framework to underpin consultation and engagement across the City
Council. It sets out the City Council’s corporate approach, outlining a
set of minimum principles and standards for consultation and
engagement. The principles are as follows.
•  Inclusion
We will try to give all citizens an opportunity to be heard in a
variety of ways, using imaginative approaches to give a broader
view than through working only with specific interest groups.
•  Respect
We will respect all consultees and protect their personal data. We
will value the opinions and feedback from users of our service on a
day-to-day basis. We will be ready to listen and provide feedback.
•  Honesty and Integrity
We will be clear why we are consulting and what everyone can
expect from the outcome (including what decisions are to be made
and how, and things we know we cannot change). We will ensure
that consultation is not subject to any inappropriate political
pressure or influence. When we make decisions, we will do so
taking into account the information and views we have gathered.
Some decisions may be difficult and unpopular. We will avoid
compromising voluntary and community sector independence.
•  Partnership
We will work in partnership with individuals and other
organisations, both in consulting on issues affecting them and in
conducting shared consultations where appropriate and cost
effective.
19

•  Empowerment
We will encourage citizens to be involved and provide support
where needed. During consultation, we will tell people being
consulted how to comment on, complain about or compliment the
way the consultation is carried out, by using the City Council’s
corporate procedure. 
In line with the mainstreaming agenda, each service and policy area
carries responsibility for ensuring equality of access in its own
functional area. The Equality and Diversity Division provides support
through advice and guidance to the rest of the organisation in this
regard. As described in Section 4, each directorate is required to
develop equality action plans, addressing the specific needs of
communities, and the common issues which cut across them
irrespective of age, race, disability, gender, religion and belief and
sexual orientation.
The localisation and devolution programme, under which considerable
resources have been allocated by the City Council to the development
of customer-facing teams within the ten Birmingham Constituencies,
is further evidence of the commitment to local engagement and
service access.
6.2 Reputation and Understanding
The City Council recognises, through its Communication Strategy,
that it is vital to understand the nature of the City Council’s
reputation with all groups of people across the City. Three principal
measures of this are used.
6.2.1 Annual Opinion Surveys
Annual opinion surveys measure how the City Council’s reputation is
judged by service users and citizens, as well as measuring citizens’
experience and perception of the services themselves.
In Birmingham, while around half (47%) of residents feel that the
City Council keeps them informed, one in twenty (5%) feel very
informed. However, people feel more informed in 2004 than they did
in 2002 and 2001 (40% and 39% respectively felt informed).
6.2.2 The People’s Panel
The 1000-strong People’s Panel comprises a representative sample of
Birmingham citizens and is consulted regularly in more depth on a
range of issues which are then measured for performance and
improvement.
20

6.2.3 The Employee Census
The City Council’s own employees are key stakeholders.
Communications plays a vital role in informing and involving each
member of our workforce. Employees should understand the City
Council’s priorities and policies and how their work contributes to
them, and effective communications with employees helps develop
their advocacy role in the community.
The 2004 employee census established that not only had perceptions
of Birmingham City Council improved since 2002, but Birmingham
City Council now compares favourably with other, similar
organisations.
6.3 Impact Consultation
The City Council strongly believes it is important to inform those
affected by a policy or function that it is to be reviewed, and to
consult about any proposed changes. Consultation is an essential part
of the EINA process. The impact of existing and proposed functions
and policies is subject to consultation, guided by the Corporate
Consultation and Engagement Strategy.
The City Council’s EINA process requires that:
•  Consideration is given as to how particular methods may be
appropriate for collating information on different groups;
•  Each service area examines, and reports that it did so, how it will
assess its service for impact on groups with multiple equality
issues;
•  Due attention is paid to human rights and data protection issues
when devising methods of data collation;
•  Where a new process for data collation is required, the short term
lack of data does not stop the service area from taking action
where an adverse impact is suspected based upon other evidence
(for instance, anecdotal).
6.4 Impact Monitoring
Knowing that a policy is working as it should is vital to achieving the
aims of the general duty. Keeping track of how a policy is working,
and whether it is having an adverse impact or harming disability
equality, depends largely on having an efficient, up-to-date, and
relevant monitoring system.
21

Monitoring allows the City Council to test on an ongoing basis:
•  how different people are affected by their policies;
•  whether people from all groups are equally satisfied with the way
they are treated;
•  whether services are provided effectively to all people;
•  whether services are suitable and designed to meet different
needs.
Each Directorate completed an assessment of its monitoring
arrangements, identifying gaps and producing action plans on how
and when these gaps will be filled, in November 2006.
All policy and service areas are required to monitor policies,
procedures and functions to ensure that there is no adverse impact;
and the resulting reports must be published.
The City Council employs a range of methods to gather its monitoring
data, including:
• Administrative 
database;
•  Citizens’ juries/ panels;
• Consultant’s 
Reports;
• Consultations;
•  Focus group Interviews;
•  Frontline staff feedback;
• Observations;
• Pilot 
Projects;
•  Review of complaints made;
•  Surveys (postal, face-to-face, telephone);
• User 
feedback.
6.5 Information Dissemination
The City Council’s overarching Communications Strategy seeks to
achieve eight main outcomes, as follows:
•  We will contribute to the achievement of the City Council’s social
and political goals;
•  We will improve the reputation of the City Council amongst its
audiences, stakeholders and partners;
•  We will ensure that communication with our citizens is focused and
targeted;
•  We will enhance communications as a means of responding to the
needs of our audiences, such as communities and interest groups
as identified by the consultation strategy and access to services
strategy;
•  We will improve the quality of information provided by Birmingham
City Council;
22

•  We will encourage greater participation in the democratic process;
•  We will assist the move towards e-government;
•  We will work to develop the Birmingham City Council brand, ensure
that all employees feel part of the brand and are able to recreate it
at the point of consumption.
A key component in the Operating Plan of the Marketing &
Communications Division is to show the diversity and richness of the
whole City by:
ensuring that all our communications eg media releases, Forward,
Inner Voice, Birmingham.gov (website), Inline (intranet) and other
forms of publicity reflect the diversity of the city; by working with HR
and equalities to improve information about opportunities in BCC,
including information relevant to minority groups…
23

7. EMPLOYMENT
7.1 Employment Monitoring
The City Council is required under the specific duties to include in the
scheme a statement of the authority’s arrangements for gathering
information in relation to employment.
The City Council will continue to monitor the composition of its
workforce. The aim of the City Council is to have a workforce that
reflects the diverse communities we serve at all levels in the council.
The collection and analysis of statistics on disabled people are
an established part of existing City Council practice in the areas of
recruitment, development and retention. This data is currently
available at a headline level. Employment monitoring systems are
being developed which will enable us to report on a wider range of
management
information.
7.2 Training
Diversity and equality is an integral part of training being delivered
across the city. We have gradually moved away from delivering
corporate training programmes on diversity and equality to
embedding the key principles in the programmes we offer. However,
there are on occasions where there is a specific service need for
diversity training. Examples of this include the Development Services’
“Diversity in the Environment” and the Library Services’ “Dealing with
different customers”.
Developments are taking place to enhance the City Council’s
management information systems, which would then enable the
reporting of a wider range of management information. One aspect of
this development is Managers and Employees Self Service portal
which will enable managers to directly input training needs arising
from professional development reviews (PDRs) and training requests.
The development work on PDRs to capture training needs and
requests is currently being tested.
24

APPENDIX 1: BIRMINGHAM CITY COUNCIL 
DISABILITY EQUALITY SCHEME - ACTION PLAN 2007-2010
KEY AREA 1: INVOLVEMENT OF DISABLED PEOPLE IN
DESIGNING SERVICES
Overall Objective: To actively involve disabled people and to empower them in
influencing The City Council services

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Establish a
March 2008 Particularly involve
Head of
Resources 
community and
Disabled People from Equality &
stakeholder
Black and Minority
Diversity 
consultation
Ethnic backgrounds
network.
and new arrivals and
new communities.
Both are currently
underrepresented. 
Commissioning
February
Community,
Service
Adults &
framework to be 2007 –
voluntary and
Director –
Communities
used for funding March 2010 independent
Policy,
to community,
organisations funded Strategy
voluntary and
in a transparent way
and
independent
to deliver the
Commiss-
organisations of
outcomes framework ioning
disabled people.
with “Our health, our
care, our say”.
Review and
Annually
Review targets
Head of
Resources 
report on
achieved by 31 March Equality
progress made
each year. Introduce
and
on the DES to
new targets.
Diversity
the Cabinet
Reports to be
Member for
presented by Cabinet
Equalities and
Member for Equalities
HR.
and HR to Cabinet by
1 May each year.     
Support the
Annually 
Celebrate the
Head of
Resources 
International
April 2007 
diversity of disabled
Equality
Day of Disabled
people and use the
and
People
event to publicise
Diversity
celebrated each
new initiatives:
year
• Sponsor activities
by different
organisations
• Establish a IDDP 
Planning Group
25

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Development of
March 2007 To provide more
Service
Adults &
Strategic Needs
timely and accurate Director –
Communities
Analysis for
information to
Policy,
disabled people
support the
Strategy
commissioning
and
process to meet the Commiss-
needs of disabled
ioning
people
Engagement of
March 2008 Further develop
Service
Adults &
users and carers
systematic
Director –
Communities
with disabilities in
engagement and
Policy,
the design,
development of
Strategy
delivery and
feedback
and
evaluation of
mechanisms for
Commiss-
adult care
users and carers
ioning
services within an
with disabilities,
outcome
within an outcomes
framework
framework.
This will include
supporting and
resourcing self-help
groups for people
with mental and
emotional distress.
Develop a
March 2008 Enhance the current Shakil
Resources
database of
directory of disabled Dixon 
disabled
organisations 
community groups
and service
providers for
idisabled people
To Pilot In-Control January
To promote rights,
Service
Adults &
for people with
2008
choices and
Director,
Communities
learning
independence for
Younger
disabilities to
people with learning Adults
ensure that they
disabilities
self direct their
own services and
support
Implement
March 2008 All Directorates are
Corporate
All
Corporate
to adhere to the
and
Directorates
Consultation and
Corporate
Directorate
Engagement
Consultation and
Teams
Strategy relevant
Engagement
responsi-
to disabled people
Strategy.
bility
within
Directorates
26

KEY AREA 2: INFORMATION
Overall Objective: To develop different channels to deliver the information for
disabled people

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
All Directorate
April 2007 – All directorates are
Corporate
All
communications March 2010 to implement the
and
Directorates
to be produced
Plain Language
Directorate
using accessible
Strategy.
Community
language. 
Teams
responsibility
Update and
April 2007
An annual report
Service
Adults &
maintain the
that monitors the
Director,
Communities
database of
numbers of people
Younger
people registered
on the register and
Adults
as deaf or deaf/
the take-up of
blind in
services to be
Birmingham
presented by 31st
within the
March 2008  
requirements of
the National
Assistance Act
1948.
Review existing
April 2007
Improve information Ken Jones/ Development 
service
for people with
Accessible
information for
learning difficulties.
Information
disabled people.
Unit.
Review
March 2007 Ensure that external Head of
Resources
procurement
providers of council
Procurement
activity to ensure
services meet their
it addresses
statutory
disability
requirements and
equality issues.
the council’s equality
Reports must be
policies and
produced
procedures in line
annually.   
with the Equality
Common Standard. 
BCC website is
January
To progress the
Alistair
Chief
to be compliant
2008
work.
Morton
Executive 
with wc3
Communica-
standard.
tions Adviser
27

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
To develop a one April 2007 - To ensure any
All Service All
stop approach to March 2010 existing one-stop
Managers   Directorates
make sure
shop arrangements
advice and
are accessible to
information is
disabled people, for
accessible from
example personal
one point of
induction loop
contact to meet
facilities available
the various
and to promote
needs of
sympathetic
disabled people.  
hearing.  
Annual
Annually
Any adverse impact All Service All
monitoring of
information
Managers
Directorates
impacts as
identified by EINAs
/ Equality
identified in
within each
& Diversity
Disability
directorate will
Managers
Equality Impact
inform where
Needs
improvements are
Assessments
needed. Monitoring
(EINAs).
reports to be
produced by 31
March each year.
Develop services March 2010 Produce regular
Accessible
Development 
that recognise
statistics on use of,
Information
British Sign
and improvements
Unit
Language (BSL)
to, Sign Language
as a language in
Interpreting
line with the
services in
European
Birmingham.
Charter for
Regional or
Regular monitoring
Head of
Minority
of all of the
Manage-
Languages.
communication
ment
systems employed
Develop-
by The City Council
ment Unit &
which are utilised
Accessible
by deaf people e.g.
Information
Text-direct.
Unit
Monitor
Annually
Reports to be
Directorate Resources 
information
presented by 1st
Lead
being recorded
April each year. 
Officers
for disabled
citizens in the
Comments,
Compliments
and Complaints
Procedure
(3C’s).  
28

KEY AREA 3: ADULT AND COMMUNITIES
Overall Objective : To develop Adult and Community Services around disabled
people in line with the Government White Paper “Our Health, Our Care, Our Say”

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
To resource
June 2007
To provide more
Service
Adults &
map/gap analysis
detailed
Director -
Communities
of universal, care
information to
Policy,
and well-being
support the
Strategy
services for
commissioning
and
disabled
process for
Commissio-
people
universal, care and ning
well-being services
To assist more
April 2008
Choice for disabled Service
Adults &
people to develop
people will
Director –
Communities
personalised
be improved by
Policy,
services with a
increasing the use
Strategy
higher take up of
of direct payments and
direct payments
supported by
Commissio-
and explore
specialist training
ning
opportunities for
and advisory
individualised
services
budgets. 
To finalise family
June 2007
To achieve Cabinet Service
Adults &
of commissioning
approval for
Director –
Communities
strategies and set
commissioning
Policy,
up implementation
strategies for
Strategy
plans for services
disabled people
and
for disabled
and commence
Commissio-
people.  Strategies
implementation
ning
to cover universal,
plans
care and well-
being services
Development of
March 2007 Commissioning
Service
Adults &
Joint
Boards and
Director –
Communities
Commissioning
reference groups
Policy,
Structures to
established to
Strategy
progress
cover all user
and
developments
groups.  Ensuring
Commissio-
outlined in the
that they relate to
ning
White Paper for
the 7 key
disabled people
outcomes.
Commission
March 2007 Independent
Service
Adults &
Independent
Mental Capacity
Director –
Communities
Mental Capacity
Advocates.
Policy,
Act Advocates
Appoint advocates
Strategy
and ensure legal
and
and good practice
Commissio-
compliant
ning
29

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Commission
April 2007 Commission training
Service
Adults &
Independent
for all staff on the
Director -
Communities
Mental Capacity
Mental Capacity Act
Policy,
Act Advocates
Strategy and
Commissio-
ning
Appropriate
March
For people with
Service
Adults &
specialist
2010
multiple disabilities, a Director -
Communities
assessment 
joint assessment will
Policy,
and care
be made to provide a
Strategy and
management will
holistic service.
Commissio-
be commissioned
ning
for those with
complex or
specialist sensory
impairments.
Develop a
April
Purchase and provide
Service
Adults &
strategy for
2007–
specialist equipment
Director –
Communities
significant
March
for people with
Older
investment in
2008
sensory impairments
Peoples
Assistive
to promote
Services 
Technology
independence and
(alarms and
well-being.
energy cut off
systems) for
disabled
people  
Adults &
April 2008 User-led services will
Service
Adults &
Communities will
be developed,
Director -
Communities
work with all
specifically exploring
Policy,
Directorates of
the use of the
Strategy and
the City Council to
Clubhouse model.
Commissio-
ensure that their
ning
services address
the social
inclusion of people
with mental
health problems. 
Home Support.
April
Strategy on independent Service
Adults &
In-house care
2007–
sector domiciliary
Director -
Communities
service will be
March
providers will be revised Policy,
concentrated on 2010
to focus on longer-term
Strategy and
the re-ablement
maintenance support of
Commissio-
programme to
specialist support.
ning
prevent the
need for long-
A review of home
term domiciliary
support services
support  
including specialist home
care support will identify
future provision
requirements
30

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
To revise Section June 2007 Set out service
Service
Adults &
31 Partnership
specifications for
Director,
Communities
Agreement
assessment.  Care
Younger
which will be
management services
Adults
developed with
and professional social
Birmingham and
work services with
Solihull Mental
improved governance
Health NHS
arrangements.
Trust
Support for
April 2008 Improvement in the
Service
Adults &
Carers:
health and well-being of
Director
Communities
Implement the
carers will be achieved
Policy,
approved Carer’s
by improved access to
Strategy &
strategy, which
health promotion and
Commissio
includes
well-being initiatives,
ning
priorities
recognising the needs of
relating to the
carers who also have
needs of
disabilities.
disabled people
Development of a range
of local support services
for black and minority
ethnic communities
which give practical and
emotional support –
particularly for BME
communities with high
levels of disabilities.
Improved availability of a
range of advice,
information and activities
to support carers across
all user groups through a
one stop city based carer
centre.
Implement Child December Increase in the number
Susanna 
Children,
and Adolescent
2007
of referrals to Heart of
McCorry-
Young
Mental Health
Birmingham CAMHS from Rice
People and
Services
BME communities,
Families
(CAMHS)
especially by
March
unaccompanied minors. 
2008
Establish a baseline for
the total number of
young people receiving a
service from CAMHS. 
31

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
To ensure that the March 2010 Sensory and
Service
Adults &
needs of blind and
physical awareness
Director -
Communities
partially sighted
training will be
Policy,
people on
commissioned to
Strategy &
registers are
promote choice and Commissio-
taken into account
social inclusion in
ning
in service
line with the social
delivery.  
model of disability. 
Implement the
March 2010 Establish a
Service
Adults &
Transitions
Transitions Service
Director
Communities
pathways for all
for all Young 
Policy,
/ Children,
young disabled 
Disabled People in
Strategy & Young People
people based
Partnership with
Commissio & Families
on a Person
Children, Young
-ning/
Centred approach
People and Families. Service
Director
Younger
Adults,
and Hilary
McCarrick,
Commissio
-ning
Manager –
Disabled
Children
Re-provision of
March 2010 Traditional services
Service
Adults &
day services and
will be reconfigured
Director -
Communities
access to
on a citywide basis
Policy,
mainstream
to use existing
Strategy &
community
resources more
Commissio-
facilities for
effectively e.g.
ning
people with
extending and
physical
diversifying the use
disabilities, people
of buildings.  
with mental
health problems
and people with
learning
disabilities aged
18 to 64
Work in partnership Ongoing
Create models of
Service
with Centre for
provision that
Director -
Inclusive Living to
enable disabled
Policy,
develop an
people to live
Strategy &
outreach worker
independently and
Commissio-
for disabled people
participate in the
ning
living in residential
community.
and day care
settings
32

KEY AREA 4: ACCESSIBLE HOUSING
Overall Objective: To ensure more accessible housing is available for disabled
people including improved aids and adaptations of properties and provision of
housing related support to promote independent living.

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Monitor the
Annually
Housing related
The
Housing
Strategic
supported services
Commissio-
Direction of the
in the City are
ning Body
Supporting
responsive to the
People
needs of disabled
Programme to
people
ensure that the
housing related
support needs of
disabled people 
are addressed.
 
Ensure that
Annually
The delivery of user Kalvinder
Housing
disabled
led services
Kohli
people are
Service
consulted on the
Improve-
design and
ment
delivery of
Manager
housing related
support services
within
Birmingham. 
Introduce
April 2008
Barriers to
Kalvinder
Housing
Equality
accessing housing
Kohli
Monitoring as
related support
Service
part of the
services can be
Improve-
Steady State
identified and
ment
Contract
addressed.
Manager
Compliance
requirements for
Supporting
People funded
services. 
Ensure that
April 2008
Demonstrate the
Pat Merrick  Housing
outcome
positive impact of
Lead
monitoring
the Supporting
Officer
frameworks are
People Programme
Supporting
adopted by the
on the lives of
People
Supporting
disabled people.
People
   
Programme. 
33

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Ensure that we
Strategic
Influencing Housing Jan
Housing 
strategically
paper to be
Association
Anderson
address the
produced by
developments.
Interim
housing needs of June 2007
Head of
disabled 
Continue to ensure
Develop-
people with
all new social
ment
our community
housing is built to
partners in
Lifetimes Home
Jan
particular
Standard, which is
Anderson
address the
part of the Housing
Interim
needs of the
Corporation’s Scheme
Head of
growing elderly
Development
Develop-
population that
Standards.
ment
increasingly
requires
Ensure that
Kalvinder
accessible
vulnerable
Kohli
homes.
households and
Service
those with specific
Improve-
needs have
ment
appropriate support Manager 
throughout
Supporting People
Programme. 
Review/up date
October 2007 Maintain Disabled
Parveen
Housing
the Disabled
Persons Housing
Akhtar /
Persons Housing
Register developed
Carol
Register.    
in July 2006.  
Smith
Review of our
October 2007 Ensure that
Parveen
Housing
allocation policy
allocations meet the Akhtar /
to address
requirements of
Carol
equality of
disabled people.
Smith
access to
appropriate
housing for
disabled people.
Develop a Health April 2007
Ensure staff training Neil Tryner Housing
& Housing
programme on
Head of
Strategy that
chronic illnesses
Housing
incorporates
and disabilities
Needs
chronic illness
information – how
and disability so
these impact on
access to
housing/
information and
accommodation
allocations meets
needs.
DDA
requirements/
equality and
diversity agenda.
34

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Employment and
specialist caseworkers
in e.g. hospital settings
linked to local area
teams to support
vulnerable
communities/groups
(LGB, Asylum Seekers/
Refugees, Older People,
BME Community, who
may be inpatients or
have a chronic illness/
disability).
Chair a bi-monthly
Health and Housing
Forum for professionals
for statutory and
voluntary health and
housing agencies to
share information,
develop services for
vulnerable groups
linked to DDA/ related
housing strategies. 
Advice and information
supporting carers
needs e.g. pilot work
via carers, new drop-in
centre, city centre
location.
Increase the
April 2008 Four Special Care
Service
Adults &
number of
Centres and two Extra
Director –
Communities
disaled people's
Care Sheltered
Policy,
need of
Housing schemes to be Strategy
support to live
operational for older
and
independently in
people services.
Commissio-
their own homes
A wider choice of
ning
in the
accommodation
community
provision including
those people with
complex care needs.
There will be a range
of tenures including
opportunities for
shared ownership/LAA
achievement of LPSA
for LD and PD targets.
35

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Implement Older April 2008
Four Special Care
Assistant
Housing
People’s
Centres and Extra
Director,
Commissioning
Care Sheltered
Adult
Strategy, and
Housing Schemes to Strategy
commissioning
be operational.
strategies for
other adult
Personalised care
groups
plan for most
vulnerable people
with special needs to
reduce emergency
bed by 5%.
Analyse housing April 2008  
Develop an
John
Housing 
allocations data
Accessible Housing
Chanin
to identify any
database
Policy
disparities
established,
Review 
concerning
marketed and
Manager
access to
promoted.
accommodation
by different
March 2009
A report detailing
groups.
how comprehensive
information on
housing options in
Birmingham will be
delivered and
promoted to
disabled people.
36

KEY AREA 5: TRANSPORTATION
Overall Objective: To invest in the City’s transportation system to enable disabled
people to travel safely and freely to wherever they want to go.

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Extend transport April 2007
Seeking Children,
Laura
Children,
provision
Young People &
Flemming
Young
Encourage and
Families funding for a
People &
support
one year for a
Families
organisations in
Technical Officer to
the development
develop/ deliver
of safe and
programme of road
independent
safety work for
travel training
disabled young
schemes.
people.
Continue to
April 2008
More cases of misuse
Parking
Development 
address the
are to be investigated Enforcement
abuse of Blue
and badges
Manager,
Badge/ Disabled
withdrawn and
Highways -
parking spaces
offenders prosecuted.  Sue
by non-disabled
Cartwright
people within
the City Centre.
Development of
May 2008
Conditional funding
Centro/
Development 
Birmingham City
approval being sought Varinder
Centre extension
by Centro from the
Raulia/
of Metro.
Department for
Graham
Agreed in
Transport – scheme
Channon 
Cabinet report
will incorporate
13 November
improved accessibility
2006.
provisions for
pedestrians including
disabled people.
Implement the
March 2008 Submit funded bid for Chris
Development 
Accessibility
East Birmingham
Haynes
Strategy.
North Solihull Mobility
and Access Project to
improve accessibility
to public transport for
residents in area,
particularly those
without access to a
car. Extensive
consultation with
marginalised groups. 
37

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Selly Oak New
April
Start the project, which Chris
Development 
Road
2007-
will reduce accidents
Haynes
March
and provide improved
2010
facilities for disabled
people.  
Promote public
April 2008 Greater use of public
Varinder
Development 
transport,
transport will assist in
Raulia
reduce road
improving accessibility
accidents and
and reduce accident
improve facilities
rates, in particular for
for those with
vulnerable users
disabilities - Bus
including disabled
showcase
people.  
Walsall Road.  
Northfield Relief
May 2008
The scheme will provide Varinder
Development 
Road
improved facilities for
Raulia
all pedestrians
including disabled
people to address
accessibility which
would also aid in
reducing accidents.   
Red Routes
May 2008
Develop valid business
Varinder
Development 
case for further red
Raulia
routes, which will
reduce accidents and
provide improved
facilities for disabled
people.  
Congestion Task May 2008
Completion of
Alan Lloyd Development 
Force Proposals
Congestion Taskforce
and
schemes which involve
implementation.
disabled people at the
design stage to meet
their requirements.   
To review
May 2008
Corporate Review of
Subject to Adults &
transport
transport to provide a
Corporate
Communities
arrangements to
flexible, accessible and
Review
enable access to
reliable transport
mainstream
system for people
community
accessing services.
activities by
Increase the number of
providing
people with a Learning
Lesley
accessible public
Disability who are
Heale
transport
Travel Trained by 10%.
38

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Improve
April 2007
Working in
Head of
Development
services
partnership to
Trading
provided by
investigate the
Standards
Hackney
possibility of
and
Carriage and
establishing a “Taxi
Licensing
Private Hire
Card”/Voucher
trade.
System for Disabled
People.
39

KEY AREA 6: EDUCATION
Overall Objective: To enable disabled children and young people to have fair
access to educational opportunities and reach their full potential.  

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Services signed
April 2007 - 
All services within
Richard
Children
up to the “Hear
March 2010
Targeted Services to Williams
Young
by Right”
have monitored
via Alison
People and
standards will
against self-
Keepax
Families
have achieved
evaluation and then
Established or
an action plan
Advanced
stating whether
Status.
Emergent,
Established or
Advanced. 
To track pupil
Baseline to be Establish baseline of Richard
Children
progress,
established
number of schools
Williams
Young
teaching and
by December making use of the
via Angela People and
learning,
2006 and
Continuum for these Hess
Families
evaluating
then progress purposes.
interventions
annually
using the
reviewed.
Special
Educational
Needs (SEN)
Audit.
Support schools
Annually
Increase the
Richard
Children
in using Person
number of young
Williams
Young
Centred
people involved in
via Chris
People and
Planning (PCP)
PCP as part of a
Atkinson /
Families
to ensure Young
transitional review.
Angela
People are
Hess
involved in
Baseline 2005/06
decisions about
16 Young People 
their education
2006/07 Baseline +
and options
5% 
post-16
Annually
Increase the number Richard
Children
of secondary schools Williams
Young
using PCP to support via Chris
People and
transition.
Atkinson /
Families
Baseline 2005/06 –
Angela
9 Secondary Schools Hess
2006/07 Baseline +
5% 2006/07 so
far…school based
staff 
40

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
To establish use of April 2007
All teams
Richard
Children
Early Support
supporting children
Williams
Young
materials across
0-3yrs using Early
via
People and
the Specialist
Support materials.
Malcolm
Families
Support Service
Garner
so families and
children with more April 2008
Review of these
Richard
Children
than one disability
families and
Williams
Young
will receive more
feedback from
via
People and
integrated support  
parents, Key Worker Malcolm
Families
in place.
Garner
April 2008
Children and
Richard
Children
families receiving
Williams
Young
co-ordinated multi-
via
People and
agency support with Malcolm
Families
no duplication or
Garner
unhelpful overlap 
Use the SEN Audit Baseline
Establish baseline of Richard
Children
Language and
established
number of pupils
Williams
Young
Literacy
by March
where pupil
via Angela People and
Continuum as part 2007,
progress can be
Hess
Families
of the Pupil &
progress
tracked using the
School Support
reviewed
Continuum.
(PSS) Assessment annually.
Establish a baseline
Strategy and as
of number of pupils
tool for tracking
making at least 
progress of pupils
1P Level or 1/3
with cognition and
National Curriculum
learning
Level progress in at
difficulties through
least 1 thread. 
its inclusion on
the PSS database.
Enable Special
Baseline
To establish
Richard
Children
Educational Needs
established
baseline of number
Williams
Young
Co-ordinators
by March
of children assessed via Angela People and
(SENCOs) or other
2007,
by PSS teachers
Hess
Families
named personnel in progress
2006-07.
individual schools to reviewed
To establish
gain sufficient
annually.
baseline of schools
knowledge and
able to carry out
skills to assess the
majority of
needs of pupils who
assessments.
are on the Code of
Practice for
Cognition and
Learning Difficulties.      
41

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Focus support on
Progress
Reduce % Level 1 or
Richard
Children
helping schools
reviewed
under in KS1 SATs
Williams
Young
improve the
annually 
writing.
via Angela People and
teaching of writing
Hess
Families
for children with
Obtain baseline %    
learning difficulties
in Key Stage
(KS1) in identified
schools.    
Support schools
Baseline
At least 60% of targeted Richard
Children
in ensuring
established pupils who are “Looked
Williams
Young
Looked After
Spring
After Children” making
via Angela People and
Children with
2007,
at least 1P Level
Hess
Families
learning
progress
progress or 1/3 National
difficulties (Bands reviewed
Curriculum Level
2/3 on SEN Audit) annually
progress in at least one
make progress in
thread on the
learning.
Continuum.
Parents are
From April
Special Educational
Richard
Children
actively involved 2006 and
Needs Assessment
Williams
Young
in assessment & ongoing
Service (SENAS) to
via David
People and
review
issue all explanatory
Bridgman
Families
procedures
information to parents
– in form of folder
which can be updated
as the procedure takes
its course.
Statements are
From June
Ensure routine advices Richard
Children
issued on time
2006
(school, doctor,
Williams
Young
and ensure that
reviewed
Educational
via David
People and
needs and
regularly.
Psychologist (EP),
Bridgman
Families
provision are
Support Services) are
clearly stated
written in a format
that enables SENAS to
write statements which
are clear and specific
From April
Ensure proposed
Richard
Children
2006 and
statements are issued
Williams
Young
reviewed
within 18 weeks
via David
People and
regularly.
Bridgman
Families
From April
Ensure final
Richard
Children
2006 and
statements are issued
Williams
Young
reviewed
within 26 weeks
via David
People and
regularly.
Bridgman
Families
From
Monitor quality of
Richard
Children
September
statements to ensure
Williams
Young
2006 and
that they are clear and via David
People and
reviewed
specific and that clear
Bridgman
Families
regularly.
educational objectives
are recorded.
42

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
The placement
Ongoing
Where required,
Richard
Children
of statemented
children will be
Williams via Young
children is
placed in the
Alex
People and
appropriate to
nearest (local)
Mroczkowski Families
identified SEN
special school or
and there are
resourced provision,
sufficient places
taking account of
available.  
parental preference
- provided the
placement is
appropriate to the
child’s SEN and is
compatible with the
efficient education
of the other children
and the efficient use
of resources.   
To ensure that
From Sept
Liaison with
Richard
Children
children and
2006 and
SENCOs &
Williams
Young
young people
reviewed
Educational
via David
People and
with learning
regularly.
Psychologists to
Bridgman
Families
difficulties
ensure that the
and/or
child’s views are
disabilities make
sought
a positive
independently and
contribution
then reported to
SENAS (SEN
Assessment
Service).
Disabled children From April
Ensure a transition
Richard
Children
and young 
2006 and
plan is always
Williams via Young
people
reviewed
included in the
Alex
People and
are helped to
regularly.
annual reviews of
Mroczkowski Families
achieve
year 9+ children with
economic well-
disabilities so that a
being
report can be run to
identify schools who
fail to do this so that
action can be taken
From April
Ensure Connexions
Richard
Children
2006 and
are present at
Williams via Young
reviewed
reviews from year 9+ Alex
People and
regularly.
so that cases where
Mroczkowski Families
this service is not
present can be
identified and
appropriate liaison
made with
Connexions Service
43

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Library Services at
Reach
All housebound
Geoff Mills Children
Home provide
magazine
users (Reach
Young
opportunities for
and Reach
magazine) approx
People and
people to access
On Tape
2000
Families
services in their
produced 3 All users of 'talking
homes. 
times a
books' and/or CD's
Production of
year  
(Reach On Tape)
'REACH' and
approx 600.
‘REACH On Tape'.   
Monitor targets for
April 2007 -  Targets for inclusion Chris
Children,
inclusion of children March 2010 met.
Atkinson, 
Young
with Special
People and
Education Needs.  
Families
Ensure
April 2007 - Staff with child
Carol
Children,
safeguarding
March 2010 protection
Douch, 
Young
arrangements take
responsibilities to
People and
account of specific
receive appropriate
Families
needs of Disabled
training on disability
Children and Young
and communication
People.  
issues.   
Produce an
April 2007 - All partners are
Cheryl
Children,
integrated strategy March 2010 working to shared
Hopkins
Young
for improving the
vision, aims and
Service
People and
lives of Disabled
objectives in
Director,
Families
Children & Young
achieving Every
Commissio
People (C&YP)
Child Matters
-ning, Co-
outcome for
ordination
Disabled C&YP 
and
Transition
Establish a
April 2007 - April 2007 - March
Cheryl
Children,
Disabled C&YP
March 2010 2010
Hopkins
Young
Partnership Board. 
People and
Families  
Appoint
April 2007
Development and
Cheryl
Children,
Commissioning and
implementation of
Hopkins
Young
Development
city-wide Disabled
People and
Project Manager for
C&YP
Families
Integrated Multi-
Commissioning
agency Disabled
Strategy
Children’s Service
Disabled C&YP
April 2007
Children and
Cheryl
Children,
Partnership Board
families 
Hopkins
Young
to set up Task and
Service design is
People and
Finish groups and
influenced by
Families
ensure each group
Disabled C&YP and
produces and
their families.
implements action
plans around the
following areas:
44

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Disabled C&YP
April 2007 Children and families 
Cheryl
Children,
Partnership Board
Service design is
Hopkins
Young
to set up Task and
influenced by Disabled
People and
Finish groups and
C&YP and their
Families
ensure each
families.
group produces
and implements
action plans
around the
following areas:
1. Commissioning
Children and Young
Cheryl
and Development
People’s Plan Every
Hopkins
2. Information and
Child Matters
Access
outcomes are
3. Assessment 
achieved within
4. Performance
appropriate
and Quality
timescales:
5. Participation and
Advocacy
6. Workforce and 
Training
• Establishment of
Cheryl
well lead, skilled,
Hopkins
flexible and well-
trained workforce.   
• Improve information
and advice
• Timely and
appropriate
assessment which
identifies needs.      
Create Joint Head of April 2007 Service delivery is
Cheryl
Children,
Service to establish
onwards
seamless, co-
Hopkins
Young
and deliver co-
ordinated and
People and
ordinated, targeted
consistent with aims
Families
and specialist
of strategy
support services to
Disabled C&YP and
their families.  
Establish a
July 2008
Service planning and
Cheryl
Children,
comprehensive,
delivery is matched to Hopkins
Young
inter-agency
needs
People and
database of
Families
service users to
inform planning
and investment in
services to
Disabled C&YP.
45

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Develop Child
April 2007 - Disabled C&YP with
Cheryl
Children,
and Adolescent
March 2010 mental health needs
Hopkins
Young
Mental Health
have their needs met
People and
Service for
Families
disabled
children and
young people.   
Appoint disabled
April 2007
Improved outcomes for Cheryl
Children,
children and
C&YP by:
Hopkins
Young
young people’s
• Influencing, planning,
People and
champion in
design and delivery of
Families
accordance with
services
recommendations
• Facilitating the
of “Ask Us”
engagement and
consultation
participation of C&YP
2006, subject to
• Acting as
partners
representative the
contributing to
interests of Disabled
funding
C&YP
• Contributing
knowledge and
expertise
Expand capacity
April 2007
Disabled children
Alison
Children,
of Disabled
receive assessment of
Waller,
Young
Children’s Service
need which pay
Service
People and
to enable all
particular regard to
Director,
Families
idisabled children
the impact of their
Specialist
and young people
impairment, and
Services
and their families
identify support
who require an
required to promote
assessment of
their inclusion in the
need, to have
community.
that assessment
carried out by
specialist staff. 
Develop
December
10 disabled children
Alison
Children,
community
2007
who are in or awaiting
Waller,
Young
provision of
residential care are
Service
People and
children
able to benefit from
Director,
Families
currently using
foster care placements Specialist
residential,
Services.  
respite or longer
term care.  
Implementation
April 2007 - Parents views are heard Nasreen
Children,
of SEN Parent
March 2010 and understood, and
Hussain,
Young
Partnership
inform and influence
Head of
People and
Service
the development of
Parent
Families
Operational
local SEN policy and
Partnership
Plan:
practice.
46

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Work with parents
Parents receive
Nasreen
Children,
accurate, neutral
Hussain
Young
information on their
Head of
People and
rights, roles and
Parent
Families
responsibilities within
Partnership
the SEN process and
options available, and
receive practical
support.
Information and
Parents have access to Nasreen
Children,
publicity
advice, information,
Hussain
Young
support and training,
Head of
People and
including
Parent
Families
communication with
Partnership
teachers, governors
and SEN staff
Training advice and
Schools, LEA officers
Nasreen
Children,
support
and other agencies
Hussain
Young
are helped to develop
Head of
People and
positive relationships
Parent
Families
with parents; links are Partnership
established and
maintained with
voluntary
organisations.
Networking and
Schools, LEA officers
Nasreen
Children,
collaboration
and other agencies are Hussain
Young
helped to develop
Head of
People and
positive relationships
Parent
Families
with parents; links are Partnership
established and
maintained with
voluntary
organisations.
Informing local
Parents views are heard Nasreen
Children,
policy and practice
and understood, and
Hussain
Young
inform and influence
Head of
People and
the development of
Parent
Families 
local SEN policy and
Partnership
practice.  
Support the local
Annually
Increased
Head of
Children,
based curriculum
participation on the
Service
Young
around the aspects
Social and Emotional
People and
of inclusion and
Aspects of Learning
Families 
equalities for all
(SEAL) project in
students
schools
47

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Develop and
Annually
All students and staff
Head of
Children,
support the
receive due awareness
Service
Young
Disability
of any difficulties and
People and
Diversity Group
are given the correct
Families 
to ensure they
support
are included not
excluded in the
classroom
Develop
Annually
Innovative curriculum
Head of
Children,
curriculum
better matched to
Service
Young
pathways and
students needs and
People and
integrate
requirements
Families 
academic and
vocational
routes to be
inclusive for all
pupils
Development
Annually
Clear policy on all
Head of
Children,
and
diversity that is
Service
Young
implementation
understood by
People and
of a Service
employees and that
Families 
Valuing Diversity
diversity contributes to
Policy.
service efficiency.
Provide an
Annually
• Children with
Head of
Children,
inclusive
learning difficulties
Service
Young
education
and/or disabilities are
People and
service for all
identified and their
Families 
learners through
needs are assessed
partnership and
at a sufficiently early
collaboration
stage for their needs
with relevant
to be met and
agencies
funding policies
encourage early
intervention
• Inclusion
• Parents contribute to
Strategy
the assessment of
• Access for
needs and are
Disabled
supported in doing so
• Family
• The impact of policies
Learning
and provision on the
• Study Support
achievement of
children and young
people with learning
difficulties and/or
disabilities is
monitored and
evaluated
48

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
• Children and young
people with learning
difficulties and/or
disabilities will
normally have their
needs met in
mainstream settings,
and these settings
make reasonable
adjustments to
provide access for
children with
disabilities
• Children and young
people with learning
difficulties and/or
disabilities are
supported in
participating in a
range of appropriate
cultural and leisure
activities
Annual monitoring
Annually in Relative performance
Chris
Children,
of the educational
November of disabled children
Palmer
Young
achievements of
each year
and young people
Senior
People and
children and young
assessed.  Information Policy
Families
disabled  people 
used to review and
Officer
at the end of each
develop strategies to
 Key Stage.
raise educational
achievements.
Implement
June 2007  Service Plan 2007/
Peter
Children,
amendment to
08 which reflects key Farrell
Young
annual service
concerns from broad
Head of
People and
planning process in
feedback exercise
Infrast-
Families
the light of feedback
conducted Autumn
ructure
obtained from
2006/ Spring 2007.
Transform-
public/b:cen.
ation
Develop coherent / Spring
Improved
Mike
Children,
comprehensive
2007
communication with
Donovan
Young
communications
stakeholders over
Principal
People and
plan 
policy development
Adviser –
Families
retransforming
retransforming
Continuing
education agenda
education. 
professional
for informing about
develop-
new initiatives i.e.
ment +
Building Schools
Innovation
for the Future,
Academies and
Primary Capital
Programmes.
49

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Enable disabled
April 2007
Work experience
Nigel
Children,
people to access onwards
placements offered
Sandland
Young
work experience
with planned
General
People and
opportunities
support and training Manager
Families
within Direct
which leads to
Direct
Services.
employment
Services
opportunities.
50

KEY AREA 7: EMPLOYMENT
Overall Objective: To improve the representation of disabled people in The City
Council and to further develop employment and career opportunities.

Action
Timescale
Target/Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
To increase the
April 2007 –
Increasing the
Director of Resources
representation
March 2010
percentage of
Human
of disabled
disabled people in
Resource
people in the
the top 5% of
workforce.
earners (BV 11c).
Target for 2007/08
is 5%. (2005/06 is
2.4%) 
Percentage of
Director of
disabled employees
Human
(BVPI 16a) – target
Resources
for 2007/08 is 2.3%
(2005/06 is 1.9%)
To develop a
Director of
structured work
Human
experience
Resources
programme for
disabled people.
To revise and
Director of
rebrand
Human
Supernumerary
Resource
Employment
Scheme for Disabled
People. Launch new
scheme.
Host a recruitment
Director of
event specifically
Human
targeting disabled
Resources
people. Highlighting
the opportunities
available at The City
Council and the
support that people
can access to enable
them to take up
paid employment.
To develop a
April 2007 –
Corporate 
Director of Resources
Corporate
March 2010
Disability
Human
Disability
Advisory
Resources
Advisory
Network
Network.
 launched. 
51

Action
Timescale
Target/Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Increase the
April 2007 – Development of
Strategic
Development 
representation of March 2010 supported work
Director
disabled people
experience
Develop-
in the council’s
placements and
ment
workforce and
employment
enable disabled
opportunities in line
people to access
with the
work experience
Government’s
opportunities
Welfare to Work
with Birmingham
programme.
City council.
(Workstep, New
Deal for Disabled
People, Employment
Preparation and
Valuing People).
Build upon Schools April 2007 – Working with
Planning &
Development 
Partnership and
March 2010 community groups
Regenera-
Transed Course
on access to work.
tion
50+ students per
year. 
Social Model
April 2007 – To build on the
Director of
Resources
Equality
March 2010 success of Social
Human
Awareness
Model Workshops
Resources
Initiatives.
for Managers. Look
at alternative ways
of raising awareness
with all employees
e.g. E-learning
packages.    
Personal
April 2007 – To deliver Personal
Director of
Resources
Development
March 2010 Development
Human
Course for
Courses for disabled Resources 
disabled
employees on an
employees.
annual basis.  
Improve the
April 2007 – Continue to deliver
Strategic
Development 
opportunities for
March 2010 Workstep and New
Director
disabled people
Deal for Disabled
Development
accessing job
People programmes
vacancies and
and progression
training
route for disabled
opportunities
people.
with major
employers in the
region.
52

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Maximise the
April 2007 –
Establish a
Development Development 
capture of jobs
March 2010
network of
Directorate
in the economy
Employment
and focus them
Development
on key target
Officers linked to
groups under
major
represented in
developments. 
labour market,
including 
disabled people.
Establish a
April 2007 –
Embed the
Development Development
partnership
March 2010
framework for
Directorate
between
Learning Disability
Disability
Services and
Employment
respond to the
Services and
Social Care and
Adults &
Health
Communities
Modernisation
Services.
agenda.
Improve the direct
assessment and
referral link
between the two
services.
53

KEY AREA 8: ACCESS TO THE ENVIRONMENT
Overall Objective: To improve the accessibility of services and buildings open to
the public  

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Maximise
March 2010 Minimum floor
Dave
Resources 
investment from the
targets must be set
Fletcher/
Corporate Capital
above the level of
Lynda
Access Budget to
BVPI 156. Target
Lewis
increase the number
2007/08 is 80%
of City Council
(2005/06 63%)
Buildings, which are
open to the public
and accessible to
disabled people in
conjunction with the
Corporate Asset
Management Plan
2006.
Develop an action
April 2007- Address any issues
Trading
Local
plan to monitor
March 2010 arises from the low
Services
Services 
service usage and
take up of services
address the issue
by any community.
of accessibility to
all sections of the
community.  
Maximise use of
March 2008 Provide advice on
Planning/
Development 
grant aid and
the requirements of
Access
statutory powers
the Disability
Officer
available in the
Discrimination Act
Building Regulations/
and work to secure
Planning Control to
best practice in the
secure wherever
provision of facilities
possible a barrier
for disabled people.
free built
Priority is given to
environment for
the voluntary sector,
new, altered
small shops, services
buildings and public
eg chemists, sub-
areas.
post offices. 
Implement the new March 2008 Monthly meetings
Graham
Development 
access for disabled
with Access
Mitchell
people -
Committee to discuss
Supplementary
planning and building
Planning Guidance.
regulations
applications adoption
of new Supplementary
Planning Guidance.
54

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Work to ensure
March 2008
Robust monitoring
Communic- Development 
more services
systems must be
ation Team
are delivered in
put in place to
an accessible,
monitor the
informative and
effectiveness of
friendly way.  
these actions. 
Continuing to
March 2008
More tactile buttons Varinder
Development 
respond to
will be available for
Raulia
identify
pedestrian
requirements for
crossings.
tactile buttons
on pedestrian
crossings.  
Continuing to
March 2008
More easy access
Doug Hyde Development 
respond to
bays at residential
requests for
areas.
advisory easy
access parking
bays at
residential
premises subject
to criteria (no
charge).  
Consider
March 2008
Provide improved
Highways
Development 
provision of
crossing points, in
pedestrian
particular for
dropped kerbs
disabled people.
as part of future
highway
maintenance
works
Ensure that
March 2008
New supplementary City Centre
Development 
sufficient seats
planning document- Management
are available
access for disabled
within the City
people now
Centre at all
includes guidance
times especially
on seating in all
during the festive
public areas.
season or city
centre events to
enable disabled
people, elderly
citizens and
others to have
places of rest.  
55

Action
Timescale
Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
City Centre
April 2007 –
Additional
Julie Moss
Development 
Wayfinder
March 2008
Wayfinder units in
System for Blind
other areas of need
and Partially
in the City Centre –
Sighted People -
responding to
continue to
customer feedback. 
improve
accessibility and
Increased uptake of
usage of
trigger fobs through
Wayfinder.
consistent,
appropriate and
timely promotion.
Investigate further
development of
Wayfinder to bring
in line with
changing
information
technology.
56

KEY AREA 9 INVOLVEMENT IN COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES
Overall Objective: To encourage participation of disabled people in sports, arts and
other community activities

Action
Timescale
Target/Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Improving the
April 2007 Ensure a consistency of Michaela
Local
health and well-
data collection, analysis Hutching
Services
being of disabled
and intelligence across
people through
sports development
sport.
and health by installing
Commence software.
Incorporating
impairment groups as
part of data collection
and analysis.
December Investigate “Inclusive
Ray Davies Local
2007
Fitness Initiative Gym
Services 
Buddy” programme
with an aim to pilot it
at Nechells Community
Leisure Centre and
Moseley Health and
Fitness Centre.
June 2007 Incorporate the
Ray Davies Local
requirements of
Services
disabled people within
the Health and Fitness
Equality Standards for
implementation by the
District Sport Service.
Draft circulated to
District contact officers
Continue to
March
Ensure that any bids
Peter
Local
widen access to
2010
for sports development Mintoft,
Services 
sport.
and health activities
Ray Davies
incorporate a request
for funding to respond
to disabled people’s
need and in particular
information format
needs. 
57

Action
Timescale
Target/Outcomes
Lead
Directorate
Help disabled
March 2010
Programmes on
All
Local
people’s
offer reflect needs
Constitu-
Services 
enjoyment of
of the local
ency
participating in
community.
Managers
arts, local
Improving the
culture and
physical access to
heritage.  
facilities  e.g.
providing swimming
pool hoist,
automatic doors
etc. 
Continue to
October 2007 Contribute to the
Michaela
Local
improve levels
achievement of
Hutchings, Services 
of sporting
Comprehensive
Peter
performance.  
Performance
Mintoft,
Assessment (CPA)
Ray Davies  
target to increase
the participation
levels of disabled
people within
sport/recreational
provision.       
58

APPENDIX 2
ORGANISATIONS INVOLVED IN DEVELOPING THE
DISABILITY EQUALITY SCHEME
AAGHEE (Awareness)
Aquarius
Ashraya Community
Asian Hindu Cultural Association
ASIRT
Association Sign Language Interpreters (ASLI)
B-Autistic
BCAT
BIDS – Services with Deaf People
Birmingham Adult Education Service  learners and tutor (BAES)
Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health Trust
Birmingham Centre for Inclusive Living   
Birmingham Children’s Cochlear Implant Programme
Birmingham Disability Resource Centre (BDRC)
Birmingham Employer Coalition
Birmingham Focus On Blindness
Birmingham Mencap
Cannon Street Memorial Baptist Church
Cerebral Palsy Midlands 
CPPIH (Mental Health)
Day Centre For Polish Senior Citizens
Disability Support Group Ltd
Gallant 2000 Ltd  
Harris House Moseley (LDT)
Heart of Birmingham PCT NHS
Huntington's Disease Association
Mental Health Matters
Mental Health Promotions
Mental Health Trust
Meshriq Challenge Resource Centre
Names of Individual disabled person have not been included.
National Deal Mental Health Service (and Birmingham)
NCH-  Birmingham Community Children's Centre
Pakistan Ex-Servicemen Association. (UK)
Pastoral Care of the Blind: Catholic Blind Services 
People First
People in Partnership
Punjab Culture Centre
Sense West
Service Birmingham (BCC)
Sushel Uhri Associated Limited
Sutton Coldfield Disability Network
The Institute of Local Government Studies, The University of
Birmingham
The Methodist Church
The Pension Service
Note: This list is not exhaustive 
59

APPENDIX 3
GOVERNMENT WHITE PAPER, OUR CARE, OUR HEALTH,
OUR SAY - 7 OUTCOMES 
Councils’ adult services would be assessed next year against the
seven outcomes in the health and social care white paper, ‘ Our Care,
Our Health, Our Say’. 
Responses to the consultation on Independence, Well-being and
Choice strongly supported the proposed outcomes which it set out for
adult social care services, based on the concept of well-being. These
seven outcomes were:
•  Improved health and emotional well-being
•  Improved quality of life
•  Making a positive contribution
•  Choice and control
•  Freedom from discrimination
•  Economic well being
• Personal 
dignity
60

APPENDIX 4
DISABILITY EQUALITY DUTY - GENERAL AND 
SPECIFIC DUTIES
General Duty
BCC compliance
promote equality of opportunity between disabled
All covered in
persons and other persons
action plan
All covered in
eliminate discrimination that is unlawful under the Act action plan
eliminate harassment of disabled persons that is
All covered in
related to their disabilities
action plan
All covered in
promote positive attitudes towards disabled persons
action plan
All covered in
encourage participation by disabled persons in public life action plan
take steps to take account of disabled persons’
All covered in
disabilities, even where that involves treating
action plan
disabled persons more favourably than other persons
Specific Duty
BCC compliance
a public authority should publish a Disability Equality
DES endorsed by
Scheme demonstrating how it intends to fulfil its general Cabinet 
and specific duties
27 November 2006
a public authority should involve disabled people in
Section 1.2
the development of the Scheme
the Scheme should include a statement of the way in
Section 1.2
which disabled people have been involved in the
development of the Scheme
the Scheme should include a statement of the
Section 4.2, 4.3,
authority’s methods for impact assessment
4.6 & 4.7
the Scheme should include a statement of steps which
Action plan
the authority will take towards fulfilling its general duty
included
(the "action plan")
the Scheme should include a statement of the
Section 7 for
authority’s arrangements for gathering information in
employment
relation to employment, and, where appropriate, its
Action plan issue
delivery of education and its functions
6 for education
the Scheme should include a statement of the
Section 4.3
authority’s arrangements for putting the information
Section 4.5
gathered to use, in particular in reviewing the
Annual Review
effectiveness of its action plan and in preparing
subsequent Disability Equality Scheme
61

Specific Duty
BCC compliance
a public authority must, within three years of the
BCC to implement
Scheme being published, take the steps set out in its
the action plan
action plan (unless it is unreasonable or impracticable
for it to do so) and put into effect the arrangements
for gathering and making use of information
a public authority must publish a report containing a
Section 6
summary of the steps taken under the action plan,
the results of its information gathering and the use to
which it has put the information
62







Birmingham City Council
Equality and Diversity
Congreve House
3 Congreve Passage
Birmingham
B3 3DA
Tel: 0121 303 2545
Fax: 0121 233 9117
Txt: 18001 0121 303 2419
Email: xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx
Website: www.birmingham.gov.uk/equalities
Age
Disability
Gender
Race
Religion and Belief
Sexual Orientation