Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Minutes of Governors' meetings'.


FOI REQUSEST – GOVERNORS’ MINUTES 
CONTENTS 
 


 
 
 
 
 JFS School Curriculum and Student Welfare Committee, Attendance & Behaviour (CSWAB) 
Committee 
 
Minutes of meeting held on 6th February 2017 at 6.30 PM. 
 
Chairman: 
 
  Ms Geraldine Fainer (GF) 
 
Members present: 

Mrs Joanne Coleman (JC) 
Mr. John Cooper (JCo) 
Ms Rosie Scallon (RS) 
Dr. Charlotte Benjamin (CB) 
 
Others present: 
Mr. Simon Appleman (SA) 
 
Mr. Anthony Flack (AF) 
 
Mr. Andy De Angelis (AdA) 
 
Ms Talia Thoret (TT) 
 
Mr. David Wragg (DW) 
 
Mr. Daniel Marcus (DM) 
 
Mr. Dharmesh Chauhan (DC). 
 
 
 
 
1.  Apologies for absence 
Apologies were received from Mrs Ruth Renton, Mrs Anne Shisler and Rabbi Dr Raphael 
Zarum. 
 2.  Minutes of the Curriculum and Student Welfare, Attendance and Behaviour Committee 
(CSWAB) meeting 12th December 2016. 
 The minutes were approved. 
 
3.  Matters Arising 
3.1 Item 3 – the minutes of the Joint Curriculum and JE committee meeting on 18th May 
2016 were approved but due to a technical error were not available on Fronter at that time. 
They are now available on Fronter. 
 
Action point:
 GF to send a signed copy to SA. 
 
3.2 Item 7.2 Attainment Data – A commentary of the KS2 to KS4 Raise Report was 
circulated to the governors as requested. 
 
3.3. Item 5.3 Explanation of process for further mathematics at A’ level
This has been emailed out today to parents to explain that in future most students wil  only 

 

 
take 3 A ‘level subjects and only in exceptional circumstances (which wil  include students 
doing Further Mathematics) wil  students take 4 A’ levels. 
 
3.4 Item 6 – AF presented an annonymised report showing the areas of less accurate 
predictions for A ‘level subjects as requested.  
 
4. Behaviour Report – TT 

4.1 TT presented the Behaviour Report to the committee. Governors had requested that the 
data be streamlined for this committee. Following a discussion TT concluded that more 
narrative was required about progress; including the support offered, successful outcomes 
and information regarding those that did not respond to support. 
 
4.2 TT said the report identifies the teachers and departments which give the most 
behaviour points. Almost al  of those teachers have received support from the external 
consultant Mrs Wilson-Brown, who suggested strategies for improvements. There has been 
improvement in the JS and Ivrit departments. TT said there are a number of factors to 
consider in addition to the teacher’s intervention such as class dynamics which can be 
complex. 
 
4.3 TT noted the spike in issues in November and attributed this to a possible reaction by 
both teachers and pupils to the Ofsted visit. Year 9 was raising more issues in January and 
there is a plan in place to get them back on track. Issues in Years 8 and 9 are more 
connected to problems with teaching and the curriculum in the lower school and are part of 
the Ofsted action plan. 
 
4.4 TT said staff did a Behaviour and Learning walk last week, pairing up members of the 
Behaviour Team with SLT and subject leaders. Overall behaviour was good and there are 
areas which can be tightened up and actions to improve outcomes such as checking 
students are not hanging around in the toilets during lessons and not dismissing students 
early or late from class. 
 
Action points

1.  TT to circulate the findings report to governors by email. 
2.  TT to invite governors to the next Behaviour and Learning walk. 
 
4.5 Governors’ questions 
Q - At what point the performance management process is engaged for teachers? 
A - SA said this occurs when there isn’t sufficient improvement after support is provided and 
a support plan is put in place. He said there is a definite overlap between staff identified as 
needing support to manage behaviour and those with performance management objectives 
regarding classroom management. 
 
Q – What impact the new lunchtime arrangements (pupils not allowed to stay in 
classrooms) had on behaviour?  
A - TT said there haven’t been many incidences and teachers are happier because the 
classrooms stay clean. The pupils are stil  adjusting. Years 10 and 11 in particular wanted to 
have access to a classroom so they have been offered the Conference Centre to use at 
lunchtime. Years 7 and 8 use the theatre and Year 9 use the small gym. The disadvantage is 
that these rooms are no longer available for lunchtime activities. 

 

 
 
Q- Will community service would be more widely used in future?  
A - TT said it will. Currently 2 pupils have done community service (cleaning tasks around the 
school). TT said this often has the best outcomes but the difficulty is covering the 
supervision required. SA said that there has been a decrease in pupils being sent to the 
reflection room which previously was the default sanction and now other sanctions are 
being used. 
 
5. Attendance - SA 

5.1 SA presented the Attendance Report. He said attendance was not quite as strong as last 
year but better than 2 years ago and stil  above the 95% target set by the government and 
adopted by Governors. 
 
The SEN support students (K) had the lowest % of attendance and they are receiving support 
by the SEND and monitoring by tutors has improved data col ection but there hasn’t been 
much change in the figures. 
 
There are a few cases of persistent absence for medical or other reasons and these can have 
a big impact on the overall figures. Some cases are dealt with as safeguarding issues and 
referrals are made to Social Services. 
 
5.2 Governors’ questions 
Q - What impact the intervention had with SEN students and when would the local authority 
become involved? 
A - SA said that many cases are complex but the school continues to work with students on 
their attendance and the local authority becomes involved if attendance fal s below 80%. TT 
explained that the narrative is important to understand the reasons for poor attendance. 
Often the Education Welfare Officer (EWO) wil  get involved before it reaches that level of a 
problem. 
 
Q – Re: requests for leave of absence, are parents are escalating the reasons for their 
requests in order to gain permission? 
A - SA said that the school wants to be caring and considerate but also fair in authorizing 
absences. There is a risk if authorization is refused that the child wil  not attend and be 
reported as ‘ill’. 
 
Q - If the child’s attendance is over 90% whether the school can refuse requests and does 
input from the EWO help?  
A - SA said that the involvement of the EWO does add authority and having an external body 
write to parents and call them in for a meeting does make a difference. 
 
Q - How quickly can attendance data can be produced? 
A – SA said it hasn’t been fast enough but now the data manager is in place this will improve 
and the school should receive data by the end of each month and this wil  also be sent to Jo 
Coleman (governor). 
 
6. Timetable review – verbal update from SA. 
6.1 SA reported that the Timetable Working Party have been looking at the Curriculum 
model. 

 

 
Key changes would be; 
1.  Expanding from 48 to 50 lessons / fortnight, 
2.  Re-allocation of time for some subjects will provide time for dedicated PHSE classes 
and additional English and Maths classes. 
3.  CTAM and MFL for Years 8 and 9 will be slightly reduced and Ivrit will reduce from 4 
classes a fortnight to 3. 
 
6.2 Governors’ Questions 
Q – How will a reduction in Ivrit classes will improve Hebrew reading?  
A - SA said responsibility for Ivrit will also be shared with the JS department. Additional Ivrit 
may be provided via drop down days. 
 
Q - What will happen to the accelerated Ivrit GCSE class if classes drop to 3 / fortnight and 
the GCSE has got harder? 
A – SA said that this group will go up to 5 lessons/week in year 9. 
 
SA noted that in future, KS4 may start in Year 9 to provide 3 years at this level rather than 2 
years as currently provided. He said it was important to note that although KS4 will start in 
Year 9 the GCSE syllabuses will not start until Year 10. The government is discouraging pupils 
from sitting GCSEs early. 
 
A concern was raised that Ivrit will become marginalized as currently it is compulsory until 
the end of Year 9 but pupils would be able to stop in year 8 under the new system. 
 
A – DM said there aren’t sufficient teachers to provide good quality teaching so better for 
the motivated students to be in wel -resourced classes than trying to provide cover for al  
students many of whom may not want to be learning Ivrit. 
 
Q - The JS Working Party had been hoping for an additional JS lesson in the new timetable, 
will this be possible? 
A  - SA said that original y they were looking at a 56 lesson fortnight that would provide 
extra classes in many subjects but the problem is with teaching capacity as extra classes 
need to be planned, provided and marked significantly increasing workloads. 
 
Q - Will the times for Fridays would change? 
A – SA said the school has decided to keep the start and end times the same for Fridays. 
 
Q – Will  these changes require a consultation? 
A – SA said that they will have consulted with staff about the move to 50 lessons / fortnight 
via the Leadership Forum and the increase in teacher loadings  has been shared at GSCF and 
the unions asked to consult with members.  SLT wil  speak to the departments effected once 
the model is signed off. 
 
SA said the report is work in progress and decisions wil  need to be made by the end of 
March when the timetable for September wil  start to be built. 
 
7. Literacy Plan 
Action point: Comments should be sent by email to RS. 
 

 

 
 
8. Progress Update: Autumn Term 
a) KS3 Progress update 
b) KS4 Progress update 
 
DC presented the Progress update 
 
8.1 Year 11 – the school measures have changed to Progress 8 and Attainment 8 for English, 
Maths, EBAC, Humanities and Computing. 
 
Al  subject assessments are now scored from 1-9 (see p49) so the data is now presented in 
this way rather than A*-C grades. The figures may look very negative because they are 
based on last year’s cohort and last year’s grades are worth less points this year. For Maths 
and English there is no benchmark for each grade. 
 
For the Intervention groups in year 11, al  departments are being monitored and actions 
plans are in place if they are getting a negative number. 
 
SA said it is very difficult to know what a 6 is and this will only become clear once this year’s 
national results come out. Predictions this year can only be based on professional 
judgement. 
 
The prediction for this year is 5.89 which is higher than the national attainment level 
because JFS came in higher than the national level last year. 
 
Subject summary for year 11 – majority of predictions are for level 5 or above. Year 10 
predictions are similar but slightly lower because they are predicting for the whole course. 
Al  subjects except Ivrit are now predicted with the new 9-1 scale. 
 
For other Year Groups the scores are similar 4,5,6s in all subjects. They will start seeing 
scores moving through from Year 7 onwards. 
 
This is the first term that teachers have received feedback broken down by individual classes 
and groups so they can identify where to target interventions. This could potential y feel 
threatening for teachers but it is not for performance management but help identify areas 
of weakness even down to assessing outcomes for specific topics so they can pinpoint the 
issues. 
 
8.2 Questions 
Q - Are the levels based on teachers’ predictions and if so can they see if teachers are over 
predicting? 
A  – DC said yes and constant moderation of assessments wil  help improve consistency. 
 
Q –Parents have expressed concern that the arrangements have been chaotic in English and 
it’s and to have confidence in the predictions, what is the school’s view? 
A – SA said he thought the predictions of 5.9 at 95% was an over estimation. He said the 
new English team in place are doing wel  but need time to settle in. They have identified 
extra revision days and workshops. The school has overstaffed the English department with 
one extra member to provide extra capacity and support. 

 

 
 
- AF said that he has good communication with the English department and is being made 
aware of any issues. Interventions have increased at lunch times to give Year 11 more time 
and AIT in period 4 is providing some year 11 students with 1:1 support. In addition when 
any Year 11 teachers are available they are joining English classes to provide 2 teachers 
which is making a significant difference. In other year groups they are now doing only 2 
different texts so pupils needing to change groups can do so. 
 
Q – How were the GCSE re-take results? 
A – AF said that there was +1.5 improvement in grades for Maths and English. 4 pupils did 
not get C or above in Maths and English. 
 
Q – Were these results good enough? 
A – SA said it wasn’t as the school aims for all pupils to attain an A-C grade in Maths and 
English. The only caveat is knowing the individual circumstances of each child. 
 
-AF said there has been a lack of motivation for some pupils re-taking GCSEs in 6th Form 
because UCAS has said they wil  take students without a C in Maths GCSE. C = a level 2 pass. 
DC is looking at equivalent qualifications that wil  be easier for these students.  Maths and 
English is a national issue. 2% of 6th Form have grades significantly lower than the national 
average. This % may increase when more vocational courses start running in the 6th Form. 
 
DC was thanked for the report. 
 
8.3 c) KS5 Progress Report – AF 
AF explained that last year they were able to track data through the 6th Form and generally 
the predictions were very accurate. The Year 13 mock exams finished last week so the 
results are not yet available. The school uses and external company Alps for student 
predictions. They predicted 84% A*-B grades and the teacher predictions were 85.2%. If 
teachers are only out by 1% the results should be good. There wil  be a full analysis once the 
mock exam results are known. 
 
8.4 Questions 
Q – How were this year’s university offers? 
A – AF said that offers can be made up until end of March so they are not al  in but so far 
they have been very good. There have been 14 Oxbridge offers and 2 for medicine at 
Oxbridge which has never happened before. 
 
9. JS Curriculum Update - DM 

DM has attended FGB to give an outline of the curriculum update and presented further 
information to this committee at the meeting. 
 
9.1 Informal Jewish Education- JIEP 
DM has been reviewing the JIEP department. The remit is to make Judaism come alive and 
be the heartbeat of the school outside of the classroom. Previously there has been limited 
line management and little opportunity to develop innovative practice. Majority of 
programmes have targeted those already interested and connected to Jewish practice. The 
aim is to engage students from all backgrounds as well as catering for the more orthodox 
students. There needs to be bigger projects to involve the whole school to widen the 

 

 
appeal. 
 
9.2 Formal Jewish Education 
 
•  6th Form – a more sophisticated JS programme called ‘Me and my Judaism’ is being 
developed. This wil  be text based and is compulsory for 2 hrs./week. DM is working 
with Yavneh College to write the programme together. 
 
•  Year 7 from Sept 2017 – all JS will have a textual dimension. This will also be 
developed for years 8 and 9 later on but may be more chal enging if they haven’t 
developed the foundation skills in year 7). 
 
•  The new GCSE for RS has very important topics for teenagers even if it is not heavily 
text based. Once the GCSE syl abus has been embedded the department can look at 
increasing the JS elements for the higher ability classes. 
 
DM is working on an action plan which wil  be discussed with Debbie Lipkin at the end of 
February. 
 
9.3 Governors’ questions 
Q – Will the external providers for JIEP are being reviewed? 
A – DM said this is being reviewed and looking for modern orthodox providers however 
there are less around than those provided by more traditional groups. They won’t be 
discounted as long as they respect the school ethos. Talks are being held with Tribe and 
Andrew Shaw from Mizrachi. 
 
Should the JS classes be called RS? 
A – Religious studies or JS, Jewish studies – DM said it should be RS on the timetable. 
 
10. Policies 
a) Teaching and Learning 
 
ADA gave a presentation on the Teaching and Learning Policy. The aims are; 
•  To improve clarity of roles and responsibilities 
•  Combine a number of policies together 
•  Identify the core principles that form the basis of the policy that wil  endure over 
time. Guidance wil  be developed that can be updated regularly. 
 
There was a discussion about section 2 Governors’ Responsibilities regarding the 
responsibility for “for arranging col ective worship "in accordance with the trust deed or 
religious designation of the school". The school does not have a trust deed. GF also noted 
that JS (Jewish Studies) should be called RS (Religious Studies). The policy was broadly 
approved with a number of actions outlined below. 
 
Action points: 
1.  AdA to get clarification on what is meant by a trust deed or religious designation. 
2.  JS to be changed to RS. 
3.  Carers need to be added where ever Parents are mentioned. 

 

 
4.  SA to amend and circulate to governors by email for further comment. 
 
10b) Staff Development – SA 
This policy has been superseded by the CPD policy which has been approved. 
 
10c) Home School Agreement –SA 
There have been some changes including a new section about expectations of students. It is 
signed by the student, parents and school prior to starting in year 7. It is no longer signed 
every year as this was found to have no impact. JC suggested section 2k) which talks about 
treating staff with courtesy and respect should include treating peers in the same way. 
 
11. Any other business 
11.1 Maternity cover for 6th Form History 
SA reported that in response to a 6th Form History teacher going on maternity leave, the 
timetable is being changed to ensure an experienced JFS teacher will teach Years 11-13. 
They will try and arrange this for Year 10 classes as far as possible but the priority has to be 
for the exam classes. A supply teacher will be brought in to cover the maternity leave for 
other classes. 
 
11.2 KS4 – Higher and Foundation Papers for Science and Maths 
SA reported that in the new exams science and maths will still have higher and foundation 
papers. It wil  not be possible to do both because the exams are at the same time so a 
decision will need to be made in January of Year 11 who will sit higher or foundation papers. 
It will be clear for high ability and lower ability classes but a more difficult decision for the 
middle groups. 
 
Date of Next Meeting: Monday 19th June 2017, 6.30pm. 
 
 
 
Signed: _______________________________________   Date: ____________________ 

 

CONFIDENTIAL 
 
 
JFS SCHOOL 
 
 

MINUTES OF PART II MEETING OF FINANCE & PREMISES COMMITTEE 
HELD ON MONDAY, 27TH MARCH 2017 
 
Present:
 
 
Chairman: 
  
Mr Stuart Waldman 
 
Governors:  
 Mr John Cooper  
 
Mr Michael Lee  
 
  
Mr Richard Martyn    
Mr Andrew Moss 
 
 
 
 
In Attendance: 
 
Mr Simon Appleman (Headteacher) 
Ms Debby Lipkin (Executive Headteacher) 
Mr Jamie Peston 
 
1. 
MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The Committee approved the minutes of the Part II meeting held on 19th 
January, 2107 
 
2. 
SECURITY 
 
The Link Governor for Security said that the Security liaison committee had met 
on 7th February, when it was established that none of the actions agreed at the 
previous meeting two years earlier had been undertaken. The committee had 
reviewed the emergency procedures and checked the systems, including the 
fixed and mobile panic buttons, not all of which were found to be optimally 
sited. Emergency backup power had been provided for the panic button but not 
yet for the CCTV system. The CCTV cameras were due to be upgraded in part 
during the holidays, but would still be blind if there were a power cut. The 
Committee would meet in a month or two's time to check on actions agreed. 
 
Mr Lee said that he had found out only retrospectively that two security 
meetings had taken place on 17th March. The Executive Headteacher 
explained that her meetings with the CST dealt with operational matters only so 
that governor presence had been unnecessary. Mr Lee responded that the 
meeting that provided a threat briefing was not operational and specifically 
requested that his disappointment should be minuted. 
 
The Headteacher reported that Richard Barnes, the Scotland Yard officer 
responsible for anti-terrorism in the local area had recently carried out a security 
inspection. He had given the arrangement a relatively clean bill of health but 

CONFIDENTIAL 
had made a few recommendations for improvement. Some of these could be 
put into effect easily, for example the provision of bus drivers’ photographs to 
the security team. Other were more difficult and required further consideration, 
for example fitting blinds on doors which could be in conflict with safeguarding 
requirements. Mr Appleman would report the outcome to the full Committee. 
 
ACTION HEADTEACHER 
 
Mr Appleman said that at another meeting Mr Alan Levy had told him that, 
whilst the CST had been given additional Government funding, it would no 
longer be able to fund 24 hour cover of the JFS boundary and could only cover 
the guarding during School operational hours, effectively reducing the grant to 
half its previous level.  
 
The Chairman said the CST should be clearly advised of the Governing Body’s 
disappointment at their downgrading of the cover it would fund. Manned 
guarding should be retained until there was satisfaction that improved remote 
surveillance was sufficient to meet the potential threat. Because of the possible 
internal CST conflict of interest it might be desirable to give further 
consideration to the proposal to commission an independent security review, 
as previously recommended to the GB by the Committee. This should however, 
await the outcome of a meeting between Mrs Lipkin and Mr Goldmeier and Mr 
Gerald Ronson. 
 Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

 
3. 
FINANCIAL CONSULTANTS PROCESS REVIEW 
 
The Executive Headteacher said that Landau Baker had been commissioned to 
review the Finance Department and the systems it employed. While some 
processes and the software used had been given a clean bill of health, the firm 
had concluded that there were duplications in responsibility and that staff were 
not always used effectively. It concluded that, if managed effectively and 
working productively, a team consisting of the School Accountant and three 
other full-time staff would suffice. With some of the Director of Finance’s 
functions performed by the Accountant and others moved upwards, there 
would no longer be a need for that senior level post. 
 
The Committee approved the Executive Headteacher’s proposal to employ 
Landau Baker further to oversee restructuring and set up new systems 
required, the cost being allocated to the restructuring heading. It requested a 
further report when this work was complete. 
ACTION MR PESTON 
 
4.          ANY OTHER BUSINESS 
 
There was none 
 
 
 
Signed: ______________________ 
        Date: ____________________ 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
(Chairman 

 
 
JFS SCHOOL 
 
 

MINUTES OF FINANCE & PREMISES COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON  
MONDAY, 27TH MARCH 2017 
 
Present:
 
 
Chairman: 
  
Mr Stuart Waldman 
 
Governors:  
Mr John Cooper  
 
Mr Michael Lee  
 
 
  
Mr Richard Martyn    
Mr Andrew Moss 
 
 
 
 
In Attendance: 
 
Mr Simon Appleman (Headteacher) 
Ms Debby Lipkin (Executive Headteacher) 
Mr Jamie Peston 
Mrs Mary Nithy 
Mr Graeme Pocock (Estates Manager) (Items 1 - 7) 
 
Clerk: 
 
 Dr Alan Fox     
 
1.   

APOLOGIES  
 
Apologies for absence were received from and Mr David Lerner and Mrs Ruth 
Renton. 
 
2. 

DECLARATION OF INTERESTS 
 
No declarations were made. 
 
3. 
 MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The Committee approved the minutes of the previous meeting held on 19th January, 
2107 
 
4.  
MATTERS ARISING NOT COVERED BY SUBSTANTIVE AGENDA ITEMS 
 
4.1 - Item 4.1 – Sinking Fund – Mr Pocock said that he had established that there 
was a sinking fund to finance the final refurbishment before the PFI contract was 
completed but there was no useful information about its size.  
 

4.2 – Item 7.2 - Fire Training -  Mr Appleman said that he had established that there 
was no formal legal requirement for all staff to have fire extinguisher training. It was 
nevertheless desirable in certain specialist areas, for example in laboratories and 
when the support staff restructuring had settled down he would arrange this with 
1440.  
 
4.3 – Item 11 - Audit Engagement Letter – the Chairman said that he had reviewed 
and approved the terms of the letter. He asked Mrs Nithy to check that it had been 
duly dispatched. 
 
ACTION MRS NITHY 
 
5.  
PREMISES 
 
Mr Pocock introduced his March update report and answered questions raised by 
the Committee. In addition to the items minuted separately, the following points were 
made: 
 
•  For the benefit of successors who would be dealing with the winding up of the 
PFI contract Ii was important that the full detail of the Settlement Agreement 
should be permanently captured before those involved in the recent 
negotiations left. 
 
•  KSSL has carried out its review of safety management systems on-site at JFS 
and shared the final version of the report with the School. The review 
concluded that safety control measures of functioning as intended. The review 
concluded that KSSL “is not considered to be at risk”, although minor changes 
are required to various processes to make the environment more effective. 
 
•  The School was not able to look behind the KSSL review of safety 
management systems but Mr Pocock would examine the company’s review 
report in detail and raise any points of concern. 
 
ACTION MR POCOCK 
 
•  Following the finding of a low count of legionella bacteria in a tap in a 
laboratory, 1440 was taking the appropriate steps and would continue until the 
matter was resolved. Systematic checks elsewhere had not established any 
other cases. There was no need to inform parents but the Committee 
requested that arrangements should be made for 1440 to confirm this in 
writing and continue to report testing outcomes. 
ACTION MR POCOCK 
 
•  Concern was expressed about the absence of benchmarking prices that were 
needed as a budgetary input. 1440 should be requested to advise when they 
would be available.   
 
•  ACTION MR POCOCK 
 
•  The Committee was concerned to learn of the Semperian management 
changes that could lead to a loss of corporate knowledge. This strengthened 
the case for the continued examination of services that the School might 
economically take over from the PFI contractor. 
 
ACTION MR POCOCK 
 


 
 
•  The remaining legal fees required to resolve the outstanding land issues had 
been paid and Pinsents were chasing LBJRE for the signed underlease and 
new long lease. 
 
•  The School’s financial position would be protected by payment of Gesher’s 
contractors on site via an escrow account. 
 
•  The delays in producing additional outside recreations spaces had been 
caught up. 
 
•  The Wolfson Trust had committed to Phase 1 of the Technology Project. 
Further phases were being planned to permit the teaching of a range of new 
subjects and vocational skills. Consideration would be given to cooperating 
more closely with ORT schools and it was also possible that, as a revenue 
generating scheme, the JFS facilities could be used in the future as a hub for 
other schools in the area.  
 
6.  
INSURANCE POLICY REVIEW 
 
Since the School’s policy benefited from three-year terms, the Clerk was requested 
to place this item on the Agenda in 18 months time. 
ACTION CLERK 
 7. 
 SECURITY 
 
The Link Governor for Security and the Executive Headteacher and the Headteacher 
gave verbal reports. 
 
8. 
FEBRUARY MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTS AND 2017/18 BUDGET  
 
The Chairman reminded the Committee that a number of detailed questions posed 
by members had been answered prior to the meeting and the Committee considered 
briefly the Management Accounts to the end of February and the revised forecast for 
the year ending March 2017. In response to further questions it was confirmed that 
redundancy costs would be posted to the salaries ledger heading in the 2016/17 
accounts (and not 2017/18) and would be covered by the grant already agreed by 
the Trust.  
 
The Chairman said that the final draft Budget resulted from repeated re-examination 
of its elements resulting in significant savings. There would, therefore, be no value in 
a further detailed scrutiny by the Committee but it should be noted that any 
redundancy costs aside there remained a shortfall. Coincidentally, this figure 
corresponded reasonably well with the Trust’s investment income and the Trustees 
had agreed to underwrite the figure should it in the event prove necessary. The 
2018/19 and 2019/20 figures did not yet show a balance but, with the inevitable 
uncertainties of projecting so far ahead, were sufficiently close at this stage not give 
rise to the same kind of concern as previously. 
 
The Committee judged that although there were risks and challenges in the 
proposed Budget, it would be achievable and therefore gave approval for its 
submission to the FGB. 
 
 


9.  
FINANCIAL PROCEDURES MANUAL 
 
The Committee approved the final draft of the Scheme of Delegation and Best Value 
Statement for confirmation by the Governing Body and incorporation in the Finance 
& Procedures Manual.  
  
10.  
SFVS (SCHOOLS FINANCIAL VALUE STANDARD) 
 
The Committee approved the draft 2017 response to the SFVS questionnaire for 
confirmation by the Governing Body.   
 
11.  

CHARGING POLICY 
 
The Committee approved updated Charging Policy for confirmation by the Governing 
Body and subsequent triennial reviews. 
 
14.  

ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
There was none. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Signed: ______________________ 
        Date: _______________________ 
 
(Chairman) 
 
 



 
 
Admissions Committee  
 
Minutes of Meeting held on 3rd April 2017 at 5:30 PM. 
 
 
Chairman:    

  Mr Michael Goldmeier  
 
Members present:  
Mrs Geraldine Fainer  
 
Mr Michael Lee  
 
Mrs Anne Shisler  
 
Observer: 
Rabbi Raphael Zarum 
 
 
 
Others present: 

Mr Simon Appleman  
 
Mrs Debby Lipkin  
 
Ms Talia Thoret  
 
Ms Maxine Ratnarajah  
 
Acting Clerk:  
Dr Alan Fox 
1. 
Apologies for Absence 
 
Apologies were received from Mrs Joanne Coleman and Mrs Ruth Renton. 
 
2. 
Minutes of Previous Meetings 
 
The draft minutes of the meetings held on 30th January, 2107 were approved. 
 
3.  
Matter Arising 
 
There were none.  
 
4.  
Mid-term Applications  
 
Ms Ratnarajah reported that the School was full in Years 7, 8 and 9 and the 
Committee agreed that three applicants should be added to the waiting list. 
 
5.  
September 2017 Year 7 Entry 
 
Mr Appleman reported that a second tranche of 63 offers of Year 7 places had been 
made on 31st March. This was 10 more than current vacancies and if there were 

 

more than 53 acceptances Year 7 would start with more than 300 pupils. This was, 
however, unlikely and Brent was also content provided that the total capacity of the 
whole School was not exceeded. Parents had until 7th April to respond and if 
necessary a third tranche of offers, probably about 10, would be made after Pesach.  
 
It was noted that following satisfactory negotiations with Brent, additional offers after 
the first tranche had been made earlier than the previous year. This reduced the 
stress for parents who now wouldn't have to wait so long for certainty at the same as 
increasing confidence that all 300 places would be filled.  
 
6. 
September 2017 Sixth Form Entry  
 
The Committee examined the list of 61 external applicants for entry to the Sixth Form 
in September. There were many reasons given, including the provision of Jewish 
education, the wide range of A-level subjects and the high reputation of the Sixth 
Form. Whilst noting that there were fewer applicants than in previous years, the SLT 
judged that a higher percentage would take up offers made. 
 
It was also the view of the SLT that the key to maintaining a large Sixth Form was to 
retain a higher proportion of Year 11 pupils. Interviews and fewer requests for 
references indicated that this was likely to be the case in 2017, partly because of the 
extension of the range of vocational courses, of which Business Studies and Media 
Studies appeared to be the most popular. It appeared possible that the Sixth Form in 
2017/18 would be 20 pupils larger than in the current year. 
 
It was agreed that the procedure for dealing with acceptance of Sixth Form 
applications would be finalised by discussion between MG and GF, with Committee 
ratification at the next meeting. 
 
7.  
2017 Bulge Class  
 
It was agreed that a report would be made directly to the Governing Body meeting 
later in the evening.  
 
8.  
2019/20 Admissions Policy Proposal 
 
The Chairman invited Mrs Fainer and Rabbi Zarum to introduce the proposition, 
circulated in advance, to alter the admissions criteria to reserve a limited number of 
places, probably up to 30, for those pupils who by some definition were "more 
observant". It was suggested that priority should be given to those who qualified for a 
"Certificate of Higher Religious Practice", which would require 24 synagogue 
attendances, prior formal Jewish education for minimum of two years and regular 
voluntary engagement or parental engagement in Jewish communal, charitable or 
welfare activity. 
 
Rabbi Zarum said that there was some evidence that more applications were now 
beginning to be received from pupils in the more religious primary schools, indicating 
that parents had confidence that their children could be comfortable and not isolated. 
JFS was not just another community school and had a specifically Jewish ethos that 
it was desirable to enhance. Unfortunately, at the moment, many of the more 

 

religious pupils were not able to obtain places and the proposal or some variation of 
it could assist in strengthening the ethos. The addition of 20 to 30 more pupils with a 
Higher Certificate would not change the JFS image to the extent that it would deter 
the less observant from applying. 
 
Mrs Fainer said that there were still some more observant parents who were 
reluctant to apply in case the random selection process resulted in their children 
being left as one of the very few practicing orthodox pupils. This proposal would give 
them greater assurance that there would always be a reasonably sized cohort. The 
requirement for a Certificate of Religious Practice was well established and the 
proposal would simply build on what was already there. 
 
In discussion, a number of issues were raised: 
 
•  The School already had a significant minority of pupils whose families were 
more observant and the additional 20 or 30 might not make much difference 
to perceptions. 
 
•  The Jewish Education curriculum was being changed so that all teaching 
would be text based with the addition of the equivalent of a yeshiva stream; 
this, in itself, should provide reassurance to more orthodox families 
 
•  Care would have to be taken to ensure that a change in the policy of this kind 
could be achieved legally. 
 
•  Whilst it was necessary to reach out to the more observant part of the 
community, this change could give the wrong message and damage the JFS 
image by signaling that children were being placed in different categories and 
not all being given the same learning opportunities.  
 
•  The change could have the unintended consequence of making the less 
observant parents feel that the chances of obtaining a place were diminished. 
 
The Chairman said that clearly there was a wide variety of views within the 
Committee and he invited Mrs Fainer and Rabbi Zarum to reflect carefully on them 
and, in particular, those expressed by the SLT, possibly discuss the issues with the 
Deputy Headteacher for Jewish Life & Learning, and then bring back their proposal 
to the Committee should they wish. 
 
8.  
Any other Business   
 
Mr Lee said that there was some parental concern about the position of those who 
wished to change their first choice to JFS but believe they could not do so until after 
the start of the Autumn Term. The Chairman invited him to discuss this further with 
Ms Ratnarajah outside the meeting. 
 
 
Signed: ____________________________ 
 
 Date: _____________ 

 


 
 
Admissions Committee  
 
Minutes of Meeting held on 3rd April 2017 at 5:30 PM. 
 
 
Chairman:    

  Mr Michael Goldmeier  
 
Members present:  
Mrs Geraldine Fainer  
 
Mr Michael Lee  
 
Mrs Anne Shisler  
 
Observer: 
Rabbi Raphael Zarum 
 
 
 
Others present: 

Mr Simon Appleman  
 
Mrs Debby Lipkin  
 
Ms Talia Thoret  
 
Ms Maxine Ratnarajah  
 
Acting Clerk:  
Dr Alan Fox 
1. 
Apologies for Absence 
 
Apologies were received from Mrs Joanne Coleman and Mrs Ruth Renton. 
 
2. 
Minutes of Previous Meetings 
 
The draft minutes of the meetings held on 30th January, 2107 were approved. 
 
3.  
Matter Arising 
 
There were none.  
 
4.  
Mid-term Applications  
 
Ms Ratnarajah reported that the School was full in Years 7, 8 and 9 and the 
Committee agreed that three applicants should be added to the waiting list. 
 
5.  
September 2017 Year 7 Entry 
 
Mr Appleman reported that a second tranche of 63 offers of Year 7 places had been 
made on 31st March. This was 10 more than current vacancies and if there were 

 

more than 53 acceptances Year 7 would start with more than 300 pupils. This was, 
however, unlikely and Brent was also content provided that the total capacity of the 
whole School was not exceeded. Parents had until 7th April to respond and if 
necessary a third tranche of offers, probably about 10, would be made after Pesach.  
 
It was noted that following satisfactory negotiations with Brent, additional offers after 
the first tranche had been made earlier than the previous year. This reduced the 
stress for parents who now wouldn't have to wait so long for certainty at the same as 
increasing confidence that all 300 places would be filled.  
 
6. 
September 2017 Sixth Form Entry  
 
The Committee examined the list of 61 external applicants for entry to the Sixth Form 
in September. There were many reasons given, including the provision of Jewish 
education, the wide range of A-level subjects and the high reputation of the Sixth 
Form. Whilst noting that there were fewer applicants than in previous years, the SLT 
judged that a higher percentage would take up offers made. 
 
It was also the view of the SLT that the key to maintaining a large Sixth Form was to 
retain a higher proportion of Year 11 pupils. Interviews and fewer requests for 
references indicated that this was likely to be the case in 2017, partly because of the 
extension of the range of vocational courses, of which Business Studies and Media 
Studies appeared to be the most popular. It appeared possible that the Sixth Form in 
2017/18 would be 20 pupils larger than in the current year. 
 
It was agreed that the procedure for dealing with acceptance of Sixth Form 
applications would be finalised by discussion between MG and GF, with Committee 
ratification at the next meeting. 
 
7.  
2017 Bulge Class  
 
It was agreed that a report would be made directly to the Governing Body meeting 
later in the evening.  
 
8.  
2019/20 Admissions Policy Proposal 
 
The Chairman invited Mrs Fainer and Rabbi Zarum to introduce the proposition, 
circulated in advance, to alter the admissions criteria to reserve a limited number of 
places, probably up to 30, for those pupils who by some definition were "more 
observant". It was suggested that priority should be given to those who qualified for a 
"Certificate of Higher Religious Practice", which would require 24 synagogue 
attendances, prior formal Jewish education for minimum of two years and regular 
voluntary engagement or parental engagement in Jewish communal, charitable or 
welfare activity. 
 
Rabbi Zarum said that there was some evidence that more applications were now 
beginning to be received from pupils in the more religious primary schools, indicating 
that parents had confidence that their children could be comfortable and not isolated. 
JFS was not just another community school and had a specifically Jewish ethos that 
it was desirable to enhance. Unfortunately, at the moment, many of the more 

 

religious pupils were not able to obtain places and the proposal or some variation of 
it could assist in strengthening the ethos. The addition of 20 to 30 more pupils with a 
Higher Certificate would not change the JFS image to the extent that it would deter 
the less observant from applying. 
 
Mrs Fainer said that there were still some more observant parents who were 
reluctant to apply in case the random selection process resulted in their children 
being left as one of the very few practicing orthodox pupils. This proposal would give 
them greater assurance that there would always be a reasonably sized cohort. The 
requirement for a Certificate of Religious Practice was well established and the 
proposal would simply build on what was already there. 
 
In discussion, a number of issues were raised: 
 
•  The School already had a significant minority of pupils whose families were 
more observant and the additional 20 or 30 might not make much difference 
to perceptions. 
 
•  The Jewish Education curriculum was being changed so that all teaching 
would be text based with the addition of the equivalent of a yeshiva stream; 
this, in itself, should provide reassurance to more orthodox families 
 
•  Care would have to be taken to ensure that a change in the policy of this kind 
could be achieved legally. 
 
•  Whilst it was necessary to reach out to the more observant part of the 
community, this change could give the wrong message and damage the JFS 
image by signaling that children were being placed in different categories and 
not all being given the same learning opportunities.  
 
•  The change could have the unintended consequence of making the less 
observant parents feel that the chances of obtaining a place were diminished. 
 
The Chairman said that clearly there was a wide variety of views within the 
Committee and he invited Mrs Fainer and Rabbi Zarum to reflect carefully on them 
and, in particular, those expressed by the SLT, possibly discuss the issues with the 
Deputy Headteacher for Jewish Life & Learning, and then bring back their proposal 
to the Committee should they wish. 
 
8.  
Any other Business   
 
Mr Lee said that there was some parental concern about the position of those who 
wished to change their first choice to JFS but believe they could not do so until after 
the start of the Autumn Term. The Chairman invited him to discuss this further with 
Ms Ratnarajah outside the meeting. 
 
 
Signed: ____________________________ 
 
 Date: _____________ 

 

CONFIDENTIAL 
 
 
 

MINUTES OF THE PART II MEETING OF THE GOVERNING 
BODY HELD ON MONDAY 3RD APRIL 2017 
 
 
Present:  
 
Acting Chairman:    
Ms Geraldine Fainer          
 
Governors: 
 
Mr Simon Appleman (Items 1 – 6) 
Mrs Joanne Coleman          
     
Mr John Cooper  
     
 
 
Rabbi Daniel Epstein  
 
     
Mr Michael Goldmeier         
 
Mr Michael Lee 
            
     
Mr David Lerner 
            
 
Ms Debby Lipkin (Items 1 – 6) 
           
Mr Richard Martyn             
 
Mrs Anne Shisler 
            
      
Mr Stuart Waldman   
 
 
Associate Members: 
Mr Andrew Moss 
 
Rabbi Dr Raphael Zarum 
  
SLT:   
 
 
Mr Jamie Peston (Items 1 – 6) 
 
Clerk:   
 
           Dr Alan Fox   
 
 
1. 
Minutes of Previous Meetings 
 
The GB approved the draft minutes of the Part II meetings held on 12th 
December 2016 and 27th February 2017. 
 
2. 
Gesher 
 
Mr Appleman reminded the GB that Gesher was a new independent Jewish 
special primary school. Progress continued to be made with the request, 
already approved by governors in principle, for Gesher to move onto the JFS 
site, taking over some sports facilities and buildings having replaced them with 
new ones at no cost to JFS. A formal undertaking to meet all initial costs had 
now been received.  
 
3. 
Multi-Academy Trust (MAT) 
 
The Executive Headteacher said that since the last report to the GB there had 
been another meeting at the United Synagogue with other schools that felt 
comfortable moving forward to a possible MAT with JFS towards. However, 

CONFIDENTIAL 
subsequently, the last-minute question by the US about the arrangements for 
ownership of JFS site, had the potential to hold everything up. 
 
It had also been disclosed that in any new MAT, the US wished to have control 
over all appointments and dismissals and admissions, conditions that would 
probably be problematical for JFS and the other schools concerned. 
 
If the proposed Multi-Academy Trust did not proceed for these or other 
reasons, JFS was probably large enough to become an Academy Trust in its 
own right, but this would run counter to Government policy. 
 
4.  
Business Restructure 
 
The Executive Headteacher reported that the restructuring programme had 
been largely successful and was nearly completed. There had been problems 
with the Trade Unions but since It had been possible, in the event, to avoid any 
compulsory redundancies, they had been unable to persuade staff to ballot for 
strike action.  
 
There had been five voluntary redundancies, two of whom were members of 
the teaching staff. It was not yet possible to put a final figure on the total cost 
but because of redeployments, it was now thought unlikely to exceed 
£250,000. There were two appeals to be heard by the end of term against the 
refusal of voluntary redundancy and the suitability of redeployed posts and 
there were two posts left unfilled that would require recruitment action. The 
new support staff structure would be in place for the beginning of the next term. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

 
The GB offered its thanks and congratulations to Mrs Lipkin and her staff for 
the successful conclusion of this difficult but vital exercise.  
 
5.  
Committee Reports 
 
The GB noted: 
 
5.1  
the minutes of the Part II meeting of the Admissions Committee held on 
30th January 2017 
  
5.2  
the summary report of the Finance & Premises Committee  
 
6. 
Any Other Business 
 
The Headteacher said that the GB should be aware that the CST was no 
longer proposing to fund 24 hour security for the School site or any activities on 
site other than educational. The School had been told that the JFS allocation 
from the government grant for security at Jewish schools funds would be cut by 
50% to c £150k pa. Mr Appleman had subsequently had a meeting with the 
CST and the matter was now under further consideration.  
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 


CONFIDENTIAL 
 
7. 
Leadership 
 
At this stage of the meeting Mrs Lipkin and Messrs Appleman and Peston left 
the meeting and the GB considered outstanding School leadership issues. It 
was agreed that Mr Appleman’s current appointment should be extended. 
 
8. 
Any Other Business 
 
There was none. 
 
 
 
Signed       ………………………………… 
    
Date    …………………. 
 
 
(Chairman) 
 

 
 
 

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY (GB) 
HELD ON MONDAY 3RD APRIL 2017 
 
 
Present:  
 
Acting Chairman:    
Ms Geraldine Fainer          
 
Governors: 
 
Mr Simon Appleman 
Mrs Joanne Coleman         Mr John Cooper  
    
Rabbi Daniel Epstein  
Mr Michael Goldmeier        Mr Michael Lee 
           
Mr David Lerner 
           Ms Debby Lipkin 
           Mr Richard Martyn          
Mrs Anne Shisler 
           Mr Stuart Waldman  
 
 
Associate Members: 
Mr Andrew Moss 
 
Rabbi Dr Raphael Zarum 
 
Observer: 
Mr James Lake 
 
 
SLT: 
Mr Daniel Marcus 
 
Mr Jamie Peston 
         
Mr David Wragg  
 
Miss Talia Thoret            
   
Clerk:   
 
           Dr Alan Fox   
 
 
 
1. 
Apologies for absence 
 
Apologies for absence were received from Dr Charlotte Benjamin and Miss Rosie 
Scallon.  
 
2. 
Chairman 
 
A letter of resignation sent by Mrs Ruth Renton was received and noted.  
 
As Vice-Chairman, Mrs Geraldine Fainer, took the Chair for the remainder of the 
meeting and agreed to continue to act until an election could be held during the 
Summer Term. The Clerk to the Governors was asked to circulate an email 
inviting those who were prepared to act as Vice-Chairman to reply to him.  
 
3. 

Declaration of Interests 
 
3.1 
Mr David Lerner advised the meeting that he had a child working at the 
School. 
 
3.2 
Rabbi Daniel Epstein advised that he was an employee of the United 
Synagogue. 
 

4. 
Membership 
 
The GB expressed its gratitude to Ms Rosie Scallon, whose term of office expired 
at the end of term, and welcomed her successor as the Staff Governor, Mr 
James Lake, who had been elected to replace her for a three-year period from 6th 
April 2017. 
 
5.  

Minutes of Previous Meetings  
 
The GB approved the draft minutes of the meetings held on 12th December 2016 
and 9th January 2017.  
 
6. 

Matters Arising - Land Ownership 
 
The Executive Headteacher said that at the last moment a further obstacle had 
arisen to the granting of the new 125-year lease that would give JFS a sufficient 
long-term interest in the premises to satisfy the requirements for moving to 
Academy Trust status. Notwithstanding the negotiations over several years, the 
United Synagogue (US) had now indicated that it disagreed with the proposed 125 
year lease and wondered why it was necessary to make any changes now when a 
review would be necessary when an Academy Trust was formed. Mrs Lipkin had 
arranged to see the CEO of US the following day to find out what the problem 
really was. 
 
7. 
JEWISH LIFE AND LEARNING   
 
Mr Daniel Marcus, the Deputy Headteacher Jewish Life & Learning, introduced 
three reports on elements of Jewish Studies he had been reviewing since his 
appointment. 
 
7.1 -   JiEP Review 
 
Mr Marcus said that the JiEP Department had been without dedicated SLT 
guidance since the departure of Rabbis Kampf and Hirsch. In this time period it 
had achieved a significant amount within the current framework but with limited 
impact. There was now a need for the development of a JiEP vision and ethos 
more aligned with those of the School as a whole and a clarification of roles and 
responsibilities, particularly with third party programme providers. There were a 
number of budgetary issues calling for cost benefit analysis and management of 
its programmes with sustainability in mind. . 
 
7.2 
 Kibbutz Lavi Review  
 
Mr Marcus reported that a review of the JFS long programme at Kibbutz Lavi had 
been undertaken. Most participants found it a very positive experience, although 
the time spent in Israel led to a lag in the students' secular education, and this 
gave rise to some mixed views about the educational value of the programme.  
 
With the increasing cost in recent times exacerbated by the worsening of the 
sterling/shekel exchange rate, the time had now come to consider carefully 
whether it was appropriate to continue to offer this option that could now be 
afforded by only a small minority of parents. The scheme was also very costly in 
terms of staff resources.  
 
 


7.3 
Jewish Studies KS3 Curriculum Planning  
 
Mr Marcus said that since he had last reported to the GB his work on curriculum 
development had continued and progress had been made with the reconstruction 
of the programme and the provision of materials for Year 7. 
 
The 2017 Taste of Israel trip had been successful and was likely to become more 
popular if the Lavi programme shrunk or was discontinued. However, a number 
of changes were required, including review of the suitability of the current 
programme operator. 
 
The term had seen some important Jewish events. The previous level of 
spending on the Purim celebrations being unsustainable, a number of changes 
had been made. The fun of the day had remained but Purim 2017 was self-
funding and indeed made a profit for charity.   
 
One of the highlights of the term had been a small number of Year 7 pupils 
working with three women who attend Jewish Care’s Brenner Community Centre 
in Stamford Hill, helping them to celebrate belated batmitzvot. This had 
culminated in a widely reported event hosted at JFS last week. 
 
Mr Gabor Lacko, a Holocaust survivor, had sponsored a contest for students on 
the Poland Trip, which resulted in outstanding pieces of work in a variety of 
media. The shortlisted entries had been presented to Mr Lacko and the winners 
would be presented with their prizes on the last day term. 
 
In discussion and in response to questions from governors, the following points 
were made: 
 
•  With the new curriculum, the JS Programme for all Year 7 pupils would 
now be text based and the enhanced level curriculum that normally 
attracted up to one third of the entry would study in greater depth. 
 
•  At the moment the JiEP program was not working for all JFS students. In 
future, greater account would be taken of the School’s modern, orthodox 
ethos.  
 
•  Bursaries no longer being sufficient to assist some students, to continue 
the Lavi programme for only the wealthy families would be to foster an 
undesirable elitism.  
 
8.  
Headteacher’s Report 
 
Mr Appleman introduced his Headteacher’s Report. In discussion and in 
response to questions from governors, the following points were made: 
 
•  Two Deputy Teachers and a Senior Data Manager had been recruited but 
there had also been a number of resignations with effect from the end the 
current term and at the end of the academic year. Ten members of staff in 
total were leaving at the end of term, eight from the support staff and two 
teachers.  
 
•  The Science Department had been disproportionately affected by 
resignations. This could have been coincidental but there had been some 
 


concern about the reduction in the number of technicians in the recent 
support staff review. 
 
•  The Curriculum Review had led to a number of changes from September 
2017, including an increase in teacher loadings and an alteration in some 
school day timings. 
 
•  Movements in and out of school had not differed greatly from previous 
years. Whilst having dropped a little from 2015/16, attendance was still 
better than two years ago and remained significantly higher than the 
national average. Efforts were being made to follow up each absence. 
 
•  Until very recently exclusion levels had been very low but there had been 
four separate incidents in the last week that had changed the picture for 
the term. Future reports to the GB would distinguish between number of 
individual pupils and numbers of days. 
 
•  It was sometimes very difficult to handle requests for authorised absences 
from School and to distinguish those where the reasons for being absent 
were genuine.  
 
•  It was probable that Sixth Form numbers would increase in September. 
Applications from external candidates were slightly down on previous 
years but it was anticipated that a higher proportion would take up the 
places. Additionally, more of this year’s Year 11 was likely to stay for 
Years 12 and 13. 
 
9. 
School Improvement Plan 
 
Based on an extensive PowerPoint presentation, the Executive Headteacher 
introduced the previously circulated updated Improvement Plan for the remainder 
of the academic year. The presentation is attached as an appendix to these 
minutes. 
 
In discussion and in response to questions from governors, the following points 
were made: 
 
•  The role of governors in regard to Improvement Programmes was to assist 
in setting goals and holding the School management to account in their 
achievement. 
 
•  Amongst the current principal concerns for the Spring Term had been a 
focus on KS3, improving and embedding the processes for assessment 
and curriculum development. 
 
•  A decision had been taken not to introduce a three-year Key Stage 4 
because it reduced access to a broad and balanced curriculum during Key 
Stage 3. 
 
•  Whereas there had previously been a concentration on the effect of 
teaching and learning on attainment, there would in future be a focus on  
progress. 
 
 


•  Because of the current concentration on Key Stage 3, Mr David Wragg, 
the new Deputy Headteacher Teaching, Learning & Curriculum had taken 
over as Director KS3 for the short term and was initiating leadership 
reviews to ensure consistency of practice. 
 
•  The February Inset had been focused on literacy. The "accelerated 
reader" programme was taking longer than had been hoped to be 
extended to Year 8 
 
•  There had also been concentration on homework, support for SEN and 
EAL pupils in class and the completion of the Curriculum and Timetable 
Reviews.  
 
Mrs Lipkin explained that the February Inset had also looked at the initiatives that 
been taken to improve relationships with parents. However, there was 
considerable staff concern about the volume of communication generated, some 
of it couched in inappropriate terms of response expectation, tone and language. 
Governors confirmed that the GB was ready, if required, to make it clear that 
abuse of the new arrangements was unacceptable and would support any 
proportionate anti-abuse restrictions introduced. Any detailed arrangements 
would be reviewed by the Pay & Personal Committee. 
 
10. 
Admissions and Possible Bulge Class 
 
It was reported that the first tranche of offers for Year 7 entry in September 
resulted in 247 acceptances. By agreement with Brent 63 places were offered in 
a second tranche on 31st March, that is earlier than in previous years, and, if 
necessary, further offer dates would be similarly advanced. Current indications 
were that there would be insufficient applicants on the eventual waiting list to 
justify a bulge class, although the School might accommodate a few more pupils. 
 
11. 

Safeguarding  
 
The GB noted the detailed safeguarding report by Miss Thoret, the Deputy 
Headteacher for Student Wellbeing, Behaviour and Attendance. The report 
incorporated detailed analyses of safeguarding and child protection cases at JFS 
with an overview of referrals made to social care and the levels of intervention as 
well as the updated 2016/17 Action Plan.  
 
12.  
Budget 2017/18 
 
The GB had before it the summary of the draft Budget for 2017/18 recommended 
by the Finance & Premises Committee and supporting projections for the 
following two years and with the main assumptions incorporated in a PowerPoint 
presentation.  
 
Introducing the figures, Mr Waldman said that as reported earlier the preliminary 
budget assessment last autumn had indicated a deficit in excess of £1M.  
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the 
School and/or a third party; 
 Since then a great deal of time had been devoted by the staff to a line-by-line 
scrutiny and the budget had passed through a number of iterations. It had been 
possible to find savings in discretionary spending but the size of the deficit was 
much too large to be eliminated in this way. It was necessary also to engage on 
 


the current restructuring exercise, which was in any case required to improve 
efficiency. the as the best means to find savings of the right magnitude. The one 
off restructuring costs could be as high as £350k, but those aside the deficit had 
been reduced from the original £1M to £150k. Work was still continuing with 
some known minor amendments to be introduced but these would not affect the 
overall figures, and, and at a recent meeting the Trustees had recently agreed to 
cover those sums, so that the 2017/18 budget could be balanced. The budget 
have been prepared on a very conservative basis; the redundancy costs might be 
lower than £350k and the income raised by fundraising might well be higher than 
the current projection that had been based only on known pledges. 
 
At the moment Years 2 and 3 required balancing income from the Trusts of 
£240k and £300k respectively. However, these needs would be diminished to the 
extent that the School Roll and fundraising increased, assumptions with which 
the Finance & Premises Committee was comfortable.  
Section 43 –  information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

 
In discussion, the following points were made: 
 
•  Whilst other state schools did not receive grants from Charitable Trusts, 
they nevertheless sought voluntary contributions and had fundraising 
programmes. 
 
•  The percentage of JFS students who qualified for pupil premium payments 
was much lower than the national average. 
 
•  Whilst efforts were being to change the approach made to parents, the 
Trust was concerned that increasing the rate of Voluntary Contribution 
would have an adverse effect on the total sum collected. 
 
•  There were some 200 families who made no voluntary contributions 
whatsoever. 
 
As proposed by Mr Waldman and seconded by the Chairman, the GB approved 
the draft 2017/18 Budget as recommended by the Finance & Premises 
Committee and with the minor amendments referred to during the meeting. The 
Chairman offered the GB’s thanks to all those responsible for the work leading to 
this successful conclusion. 
 
13.  
Best Value Statement 
 
The GB took note of the 2017 Best Value Statement prepared by the Finance & 
Premises Committee.  
 
14.  
Scheme of Financial Delegation 
 
The GB approved the 2017 Scheme of Financial Delegation recommended by 
the Finance & Premises Committee.  
 
15.  
Schools Financial Value Standard 
 
The GB approved the 2017 SFVS self-assessment as recommended by the 
 


Finance & Premises Committee.  
 
16.  
Pathways and Provision 
 
The GB received a presentation from Mr David Wragg, the Deputy Headteacher 
for Teaching, Learning and Curriculum. Illustrated by a set of PowerPoint slides 
provided with the meeting papers, he explained the planned alternative pathways 
developed for JFS pupils both potentially leading to university education or 
employment. Following the broad curriculum studied for three years at Key Stage 
3, from September 2017 the pathway would provide pupils with a credible 
alternative to the academic English Baccalaureate (EBacc) route via GCSE and 
A level to university. 
 
EBacc was a suite of GCSE examinations in English, mathematics, history or 
geography, sciences and a language and was not to be confused with the 
European Baccalaureate. Successful completion allowed pupils to move either to 
studying for A-level qualifications or Level 3 or Level 4 Apprenticeships, either of 
which could lead to university or directly to employment. Both of these endpoints 
could also be approached via the non-EBacc route, which led after Key Stage 3 
to Level 2 or Level 3 Vocational Qualifications (A level equivalent) or various 
levels of Apprenticeship. 
 
This represented a major change and meant that every student, regardless of 
GCSE results, could stay at JFS following a vocational or apprenticeship route, 
both of which would still retain Jewish Studies. No other secondary school 
offered such a wide range of options and it might be possible to negotiate 
arrangements for other schools in the area to benefit from the courses from the 
new pathways on a repayment basis. 
 
In September 2018 vocationally based technical qualifications would be offered 
at Key Stages 3 & 4 in both the EBacc and non-EBacc streams. JFS would still 
offer the very high number of 22 A-level choices. This overall widening of the JFS 
curriculum might require additional buildings and the practical possibilities and 
funding were all under consideration.  
 
The GB thanked Mr Wragg for his presentation and for the immense amount of 
work that lay behind it. 
 
17.  
Committee Reports 
 
The GB noted: 
 
17.1   the summary report of the Admissions Committee and the minutes of its 
meeting held on 30th January 2017; 
  
17.2   the summary report of the Curriculum and Student Welfare & Behaviour 
Committee and the draft minutes of its meeting held on 6th February 2017; and  
 
17.3   the draft minutes of the meeting of the Finance & Premises Committee 
held on 6th February 2017. 
 
No report of the Pay & Personnel Committee was provided to this meeting of the 
GB. 
 
 


18.  
Terms of Reference 
 
The GB approved terms of reference for the Pay & Personnel Committee. 
 
19.  
Reviewed Policies 
 
The GB approved the updated Charging Policy as recommended by the Finance 
& Premises Committee and the Confidentiality Policy as recommended by the 
CSWAB Committee. 
 
20. 
Policy Schedule 
 
The GB took note of the schedule of policies updated by the Mr Appleman, 
indicating the date of approval, the date for review and the reviewing authority. 
 
21.  
Skills Audit 
 
The GB noted the outcome of the Autumn Term skills audit, covering 42 areas of 
expertise and which identified those were the levels were lower than desirable. 
 
22.  Any Other Business 
 
There was none. 
 
 
 
Signed       ………………………………… 
    
Date    …………………. 
 
 
(Chairman) 
 
 


 
 
JFS SCHOOL 
 
MINUTES OF FINANCE & PREMISES COMMITTEE PART II MEETING 
HELD ON MONDAY, 22ND MAY 2017 
 
Present:
 
 
Chairman: 
  
Mr Stuart Waldman 
 
Governors:  
Mr John Cooper  
 
Mr Michael Lee  
 
  
Mr David Lerner  
 
Mr Richard Martyn    
 
 
 
 
 
In Attendance: 
 
Mr Simon Appleman (Headteacher) 
Ms Debby Lipkin (Executive Headteacher) 
Mr Jamie Peston 
Mrs Mary Nithiy 
Mr Graeme Pocock (Estates Manager) (Items 1 - 6) 
 
Clerk: 
 
 Dr Alan Fox     
 
 
1. 
MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The Committee approved the minutes of the previous Part II meeting held on 
27th March, 2017. 
 
2. 
PFI CONTRACT 
 
Mrs Lipkin reported that she had been approached by Mr Harvey Bard, 
formerly the Chairman of Jarvis, seeking initially to explore the how he might 
assist with the improvement of the services received by JFS under the PFI 
contract. There were many possibilities assisting with the funding of a buy out 
of the PFI contact or part thereof, facilitating the purchase of the contact bu 
another provider to funding litigation from the provision of capital to buy out 
the contract. 
 
The investigation had been passed to Michael Goldstein who had asked for a 
great deal of information and access to documentation. Much of this was 
subject to a confidentiality with 1440 who were being approached for   
consent to the release subject to further confidentiality arrangements. 

 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

3.  
SECURITY 
 
Mr Appleman reported that discussions with the CST about the reduction in 
security grant had continued and the remaining difference was only £5000. 
The CST was taking the view that manned guarding was only during the 
official school working hours and that technology had improved sufficiently 
that remotely accessed CCTV coverage would sufficient at other times. The 
new reduced level was intended to cover manned guarding only between 5:30 
AM and 8 PM. Given agreement on the grant quantum, the CST had also 
offered to fund the initial installation of any further cameras required.  
 
In discussion, the following points were made: 
 
The CST had said that reductions in funding of security for schools were 
necessary because of a need to increase the funding for security of 
synagogues. On the other hand, it had been reported that the CST was 
cutting synagogue funding using the argument of an additional requirement 
for schools. Mr Lerner offered to approach his contacts to resolve this 
apparent paradox. 
ACTION MR LERNER 
 
Adding the cost of the additional security that would be required, could render 
third-party usage uneconomic with a consequential loss of income. However, 
stopping this usage might be a breach of the original planning permission. 
 
A reduction in the security of the site might have an adverse effect on parental 
and other outside perceptions and cause a reduction in voluntary 
contributions. 
 
Remote monitoring would mean that alarm signals would have to be referred 
to keyholders prepared to travel to the site at short notice at any time. 
 
In further discussion, governors expressed concern about the CST security 
adviser role at the same time as having a possible vested interest in the 
advice being given. In these circumstances, it might be appropriate to 
resurrect earlier proposals to appoint a third party contractor simply to review 
the level of security provided. The Chairman offered to check on the 
arrangements as JCOSS. 
ACTION CHAIRMAN 
 
The possibility of approaching Gerald Ronson was left on hold pending the 
resolution of the points referred to above and the completion of negotiations 
with the CST. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 


 
 
 
Signed: ______________________ 
    Date: _______________________ 
 
(Chairman) 
 

 
 
JFS SCHOOL 
 
 

MINUTES OF FINANCE & PREMISES COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON  
MONDAY, 22ND MAY 2017 
 
Present:
 
 
Chairman: 
  
Mr Stuart Waldman 
 
Governors:  
Mr John Cooper  
 
Mr Michael Lee  
 
 
  
Mr David Lerner  
 
Mr Richard Martyn    
 
 
 
 
 
In Attendance: 
 
Mr Simon Appleman (Headteacher) 
Ms Debby Lipkin (Executive Headteacher) 
Mr Jamie Peston 
Mrs Mary Nithiy 
Mr Graeme Pocock (Estates Manager) (Items 1 - 6) 
 
Clerk: 
 
 Dr Alan Fox     
 
1.   

APOLOGIES  
 
Apologies for absence were received from Mr Andrew Moss.  
 
2. 

DECLARATION OF INTERESTS 
 
No declarations were made. 
 
3. 
 MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The Committee approved the minutes of the previous meeting held on 27th March 
2017 
 
4.  
MATTERS ARISING NOT COVERED BY SUBSTANTIVE AGENDA ITEMS 
 
4.1 - Item 4.3 - Audit Engagement Letter – the Chairman confirmed that the letter in 
the terms approved had been duly dispatched.  
 
4.2 – Item 5 – Legionella - The Estates Manager confirmed that checks were being 
carried out satisfactorily. 
 

5.  
PREMISES 
 
Mr Pocock introduced his May update report and answered questions raised by the 
Committee. In addition to the items minuted separately, the following points were 
made: 
 
•  There were continuing concerns about the quality of service from KSSL that 
would be raised at a meeting the following day with the Semperian Regional 
Director. The shortcomings were illustrated by the lack of utilities consumption 
information since August 2015 and failure to provide proposed benchmark 
prices to apply from April 2017. There remained differences of interpretation 
of Service Level Agreements, exacerbated by turnovers in the contractor’s 
staff. The Estates Manager was asked to report the outcome to the following 
meeting. 
ACTION MR POCOCK 
•  The potential desirability and economic viability of taking over some services 
from the PFI contractor continued to be examined. 
 
•  It had just been confirmed that LCVAP funding applications for four projects 
had been approved by Brent. As usual significant efforts would have to be 
made to ensure that expenditure on each of the projects was committed by 
next January. 
 
•  There had been a meeting with the United Synagogue about the ongoing land 
issues. It appeared that the US now considered that it did not have the power 
to grant the proposed new long lease to the Governing Body and that this 
would have to be done by a successor Trust to the London Board for Jewish 
Religious Education. 
Section 43 –  information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

 
•  There had been a misunderstanding about the number of changing rooms to 
be provided as part of the Gesher School Project about. Resolution had 
caused reconsideration of the costings and Gesher now wished to create a 
new building, as opposed to extending existing facilities. As negotiations 
continued, decisions might be required at relatively short notice and it would 
be cumbersome to have to revert regularly to the Governing Body. The 
Chairman would discuss with the Chairman of the GB the possibility of 
delegation to the Committee or to a Sub- Committee. 
ACTION CHAIRMAN 
 
•  Discussions continued with the Wolfson Trust about further phases of the 
Technology Project. In the meantime, the School’s architect was preparing a 
"Pre-Application" to precede the submission of a full Planning Application. A 
difficulty was foreseen in persuading the LA Planning Department that new 
space should be employed instead of redesigning and refurbishing existing 
buildings.  
 
6. 
 SECURITY 
 
The Link Governor for Security and the Headteacher gave verbal reports. 
 
 


7. 
MARCH MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTS AND 2017/18 BUDGET  
 
The Committee considered the Income and Expenditure Account for the year ended 
March 2017, noting that it remained largely as previously forecast. The latest 
forecast costs of the restructuring exercise, including fees for external assistance 
and all statutory and voluntary payments, were lower than predicted but the exercise 
was not yet complete. The drawdown from the Charitable Trust was correspondingly 
lower. In addition, there had been an increase in teaching relating costs, which 
related to additional supply to cover sickness. 
 
There had been a drop in voluntary contributions and a major exercise was about to 
start to contact individually two key groups of parents. First, there were a number of 
parents of Year 13 pupils who had stopped their regular standing order or direct 
debit payments before the end of the year. In addition, there remained 63 Year 7 
pupils whose parents had not notified the school of any financial hardship but had 
not started making any contribution.  
 
It was noted that there had not yet been any resolution of the Gift Aid tax refund 
issue 12 months after a major submission had been made to HMRC and extreme 
care should be taken in approaches to parents to avoid prejudicing the case. Before 
any further action was taken the School was requested to check the language to be 
used with BDO, the accountancy firm acting pro bono for Jewish schools. Care 
should also be taken to avoid any implication of providing tax advice to parents. 
ACTION MR PESTON 
 
The Committee also took note of the 2017/18 Budget and projected budgets for the 
following two years. The latest current year budget showed the very substantial 
savings that had been made since the initial version seen by the Committee in the 
Autumn Term and the Chairman requested that, together with the previous full-year 
forecast, it be taken as the baseline for all future comparisons provided to inform the 
Committee.  
 
8. 
FINANCE TEAM 
 
Mr Peston reported on the completion of the reorganisation of the Finance Team, 
which was now preparing the Audit that would start in two weeks time. Mrs Nithiy 
had been trained on Exchequer Live reporting software and this was being cascaded 
down to the whole team. It was hoped that, time permitting, the system would go live 
by the end of the month. 
 
In the meantime, Landau Baker, the consultants who had recently advised on the 
Team’s size and structure, had arranged for Mazars to provide a member of staff to 
be present in the Team for four weeks to audit and advise on the Team’s processes 
and working practices.     
 
9.  

HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY 
 
It was agreed that the policy would be reviewed by the Committee at its next 
meeting. 
 
10. 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT PENSION SCHEME DISCRETIONS        
 
It was agreed that the policy would be reviewed by the Committee at its next 
 


meeting. 
 
11. 
STATEMENT OF INTERNAL CONTROL 
  
It was agreed that the statement would be reviewed by the Committee at its next 
meeting.  
 
12.  
ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
There was none. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Signed: ______________________ 
        Date: _______________________ 
 
(Chairman) 
 
 



 
 
 
 JFS School Curriculum and Student Welfare Committee, Attendance & Behaviour (CSWAB) 
Committee 
 
Minutes of meeting held on 19th June 2017 at 6.30 PM. 
 
Chairperson:    
  Ms Geraldine Fainer (GF) 
 
Members present: 

Mrs Joanne Coleman (JC) 
Mr. John Cooper (JCo) 
Dr. Charlotte Benjamin (CB) 
Mr. James Lake (JL) – Staff 
governor 
Mrs Anne Shisler (AS) 
 
Others present: 
Mr. Simon Appleman (SA) 
 
Ms Debby Lipkin (DL) 
Dr. Rabbi Raphael Zarum (RZ) 
 
Ms Talia Thoret (TT) 
 
Mr. David Wragg (DW) 
 
Mr. Dharmesh Chauhan (DC). 
 
 
 
 
1.  Apologies for absence 
None. 
 2.  Minutes of the Curriculum and Student Welfare, Attendance and Behaviour Committee 
(CSWAB) meeting 6th February 2017. 
 The minutes were approved. 
 
3.  Matters Arising 

3a – Item 4.4 Findings of February Behaviour and Learning Walk and Governor 
participation in following walk – covered in Agenda item 4 – Behaviour. 
 
3b – Item 6.1 See Timetable Review (3b) below. 
 
3c Item 7 – Literacy Plan – Rosie Scallon who was the literacy coordinator has now left JFS. 
Part of the role is being covered by Liz Cotterall and Matt Marks who is a newly appointed 
English teacher will take on the full role in September. 
 
3d – Item 9.2 Formal Jewish Education Action Plan – a decision was made for this to be a 
standing item at FGB rather than discussed initially at CSWAB because it is considered so 
important that all governors should be involved in all discussions. However a concern was 
raised that it could lead to long discussions and prolong FGB. Some governors thought it 

 

would be useful for a working group to discuss issues to be presented to FGB. Daniel Marcus 
has now taken over the working party lead previously by CB. 
 
Action point: GF to ask FGB if they want the Jewish Education Plan to be dealt with by 
CSWAB  initially or just FGB in future. 
 
3b. Timetable Review – SA. 
Outcomes from September 2017; 
•  50 lessons / fortnight up from 48 
•  More lessons allocated to Maths and English at KS4 
•  PSHE lesson 1/ fortnight for years 7-11. 
•  Maths and English for year 10 reduced to 2 / fortnight down from 3. 
•  Teacher loadings in line with other schools and budgetary requirements 
•  In 6th Form, 3 A’ level subjects to be taken rather than 4. 
 
Questions; 
Q – Were the staff and Unions consulted? 
A- Yes it was discussed at leadership forums and other staff meetings. There is a general 
acceptance and staff can see the rationale behind it but it was not a popular decision. The 
national agreement is for 10% protected time and at JFS staff will be teaching for a  
maximum of 84% of the time so there was no issue for the Unions. 
 
JL said that although most staff accepted it, heads of year expressed their concerns that 
they were already over-burdened with 32 lessons increasing to 34 lessons. 
 
It was noted that each year group now has a full-time pastoral care officer, year 7 has a 
transition coordinator and year 11 has an assistant head of year. These are all non-teaching 
posts. TT explained that this meant parents could be contacted during the day rather than 
after teaching addressing issues more quickly. There are also new posts – directors of KS3 
and KS4 with the aim of creating smaller schools within the school. 
 
Q- What has been the impact on Ivrit and JS lessons? 
A- Ivrit has been maintained at 4 lessons / week but an additional JS lesson cannot be 
staffed at present. RZ asked if this could be reviewed when staffing issues have been 
resolved. DL said there will be additional drop down days in JS. 
 
4. Attendance – Report presented by SA. 
Key points; 
•  Year 7 attendance has mirrored the pattern of the last 2-3 years. 
•  There has been a big improvement in 6th Form attendance. 
•  The national average for attendance is 95% and JFS average is 95.25%. 
•  Lateness in years 7-11 is becoming a problem. It may be only 5-10 minutes late for 
roll call but it has reached a level now that requires action. It will be addressed 
generally in tutor base and individually via tutors. 
•  After Pesach, 6th Form attendance drops as many students choose to work 
independently at home. 
•  Timely data is now available down to individual student level and is being acted 
upon. 
 
It was noted that Jo Coleman who has been the link governor for attendance ends her 
term of office this August and so a new governor has to be appointed to take on this 

 

role.  
Questions: 
Q- Is 6th form attendance recorded in second half of the summer term when they are on 
study leave? 
A – Figures are not collected nationally for this period for 6th form. 
 
Q – Should 6th form be given more study leave if pupils are taking it anyway? 
A – JFS position is that it is better for them to attend the specialist workshops and support 
made available to students during this period. 
 
Q – How quickly is attendance data available? 
A- Monthly reports are provided to staff. Governors would like the attendance data at the 
same time as it is provided to staff. 
 
5. Progress Update – Report presented by DC. 
Year 13 – Last year grade predictions were very accurate and if this year is the same, there 
will be very good outcomes. Increase in A-A* predictions 56% up from 49% last year and A*-
C grade predictions up by 1%. Key subjects for increases are computing, theatre studies, 
further maths and sport. Drop in predictions for fine art and media. Staff are using the 
progress data on each student now in a systematic way. 
 
Year 12 – Some subjects are still doing the AS level but many are not. The grades in the 
report are ‘working at’ grades, not predictions so should go up. 
 
Year 11 – 2017 Spring term GCSE predictions for A-G now converted to 9-1 grades.  The new 
grades are based on progress expected so staff can compare students to the national 
average and identify the lowest cohort to focus intervention. 
Maths and English are new courses so the predictions are very conservative and cannot be 
compared to previous years. 
 
SEN K, S and E are not making as much progress as other students. In addition the high 
attainers in Maths are not showing as much progress. The government expectations for this 
group increased while it was reduced for al  other cohorts. It was noted that it is more 
difficult to show progress at the top of the scale and maintaining a level 8 or 9 should be 
considered progress. 
 
Year 10 – Grades are looking promising but they are all new curriculums (except for Ivrit and 
IT) on the 9-1 scale with nothing to compare to currently. 
 
DL stated that the new data system is almost fully embedded and wanted it acknowledged 
how valuable the work of the data team has been in making this progress. Staff meet 
regularly with the data team to analyze data. 
 
DC said that after the data drop, staff develop intervention plans for underperforming 
groups. Not al  plans are robust enough and some departments require development work 
on this. Some are better at differentiating work for SEN students, some plans detail support 
down to individual students and others provide more generic information for whole groups. 
 
Questions; 
Q – How does the school know if they are doing wel  based on the progress scores? 

 

A- Positive numbers are good. Last year a grade ‘5’ was comparable to a GCSE ‘C’. This year, 
a ‘5’ = ‘4.5’ last year, so the numbers are not comparable. 
 
Q- How was Maths GCSE this year? 
A – Students found 2 out of the 3 papers good and one very difficult. 
 
Q- How does the data help with the quality of teaching? 
A – Heads of Year get a summary to identify key groups that require additional support and 
they meet with the data team and the SENCO to discuss interventions. Staff can track by 
class therefore can see any patterns and can inform performance management actions. It 
was noted however that caution is required when teachers share classes. 
 
Q – Has the Accelerated Reading Programme had an impact this year? 
A- It hasn’t been fully embedded yet and the literacy coordinator has left so an impact 
assessment will be completed once the new coordinator is in place. 
 
Q- Should the improvement in progress be part of the school’s PR, not just focusing on 
attainment and grades? 
A – Unfortunately most people don’t understand Progress 8 enough to focus on this but 
information is provided in the newsletter. 
 
DC was thanked for his work and that of the data team. 
 
6. Behaviour – Report presented by TT 
Key Points: 
•  Overall drop in referrals to the behaviour room since February 
•  SEN K stil  higher than expected behaviour issues, although incidences down by 26% 
from last year. 
•  Year 8 and 9 particular issues 
•  Improving communication with parents / guardians 
•  Aiming to establish an automatic letter to parents/guardians when behaviour points 
hit 40+ 
•  SLT on-call, now replaced with SLT on hourly duty rota, visiting classes with 
behaviour issues, checking corridors/toilets and supporting teachers if incidents 
occur. 
•  Subject leads to be more involved at early stages rather than immediate referrals to 
the behaviour team. 
•  Ongoing training for teachers on behaviour management. 
•  New post from September – Behaviour Co-coordinator, non-teaching role and will be 
available full time. 
•  Educational Psychologist – once/fortnight 
•  Working with Norwood to locate a family worker in the school 
•  Aim to create and multi-disciplinary team on site. 
•  Culture change in managing behaviour from fear to mutual respect between staff 
and students – this will take time to embed. 
 
Questions; 
Q – There is a perception that behaviour is deteriorating and some teachers feel restorative 
justice always fal s in the favour of the student which may result in them no longer referring. 
A – Some teachers need training in restorative justice and how to response to students who 
express themselves inappropriately. Issues can still be resolved but need to be managed in 

 

the right way to ensure respect for teachers and students having a voice. 
 
Q – Is the rewards system money well spent? 
A – Yes. Some students have the maturity to find satisfaction in achievement and good 
behaviour alone. Others still require outside validation to motivate them, which the reward 
system provides. It’s very popular. 
 
Q- Is there a different threshold for SEN Students for referrals to the behaviour team? 
A – Yes. For example students with ADHD find it more difficult to settle down. Teachers 
need to be aware that they should not apply the behaviour policy the same way for al  
students regardless of their needs. It has helped having SEN students in the departments 
and the Head of Inclusion post wil  also help. 
 
7. Safeguarding Update – TT. 
There has been a lot of issues this term after the death of a 6th Form pupil and an ex-pupil. 
Support was put in place for al  students affected including input from the educational 
psychologist, Grief Encounter and the Health Hut. Grief Encounter wil  come into school 
weekly to the Health Hut and wil  target students who have suffered loss or bereavement. 
There was also an Inset day for staff on Loss and Bereavement. 
In the lower school there has been some anxieties about events in the news and students 
with vulnerabilities wil  be identified and supported. 
 
The Safeguarding team meet every 2-3 weeks in addition to meetings with Heads of Year to 
discuss individual students to ensure no one fal s through the net. The team use a risk 
assessment to see if a student meets the threshold for intervention. The school has a 
number of children supported by Social Services as Children in Need (CIN) and two Child 
Protection (CP) cases. 
 
The next stage is to switch from paper to electronic folders. Someone is being employed to 
scan al  the documents and extra data security is being put in place to ensure data 
protection. CB visited the Safeguarding team this team as the new Safeguarding Governor. 
 
Questions; 
Q- Do the staff feel secure in light of recent events? 
A –No concerns have been raised. It is clear the security and entry systems have been 
tightened up. 
 
Q- Are all evacuation plans and fire drills up to date? 
A – Yes these were discussed by staff today. 
 
8. SEN Update 
AS had a telephone meeting with the SENCO who is working on the report. This will be 
covered in FGB. 
 
9. Policies 
9.1 a – Continuing Professional Development – This has not been reviewed as it is now 
covered in the Teaching and Learning Policy and performance management covers this. 
 
9.1b – Careers, Education and Information, Advice and Guidance – DC noted that Young 
Enterprise is not mentioned in the policy. 
Policy approved subject to inclusion of Young Enterprise. 

 

Action point: SA to include Young Enterprise in the policy. 
 
9.1c – Behaviour (incorporating school response to drugs) - Approved. 
 
9.1d – Special Educational Needs & Disability – This requires significant changes and will be 
reviewed at FGB in July. 
 
9.2 – Wi-Fi 
Current Wi-Fi provision covers 30-40% of the school. It was only set up for approximately 
100 users not the whole school and not for students or guests.  Costs to upgrade the Wi-Fi 
are high due to the PPI agreement. It is deemed a capital project, not an extension. If 
funding is found it will be installed during the summer holidays. 
 
10. Any Other Business. 
JL (staff governor) made a request that exit interviews, which are conducted as a matter of 
good practice, should be offered to staff that are leaving, with a governor present. JL also 
requested a staff survey. 
 
 
Date of Next Meeting: TBC. 
 
 
 
Signed: _______________________________________   Date: ____________________ 

 

link to page 47
 
 
Personnel and Pay Committee Part II. 
 
Minutes of meeting held on 24th June 2017 at 6:30 PM. 
 
Members present: 

Mrs Geraldine Fainer (GF) Acting Chairman 
 
Mr. Michael Goldmeier (MG) 
 
Mr. Richard Martyn (RM) 
 
 
Others present: 
Mr. Simon Appleman (SA) 
 
Ms. Debby Lipkin (DL) 
 
Mr. Jamie Peston (JP) 
 
Mr. Andrew Moss (AM). 
 
 
 
  
1.  Apologies for absence 
Apologies received from Stuart Waldman. 
 
2.  Minutes of Personnel and Pay Committee meetings Part II held on 1st December 
2016 and February 7th 2017. 
 
2.1 1st December 2016 – Approved  
 
2.2 7th February 2017 – Approved subject to the following amendments; 
  
•  Meeting title date to be changed to 2017 from 2016. 
•  All references to JP to be replaced with ‘a member of SLT’  
•  In section 2.4 Way Ahead - removal of incorrect phrase ‘the Executive 
Headteacher’s last day at school (8 February)’  
•  In section 3. Senior Posts - removal of the sentence ‘Including pension, this was 
remunerated with…’ 
 
 
3.  Matters Arising  
 
Pay (1st December 2016 minutes) – Governors to be told the total salary figure at the 
Finance and Premises meeting on 8.12.16 – action completed. 
 
4.  Review of Pay Policy with regard to R & R Payments. 
From September 2017, 60members of staff will be receiving R& R payments. Only 6 
people have the recruitment award. 3 are new members of staff, 2 are for JS teachers 
whose awards will end next year (on year 2 of a 3yr award) and 1 is in the budget for 
another JS teacher. 
Section 40 (1) – the request is for the applicants personal data.   
The current Pay Policy is not being adhered to in relation to R & R payments, in that the 
payments are being made as ongoing and not being reviewed as stated in the contracts. 
When this was first discussed it was felt that the impact on morale would be too great if the 
                                                           
1 To be confirmed by Debbie Lipkin. 

 

policy was implemented at the time, so the review was postponed until now. SLT asked the 
governors whether now is the time to freeze R & R payments or allow them to continue 
increasing year on year. This would be discussed with the Unions prior to any changes. The 
Governors agreed in principle to a freeze, subject to Union responses and legal advice 
regarding whether the current situation would fall under ‘Custom and Practice’ i.e. as these 
payments have been made for several years unchallenged, do they now constitute a 
contractual obligation?. 
 
Questions: 
Q – What is the role of the governing body in agreeing R & R payments? 
A – R & R payments are at the discretion of the Headteacher but the Governors have a duty 
to review annually. 
 
Q – Why do some teachers receive two payments? 
A – Some staff received one and also had a TLR. Others can receive one award from the 
school and one from governors. 
 
Q – Does the Governor’s award still exist as it isn’t mentioned in the policy? 
A – No, there is now, no Governor’s award. 
 
Action point:  
•  SLT to circulate number of R & R awards to governors. 
•  SLT to discuss the issue of a freeze with the Unions and report back to the 
committee. 
 
5.  Restructuring and Further Developments 
The Chair noted an external report prepared by SLT. 
 
The Executive Headteacher asked for it noted that members of SLT should be credited with 
producing an excellent business case and completing successful negotiations with the 
Unions during a difficult time for the school. This was highlighted by the external consultant’s 
report. The report described JFS’s process as ‘a model redundancy process’. There were 
high risks involved that caused concern for governors and the SLT team with support from 
external advisers demonstrated a high level of competency in managing the re-structure. 
 
Michael Goldmeier said he was reassured by the comments in Andy Pott’s report and 
congratulated the SLT on the steps they had taken which had avoided strike action. 
 
 
The final costs and savings varied slightly from that forecast originally with the cost of the 
restructure being lower than the forecast. The timeline for the process changed and not all 
information was available at the time. The only outstanding issue in the report is the 
possibility of one constructive dismissal claim that is still within the time frame for application. 
 
6.  Any other business 
None. 
 
Date of Next Meeting:
 tbc 
 
 
 
 
Signed: __________________________________  
 
Date: ______________ 

 

 
 
JFS SCHOOL 
 
MINUTES OF FINANCE & PREMISES COMMITTEE PART II MEETING 
HELD ON MONDAY, 3RD JULY 2017 
 
Present:
 
 
Chairman: 
  
Mr Stuart Waldman 
 
Governors:  
Mr John Cooper  
 
Mr Michael Lee  
 
 
Mr Richard Martyn    
 
 
 
 
 
In Attendance: 
 
Mr Simon Appleman (Headteacher) (Items 1 - 2) 
Ms Debby Lipkin (Executive Headteacher) 
Mr Jamie Peston  
Mrs Mary Nithiy  (Items 1 - 3) 
 
Clerk: 
 
 Dr Alan Fox     
 
 
1. 
MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The Committee approved the minutes of the previous Part II meeting held on 
22nd May 2017. 
 
2.  

SECURITY 
 
Reminding the Committee of the history of the reduction in the security grant, 
the Headteacher reported that in the latest discussions, the CST continued to 
contend that, with the introduction of a more effective remote monitoring 
system and intruder warning around the perimeter, the 24 hour on site 
security that it had previously recommended was no longer necessary. The 
CST would now support financially manned guarding only during the official 
school working hours, namely between 5:30 AM and 8 PM, as illustrated on a 
chart that was circulated to the Committee, even though the site was used 
outside those hours. The CST had also offered to fund the initial installation of 
any further cameras required.  
 
The Committee considered the unbudgeted financial consequences of 
maintaining the current level of security or various reduced options on the 

basis of a chart distributed by Mr Appleman.  In discussion the following 
points were made: 
 
•  The philosophy underlying the new CST recommendation that the 
building did not need to be guarded if unoccupied appeared to be 
driven by resource implications. Whilst these could not be ignored, 
assessment of risk should initially be made on its own merits 
independently of the financial consequences and should clearly be 
distinguishable.   
 
•  Whilst it was noted that JCOSS did not have 24/7 manned cover, the 
abrupt change in security advice might well be regarded as 
unacceptable and should be taken up with Mr Gerald Ronson.  
 
•  The timescale for making changes was increased by the requirement 
to work through the PFI contractor 
 
•  Pending the outcome of any separate negotiation funding was going to 
be withdrawn in two weeks time and urgent decisions were required. 
 
•  It was beyond the Committee’s powers to agree to a reduction in 
security cover and an urgent referral to the GB was necessary. 
 
•  If it were decided to maintain a level of security above that funded by 
the CST. resources would have to be found fro elsewhere. A promise 
had been given to the Trust that it would not be approached again for 
additional funding but it might be possible to ask for more parental 
contribution towards the security costs.  
 
•  It was already planned to increase the Voluntary Parental Contribution 
rate in September and to make up the security shortfall would imply 
doubling the increase. This could well be counterproductive. 
Section 43 –  information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the 
School and/or a third party; 

3. 
GIFT AID 
 
A member of the SLT reported on the enhanced action being undertaken by 
the Trust to collect Voluntary Contributions pending the resolution of the 
dispute with HMRC on their eligibility for Gift Aid. He said that 900 of the 1400 
families with pupils at JFS were making contributions. Three hundred of the 
non-contributors were known to have financial difficulties and a concentrated 
effort would be made to contact the remaining 200. In addition letters had 
been sent to Year 7 parents who had not started making payments and to 
Year 13 parents who had ended their payments prematurely. Where 
necessary these would be followed up by telephone calls. 
 
The opportunity of a visit by the DfE Faith Schools Adviser had recently been 
to raise the on-going Voluntary Contributions Gift Aid dispute and had 
appeared to be received sympathetically with an invitation to make a further 

approach if necessary. In the meantime HMRC had recently admitted this 
dispute had nothing to with the Fundraising Dinner and agreed to approve the 
claim made in respect of the donations received on that occasion. This oral 
undertaking would be followed up if the payment were not received during the 
following week. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

4. 
FINANCE TEAM 
 
As requested Landau Baker had provided a consultant who had been working 
alongside the Finance Team  to assist in the improvement of processes and 
procedures and to provide a better reporting system. 
 
 
 
 
Signed: ______________________ 
    Date: _______________________ 
 
(Chairman) 
 

 
 
JFS SCHOOL 
 
 

MINUTES OF FINANCE & PREMISES COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON  
MONDAY, 3RD JULY 2017 
 
Present:
 
 
Chairman: 
  
Mr Stuart Waldman 
 
Governors:  
Mr John Cooper  
 
Mr Michael Lee  
 
 
 Mr Richard Martyn    
 
 
 
 
 
 
In Attendance: 
 
Mr Simon Appleman (Headteacher) (Items 1 – 4) 
Ms Debby Lipkin (Executive Headteacher) 
Mr Jamie Peston  
Mrs Mary Nithiy 
 
Clerk: 
 
 Dr Alan Fox     
 
1.   

APOLOGIES  
 
Apologies for absence were received from Mr David Lerner, Mr Andrew Moss and Mr 
Graeme Pocock.  
 
2. 

DECLARATION OF INTERESTS 
 
No declarations were made. 
 
3. 
SECURITY 
 
The Headteacher gave a verbal report on recent discussions with the CST. 
 
4. 

 MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The Committee approved the minutes of the previous meeting held on 22nd May 
2017 
 
5.  
MATTERS ARISING NOT COVERED BY SUBSTANTIVE AGENDA ITEMS 
 
5.1 
Item 5 – Meeting with Semperian  - The Executive Headteacher reported on a 
meeting held on 23rd May to discuss a number of service deliveries shortcomings, 
the Agenda for which she subsequently circulated to members and appended to 

these minutes. Whilst the firm readily acknowledged its shortcomings, she had 
gained little confidence that they would be speedily rectified. 
 
Together with Mr Michael Goldstein, Mrs Lipkin had also attended a meeting with a 
special unit set up within the DfE to assist schools with PFI contracts. Together with 
Mr Goldmeier she would be taking advice whether the history of the JFS contract 
might lead it to be judged as not fit for purpose and, if so, what could be done about 
it.  
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or 
a third party; 

 
 
5.2 – Item 5 - Gesher - The Chairman confirmed that, as requested, he had raised 
with the Chairman of the GB the possibility of delegation to the Committee or to a 
Sub-Committee powers to make on going decisions required during negotiation. In 
the meantime, there had been no further approach to JFS whilst Gesher’s architect 
looked at different build options. 
 
5.3 - Item 5 - Technology Project - An SLT member reported that the School had 
received an invitation from the Wolfson Trust to apply by 28th July for a second 
phase of the Technology Project.   
 
5.4 - Item 5 – Fundraising - An SLT member provided the Committee with a Gift Aid 
Report.  
 
6.  
PREMISES 
 
In the absence of Mr Pocock there was no Premises Report.  
 
7. 
MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTS AND 2017/18 BUDGET  
 
The Committee considered the latest Management Accounts noting that the deficit 
now forecast for 2107/18 was largely caused by the reduced income from the CST 
for the provision of security. In discussion and in response to questions, the following 
points were made: 
 
•  The Unitary Grant had been increased in line with the CPI Index but the 
additional sum would become due to the PFI contractor.  
 
•  The per capita income for students was lower because the number on the Roll 
was down to 1921 and because of the Brent charge deducted of £15 each. 
However, with a planned small bulge in Year 7 the numbers were expected to 
be in excess of 1950 in September.    
 
•  UJIA was making a grant to JFS in support of Israel related projects and the 
United Synagogue was providing funding in support of Jewish Studies.  
 
•  Fundraising at the first grandparents’ tea had proved very successful and the 
gross income from the James Lakeland fashion show later in the week would 
be donated to the School.   
 
 


The Committee expressed its gratitude to Mrs Nithy who had managed to provide 
the Accounts in time for the meeting despite a family bereavement.  
 
8. 
ACCOUNTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31ST MARCH 2017  
 
The Committee was unable to consider and approve the draft Report and Audited 
Accounts and associated documents for the year ended 31st March 2016 as planned 
because they had not been completed in time by the Auditors. 
 
9. 
PFI ANNUAL REVIEW 
 
In the absence of Mr Lerner and the Estates Manager, the Chairman asked the Clerk 
to contact them to say that he very much hoped that they would be able to complete 
the review before the end of term, so that it could be discussed with Joanne 
Coleman, joint author of the original report, before she left the GB. 
 
10. 
HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY 
 
It was reported that the policy was not yet available for review by the Committee and 
it was agreed that it would be circulated by email as soon as possible. 
 
11. 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT PENSION SCHEME DISCRETIONS POLICY        
 
The policy was approved by the Committee for review by the Governing Body. 
  
12. 
STATEMENT OF INTERNAL CONTROL 
 
Consideration of the Statement of Internal Control was postponed pending receipt of 
the Draft Accounts and Audit Report. 
 
13.  
ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
The Chairman said that this would be the last regular meeting of the Committee that 
Michael Lee and he would be attending, since their terms of office as governors 
expired shortly. On behalf of the School, the Executive Headteacher expressed her 
gratitude to both for the years of service they had given to JFS both on the GB and 
particularly on this Committee. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Signed: ______________________ 
        Date: _______________________ 
 
(Chairman) 
 
 
 


JFS School 
Meeting with KSSL to discuss shortcomings in Service Delivery 
23 May 2017 
 
 
Agenda 
1.  Very poor procurement of building contractors: 
 
Nearly failed to have the External Recreation Space on time. 
 
We could not order the Catering Hut on time. 
 
Poor contractor management by 1440. 
 
The debacle with the Reception Desk contractor not being paid. 
 
Toppers not being paid as they were promised. 
 
 
 
2.  No Benchmarking information 
 
 
The fifth anniversary is September 2007, 2012, 2017 
 
We were promised a process to produce prices for the budget as from 1 April 
2017. 
 
3.  Lack of flexibility to work with the school: 
 
Essential room set-ups for Parents Evenings. 
 
Lack of self-checking by 1440 – toilet paper issues! 
 
4.  ICT 
 
 
Lack of clarity on where the money has gone from last year’s ICT refresh 
fund. 
 
The school had to do the data point survey. 
 
Lack of imagination about reconfiguring the classrooms to suit Interactive 
Screens.  
 
Delays in buying all the Interactive Screens. 
 
Wifi no longer fit for purpose – why no proposals from 1440 without having 
to ask? 
 
5.  Ongoing lack of confidence in KSSL’s maintenance regime.  
 
External doors near the Synagogue. 
 
Lack of a permanent landscape contractor (Query performance management). 
 
Room checks are either absent or not picking up issues like stained ceilings, 
 
EG H226 ceiling and wall; Mezz chair backs. 
 
6.  Poor decorations in some parts of the school. 
 
We were to have a jobbing maintenance man who would do decorations. 
 
Slow sharing of ideas for summer refresh of walls and flooring, 
 
7.  Extensive repairs required for the roof – Sixth Form stairs – recent leak 
 
8.  Slow production of performance reports. 
 
9.  Disorganised Operational & Maintenance Manuals and Health & Safety File. 
 
10. Any Other Business 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or 
a third party; 

 
 


 
 
 
 


 
 
 
MINUTES OF THE PART II MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY 
(GB) HELD ON MONDAY 17TH JULY 2017 
 
 
Present:  
 
Acting Chairman:    
Ms Geraldine Fainer          
 
Governors: 
 
Mr Simon Appleman (Item 1 only)  Dr Charlotte Benjamin       Mrs Joanne Coleman         
Mr John Cooper  
     
Rabbi Daniel Epstein  
 Mr Michael Goldmeier        
Mr James Lake  
 
Mr Michael Lee 
            Mr David Lerner (Item 1 only)  
Ms Debby Lipkin (Item 1 only) Mr Richard Martyn  
 Mrs Anne Shisler             
Mr Stuart Waldman   
 
 
Associate Members: 
Mr Andrew Moss 
 
Rabbi Dr Raphael Zarum 
 
SLT(Item 1 only) 
Mr Anthony Flack 
 
Mr Daniel Marcus 
 Mr Jamie Peston 
           Mr David Wragg  
 Miss Talia Thoret    
           
  
 
Clerk:   
 
           Dr Alan Fox   
 
In Attendance: Mr Jonny Criven (CST Head of Security, London and SE England) 
(Item 1 only)   
 
 
1. 
Security 
 
Mr Goldmeier said that unfortunately JFS, just like other Jewish schools and 
communal organisations, required security arrangements of a higher standard 
than their non-Jewish counterparts. In recognition of this, some years ago the 
Home Office had provided a grant that was administered by the Community 
Security Trust (CST). The CST was also the School’s professional security 
adviser and until recently had recommended 24/7 live guarding at JFS. However, 
it was now advising that when the School was unoccupied an alarm system 
provided a proportionate response to the perceived threat. As a belt and braces 
enhancement, the CST was also suggesting the provision of extra CCTV 
equipment directly accessible from Shield House and updated infrared perimeter 
alarms. Because of the special PFI arrangements, any changes of this kind 
required discussion with the contractor, which, unfortunately, was not always an 
easy process. These changes had potentially significant cost implications. 
 
Mr Criven said that he welcomed the opportunity to explain to governors the 
changes proposed. The Home Office grant had always been intended to cover 
core activities with a few limited extras, such as governors meetings. Because of 

the assessment made when the current site was opened, JFS had been made an 
exception with 24/7 guarding and had remained as such even though there in the 
past decade there had been significant advances in technology. The need had 
now been reassessed because there were more sites to be guarded without any 
increase in grant. 
 
The emphasis was on guarding people and not on buildings that had alarm 
systems. The JFS building alarm system was being upgraded and with CST 
financial assistance the CCTV system with motion detectors was also being 
improved. Only about one hour was required systematically to search the site 
once vacated but new schedules now drawn up allowed two hours for guards to 
check for any suspicious object before the alarm and intruder systems were set. 
Any alarms would be automatically routed immediately to the CST Control Centre 
which, with the assistance of sophisticated computer programmes already 
monitored more than other 200 sites. Alerts from the CST would be passed 
y7also allowed for further site search time before the first regular arrivals on site. 
 
In response to criticism that the Home Office grant had been increased in 2015 
and that insufficient notice had been given to JFS that its share was to be 
reduced Mr Criven said that there was a grant guarantee only up to the end on 
March 2018 and it might be prudent for JFS and similar organisations to build up 
ring fenced financial reserves.  Advice by the Home Office to the CST of the new 
overall level of funding was given only a few weeks before JFS and others were 
given news of the level. The Home Office had also declined to give the three-year 
guarantee requested.  It was accepted that the rationale for the reduction might 
have been better explained earlier but the JFS pre-cut grant level had been 
extended to cover a period of system upgrading.  
 
In response to questions Mr Criven said that JFS was not an easy target. It was 
well protected and an incident was more likely during transit to and from the 
School than on-site. Whilst more could always be done, the arrangements to and 
from Kingsbury Station were quite adequate. Some JFS parents had received the 
CST basic level of training and the CST would welcome even more volunteers.  
 
The GB’s legal responsibilities were met even without the enhancements being 
put in place. Should the GB wish to have an independent review of the 
arrangements and the advice given by the CST Mr Criven could confidently 
recommend the National Counterterrorist Office or the Metropolitan Police. 
Section 43 –  information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

 
2. 
Leadership 
 
Although the advice received by the Acting Chairman and Acting Vice-Chairman 
from Karen Thomas at Brent was that the staff governor was entitled to remain 
for discussions concerning the appointment of a headteacher, the staff governor 
voluntarily left the meeting. Mrs Lipkin wished to have her objection noted should 
the staff governor have chosen to remain. At this stage of the meeting Mrs Lipkin 
and Mr Appleman and all remaining members of the SLT left the meeting and the 
GB considered outstanding School leadership issues. It was agreed that informal 
planning should continue during the Summer holidays and that a selection 
Committee should not be appointed until the September meeting.  
 
It was also agreed that Mr Appleman’s current appointment should be extended. 
 


 
3. 
Any Other Business 
 
There was none. 
 
 
 
 
 
Signed       ………………………………… 
    
Date    …………………. 
 
 
(Chairman) 
 
 


 
 
 

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY (GB) 
HELD at 6.00 PM ON MONDAY 17TH JULY 2017 
 
 
Present:  
 
Acting Chairman:    
Ms Geraldine Fainer          
 
Governors: 
 
Mr Simon Appleman 
Dr Charlotte Benjamin  
Mrs Joanne Coleman         
Mr John Cooper  
     
Rabbi Daniel Epstein  
Mr Michael Goldmeier        
Mr James Lake  
 
Mr Michael Lee 
           Mr D Lerner (6.00 – 7.15)             
Ms Debby Lipkin 
           Mr Richard Martyn            Mrs Anne Shisler 
           
Mr Stuart Waldman   
 
 
Associate Members: 
Mr Andrew Moss 
 
Rabbi Dr Raphael Zarum 
 
SLT: 
 Mr Anthony Flack   
Mr Daniel Marcus 
 Mr Jamie Peston 
           Mr David Wragg  
 Miss Talia Thoret              
  
 
Clerk:   
 
           Dr Alan Fox   
 
 
1. 
Apologies for absence 
 
No apologies for absence were received.  
 
2. 
Declaration of Interests 
 
Mr David Lerner advised the meeting that he had a child working at the School. 
 
3. 

Membership 
 
3.1  
Parent Governors - The Governing Body noted that the terms of office of 
Ms Geraldine Fainer and Mr Michael Lee as Parent Governors would end on 31st 
August 2017 and that an election to choose their successors was in progress.  
 
3.2    Foundation Governors - The Governing Body noted that the terms of office 
of Mrs Joanne Coleman and Mr Stuart Waldman as Foundation Governors would 
end on 31st August and that the United Synagogue was considering fresh 
appointments.   
 
3.3    Associate Members - The Governing Body noted that the appointments of 
Mr Andrew Moss and Rabbi Dr Raphael Zarum as Associate Members would 

end on 31st August 2017 and reappointed them for a further year to 31st August 
2018. Mr Moss would be appointed to sit as a member of the Finance & 
Premises Committee and of the Pay & Personnel Committee. Rabbi Zarum 
would be appointed to sit as a member of the Admissions committee and of the 
CSWAB Committee. 
 
3.4      Valete - presentations were made to Mrs Coleman, Mr Lee and Mr 
Waldman who would not be returning in the Autumn Term and as a token of the 
School’s appreciation for their major contributions to its welfare and improvement 
as governors. 
 
4.
 
SCHOOL CALENDAR FOR 2018/19 
 
The GB approved the 2018/19 Calendar, as proposed by the Acting Headteacher 
following full staff consultation. The GB also delegated to Mr Appleman the power 
to change the dates of the Spring half term holiday to coincide with the Local 
Authority dates when published.  
 
5. 

SCHEDULE OF GB AND COMMITTEE MEETING DATES 
 
The GB adopted the programme of dates for meetings of the GB and its 
Committees in 2017/18 recommended by the Acting Headteacher, subject to the 
addition of a second meeting of the GB in the Summer Term on Monday 4th June, 
2018 
 
6. 

PAY & PERSONNEL COMMITTEE POLICIES 
 
The Governing Body approved the following policies as reviewed and 
recommended by the Pay & Personnel Committee: 
 
6.1 
Allegations of Abuse Against Staff         
6.2 
Equal Opportunities & Equality Objectives  
 
 
6.3 
Pay 2017/18  
 
6.4 
Performance Management  
6.5 
Confidentiality  
6.6 
Code of Conduct for Employees  
 
7. 
CSWAB COMMITTEE POLICIES  
 
The GB approved the following policies as reviewed and recommended by the 
CSWAB Committee: 
 
7.1 
Behaviour Policy  
7.2 
Careers Education, Information Advice & Guidance  
7.3 
Sex and Relationships Education  
 
7.4 
The GB also approved the Committee’s recommendation that there should 
no longer be a Continuing Professional Development Policy because the subject 
matter was already included elsewhere.   
 
 
8. 

FINANCE & PREMISES COMMITTEE POLICIES  
 


 
8.1  
The GB approved the Local Government Pension Scheme Discretions 
Policy as reviewed and recommended by the Finance & Premises Committee. 
 
8.2 
The GB also noted that the Statement of Internal Control could not be 
provided for consideration by the GB until the Accounts Audit process had been 
completed. 
 
9. 

GOVERNING BODY POLICIES 
 
9.1 
The GB approved the Data Protection Policy, whilst noting that 
amendments would be proposed in the Autumn Term to take account of new 
regulations due to come into force in March 2018. 
 
9.2 
The GB also approved the Freedom of Information Publication Scheme.  
 
9.3 
The GB noted that a number of policies scheduled for review at this 
meeting were not yet ready available and were being dealt with as follows: 
 
9.3.1 - Collective Worship Policy  - currently being drafted by Mr Daniel Marcus, 
the Deputy Headteacher Jewish Life & Learning, and would be available in the 
Autumn Term. 
ACTION MR MARCUS 
 
9.3.2 - Complaints Procedure  - amendments proposed by the Clerk were 
currently being considered by the Executive Headteacher who would provide a 
draft for the GB at the second meeting of the Autumn Term. 
 
ACTION EXECUTIVE HEADTEACHER 
 
9.3.3 - Discipline & Capability Policy  - the Executive Headteacher was in the 
process of separating the two elements of this policy and would be consulting 
staff in the first half of the Autumn Term with a view to providing a draft for the 
GB at the second meeting. 
 
ACTION EXECUTIVE HEADTEACHER 
 
9.3.4 - Health & Safety Policy  - this policy was under consideration by the Acting 
Headteacher and the Estates Manager with the objective of providing a draft for 
the GB at the second meeting of the Autumn Term. 
 
ACTION ACTING HEADTEACHER 
 
9.3.5 - Risk Policy - a first draft would be reviewed by the Acting Headteacher 
and the Estates Manager during the coming holidays with the objective of 
providing a draft for the GB at the second meeting of the Autumn Term. 
 
ACTION ACTING HEADTEACHER & ESTATES MANAGER 
 
9.3.6 - Special Educational Needs & Disability Policy - a draft would be ready for 
the GB at its first meeting in the Autumn Term. 
 
9.3.7 - Use of Internet and School Network Policy - this was being drafted by Mr 
David Wragg, the Deputy Headteacher for Teaching Learning & Curriculum with 
 


the objective of providing a draft for the GB at the second meeting of the Autumn 
Term. 
ACTION MR WRAGG 
 
9.4 - The GB invited the  Executive Headteacher to update the circulated Policy 
Review Plan in line with the decisions taken earlier in the meeting.  
 
ACTION HEADTEACHER 
 
10.  

Minutes of Previous Meetings  
 
The GB approved the draft minutes of the meetings held on 3rd April 2017.  
 
11. 

Election of Chairman and Vice-Chairman 
Given the instability arising from the changes in the current year, the GB 
considered it important that a Chairman and Vice-Chairman should be identified 
as soon as possible. However, there being no nominations for these posts the 
Governing Body extended the appointments of Ms Geraldine Fainer and Mr 
Michael Goldmeier, the current acting officers, with the intention that an election 
should be held, preferably at the first meeting the GB in the Autumn Term, but   
no later than the second meeting.  
 
For the interim period any Governor willing to assist with some of the Chairman’s 
responsibilities was invited to let her know as soon as possible 
 
ACTION GOVERNORS 
12. 
Composition of Governing Body 
 
The Governing Body reviewed its current size and composition. It was 
unanimously agreed that the reduction of size from 20 to 14 enshrined in the 
current Instrument of Government had left insufficient members properly to fulfil 
all of the governance roles and to provide stability and continuity of experience 
when personnel changes took place. This should assist in filling scarce skill 
requirements. Accordingly, Ms Fainer proposed and Mr Goldmeier seconded the 
following proposition: 
 
“That the approval of the United Synagogue, the Foundation Body, should be 
sought to an increase in the number of governors to 16, by the appointment of 
two additional Foundation Governors and that the London Borough of Brent 
should be requested to make a new Instrument of Government accordingly.”  
 
The proposition was carried unanimously and the Clerk was requested to convey 
its terms to the United Synagogue (US). At the same time the Chairman 
proposed to advise the United Synagogue of the key skills required by the GB 
both for the impending three Foundation Governor vacancies and for the further 
two that would exist following adoption of the recommended increase in numbers. 
 
ACTION CHAIRMAN AND CLERK 
 
 
13. 

Chairman’s Report 
 
 


Ms Fainer said that she had found that the responsibilities of Chairman were 
extremely time-consuming. As an illustration of the pressure of work, she noted 
that she had not had the time available to produce written reports for the GB of 
her activities or to summarise the proceedings of the CSWAB Committee and the 
Pay & Personnel Committee. The expansion in numbers now proposed by the 
GB should make it easier to spread the workload and she hoped would obviate 
the need for the GB Chairman and Vice-Chairman to double up as Chairmen of 
Committees. She was also grateful for the earlier agreement to the suggestion 
that there should be an additional GB meeting and wondered whether it might be 
more effective also to have more Committee meetings than in the current year. 
She appreciated that this could place a heavier attendance load on the SLT, but 
it might be possible to minimise the time taken by more selective turnout.  
 
In her short period as Acting Chairman there were a number of matters that had 
struck her forcibly. Amongst these were the time taken up in dealing with parental 
complaints and in this regard she was particularly grateful to Rabbi Epstein who 
had recently dealt with a particularly difficult case and to Mrs Shisler who had an 
investigation on going. 
 
Ms Fainer reported that following discussion at the CSWAB Committee, 
governors were on this occasion attending as observers staff exit interviews 
where staff had requested governor presence. The themes arising from these 
interviews would be collated and presented to the GB at its first meeting in the 
Autumn Term. 
 
Mr Andrew Moss was concerned that governors should be assisting the School in 
ensuring that staff felt appreciated, possibly by providing a channel for informal 
communication with individuals to alleviate potential problems. Attempts might be 
made also to arrange social contact with hospitality offered. 
 
14. 
Executive Headteacher’s Report  
 
The GB noted the Report by the Executive Headteacher that was supported by 
the Jewish Life & Learning Report and the latest Senior Leadership 
Responsibilities chart. In discussion and in response to questions from 
Governors, the following points were made: 
 
14.1  Multi Academy Trusts (MAT) - A number of meetings had been held during 
the term to discuss possibilities and two Jewish primary schools had now decided 
to proceed on their own. Amongst the remainder, there had been some 
agreement on structure and vision but otherwise relatively little progress due to 
the due diligence difficulties faced by each individual School. 
 
14.2  Land Issues - the Executive Headteacher reported that legal ownership of 
the site continued to form an obstacle for JFS membership of a MAT. Despite two 
further meetings with the US there was still no agreement on the way forward. It 
was hoped that the US would now propose its own solution aimed at provision of 
confidence that JFS would have sufficient security of tenure on the site, a DfE 
requirement for an academy trust application. 
 
14.3  Student Numbers - the School was aware of a number of Year 9 and Year 
12 leavers and also of rumours that there would be found to be more at the start 
of the new academic year. So far as Year 9 was concerned there had been a 
concerted but unfounded Facebook campaign to denigrate JFS, mainly on 
 


financial grounds and drawing on confidential GB documents. The points being 
made had been refuted in a parental email and the GB felt that every opportunity 
should continue to be taken to restore parental confidence. An offer by Rabbi 
Epstein to address classes and groups on the theme of strength of community 
was gratefully accepted. 
ACTION RABBI EPSTEIN 
 
A member of the SLT said that some of the losses at the end of Year 12 resulted 
from the absence of the AS examinations, which were no longer available as 
previously to provide confidence to pupils and their parents of the value of 
continuing into Year 13. This problem had been partly fuelled by disgruntled staff. 
It had been found that more parents than usual were abdicating decision-making 
to their children and were reluctant to engage in any discussion about this with 
JFS staff. 
 
14.4  Bulge Class - JFS had agreed to create a bulge class in September if 
necessary. In fact, two extra classes had been created elsewhere and, for the 
first time, JFS had no Year 7 waiting list. The opening of an additional secondary 
school would be likely to create serious problems for JFS. Currently, a response 
was awaited from Brent to a request for greater flexibility within the Published 
Admission Number in order to allow places to be offered in other years where 
there were still waiting lists. 
 
14.5  Staffing - Mrs Lipkin believed that there had never been a harder time to 
be a teacher and that this was seen in the pressures on staff nationally. There 
were many examination changes to prepare for with fewer resources; in some 
cases there were no published criteria or specifications and therefore no 
textbooks. Nevertheless, the scale of the staff turnover at JFS in the year had 
been exaggerated and sufficient new and well-qualified staff had been recruited 
to avoid vacancies in September. Detailed information had been published to 
provide parents with reassurance. 
 
It was agreed that it was important that the line management chain should 
operate effectively and that all staff should feel comfortable in discussing any 
problems or issues with their managers up to the SLT. At the same time it was 
felt that it could be helpful for opportunities to be found for governors to meet all 
new teachers and to make them aware that the GB was very much involved and 
concerned for their welfare. 
 
14.6  Summary - Mrs Lipkin said that when she was appointed a number of 
problems and legacy issues were identified and it was well recognised that 
difficult decisions would be necessary and changes were required that could 
have an upsetting impact on some members of staff. Since then, reorganisations 
of the support staff and the Faculty Structure had been successfully completed 
together with a major review of SLT responsibilities. The first major milestone of  
moving JFS out of Requiring Improvement status had been achieved.  
 
Nevertheless, Mrs Lipkin believed that JFS was not yet out of the woods. 
Completing the necessary improvements had always been known to be a three-
year process. The School was, in her opinion, clearly on an upward trajectory 
and 2017/18 should show further improvements on the current year. It was 
important to note that that the School was no longer in the " Requiring 
Improvement" category and was judged by OFSTED to be a good school with an 
outstanding Sixth Form.  
 


 
The Chairman thanked Mrs Lipkin for her very comprehensive report.  
 
15. 
School Improvement Plan 
 
The GB took note of the review and updating of the plan previously presented to 
it in January following the latest OFSTED report. It was colour-coded to show the 
actions taken against each heading and the perceived achievements. The 
Executive Headteacher confirmed her intention to publish new improvement 
themes in September, embedding the achievements to date. 
 
ACTION EXECUTIVE HEADTEACHER 
 
16. 

Acting Headteacher’s Report 
 
The GB took note of the statistical information contained in the Acting 
Headteacher’s Report. Expanding on the contents, Mr Appleman said that since 
publication there been two further exclusions. 2016/17 had been a hard year for 
bereavements, including the passing of two students, and he wished to thank 
Rabbi Epstein for all of the support he had provided for those concerned. 
 
Continuing, Mr Appleman said that list of events organised demonstrated the 
wide and impressive range of educational opportunities available at JFS. He 
wished to take the opportunity of thanking the governors and in particular Mrs 
Lipkin for their inspirational leadership and the members of the SLT who could 
not have worked harder during the year to effect the improvements seen. 
 
Ms Fainer said the Governing body fully recognised the exceptional pressure on 
staff, who retained their full confidence and support.  
 
17. 
 Jewish Life & Learning 
 
The GB took note of the report by Mr Daniel Marcus, the Deputy Headteacher 
Jewish Life & Learning, who explained the many challenges and resource 
implications of preparing an expanded and updated syllabus at a time of sig 
nificant staff changeover. Rabbi Zarum said that it was clear that much change 
was needed and that there continued to be a need for external input both 
physical and financial to facilitate this. 
 
In discussion of the arrangements following the disbanding a year ago of the 
Jewish Education Committee, the GB judged that the ring fencing of a dedicated 
period at its meetings without any organization for preliminary and detailed 
consideration had not succeeded in demonstrating as intended the special 
importance attached to the subject at JFS and probably had achieved the 
opposite. The CSWAB Committee had very heavy responsibilities and did not 
have the capacity to replace the time previously given by the JE Committee. It 
was, therefore, agreed that the two rabbinical governors, in consultation with Mr 
Marcus, should undertake any necessary work preliminary to consideration of JE 
issues by the GB. The CSWAB Committee would still be available on an 
occasional but not regular basis to deal with particular issues referred to it. 
 
18. 
 Sendco Inclusion Report 
 
The GB took note of Mrs Roston’s 2016/17 Report covering SEN, EAL and other 
 


vulnerable pupils in what had been a challenging year due to staff changes and 
restructuring of the Department. It provided category by category, assessments 
of the effectiveness and impact of the provision by internal resources and in 
cooperation with a variety of different external agencies and parents. The GB 
wished to extend thanks to Mrs Roston for her thorough and comprehensive 
report, as a result of which the GB had no questions. 
 
The GB also noted Mrs Schissler's SEND Report. 
 
19. 
 Committee Reports 
 
The GB noted the reports and minutes of Committees submitted for information 
as follows: 
 
19.1  Admissions Committee - Summary Report with oral updating. 
 
19.2   Curriculum and Student Welfare & Behaviour Committee – draft Minutes 
of Meeting held on 19th June, 2017 
 
19.3   Finance & Premises Committee -  Summary Report and Minutes of 
Meetings held on 22nd May 2107 
 
19.4  Pay & Personnel Committee – Oral Report 
 
In response to questions posed by Governors on the content of these reports the 
following points were made in respect of the CSWAB and Finance & Premises 
Committee activity: 
 
•  The allocation to PE in the new timetable had been reduced marginally to 
provide more time at KS4 for Mathematics and English. 
 
•  There were continuing on-site service delivery problems with the PFI 
contactor, which was difficult to hold to account. External assistance was 
being obtained and some payments due to the contractor might be 
withheld pending resolution. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 
20.  Any Other Business 
 
There was none and the meeting closed at 10:30 PM  
 
 
 
Signed       ………………………………… 
    
…………………. 
(Chairman)    
 
 
 
 
 
(Date) 
 


 
 
 

MINUTES OF THE PART II MEETING OF THE GOVERNING 
BODY (GB) HELD ON MONDAY 11TH SEPTEMBER 2017 
 
 
Present:  
 
Chairman:    
 
Ms Geraldine Fainer          
 
Governors: 
 
Mrs Julia Alberga 
 
Mr Simon Appleman (Items 1 - 3)  
Dr Charlotte Benjamin        Mr John Cooper  
     
 
 
Rabbi Daniel Epstein  
Mr Michael Goldmeier         
 
 
Mr Mark Hurst 
 
Mr James Lake  
 
 
 
 
Ms Debby Lipkin (Items 1 - 3)   Mr Richard Martyn  
          
 
Mr Paul Millett 
 
 Mr Andrew Moss 
          
 
Mrs Anne Shisler 
 
 
Associate Member:  Rabbi Dr Raphael Zarum 
 
Clerk:   
 
           Dr Alan Fox   
 
 
1. 

MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The GB approved the draft minutes of the Part II meeting held on 17th July 
2017.    
 
2.     MATTERS ARISING 
 
There were no matters arising from the minutes other than matters covered by 
substantive agenda items.  
 
3. 
 SECURITY 
 
The Acting Headteacher gave the GB an oral update on progress since the 
July meeting. He reminded governors that the CST judged that 24-hour on-
site security was no longer justified and that, provided that the perimeter 
alarm system was improved, off-site surveillance would be sufficient when the 
site was not occupied. Subsequently it had been found that the alarm system 

did not work properly and it had therefore been repaired. CST now had 
remote access to the on-site cameras but were seeking additional authorities 
that were being disputed by 1440. The School was trying to facilitate 
resolution discussions. 
 
It had also been established that the intruder alarm did not meet the insurer’s 
requirements and 1440 had been asked to establish what was needed. 
Alternative estimates of £80,000 or £14,000 had been provided. 
 
Mr Appleman reminded Governors that the new CST assessment had also 
other significant financial consequences. CST was insisting that later in the 
month the grant would be reduced to meet only the costs of on-site security 
during School hours (which included governors meetings). These did not 
example, include the times when the site was being used for third-party 
lettings and 1440 had estimated that an additional £60,000 per annum would 
be required to retain guarding during these periods. If third-party lettings were 
reduced or suspended, JFS would still have to pay 1440 the minimum 
guaranteed income. 
 
Mr Appleman said that he had hoped to be able to put costed alternatives to 
governors at this meeting but unfortunately this was still not possible. The GB 
authorised Mr Appleman to continue negotiations taking a very firm line on the 
importance it placed on protecting the security of the School, its students and 
staff and all visitors. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

 
4. 
HEADTEACHER RECRUITMENT 
 
Ms Lipkin, Mr Appleman and Mrs Newman left the meeting. On the basis of 
advice received, it was agreed that Mr Lakes was entitled to remain and 
participate in decisions concerning Headteacher recruitment. 
 
The GB discussed proposals for recruitment during 2017/18.  
 
5.  
ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
There was none.  
 
 
 
 
Signed       ………………………………… 
    
…………………. 
(Chairman)    
 
 
 
 
 
(Date) 
 

 
 
 

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY (GB) 
HELD at 6.00 PM ON MONDAY 11TH SEPTEMBER 2017 
 
 
Present:  
 
Chairman:    
 
Ms Geraldine Fainer          
 
Governors: 
 
Mrs Julia Alberga 
 
Mr Simon Appleman 
Dr Charlotte Benjamin      
Mr John Cooper  
     
Rabbi Daniel Epstein  
Mr Michael Goldmeier        
Mr Mark Hurst 
 
Mr James Lake  
 
Mr D Lerner (Items 1 – 14) 
Ms Debby Lipkin 
           Mr Richard Martyn            Mr Paul Millett 
 
 
Mr Andrew Moss 
         Mrs Anne Shisler 
 
 
 
 
Associate Members: 
Rabbi Dr Raphael Zarum 
 
SLT: 
 Mr Anthony Flack   
Mr Daniel Marcus 
 Mr Jamie Peston 
           Mr David Wragg  
 Miss Talia Thoret              
  
 
Observer: 
 
 
Mrs Naomi Newman 
 
Clerk:   
 
           Dr Alan Fox   
 
 
1. 
Apologies for absence 
 
No apologies for absence were received.  
 
2. 
Declaration of Interests 
 
Mr David Lerner advised the meeting that he had a child working at the School 
and Mr Richard Martyn that his wife was a teacher at Yavneh. Rabbi Epstein 
reminded Governors that he was an employee of the United Synagogue. 
 
3. 

Membership 
 
3.1  
Parent Governors - The Governing Body noted that the terms of office of 
Ms Geraldine Fainer and Mr Michael Lee as Parent Governors had ended on 31st 
August 2017.  
 
3.2    Foundation Governors - The Governing Body noted that the terms of office 
of Mrs Joanne Coleman and Mr Stuart Waldman as Foundation Governors had 
ended on 31st August. The United Synagogue had appointed Ms Geraldine 

Fainer as Foundation Governor for a three year term of office with effect from 1st 
August, 2017 and Mr Andrew Moss and Mr Paul Millett as Foundation Governors 
for three years with effect from 1st September, 2017.  
 
3.3 
Observer – The Chairman welcomed Mrs Naomi Newton, a Foundation 
Governor designate who was by invitation observing the meeting.  
 
4. 
Election of Chairman and Vice-Chairman 
 
Only one nomination having been received for each position, the Clerk declared 
Ms Geraldine Fainer elected as Chairman and Mr Michael Goldmeier and Mr 
Andrew Moss elected as Vice-Chairmen. 
 
5. 

Minutes of Previous Meetings  
 
The GB approved the draft minutes of the meetings held on 17th July 2017.  
 
6. 

Matters Arising 
 
6.1 – Item 8.2 - Audit - the GB was advised that the audit should be completed 
within a very short period. 
 
6.2 - Item 14.3 - Student Numbers - the GB thanked Rabbi Epstein for 
addressing a number of classes and for coming to the School on the first day of 
term to talk also to the staff. 
 
7.  
Composition of Governing Body 
 
The Chairman referred to the decisions taken in July that the Governing Body 
was too small to be able to work effectively and therefore to seek amendments to 
the Instrument of Government to add two more Foundation Governors. However, 
it subsequently emerged that this would breach the regulatory requirement that 
Foundation Governors outnumber all others by exactly two.  
 
On a motion proposed by Mr David Lerner and seconded by Mr James Lake, the 
GB ratified an amended proposal, already approved by the Trustees of the 
United Synagogue, to add to the Governing Body one Foundation and one 
Parent Governor, thereby increasing its overall size to 16, and requested the 
Clerk to action this change with the London Borough of Brent.   
 
8. 
Chairman’s Report 
 
Ms Fainer said that she wished to thank Mr Goldmeier for his support as Acting 
Vice-Chairman over the last few difficult months and to the Governing Body as a 
whole for its confidence in electing her now as Chairman for 2017/18. With the 
forthcoming increase in the numbers of governors she hoped that it would be 
possible in the main for the Chairman and Vice-Chairmen not to have to act also 
as chairmen of committees, and thus for the workload to be spread more evenly.  
 
Ms Fainer said that there was much for governors to do outside the formal GB 
and committee meetings, such as acting as links for particular topics and dealing 
with complaints that reached the Governing Body. She asked that all governors 
who found that they no longer had sufficient time available to devote to JFS 
 


business, should, without any feeling of shame, consider the possibility of 
standing down to let someone else take their place.  
 
9.  
Staff Exit Interview Themes and Action Plan 
 
Introducing her comprehensive report, the Executive Headteacher said that more 
than 30 of the 37 members of staff who had left JFS in September 2017 had 
taken up the offer of an exit interview and Governors had observed the 18 cases 
where a request had been made. These interviews provided important and 
valuable insights into departing colleagues’ experiences and the report recorded 
and analysed the feedback at face value. Nevertheless it also had to be 
considered within the context not only of the normal turnover due to changes in 
personal circumstances but also the changes introduced rapidly both to meet the 
findings of the OFSTED and the difficult financial position. The report drew 
attention to the main themes that the SLT had drawn from the interviews and to 
the resulting Actions being put in place.  
 
Mr Cooper said that he had observed nine of the interviews and the Chairman 
eleven, making a good representative total of 20. He believed that the Report 
accurately reflected the issues raised, but was somewhat bland in dealing with 
the strength of feeling of some of the departing staff. Some, having lived through 
a rollercoaster of changes felt that they could no longer cope and, it had to be 
recognised, had taken the opportunity to vent their spleen against members of 
the SLT. 
Section 40 (1) – the request is for the applicants personal data.  This must be dealt with in 
accordance with the Data Protection Policy. 
 
In discussion, members of the SLT thanked governors for their support during the 
past very difficult period, but nevertheless expressed surprise that the views of 
departing staff featured so high on the GB Agenda, with the implication that these 
might be more important to governors than the School’s achievements and the 
plans for the future to be discussed later in the meeting. 
 
The Executive Headteacher added that it was very important that governors 
should recognise the concerns of members of the SLT, who had been required 
simply to sit and listen to critical comments during the exit interviews without 
replying. In her view, the first substantive item on the agenda should have been 
to congratulate the staff rather than deal with the concerns of those who had left. 
 
Mr David Wragg said that during his short time at JFS he had not felt supported 
by governors. He believe that the exit interviews should be taken with a pinch of 
salt and that perhaps governors needed to hear the views of all the staff, not just 
members of the SLT, supplemented by anecdotes. The staff survey that would 
start shortly in parallel with the pupil and parent surveys should provide a much 
more reliable picture. In his view the job of the SLT was to lead the School and 
the role of the GB was to ratify what was being done. 
Section 40 (1) – the request is for the applicants personal data.  This must be dealt with in 
accordance with the Data Protection Policy. 
 
Rabbi Epstein said that he had a real concern about staff morale. He had picked 
up from some a sense of worry and concern that the staff were not fully 
supported by the GB and even if they were did not make it clear. He believed that 
 


governors should demonstrably recognise good results and should offer greater 
support. 
 
Mr Lerner said the School had come through a tough year facing serious financial 
problems and long-standing staff problems. The way the School had been turned 
round should be celebrated by the GB, which should forget about those who left 
because they were uncomfortable with change and work to build on the positive 
mood that he now detected. 
 
Mr Goldmeier said that to put matters in perspective everyone should remember 
that one of the three core functions of every governing body was to hold the 
Headteacher to account for the educational performance of the school and its 
pupils and the performance management of staff. To do this effectively it was 
essential, from time to time, to hear directly from a range of staff, including those 
who were unhappy as well as those who were happy. Clearly, a number of 
members of the SLT had concerns and he offered to meet each one separately 
and privately to discuss the issues they had. 
 
Mr Cooper said that there had been much pressure for governors to attend some 
of the Exit Interviews and it would have been wrong not to do so. He had been 
impressed by the composure of SLT members on these occasions. He heard the 
message that the SLT felt that it should be better supported and he would be 
happy to join with Mr Goldmeier in private discussions. 
 
Mr Millett said that as a new governor his interest lay in the future. He did not feel 
there was too much to be concerned about in the Exit Interview Report but it was 
nevertheless important to draw from it any useful lessons. An essential element 
was to get messaging right and consistent so that everybody understood the 
reasons for things that were happening and the intentions for the future. All 
messages needed to be consistent including those from the Line Management 
and from the Governing Body and in his view it was impossible to talk to staff too 
much. 
 
10. 

Report of Executive Headteacher and Headteacher  
 
Introducing the report the Executive Headteacher offered a warm welcome to all 
new and returning governors, thanking them for the time and effort devoted to 
JFS business. She offered them an open invitation to approach the 
Headteachers or members of the SLT for information and assistance at any time.  
 
10.1  Examination Results - Ms Lipkin drew governors’ attention to the recent 
examination results, with the caveat that some were still subject to re-marking. 
Four papers had been upgraded so far and JFS had now requested re-marking 
also of the all the GCSE IT papers. She said that comparisons with previous 
years were difficult because Progress 8 scores could not yet be calculated and of 
the gradual introduction of new grading systems. It could be confidently claimed, 
however, that the earlier predictions had been proved accurate despite the lack 
of guidance on the new scoring methods.  
 
Although there was a smaller sixth form and therefore fewer A-level entries this 
year, Oxbridge results were just as good and the 100% results in the Cache 
Course results had been outstanding. Additional BTEC courses were being 
introduced and this would help to retain more students at the end of Year 11. A 
 


table included in the presentation showed how well JFS results compared with 
other Jewish secondary schools. 
 
A new slide, to be circulated after the meeting, would show that although the 
Year 7 entry level was high, nevertheless JFS was in the top 1% of schools by 
added value, a true indicator of the contribution made by the teaching staff. 84% 
of students had performed better than predicted by their entry standard. 
 
It was disappointing that more students than normal had left at the end of Year 
12, some to Brampton College that, ironically, charged in excess of £18,000 but 
had lower A-level results than JFS. 
 
In response to questions by governors, Ms Lipkin said: 
 
•  the general whittling down of curriculum choices, recently criticised by the 
Chief Inspector for Schools, did not apply to JFS which was still offering a 
very wide range; 
 
•  specialist facilities were required for the broadening of sixth form options 
but space was available and all the signs were that there were good 
prospects of further donations for this purpose from the Wolfson Trust; 
 
•  JFS A level students had a most successful year in achieving their first or 
second university choices and the same percentage of the cohort obtained 
Oxbridge places as in the previous year. 
 
10.2  Years 7 – 11 - Introducing his report on the GCSE results the Acting 
Headteacher said that very reliable tracking data availability was now helping to 
follow student progress from Year 7 onwards and allowing much earlier targeted 
interventions where indicated. Much effort was now being devoted to keep on 
track those students who were not doing well and who had initially asked to give 
up some subjects; it could be demonstrated that as a result of these efforts in the 
event these students performed much better than they had expected.  
 
Mr Appleman said that JFS was ranked second in the Times performance table 
for non-selective schools and he drew attention, in particular, to the much higher 
pass rates at JFS than nationally in all subjects and to the very wide disparity in 
the proportion completing the EBacc. Interestingly, the attainment gap between 
male and female students had narrowed. Disadvantaged students performed well 
and could be shown to be catching up. 
 
10.3  Public Relations – Ms Lipkin said that the public examination results 
provided excellent material to counter the adverse publicity mounted against the 
School during the previous year. Parents and pupils had been saying that all the 
best teachers had left but, now that data collection was better organised, it could 
be demonstrated that many of those who had left achieved the worst results and 
that many of the proven best teachers had remained. It was important to ensure 
that the public knew of JFS’ achievements and that it was clearly on an upward 
trajectory.   
 
10.4  Admissions - Ms Lipkin said that permission had been granted to use the 
Published Admission Number flexibly and it had thus been possible to admit 
more students from the various year group waiting lists. The admissions process 
had been streamlined with an average time of only two weeks between offer of a 
 


place and admission. As a result there were now only 12 vacancies available in 
Years 7 - 11 as opposed to 80 at this time last year. Places had been provided 
for desperate families without creating a bulge class and significant additional 
income had been generated.  
 
Improved GCSE results and the widening of the curriculum to include vocational 
courses had led to greater retention at the end of Year 11. Seventy leavers in 
Summer 2016 had reduced to 25 this year. The number of applications for Sixth 
Form entry had reduced but at least 25 Year 12 entrants had been accepted from 
other schools, bringing the starting total in to 285. 
 
In response to questions from governors, the following points were made: 
 
•  the range of BTEC courses was being expanded but was, of course, 
dependent on the acquisition of more specialist equipment; 
 
•  a Sixth Form Apprenticeship Pathway & Support Group had been created; 
 
•  Arrangements had been made for some 20 Year 12 students to take four 
A-levels, instead of the now standard three. Sixteen of these would be 
studying Further Mathematics. 
 
•  Overall, there were now places for all Jewish children wishing to attend a 
Jewish school. 
 
10.5  Land Issues and MAT - further meetings and contacts with the United 
Synagogue had not made any progress in settling the land ownership issues, 
thus holding up any possible progress on JFS involvement in a Multi-Academy 
Trust, whilst other Jewish schools were moving onwards. The United Synagogue 
appeared to consider the matter a technical one, a solution for which was not 
urgent. Mr Wagner had approached the new US President and together with Mr 
Bloom and Mr Lerner, would be pursuing resolution. Mr Hurst and Mr Millett were 
being briefed on the detail to assist as required. 
Section 43 –  information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

10.6  Gesher - formal planning assent for the creation of the proposed new 
school unit was awaited but agreement had not yet been reached on the siting of 
unit.  
 
10.7  PFI – Ms Lipkin reported that the pressure being exerted on the PFI 
company to improve its performance had continued over the Summer Holidays. 
There had been many meetings at various levels, including the Managing 
Director of Imagile, the asset management provider, but with no noticeable 
improvement overall. The Company was now being held to account on a daily 
basis but the resignation of the sixth successive Contract Manager had not 
helped. 
 
Payments were continuing to be made by JFS at the contractual rate of £400,000 
per month (including amortisation of the building costs) but the School was now 
on the verge of withholding payments amounting to a total of about £600,000 for 
poor services. A JFS monthly strategy meeting would be held with representation 
by two governors and it was probable that a formal Disputes Board would be 
created with the purpose of declaring that the services provided were not fit for 
 


purpose. The options of buying out IT, Security and of third-party lettings were 
still under consideration. 
Section 43 –  information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

The GB agreed to the employment of consultancy by Local Partnerships, a 
Government/Local Government Association joint venture, at a cost of £25,000 to 
assist the School to obtain its contractual entitlements 
Section 43  –  information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

 
10.8   Staffing - the Acting Headteacher reported that the School was now fully 
staffed including the traditionally difficult areas of Jewish Studies and Ivrit. In total 
there were 33 new teachers and nine new non-teaching members of staff. In 
addition, assistance would be given to these departments by Rabbis 
Hackenbroch, Epstein and Pollack, which sent an important message about the 
support for JFS in the community,   
 
10.9  Events - Ms Lipkin drew attention to the programme of planned School 
events during the Autumn Term. She said that attendance at all or part of the 
meeting for prospective parents would be very much welcomed. 
 
10.10  Exclusions - since the written report had been prepared three Year 7 
students had been excluded for one day, each for the use of abusive language 
 
On behalf of the GB, the Chairman thanked Mrs Lipkin and Mr Appleman for their 
very comprehensive report.  
 
11. 

Fundraising 
 
Mr Peston introduced the report that had been provided listing the various 
elements of the fundraising programme, In response to questions from 
governors, the following points were made: 
 
•  50% of parents were now making made voluntary contributions; 
 
•  Some parents were being invited to make significant donations and take-
up was so far judged to be successful;  
 
•  the £12,000 raised by grandparents’ committees provided an example 
what might be achieved by involving more people; 
 
•  Although there was concern that some potential donors were being 
frightened off by the sums referred to at the Patrons Programme meeting, 
the figures had been based on advice. 
 
•  The possibility had been considered of suggesting donations equivalent to 
one term’s fees at a private school from those parents known to be able to 
afford it. However, it would be very important to avoid any suggestion 
discrimination between parents. 
 
•  A number of applications, as listed, had been submitted to grant making 
trusts. 
 


 
In further discussion, Mr Peston said that the Gift Aid tax refund requested by the 
Trust following the decision on eligibility amounted to £765,000 and the Trustees 
would have to decide the best way of handling the money expected very shortly. 
They might wish to use part or this entire sum to replenish the Trust’s depleted 
reserves and they would also have to reconsider the future level of suggested 
voluntary contribution. However, there were immediate unfunded pressing needs, 
such as £185,000 for a better Wi-Fi system and £10,500 to match a donation for 
a Norwood Social Worker to be based at the School two days a week. A public 
position should be established quickly. 
Section 43 –  information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

 
12. 
Key Improvement Themes 
 
The Executive Headteacher introduced the table provided showing the main 
themes planned for the current academic year. Subsequent to its preparation in 
the current form, Staff had been consulted. As a result, a third theme was being 
added to each of the two final sections dealing with Outcomes and the Sixth 
Form. These would be included in the next iteration together with associated 
Action Programmes and would be shared with governors in time for the next GB 
meeting. 
 
In discussion Rabbi Zarum questioned the extent to which the views of parents 
were reflected in the list of intended improvements and whether the twice a year 
postal distribution was sufficient. In response, it was explained that there were in 
addition face-to-face meetings and volunteers were being sought for a Parents 
Forum. 
 
13. 
Jewish Learning & Life Report 
 
Mr Daniel Marcus summarised the written report he had provided, which sought 
advise Governors of the achievements planned for 2017/18. He said that Year 7 
students were now using the new booklets, largely paid for by a donor in memory 
of his late son, for Talmud, Tanach and Jewish History. In addition, a basic 
programme had been introduced for students from non-Jewish primary schools 
with the ambitious aim of enabling them to catch up in one year. Staff were being 
trained on teaching the new Year 7-9 reading scheme. The new Year 12 
programme, as previously reported, was also starting. 
 
Whilst the Lavi programme was undoubtedly of tremendous value to those 
students who participated there was doubt about the staff time and effort involved 
and, indeed the morality of providing the experience for the very limited number 
of students whose families could afford £7500. Serious consideration was being 
given this term by the SLT to the status quo or whether a new scheme should be 
devised. Proposals would be brought to the GB in due course. 
 
In discussion and in response to questions raised by governors, the following 
points were made: 
 
•  Mr Marcus was very pleased with the way that the JS teaching staff was 
embracing all of these changes and, in addition, was now working on new 
materials for Year 8. 
 


 
•  It was hoped to expand JIEP staff from 3 to 5 and to strengthen JIEP 
processes. In an effort to create a closer working relationship and sharing, 
Jewish Studies and JIEP were now working out of the same Resource 
Base. A JIEP lounge next door was being created. 
 
•  The JIEP programme would have greater emphasis on social action and 
charity. 
 
•  In future the first 10 minutes of each JS lesson would be devoted to 
reading in pairs. 
 
Dr Benjamin questioned whether the JS Department should remain separated 
from the rest of the School and wondered whether JFS was to be regarded as a 
Jewish School or a School that taught Jewish subjects. Mrs Lipkin said that a 
Jewish faith school should be aiming to provide a high quality Jewish education. 
Rabbi Epstein said that JFS was one of the weakest schools for prayer and, 
indeed, there was no compulsory worship. No student should leave JFS without a 
good knowledge of Jewish practice. 
 
14. 
POLICIES 
 
14.1   Data Protection Policy - the Governing Body approved in principle the draft 
policy based on a model from Stone King. It delegated to Mr Goldmeier power to 
approve any amendments required by the introduction of forthcoming new 
regulations. 
 
14.2   Special Educational Needs & Disability Policy - the Governing Body 
approved in the draft policy.  
 
14.3   Policy Review Plan - the Governing Body approved the updated Plan for 
the Autumn Term. 
 
15.  
COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP AND CHAIRMANSHIP 
 
15.1   The GB approved the membership and chairmanship of Standing 
Committees as proposed subject to the additional appointment of Mr David 
Lerner to the Admissions Committee. 
 
15.2   The GB requested each Committee to review its terms of reference and 
report to the next GB meeting. 
 
16.  
LINK GOVERNORS FOR 2017/18 
 
The GB approved the appointment of Link Governors as follows: 
 
16.1  Attendance & Behaviour   Ms Geraldine Fainer 
16 2.   Governor Training    
Mr James Lake 
16.3    Health & Safety  
 
Mr Andrew Moss 
16.4  Pupil Premium  
 
Mrs Julia Alberga 
16.5.  Safeguarding  
 
Dr Charlotte Benjamin 
16.6  Security  
 
 
Mr Mark Hurst 
16.7  SEND  
 
 
Mrs Anne Shisler 
16.8   Student Fund Grants  
Mr Richard Martyn  
 


 
17.  
GOVERNOR TRAINING 
 
The attention of governors was drawn to the forthcoming all day training session 
to be held by Brent. 
 
 
 
18.  

FUTURE OF FRONTER 
 
The Clerk reported that Fronter could no longer be used for circulation and as an 
archive for papers for the Governing Body or its Committees. 
 
19.  
ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
There was none.  
 
 
 
 
Signed       ………………………………… 
    
…………………. 
(Chairman)    
 
 
 
 
 
(Date) 
 
10 

 
 
JFS SCHOOL 
 
 

MINUTES OF FINANCE & PREMISES COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON  
MONDAY, 16TH OCTOBER 2017 
 
Present:
 
 
Chairman: 
  
Mr John Cooper  
 
Governors:  
Mr Mark Hurst 
Mr David Lerner 
Mr Richard Martyn    
Mr Paul Millett 
Mr Andrew Moss 
 
 
 
 
In Attendance: 
 
Mr Simon Appleman (Headteacher)  
Mr Greg Foley 
Ms Debby Lipkin (Executive Headteacher) 
Mr Jamie Peston  
Mrs Mary Nithiy 
 
Acting Clerk: 
 
Ms Candace Bertie  
 
The Chairman welcomed everyone to the meeting, and introduced Mr Foley, a 
consultant to the Finance Team. 
 
1.   

APOLOGIES  
 
Apologies for absence were received from Mr Graeme Pocock (Estates Manager) 
and Dr Alan Fox (Clerk). 
 
2. 

DECLARATION OF INTERESTS 
 
No declarations were made. 
 
3. 
MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The Committee approved the minutes of the previous meeting held on 3rd July 2017 
 
4.  

MATTERS ARISING NOT COVERED BY SUBSTANTIVE AGENDA ITEMS  
 
4.1 
Item 5.2 – Gesher - There was nothing further to report pending a meeting in 
November. 
 

4.2  
 Item 5.3 - Technology Project – Mr Peston reported that a meeting had taken 
place on a second phase of the Technology Project for which a grant application had 
been made to the Wolfson Trust. This would involve an additional cost over two 
years for changes in the curriculum and recruitment of more staff. All of this had 
involved additional work for staff who were to be congratulated and an updated 
proposal would be submitted shortly. 
 
4.3 
Item 7 – Budget 2017/18 – the School roll now numbered 1978 with 294 in 
Year 7 and nearly 500 in the Sixth Form 
 
5. 
PREMISES UPDATE 
 
The Committee noted that, in the absence the Estates Manager, the regular text and 
traffic light reports were not available.  
 
6. 
ANNUAL ACCIDENT REPORT  
 
The Committee noted the Estate Manager’s Annual Report.  
 
7. 

PFI ANNUAL REVIEW 
 
The Committee considered an updated version of the 2015 Report of the PFI Working 
Party and reviewed a stand alone Report covering the 2015 – 2017 period prepared 
by the Estates Manger and Mr Lerner in consultation with Mrs Coleman.  It noted the 
importance of updating the Report, probably annually, until the end of the PFI contract 
period to ensure that, despite the inevitable staff turnover, there would be at all times 
at least two people with a full understanding of the financial model and the project 
history. The Committee agreed that the 2015 -2017 report should be submitted to the 
Governing Body at tits next meeting. 
 
ACTION CLERK 
 
The PFI contract required that a reserve fund should be maintained to deal with any 
repairs required in 10 years time at the time of its expiry. Because of the danger that 
the DfE would not provide capital funds at that point, strenuous efforts should now be 
made to establish the size and location of this fund. No report had been provided by 
the contractor for more than a year. 
 
Mr Millett said that the immediate problem was that the contract was not being 
operated in accordance with its terms and JFS was paying for services not being 
provided to a satisfactory level. This on going situation could not be allowed to 
continue and a target date of next July should be set to ensure that the contract was 
running properly. 
 
The Executive Headteacher had recently met Mark Trumper, the Managing Director of 
Imagile Infrastructure Management, to discuss his company's shortcomings. It was 
clear that, after several changes in recent years, much was dependent on the 
recruitment of a suitable on-site manager and it had been agreed that the School 
could participate in selection.  
 
Ms Lipkin judged that Mr Trumper was committed to putting matters right, but noted 
that he was the Managing Director of a large company operating many major 
contracts and with limited time to concentrate on JFS. It should be noted that in 
 


discussion he had sought to blame the school for the problems being experienced. 
She was now meeting Mr Trumper and his Regional Director monthly but she noted 
that, nevertheless, the company had not dealt with a number of items scheduled for 
completion over the holiday period. 
 
Through an introduction by Michael Goldstein, there had also been discussions with 
Local Partnerships, a body that worked with public sector organisations to help in the 
delivery of services and infrastructure. 
 
Mr Moss said that hopefully current initiatives could lead to new benchmarking and 
the proper operation of the contract. If, however, there were to be a major dispute, it 
would be important to be able to demonstrate that JFS had been operating the 
contract in accordance with its terms even if the contractor wasn't. It was good that a 
new manager was being sought who, hopefully, would not bring historical baggage 
with him. 
 
In discussion, it was agreed that the GB needed to start thinking seriously about how 
to bring the PFI arrangement to a premature end, for which further information was 
required. The solicitors, Pinsent Mason, who had advised the School at the time of 
signature, should be asked for a succinct report explaining the arrangements for 
dispute resolution and the practicalities and consequences of termination. Mr Millett 
would speak to Pinsent Mason about this the following day.  
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or a 
third party;
 
 
ACTION MR MILLETT 
7. 
SECURITY  
 
The Committee considered a report by the Acting Headteacher outlining the outcome 
of further extensive discussion and meetings with the CST and 1440.  
 
8. 
HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY 
 
The Committee considered the draft policy prepared with advice from the School’s 
solicitors, Stone King. Concern was expressed that there was insufficient expertise to 
give approval with confidence and it was recognised that, in addition, many of the 
elements fell within the remit of other committees. Nevertheless, it was noted that the 
draft was based on solicitors advice, had been reviewed by the Estates Manager and 
the Acting Headteacher, had the support of the SLT and was consistent with general 
advice for schools contained in The Key for School Leaders.  
 
Accordingly, the Committee recommended the policy for approval to the Governing 
Body. 
 
ACTION CLERK  
9. 
RISK REGISTER 
 
The Committee noted that the draft Register would be considered at its following 
meeting.  
 
10. 

MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTS  & BUDGET FOR 2017/18 
 
The Committee considered the end August Management Accounts provided by Mrs 
 


Nithy, noting that at that relatively early stage, whilst showing a surplus over budget, 
the forecast for the financial year indicated nothing of material significance. Whilst the 
financial situation looked for more healthy because of the restoration of gift aid, there 
were nevertheless a variety of factors to consider: 
 
•  For historical reasons the School was probably still receiving too much pupil 
premium and effort was still being made to persuade more qualified parents to 
apply. 
 
•  Following staff departures problems were arising in some areas where 
replacements were unable to cover as wide a field as their predecessors. 
 
•  The use of part-time teachers in Jewish Studies was less economic. 
 
•  It was costly to engage agency staff to cover absences due to sick leave. 
 
In discussion, it was noted that, Governors had sought clarification of a number of 
detailed points in advance of the meeting and had received responses as follows: 
 
•  A detailed breakdown of the elements included in Code I13 in the full year 
forecast had been provided.  
 
•  The position on pupil premium funding was currently unclear and an enquiry 
to Brent awaited a reply. A few families in the new intake had been supported 
in making applications. All pupil premium expenditure was recorded 
separately for audit. 
 
•  The reduction in examination costs was due to a combination of a falling roll in 
the examination cohorts and abolition of AS level examinations. 
 
•  All the forecasts savings from staff reductions had been met. However, with 
the increase in classes and the changed timetable incorporating additional 
lessons each week, it was found that consequential increases in staffing were 
needed in specific areas. More staff were taken on to enable the School to 
deliver the enhanced curriculum and in preparation for the focus on technical 
qualifications. The additional cost would be offset by a grant just received. 
Further details would be provided. 
 
•  A number of staff would be on sick leave during the current term. 
 
•  The fundraising income shown was restricted to commitment only. 
 
The Committee noted that Management Accounts to end September should be 
available at the end of October. It was suggested that Mr Peston could provide a 
presentation of the management accounts at the next meeting of the FGB.  
 
ACTION MR PESTON 
11. 
 REPORT ON FINANCE TEAM 
 
The Committee considered an overview report and recommendations by Greg Foley, 
the consultant recommended by Landau Baker to work alongside the Finance Team 
to assist in the improvement of processes and procedures and to provide a better 
 


reporting system. The Committee approved Mr Foley's report and recommendations 
and thanked him for his efforts. 
 
 12. 
ACCOUNTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31ST MARCH 2017  
 
The Committee had received the draft Report and Audited Accounts for the year 
ended 31st March but not the Audit Findings Letter including the draft Letter of 
Representation or the Audit Overview letter incorporating the Engagement Letter and 
Ethical Standards Letter. Consideration was therefore postponed until the following 
meeting after review by the Chairman in the interim period.  
ACTION MR PESTON 
 
13. 
STATEMENT OF INTERNAL CONTROL 
 
Consideration of the Statement of Internal Control prior to submission to the 
Governing Body was postponed until the Committee was able to study the Audit 
Findings. 
ACTION MR PESTON 
 
14. 
FINANCIAL PROCEDURES MANUAL 
 
The Committee postponed for later consideration the Financial Procedures Manual 
incorporating the Scheme of Delegation and Best Value Statement, after review by 
the Chairman in the interim period and prior to submission to the Governing Body. 
 
ACTION MR PESTON 
 
15. 
FUNDRAISING 
 
The Director of Operations said that he proposed to offer the Committee a written 
report at its next meeting but in the meantime he was happy to confirm that prospects 
looked good and the patrons scheme had been launched. Delivery of the minibus, for 
which funds had been raised at a grandparents’ tea, was expected in November. It 
would be used mainly for PE and JIEP. It was hoped that funds for a second minibus 
could also be raised. Voluntary Contributions were on target. 
 
The Committee confirmed that there was no objection to an increase in the 
procurement credit card limits. 
 
16. 

TERMS OF REFERENCE 
 
The Committee reviewed and approved its current Terms of Reference.  
 
17. 
GOVERNORS' ALLOWANCES POLICY 
 
The Committee reviewed and approved the draft policy for submission to the 
Governing Body.  
 
18. 

ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
18.1 
Multi Academy Trust – In answer to a question from Mr Millett, Mrs Lipkin 
explained that JFS had applied for academy status several years ago and had 
received a £25,000 grant at the time. However, progress had been blocked because 
 


of the land ownership issue and all the money had been spent on lawyers’ fees. There 
had been further abortive discussions with the United Synagogue some months ago. 
If the land issue were unlocked, given governing body approval, academy trust status 
could be reapplied for and JFS would be qualified to become a flagship school if 
joined with Sinai. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or 
a third party; 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Signed: ______________________ 
        Date: _______________________ 
 
(Chairman) 
 



 
 
Personnel and Pay Committee  
 
Minutes of Part II Meeting held on 16th October 2017 at 6:30 PM. 
 
Chairman: 

 Mr Paul Millett 
 
Members present:  
Mr John Cooper 
 
Mrs Geraldine Fainer  
 
Mr Michael Goldmeier  
 
Mr. Richard Martyn  
 
 
Others present: 
Mr. Simon Appleman  
 
Ms. Debby Lipkin  
 
Mr. Jamie Peston  
 
Mr. Andrew Moss  
 
 
1. 
Assistant Headteachers 
 
Mr Peston said that the School website had been corrected and that Mrs Berg 
and Mr Chauhan were no longer shown as Assistant Headteachers. The 
corresponding error in the school calendar had been entirely his own fault. 
 
Without making any judgement at this point about the ability of the two 
individuals, the Committee requested that the Executive Headteacher should 
provide for it a paper explaining the process for filling the assistant 
headteacher positions. The positions could be advertised and appointments 
made on the understanding that Mr Peston would provide a paper showing 
that the appointments were made on terms consistent with the Pay Policy.  
Section 40 (1) – the request is for the applicants personal data 
 
ACTION EXECUTIVE HEADTEACHER & DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS 
 
2.  

Any Other Business 
 
There was none. 
 
 
 
 
Signed: _______________________ 
 
 
Date: ______________ 
 
 


 
 
Personnel and Pay Committee  
 
Minutes of Meeting held on 16th October 2017 at 6:30 PM. 
 
Chairman: 

 Mr Paul Millett 
 
Members present:  
Mr John Cooper 
 
Mrs Geraldine Fainer  
 
Mr Michael Goldmeier  
 
Mr. Richard Martyn  
 
 
Others present: 
Mr. Simon Appleman  
 
Ms. Debby Lipkin  
 
Mr. Jamie Peston  
 
Mr. Andrew Moss  
 
 
 
  
 
1. 
Apologies for Absence 
 
There were none  
 
2. 
Minutes of Previous Meeting  
 
The Committee approved the draft minutes of the meetings held on 26th June 2017 
 
3.  
Matters Arising  
 
There were none.   
 
4. 
National Pay Proposals 
 
The Committee discussed a paper prepared by the School on the national pay 
proposals recommending an increase of 2% for all six levels on the Main Pay Scale. 
Governors considered the implications of not accepting this recommendation as well 
as the case for granting a higher increase. They wished to make it clear to staff that 
the Governing Body was committed to working within the National formula and the 
discretion provided within the School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Document 2017 
and also that it should remain in with other Brent schools.  
 
The Committee agreed that levels M1-M6 should be increased by 2% and all others 
by 1%.    

 

5. 
Staffing update 
 
The Executive Headteacher updated the Committee on current staffing challenges 
caused by ill health of staff and that of their partners. A plan had been produced to 
redeploy SLT members where needed, sharing responsibilities and additionally to 
employ consultants where needed. 
 
It was noted that additional expenditure might be needed for external consultants 
and cover teachers and Mr Goldmeier suggested consideration of delegating 
authority jointly to the Chairmen of the Finance & Premises and the Pay & Personnel 
Committees to assist with decisions on these matters. 
 
Afternote: it was subsequently confirmed that the two Chairmen had this delegated 
authority. 
 
The Committee also asked for consideration to be given to the provision of a monthly 
contingency fund from which commitments could be made beyond the approved 
budget.  
ACTION MR PESTON 
6. 
 Restructuring and Further Developments 
 
The Committee considered an external consultancy report on the restructuring 
exercise and the Executive Headteacher asked for it to be noted that members of 
SLT should be credited with producing an excellent business case and completing 
successful negotiations with the Unions during a difficult time for the School. The 
consultant had described JFS’s handling of the restructuring as ‘a model redundancy 
process’ and had judged that, with support from external advisers, the SLT had 
demonstrated a high level of management competency.  
 
Mr Goldmeier said he had been reassured by report and congratulated the SLT on 
the steps they had taken that had avoided strike action. The cost of the exercise had 
turned out lower than forecast subject to the remaining outstanding issue of the 
possibility of one constructive dismissal claim.  
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or a third 
party;
 
 
7.  
Any Other Business 
 
There was none. 
 
 
 
Signed: _______________________ 
 
 
Date: ______________ 

 


 
 
Admissions Committee. 
 
Minutes of meeting held on23rd October 2017 at 6:30 PM. 
 
 
Chairman:    

 Mr. Mark Hurst (MH) 
 
Members present:  
Mr. Michael Goldmeier (MG) 
 

MrDavid Lerner 
 
 
Others present: 
Ms. Debbie Lipkin (DL) 
 
Mr. Simon Appleman (SA) 
 
Mr. Jamie Peston (JP) 
 
MrAnthony Flack (AF) 
 
Ms. Maxine Ratnarajah (MR). 
 
1.  Introductions. 
Mark Hurst was welcomed as the new chairman of the committee. 
Michael Goldmeier was thanked for chairing the committee for the previous year. 
 
2.  Members of the committee. 
The committee is made up of the following Governors, Michael Goldmeier, Anne 
Shisler, David Lerner, Mark Hurst, the Headteacher and Executive Headteacher. 
To be quorate, there needs to be 3 Governors and one needs to be the Executive 
Headteacher.  
 
3.  Apologies. 
Apologies were received from Mrs Anne Shisler. 
 
4.  Minutes of 3rd April 2017.  
The minutes approved. 
MH asked for an update on the discussion around a certificate of higher religious 
practice. It was explained that the committee had decided not to pursue this for a 
number of reasons.  
 
5.  Sixth Form Statistics 2017 – Anthony Flack. 
AF thanked Hannah Goldwyn and Maxine for preparing notes and statistics for the 
meeting tonight. 
 

 

Currently there are 273 students in year 12 and 220 in year 13 down from 250 last 
term. This is a 12.34% drop out rate which is in line with previous years.  
 
Reason for drop out include; 
•  8-12 on 1-year programmes, GCSE re-sits. 
•  Disappointed with exam results end of 1st year 
•  Realise not the course they want end of 1st year. 
•  Wanted to stay at JFS but not the right course  
•  Change of career plan 
•  Small no. move to Israel. 
•  Adds up bet 20-30. 
 
The focus now is on retaining current Year 11 students and recruiting externally. 
External applications have dropped in the last couple of years. There is more 
competition now that JCOSS and Immanuel have developed their 6th Forms. 
Research was undertaken to work out what people want from a 6th Form which 
has led to widening the BTEC programme and maintaining the breadth of 
subjects. JFS now offers A’ level business and double business BTEC, as some 
students were leaving to do this at West Herts college. The CASH Childcare 
course which is the equivalent of 3 A’ levels is popular, with students at JFS 3 
days/week and 2 days a week working. The art foundation course however was 
not popular so will not be continued. 
 
The external launch last year was not a great success due to being quite close to 
the application closing date. This year it will be earlier and hopefully more 
successful. The internal launch went well with 70 parents attending. 
 
The school has £330k to invest over 3 years in pathways starting at KS3 and 4 
some background is needed before studying at KS 5 e.g. Robotics, technology 
and photography can start as enrichment and lunch time clubs. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or a third 
party; 

The aim is to have 290 in both 6th form year groups. Due to removal of AS levels, 
only the 1- year course students should be moving and hopefully no drop out 
between year 12-13.  
Overall the ‘value added’ as well as the results show phenomenal progress being 
made despite the recent changes and uncertainty in the school 
Questions:  
Q – Are you able to collate data on the reasons students turn down places in 6th 
Form?  
A – No, they don’t always tell the truth. 
Q- What do you do about JFS students leaving at the end of Year 11? 

 

 A - Head of 6th Form meets with everyone who requests a reference to transfer to 
a different school. Last year all had good reasons to move, mainly to do with 
course choices especially lower attainment students (e.g. hair and beauty or 
sports BTEC linked to sports clubs). These can’t be offered at JFS as there isn’t 
sufficient demand. A considerable number of pupils who commute long distances 
have had enough and a want local 6th Form.  Some of those leaving at the end of 
year 12 might have been unsettled by the number of A’ Level teachers leaving this 
year and comments made by those teachers.  
Q – Is it possible to offer the highest quality education with the funding available 
for the maximum number of students? 
A – Setting up the media and business studies courses was quite easy and 
relatively low cost because the facilities and teaching staff were already in the 
school. The photography A’ Level joins some parts of the existing art A ‘level 
classes and a room was converted into a dark room. Some courses are not 
always run if there is low or no demand. Language courses require double figures 
to make them viable. Moving from 4 A’ level subjects to 3 means that some 
courses are less popular now as they would have been the 4th subject. Some 
subjects are not required at A’ level to study at university (e.g. PE or Music) so 
there can be less demand. It is important however to retain the specialist staff who 
can teach these subjects at A’ level in case demand increases in coming years. 
The committee thanked AF for his presentation.  
6. Report for Prospective Parents’ evening 2017; Bulge class for sept 2018 and 
feasibility study update – JP.  
 
The recent Prospective Parents’ evening was similar to last year except that the tour 
guides had the Primary School names on their badges which was positively 
received. There was a reduction in numbers attending (student calculated) with a 
15% drop in number of families but those people may not all be applicants for 
September 2018. Of 400+ people, only approximately 200 were from year 6 and the 
majority were from years 5 or 4. Therefore there is not a direct correlation between 
numbers attending parents’ evening and applications. 
 
100 families are registered for 2 open mornings which is an increase on last year. All 
the schools’ parents’ evenings were close to the Chagim this year, which may have 
had an impact on numbers. 
 
2014 - 560 families attended and there were 691 applications. 
2015 - 100 less visitors but only 4 less applications. 
2017 – so far there have been 486 applications. Last year there were 277 
applications at this stage (post parents evening but same date week before 
deadline). In end there were 856 applications. 
 

 

Feedback was very positive particularly about the students. Two minor issues about 
being too noisy. A lot said their views changed on visiting JFS (in a positive way).  
 
Next year Prospective Parents’ Evening will be later, a couple of weeks after the 
Chagim. JFS always run the last parents evening to allow families to have something 
to compare to. 
 
Questions: 
Q – Were there changes to the presentations this year?  
A – Yes. Presentations were reduced to 20 minutes, there was a new film and the 
message has changed really selling JFS and encouraging people to think about JFS 
in a different way. Following feedback, a wider variety of students spoke to reflect 
different elements of the student group. The tour guides were very enthusiastic and 
governors and SLT were engaged with parents all the time in the foyer. 
Q –Would it be better to hold the parents evening at the end of the summer term 
ahead of the other schools? 
A – This idea was supported by about 50% of parents in feedback but it is a difficult 
time to showcase the school as there are exams going on and the school is not 
always looking its best at the end of the academic year.  
 
6.1 Bulge class working party - JP. 
The working party has only just launched and is meeting this week. Its purpose is to 
assess whether JFS can take additional students and how this could be managed. 
The time frame is to present reports and the proposals to relevant committees for 
comment in time to present to FGB on 15th January 2018.  
 
Questions: 
Q – Will the bulge class be for 30 extra students? 
A – There needs to be flexibility on the numbers. Last year there was no need for an 
extra class but anecdotally this year is a bigger year, but the statistics are not reliable 
due to the impact of a range of factors. Last year JCOSS opened an extra class and 
Hasmonean and Immanuel increased their numbers. There are also a number of 
new Jewish primary schools reaching year 6 and coming on stream for secondary 
school applications. JFS did increase capacity but in different year groups and needs 
to offer that flexibility in future. 
Q – What will trigger serious consideration of opening more places? 
A – A decision will be made before the March offer date based on number of 
applications. More offers than places need to be made in order to fill the extra 
capacity preferably in the first tranche of offers. 
Q – What happens if more places are offered and all accepted? How will the school 
provide the extra facilities and resources?  
A– The Working party is also looking at longer term issues, later years and the 
impact on rest of the school. An external factor to consider is the possibility of 
another Jewish school opening. The likelihood of this has reduced, but it may 

 

happen. JFS is talking to Barnet about additional funding because Brent have said 
there will no additional funds from them. The maximum number of places that will be 
funded is 2050. The school may reach this level if the number of students in the 6th 
form increases to capacity. 
 
There was a discussion about offering more than 300 places in the first tranche of 
offers in order to fill 300 places as quickly as possible. MR explained that by offering 
300 places in March, approximately 250-260 are accepted. It can take a long time to 
fill the remaining 40 to 50 places as people have received other offers by the second 
tranche and students do hold more than one place for extended periods. Usually 
270-280 places have been accepted by the end of the second tranche. If the working 
party recommends a bulge class then additional places will need to be offered in 
round one. JFS need to confirm the number of offers to be made to Brent by 15th 
December. 
 
Committee recommendation: To make 330 offers in the first tranche to fill 300 
places and to be reviewed in light of feasibility study findings are produced. 
 
JP was thanked for his presentation. 
 
7.  Matters arising. 
To ratify CRPs and SIFs for 11+ 2019, to go on website.  
The only changes to last year are the submission dates. 
 
Decision: The committee ratified the CRP and SIF documents to go online.  
 
8.  Review Terms of Reference – MR. 
There have been no changes to the TOR since last year.  
Decision: the TOR were agreed by the committee. 
 
9.  Review of admissions Policy 2019/20 – DL. 
Proposed changes; 
 
9.1  Child of staff priority. 
There have been circumstances where children of staff who have applied for places 
have not been offered, which has caused great distress to the staff members. Other 
Jewish schools have provision for staff members’ children to receive priority and 
this can be a useful recruitment and retention tool.  
 
It was agreed that there would still be a requirement to produce a CRP to gain 
priority and the offer would sit as next priority after siblings in the policy. Options 
were discussed such as stipulating the member of staff must have been in post for 
a minimum of 2 years but exceptions could be made for roles with demonstrative 
skill shortages. 
 

 

Decision: The committee supported the change, subject to drafting, approval of the 
FGB and the consultation process 
9.2 Lower/upper sibling policy 
Currently the policy on siblings only relates to having an older sibling in the school. 
This has meant that older siblings of students who have joined the school in other 
years have not had any priority if they wanted to join JFS. An example is when a 
family move from abroad and a place is available for only one child in a lower year. 
The older sibling may be on the waiting list for a high year but will receive no 
priority as a sibling. This has led to families not moving to JFS.  
 
Decision: The committee supported the change, subject to drafting, approval of the 
FGB and the consultation process 
 
9.3  Policy update to reflect change of use of PAN (Published Admissions 
Number). 
The school is now using the PAN more flexibly so each year is not necessarily 
limited to 300 students. The wording of this will need to be mindful of the impact it 
may have on admissions appeals. 
 
Decision: It was agreed that the drafting of the policy would be looked into. 
 
Actions agreed:  
1. MH and MG to draft the wording of these changes and share with MR. Some 
changes may need to be reviewed by Stone King. 
 
2. The changes need to be agreed by 7th or 15th December in order to give 
sufficient time to complete a consultation. 
 
3. MR to prepare a consultation pack. 
 
10.  Mid – term applications - MR 
MR said there is one application for a place in year 8 and that will be offered as 
there are 304 students in the year and this can go up to 310. There is a new 
application for year 9 to go onto the waiting list. There are 34 students on that 
waiting list and 4, randomly chosen, will be offered places.  
 
11. 11+ Statistics, 2017 admissions – MR. 
•  729 applications of which 687 had a CRP.  
•  First round - 289 regular offers were made and 10 ‘distance’ offers. 247 
places were accepted in the first round (inclusive of the 10 distance offers).  
•  There were 84 withdrawals in tranche 1, mainly to go to Immanuel. 
•  Second round - 63 offers were made and 45 were accepted (compared to 34 
in 2016).  
•  Third round -28 offers and 28 acceptances. 

 

•  13 withdrawn in tranche 5. 
•  No appeals last year 
•  Admissions officers for Yavneh and JCOSS worked together to identify 
students holding 2 offers. This year Hasmonean will also join to manage the 
lists 
•  8 applicants with an EHCP and 5 offers made. JFS couldn’t meet the needs 
of 3 of them and one chose to go to JCOSS.  
 
Questions: 
Q – What does the lack of appeals tell us? 
A- The bulge class of 25 went elsewhere. This year we want to capture the bulge 
class in tranche 1 if possible. 
Q- Will you change the offer dates this year? 
A – There are 3 set statutory offer dates and JFS added a further 2 this year. 
This reduced the waiting time between tranches. This year will be similar to last 
year. 
Q – Were the SEN refusals appealable? 
A – Parental preference can override the decision but the school works with the 
local authority and the parents to find the best place for that student. There are 
also clear criteria when there are grounds not to offer a place if that student’s 
needs can’t be met or it would be detrimental to the student or others to offer a 
place. 
 
12. A.O.B 
Student returning to Year 10. 
A student who left JFS at the end of Year 9 has requested to return in Year 10. 
On leaving the school, the student’s parent was very vocal to the parent group 
criticising the school. 
 
Committee decision: The student will be offered a place in year 10 and will 
have the usual transition meeting for new or returning students. Governors to 
decide if further meeting with parents required once student has returned. 
Section 40 (1) – the request is for the applicants personal data.   
 
 
Date of next meeting: 29th January 2017. 
 
 
Signed:_________________________________   
Date______________ 
 
 
 
 
 

 


 
 
 
 
 
JFS School  Curriculum and Student Welfare Committee, Attendance & Behaviour 
(CSWAB) Committee. 
 
Minutes of meeting held on 13th November 2017 at 6.30 PM. 
 
Chairman:  
 
 Dr. Charlotte Benjamin (CB) 
 
Members present: 

Ms Geraldine Fainer (GF) 
 
Mrs Julia Alberga (JA) 
Mr. James Lake (JL) 
Mrs Anne Shisler (AS) 
Dr Rabbi Raphael Zarum (RZ) 
 
Others present: 
Mr. Simon Appleman (SA) 
 
Mr Anthony Flack (AF) 
 
Ms Talia Thoret (TT) 
 
Mr Daniel Marcus (DM) 
 
Mr. David Wragg (DW). 
 
 
 
1.  Apologies for absence. 
Apologies were received from Naomi Newman and Debby Lipkin. 
 
2.  Minutes of CSWAB committee meeting of 2nd October 2017. 
      The minutes were accepted with no amendments. 
 
3.  Matters Arising 
3.1 Review of Terms of Reference. 

The following changes were approved; 
•  Administrative matters - removal of arrangements in relation to parental 
representations in members and quorum sections. 
•  Student Discipline section – 2 new responsibilities added regarding considering 
parents’ representations regarding exclusions and deciding whether to confirm 
exclusions of more than 5 days or if student may miss a public exam 
•  Removal of policy for review entitled ‘Behaviour Principles Written Statement’ 
•  Updating language to reflect changes to the school’s current policies and 
procedures 
•  Amendment of the Policies and other statutory documents to be reviewed, which 
now reads; 
 
  Accessibility Plan  
  Careers Education and Information, Advice and Guidance 
  Home School Agreement 

 

  Information on Website 
  Medical Policy (Supporting Students with Medical Conditions) 
  Register of Pupils’ Attendance 
  SEND 
  Supporting Students with Medical Conditions 
  Teaching, Learning and Assessment 
  Use of Internet and School Network 
  Visits. 
 
Decision: The responsibility for convening discipline committees should remain with the 
CSWAB committee who will find external representation to sit on the panels. This can be 
a mixture of governors and associate members.  
 
4.  Curriculum Matters 
a)  GCSE RS 
DM presented the paper ‘Pros and Cons of changing from the current RS GCSE’. 
DM explained the background to the change in RS GCSE 3 years ago to require 
students to study 2 religions in depth. Prior to this the RS GCSE could focus exclusively 
on Jewish studies and became the sole provision of JS in KS4. With the new GSCE only 
60% of the time can devoted to JS. If students don’t take the RS GCSE they are unlikely 
to take the alternative JS provision seriously including in the lower years. 
 
Difficulties with the new GCSE include; despite much CPD and effort, teachers finding it 
difficult to teach a religion they are less familiar with, increased content and teaching 
speed leading to confusion for students, students don’t need such in-depth 
understanding of Islam at the expense of a broader knowledge or all other religions, 
predicted grades much lower than previous excellent JS GCSE results. 
 
DM said a new iGCSE (Edexecel) has become available. It focuses on one religion and 
for JS has a good balanced curriculum. Some Jewish Schools who decided not to offer 
the new RS GCSE are exploring this option. The iGCSE is an international qualification 
which is recognised for purposes of University entrance but is not counted towards the 
school’s Progress 8 scores. DM said a course could be run along side it offering a broad-
brush approach to major world religions to ensure students have a good basic 
understanding of the teachings and practice of other religions. DM said he favoured this 
option as it was in keeping with the Jewish ethos of the school and would provide a 
better Jewish education for the students. DM said that opinion within SLT was divided 
and it would be helpful to get governors’ views. 
 
There was a discussion about the pros and cons of switching to the new iGCSE. 
Pros – 
•  From a parent’s perspective, the better Jewish education and broad-brush 
teaching on all religions was a more attractive offer 
•  Curriculum more in keeping with the Jewish ethos of the school and this should 
be a priority over Progress 8 
•  It would still provide students with a valuable GCSE to go towards their 
Attainment 8 

 

•  Better curriculum for JS – JFS never been happy with the new RS GCSE 
curriculum 
•  Possibility of getting better grades in the iGCSE. 
 
Cons – 
•  As the iGCSE is not taken into account in the Progress 8 scores, this could have a 
negative impact for the school. The previous RS GCSE grades were excellent and 
was a big boost the school’s Progress 8 score. 
•  The new RS GCSE has not yet been fully embedded so it’s difficult to judge the 
impact on grades for the coming couple of years and their contribution to Progress 8. 
•  If a large number of Jewish schools switch to the new iGCSE, the government might 
perceive this as a way to avoid teaching multi-culturalism in Jewish schools which 
could be very damaging to the schools and public perception. 
•  RS currently receives more time than other subjects and the KS4 curriculum is built 
around this so would need to look at the impact of devoting extra time to a subject 
that does not contribute to Progress 8 scores. 
•  If Progress 8 drops it could push JFS results at KS4 from ‘outstanding’ to ‘good’. 
•  No other subject is allowed to switch to a non-affiliated qualification so could set up 2 
tier-system within the school. 
 
Actions agreed: 
1.  SLT to do some modelling of possible results based on mock exam results next term 
2.  SLT to discuss with other schools whether they are concerned about or have 
solutions to the possible impact on Progress 8 
3.  DM to update the committee at the next meeting in February 2018. 
 
4b) Ivrit  
SA presented a Briefing Paper on Ivrit. 
SA is currently the acting head of MFL. There have been long standing difficulties recruiting 
and retaining good teachers which has led to the department being understaffed and this is 
having a significant impact on the quality of teaching, frequency of cover lessons and 
subsequent behaviour and interest of students. To be fully staffed the department needs 6 
full time teachers. There are currently 4. Two were recruited from Israel and one is struggling 
and thinking of leaving. Of the 2 UK based teachers, one is going through teacher training 
and will be going on maternity leave soon and the other teacher is struggling. The poor 
behaviour issue is starting to impact on other lessons as well. All Jewish schools are having 
the same difficulties with recruitment and retention despite large amount of time and money 
being spent on recruitment. 
 
SA said it’s a difficult decision but changes need to be made from January next year and is 
proposing to make Ivrit optional in years 8 and 9 (continue to be compulsory in year 7) and 
look at alternative provision in the timetable to fill those lessons e.g. additional JS, literacy 
programme or PE classes. 
 
Governors acknowledged the difficulties in recruitment and retention and the efforts made to 
resolve the issues. There were concerns that reducing the amount of Ivrit provision would 
impact on the Jewish ethos of the school and Ivrit should not be looked at in isolation but as 

 

a significant contributor school to the overall Jewish ethos. There was a discussion about 
community fundraising in order to boost Ivrit resources but it was felt this would not be 
sustainable to provide an ongoing Ivrit curriculum. It was noted that this an issue effecting 
UK Jewish schools and a community approach is required as it is bigger than just one 
school. 
 
RZ said that PAJES are running a pilot scheme for a new approach for Ivrit teaching. JFS 
has not been involved but it was agreed that RZ would contact PAJES to find out more 
information with a view to JFS getting involved. This project would come with additional 
funding for Ivrit teaching. 
 
Decision:  
1.  The school should implement the changes recommended in the briefing paper. 
2.  JFS to explore joining the PAJES Ivrit Project. 
 
DM and SA were thanked for their presentations. 
DM and RZ left the meeting. 
 
4c. Sixth Form Offer – AF presented a handout circulated at the meeting. 
The 6th form are increasing its vocational pathways slowly with a focus on technology. This 
year an Art and 3D Design course is being added lead by the Design department. It can be 
sat with the business BTEC or photography or art for those looking for more creative 
subjects. This will give students more flexibility and is a move away from the idea of courses 
on one subject that are the equivalent of 3 A’ levels. The CASH childcare course is popular 
but an art course equivalent to a foundation course that was offered last year was not 
popular. Future developments may include engineering and textiles to widen the vocational 
options. These subjects can be taught using existing resources and teaching staff, so less 
investment is required to set them up. 
 
Questions: 
Q- Did you canvass current year 11 students about what they want? 
A – Yes and we developed the business BTECs in response and are introducing more 
flexible creative options for students who don’t want to do another essay based A’ level 
subject. 
 
Q- Is the Hospitality course still offered? 
A – Only for the current year 13s. After that it will be dropped as it is no longer recognised  
 
Q- Is the Art and Design BTEC equivalent to one A’ level? 
A – it can be taken as the equivalent of one or two A’ levels. If 3 creative A’ levels are taken 
this should provide students with a sufficient portfolio to apply to art school without doing a 
foundation course but some students want to do the foundation courses anyway. 
 
Q- Are there any new A’ level subjects being offered? 
A -Philosophy. This is replacing the RS A’ level which is not being continued due to changes 
to parts of the curriculum which does not fit with the school’s ethos. 
 
Q- How does JFS’s 6th Form offer compare to other schools of a similar size? 

 

A – The JFS offer is wider. 
 
Q- What is the maximum class size? 
 A -Generally 20. Group sizes can vary slightly depending on the timetabling with other 
subjects chosen in the block. 
 
AF was thanked for his presentation. 
 
5. Behaviour and achievement update – TT 
TT presented the September data and explained that the October data will be available next 
week. It depends when the committee meetings are as to which data will be ready for 
presentation.  Key points; 
•  SEN K still have higher number of behaviour incidents 
•  Year 9 is the most difficult year for behaviour (always has been as it is a transitional 
year) and this particular year group are more challenging. Year 9 now has a strong 
behavioural team and improvements are being noted. 
•  There is an increase in behavioural incidents this year but it’s due to improved and 
more systematic recording. 
•  The behavioural issues due to Ivrit is concerning as it is spreading to other lessons 
on the MFL corridor with copycat behaviour.  
•  Behaviour team has been strengthened and is working well. 
•  Detention process is being tightened up with every missed detention being followed 
up and responded to. Students are starting to understand there are consequences to 
not attending detentions, which was not happening last year. 
•  The rewards system has been so successful it has used up all the budget. Looking at 
ways to increase the number of points to access rewards and consider subtracting 
behaviour points from achievement points. 
•  A lot of support being offered to teachers to manage behaviour and peer support. 
 
Questions: 
Q – Is racism still an issue? 
A – yes particularly in speech. Students often don’t understand that they are being offensive 
with politically incorrect speech which is racist and also homophobic. The school takes a 
zero-tolerance approach. It is reported as a S4 serious incident with letters home to parents, 
re-education. Very serious incidents are reported to the police. The school is also improving 
awareness of the issues via PSHE sessions and for example Black History month, displays. 
Staff will also be reminded in CPD about how to deal with racism and homophobia. 
 
Q- Are there issues with sexualised behaviour? 
A – Yes, a lot of sexting prevalent in years 7-9. It tends to tail off as students mature. The 
school often call in a PC to talk to the students to help them recognise the dangers and that 
it can be a criminal act when photos are of children. This can be very effective in getting 
children to understand the consequences. JWA did a useful session for 6th form on consent 
including sexting. 
 
Q- How many students / year are getting a  high number of behaviour points? 
A – approximately 10 in each year are well known to the Behaviour team and they all either 
have SEN or safeguarding issues to deal with. They have behaviour plans and other support 
made available to them. 
 
6. Attendance Update - DW 
 Attendance is at 96.12%, which is slightly higher than last year and over the 95% target 
despite illness. 6th form attendance was 92.2% for October, which is higher than last year. 

 

Punctuality is similar to last year. 
 
There is currently a systematic problem with recording attendance data caused by reducing 
the attendance staff from 2 to 1. An additional administration officer is being recruited and 2-
3 hours of their day will be to assist with recording attendance. Support is being given to the 
existing attendance officer and more responsibility is being given to teachers to assist. 
 
7. Link Governor Reports. 
7.1 SEN – AS 
AS met with the SENCO in September. There is a deputy SENCO who is working 3 ½ 
days/week and leading on the inclusion faculty and AS plans to do a learning walk with her 
in a couple of weeks. Naomi Newman is being updated on SEN issues. AS attended a 
training update with Brent for SEN Governors. There has been a change in SEN support in 
that there are now subject specific LSAs rather than 1:1 support being offered (although 
some SEN students will continue to have their own key workers). This makes the students 
more independent and less attached to one person for support. It is the teacher’s 
responsibility to differentiate work.  
 
Governors are reminded they need to update the school information report annually and it 
should be published on the school website. Support for disabled students needs to be 
reviewed every 3 years but no longer needs to be on the website. 
 
7.2 Pupil Premium – JA. 
JA is meeting with Jeff Peddie next week and will report back to the next meeting. 
 
7.3 Safeguarding – CB. 
CB met with TT on 17/10/17. The school run training every 2 weeks to induct new staff more 
regularly and all staff have signed the ‘Keeping children safe in school’ document. A lot of 
work has gone into computerisation of the safeguarding files. There is a monthly meeting 
with Heads of Year reviewing all students with safeguarding issues and this is proving very 
effective. Currently there are 2 students on Child Protection plans and 4 to 5 students 
classed as Children in Need with the local authority. 
 
There was a discussion about the response to a student overdosing. The news spread 
among students very fast via social media. Sometimes other students are aware of incidents 
before families or the school. The school responded to the particular case by opening the 
Health hut immediately for those who were distressed, allow them to call their parents or go 
home if necessary and try and contain the situation meeting the needs of those who were 
distressed without sensationalising the event for the rest of the school. 
 
8. Policies 
E-Safety and Use of Networks. 
The only changes are the dates and adding the words ‘social media’. Bigger changes will 
occur once the WIFI is working in school. 
 
9. Any Other Business 
9.1 Support for parents whose children are excluded – what is the provision? 
Parents are contacted by a support officer and have on-going conversations and teachers 
provide work for the student. The pre-exclusion officer from Brent can be involved to work 
with parents and pastoral care plans can be developed. There is always a re-integration 
meeting on the student’s return to school. If the exclusion is for more than 5 days the school 
has a responsibility to identify alternative provision for them. However, parents can still feel 
unsupported by the process if they disagree with the exclusion or have difficulty arranging 
supervision of their child during school time. 
 

 

9.2 Staffing in the English department. 
There have been difficulties retaining staff in the English department. One new starter in 
September left after a few days and she has been replaced twice so far. Two teachers have 
handed in their notice and one has taken leave for 3 weeks for other commitments. Line 
management of the English department has transferred to DW. One new member of staff 
has been recruited to start in January and two teachers employed to do intervention work 
are covering other classes. 
 
 
 
 
 
Date of Next Meeting: Monday 5th February 2018, at 6.30pm. 
 
 
 
Signed: _______________________________________   Date: ____________________ 

 


 
 
Personnel and Pay Committee  
 
Minutes of meeting held on 20th November 2017 at 6:30 PM. 
 
 
 
Members present:  
Mr. Paul Millett - Chairman 
 
Mrs. Geraldine Fainer (GF) 
 
Mr. Michael Goldmeier (MG) 
 
Mr. Richard Martyn (RM) 
 
Mr. John Cooper (JC) 
 
 
Others present: 
Mr. Simon Appleman (SA) 
 
Ms. Debby Lipkin (DL) 
 
Mr. Jamie Peston (JP) 
 
 
 
 
  
1. Apologies for absence 
None. 
 
2.  Previous minutes 
 
2.1 Personnel and Pay Committee minutes 16th October 2017 Part I  
Point 5 Staff Update – Minutes to be updated to confirm that the Chairmen of the Personnel 
and Pay committee (Paul Millett) and of the Finance and Premises committee (John Cooper) 
do have delegated authority to approve additional expenditure for staffing if required. 
  
2.2 Personnel and Pay Committee minutes 16th October 2017 Part II  
Assistant Headteachers - Minutes to be amended to confirm that both positions were 
advertised and interviewed for and that the appointments were made in line with the Pay 
Policy pay scales. This will be confirmed in writing to the committee by JP. 
 
[Minutes: last sentence: positions may be advertised and appointments made on the 
understanding will get a paper from JP showing that the pay scales for the appointments 
comply with the Pay Policy. 
 
3. Matters arising 
 
3.1Contingency fund for additional funding and 3.2 Updated estimate of outturn on staff 
budget. 
Dealt with at 2.1 Above. 
 
3.3. Compliance with Assistant Headteacher pay policy. 
Dealt with at 2.2 above. 
 
4. Average Pay 
 


There was a discussion regarding statistics previously circulated to the committee, regarding 
differences in average pay for men and women. It was felt that the figures were statistically 
irrelevant with a 0.8% differential. It was noted that comparing averages did not supply much 
useful information. Governors were re-assured that staff at all levels were receiving equal 
pay for the same roles. The differences in average pay between men and women could be 
explained by different working patterns, career breaks etc. 
 
5. Staffing and recruitment update – SA 
 
Four members of staff have resigned this term (2 English, 1 Maths, 1 PE). 1 permanent 
English teacher has been recruited. 
 
Two teachers were recruited via the WZO Ivrit programme. However, one is not working out 
and the school will be ending their contract. The school has a replacement available to start 
on a temporary basis with a view to making a permanent appointment.  
 
6. Performance Management summary  
 

•  Less staff are eligible this year to move up a pay spine point due to the large number 
of new staff this year 
•  One member of staff is moving up for exceptional performance based on exam 
results 
•  Four staff members not being moved up, one is appealing. 
 
SLT would like permission from governors to award £1500 as the Governor’s discretionary 
award to two teachers, one for exceptional exam results and the other who is at the top of 
the pay scale, to recognise the award of ‘Outstanding’ by Ofsted for the 6th Form. 
Section 40 (1) – the request is for the applicants personal data 
Decision: The governors agreed these two awards. 
 
DL raised the issue of recommendations for headteachers’ pay awards following 
performance management. The current situation is unusual having both an executive head 
teacher and acting headteacher and this is not accounted for in the policy. DL took advice 
from Alan Fox, Clerk to the governors who advised that she could make the 
recommendation for SA and the committee would complete her performance management 
and pay award recommendation itself. However, the committee decided that it would 
delegate the pay award recommendation for SA to PM as the chairman of the committee. 
 
Questions: 
 
Q – Why have the newly qualified teachers started on level M3 and not M1? 
A – the top of the unqualified scale is above M1. M3 is next level that would constitute a 
salary increase. 
 
Q – Are there staff under performance management? 
A – Currently there are 3 or 4 on support plans (informal process) but none going through 
capability processes at the moment. Those on support plans are a mixture of new staff 
requiring mentoring and some longer standing teachers needing support. 
 
7.Restructuring review – JP 
 
The report shows a RAG review with all actions completed or booked in. Meetings were held 
at the end of term for feedback and there will be another round of meetings at the end of this 
term to see how people have adjusted to their roles. There have been some substantial 


changes to contracts in relation to some salaries and allowances, change in responsibilities 
and line management structure. Staff suggestions have been taken on board but not all 
could be implemented. There is still more work to do in streamlining processes and 
identifying what can no longer be offered by the school, due to reduced resources. More 
work is still required on increasing income. It was requested that an additional column be 
added to the next report to explain the costs for each action. 
 
7.1 Staff morale 
 
Many staff have noted a dramatic improvement since last academic year with most of the 
negativity gone. Approximately 90% of the non-teaching staff who have experienced change 
are embedded in their new roles. Some staff are still grappling with a reduction in their 
activities and need support to plan how to respond to the changes.  
 
New staff think JFS is a good place to work. Not everyone is happy but some issues are to 
do with pressures of working in education currently and are not specific to JFS. Key issues 
effecting morale of teaching staff include; increased teaching time, demand of providing 
cover and increased parental demands. 
 
7.2 Parents’ behaviour 
 
This has become a particular stressor for all staff especially middle leaders and SLT. Staff 
are finding it difficult to manage both the quantity of emails and the level of aggression in 
some of them. DL reported that two senior staff members said it may cause them to resign. 
DL addresses aggressive behaviour by contacting the parent immediately, explaining that 
the behaviour is unacceptable and inviting them to meet with her to discuss the underlying 
issue. Most parents apologize following this approach but DL does not have capacity to do 
this with every incident as the numbers are high. Bandings are often a trigger for complaints. 
It was agreed approaches to this be discussed at the next meeting. 
 
7.3 Staff Vulnerabilities – DL  
 
Long term sickness is high and is affecting every area of the school. The additional costs of 
sick pay and cover teachers have not been sufficiently budgeted for, due to the unusually 
high levels currently. An additional pressure has been huge increase in safeguarding issues 
and additional support at SLT level is required to ensure safeguarding is managed safely. 
DL said the School is proposing to recruit to a temporary extended leadership post to take 
on management of Behaviour and free up the Head of Safeguarding who currently holds 
responsibility for both areas. It would be a fixed term contract until the end of term. 
 
The governors noted the concerns and said that responding to safeguarding issues is vitally 
important to do everything possible to reduce the risk to students.  
 
Decision: Governors approved recruitment of a temporary extended leadership post. 
 
Questions:  
Q - How does the sickness rate compare to comparable schools? 
A – JFS has less recruitment issues than other schools but this has been a perfect storm of 
serious illness in staff or relatives causing much stress and anxiety. 
 
Q – Is any illness attributed to re-structure? 
DL – no. 
 
Q – At what point do you end a contract for long term sickness? 
A - Teaching staff have 6 months full pay and 6 months ½ pay, however if they come into 


school for any length of time during this period, the sick pay entitlement starts again.  
 
7.4 Funding 
 
£750k of owed Gift Aid money is now in the Trust. The money raised at the fundraising 
dinner including the 2-4 year pledges have been added to the budget for the relevant years. 
There are no ‘ghost’ funds in the budget. It was agreed the budget would reflect only money 
already in the accounts and not potential funds raised as the figures are unknown. 
Sustained, substantial fundraising is required. There is some work being developed to 
increase income from use of the building via the PFI. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or 
a third party; 

Questions: 
 

Q.  When will the staff/parent/student survey results be reported to governors? 
A.  All 3 surveys will close by mid-December and the report will be presented at the 
January FGB. 
 
Q- What is the response rate like? 
A – For parents approximately 25%, staff 75-80% and it’s compulsory for students in 
years 7-11. 
 
8. Entry Interviews – DL 
37 new staff (teaching and non-teaching) joined the school this term and the headteachers 
are meeting with them to see how they are settling in. Seen 17 so far. 
Main themes from interviews; 
•  16 out of 17 said they would recommend JFS as a place to work. One said 
communication was difficult due to the size of the school. 
 
•  Staff friendly and supportive 
•  Good induction, school is well organised,  
•  Peer buddies useful in some cases but not all 
•  Challenges include large number of new processes to learn and parental demands 
 
9. Policies 
 
9.1 Staff Discipline 
9.2 Staff Capability 
 
These two new policies replace the previous single policy on staff discipline and capability 
that was not considered to be fit for purpose. Staff, the Unions and HR have all been 
consulted. The committee felt it was important for the new policies to be reviewed by Stone 
King before signing them off. 
 
Action agreed: 
 

1.  The policies be passed to Stone King with MG to review. 
2.  Once signed off by Stone King, the policies to be circulated to the committee by 
email with a note confirming legal sign off and consultations completed. 
3.  If the policies are re-drafted a new consultation process will need to be carried out 
when MG’s comments would be considered. 
 
There was a general discussion about governors’ responsibilities to review policies and 
whether this could be delegated to an external body. It was felt the cost implications would 


prevent this from being workable. However, there is now a retainer with Stone King for HR 
matters as well as educational law so they can review and recommend approval of all new 
and updated policies, prior to governors’ approval. 
 
The committee suggested that a short report is added to new or updated policies for review, 
explaining; 
 
•  Where the policy has come from 
•  Summary of changes if an updated policy 
•  If it has been checked externally and if so by whom 
•  Is it compliant with the norms for that type of policy? 
•  Is it fit for purpose? 
 
It was also noted that not all policies need an annual review so they do need to be reviewed 
at different times rather than at one set time in the year. 
 
10. Terms of Reference 
 
Actions agreed

 
1.TOR to be reviewed by the committee and any changes confirmed via email before 
the next meeting.  
 
2. PM to be the Freedom of Information (FOI) governor. 
 
 
11. Any other business 
11.1 PM asked when the School Improvement Plan that had been circulated recently was to 
be discussed. It will be discussed at the next FGB. 
 
 
 
 
Date of Next Meeting: 6.30pm Monday 5th March 2017. 
 
 
 
 
 
Signed: __________________________________  
 
Date: ______________ 



 
 
 
 
 
JFS School  Finance and Premises Committee. 
 
Minutes of meeting held on 27th November 2017 at 6.30 PM. 
 
 
 
Chairperson:  
 Mr John Cooper (JC) 
 
Members present: 

Mr Paul Millett (PM) 
 
Mr Mark Hurst (MH) 
 
Mr Richard Martyn (RM) 
 
Mr David Lerner (DLe) 
 
 
Others present: 
Ms Mary Nithiy (MN) 
 
Ms Debby Lipkin (DL) 
 
Mr Graeme Pocock (GP) 
 
 
  
1.  Apologies for absence 
Andrew Moss and Simon Appleman sent apologies. 
 
Congratulations from governors to school on achieving an excellent position in the 
Sunday Times league table just published. 
 2.  Declaration of Interests 
None. 
 
3.  Minutes of Meeting held on 16th October 2017. 
The minutes were approved subject to the following changes; 
 
Part 1 minutes item 6 should read, ‘The Committee noted the Estate Manager’s Annual 
Report’. 
 
Part 1 minutes – Item 7 PFI Annual Review – to remove the last sentence of the 
paragraph. 
 
4.  Matters arising not covered by substantive agenda items. 
A number of questions were asked outside of the meeting and the responses are as 
follows; 
 
1.  Pupil premium: The forecast income is £36,465 for the year; but in the year to 
October we have spent £15,800 above budget on pupil premium consultancy. Why 
so much? 
 

 

A - You are looking at the budgeted amount (£36,455) which has increased to a 
forecast of £87,850 in line with actual payments, by virtue of DFE increasing our 
allocation. The expenditure is therefore in line with increased income. 
 
2.  Staff: The two separate papers show restructure costs as £34,127 above what 
we accrued, and staffing costs as £52,591 above budget; but the forecast for the 
year shows overall staff costs about £200,000 above budget. Why the difference? 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or a 
third party; 

 
A -There was an error in the last reforecast for salaries. This was due to a double 
counting of Unfilled Vacancy Costs from April-August when the actual expenditure 
was brought into the forecast. Having highlighted the concerns with the ‘historic’ use 
of an excel spreadsheet to make these forecasts, a hidden cell was identified – this 
is good news and also won’t happen again as Greg is preparing a new methodology 
for us. As a result, the implications of the overspend in restructure costs and 
increased staffing are not as profound as would be the case based on the latest 
reforecast. We are shortly going to recirculate an updated budget reforecast to 
reflect this, which also includes the additional costs of £34,127 as above. 
 
3.  Gift Aid: The forecast implies that only 55% of the parents sign a Gift Aid 
Declaration. Is this the usual proportion, and can it be increased? 
 
A -This is an estimation but you are correct. At present we claim gift aid on 55%-60% 
of donations. It is apparent that the new students who joined this year have not yet 
been added to this amount and there is an action as part of the VC action plan to 
ensure all new donors have completed the forms. We will then be making a separate 
application to reclaim any as yet unclaimed Gift Aid. This is not in the current forecast 
and would therefore be retained in the GCT rather than being included in current 
planned expenditure. The intention is to follow up the communication currently under 
consideration about VCs and Gift Aid with a full chase. 
Section 41 –  information that has been sent to the School (but not the School’s own 
information) which is confidential; 
 
4. Capital expenditure: We are forecasting £339,092 on new construction etc. Why 
is that £93,626 over budget? What does it relate to? When was this given committee 
approval? 
 
A - These figures relate to the expenditure for DFC and LCVAP monies as well as 
the 10% contribution to LCVAP expenditure from the DCT. The increased costs 
relate to works carried out from the 2016/17 grants that were held in DCT but not yet 
transferred to JFS as the invoices had not yet arrived. There is therefore no 
additional work that has not already been approved by F+P 
 
5. Donations: Please confirm that none of the donations shown in the Income & 
Expenditure account are for capital expenditure e.g. the BTEC project. Where is that 
amount shown? 
 
A -The BTEC project monies are in the Balance Sheet as deferred income. It is not 
shown in Income and Expenditure. 
 
5.  Accounts for Year ending 31st March 2017. 
It was noted that the accounts are externally audited for the benefit of the governing 

 

body and Brent local authority completes its own audit. 
 
5a) Letter of Representation – this was approved by the committee. 
 
5b) Audit findings letter incorporating Engagement letter and Ethical Standards letter –  
This is a letter sent by the auditor to the head of the F&P committee to start the audit 
process. It may have been sent to the previous chairman of the committee Stuart 
Waldman. 
 
Action agreed: MN to find the letter and send it to JC for approval on behalf of the 
committee. 
 
5c) Report and Audited Accounts (year ending 31st March 2017) – approved by the   
committee.  
 
6. Statement of Internal Control 
      Discussed jointly with item 7 – see below. 
 
7.Financial Procedures Manual 
The only updates to both documents are; a change of titles to reflect executive head 
teacher position, update of budget holders in capitation lines and an update of levels of 
delegated authority. The TOR were approved at the last F&P meeting October 2017. 
Decision: The committee agreed both documents are ready to go to the FGB for 
approval. 
 
8. Management accounts - JP 
A report was handed out at the meeting. 
Main changes include; 
•  Re-forecast budget for the year 
•  A problem identified in the Excel spreadsheet caused by a hidden cell has been 
rectified and this shows salary costs have not gone up. 
 
Greg Foley has been assisting 2 days/week with the transfer to a fully automated system 
not based on a spreadsheet that will give more accurate forecasts. He will continue until 
April 2018 and will help with next year’s budget forecast. He has also helped with the re-
distribution of responsibilities within the finance team according to skill set. 
 
Key points to note in the report; 
 
•  Headteacher recruitment is being funded by the DCT 
•  No capital will be requested from the DCT for running costs, only income 
generated by the investment portfolio 
•  The student fund has a healthy balance 
•  Some fundraising income will be carried forward to next year 
•  Some additional costs for management and salaries were incurred for the 
building project even though the work is not currently progressing. Excess 
funds may be used to cover this. 
 
DL referred to the Report on Vulnerabilities presented to the recent Pay and Personnel 
Committee. She said it is key because is has a significant impact on the budget and 
there is need to keep funds available for contingencies. 
 
The committee was asked to decide on a matter relating to the funding of the re-
structure. The DCT made an undertaking to fund it at an estimated cost of £202k. 

 

However, there was a £34k shortfall. Should the school ask the Trustees to fund the 
additional £34k rather than fund this out of the school budget. DL noted that this is the 
first year in a long time since the school actually put money back into the trust (the Gift 
Aid money).  
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or a third 
party; 

Decision: the Committee recommended that the School asks the Trustees for the 
additional sum. 
 
Questions; 
Q – Is there an issue with showing a surplus at the end of the financial year in terms of 
future funding provided by the LEA? 
A – The school is allowed to retain up to 5% of the budget share from the LEA. So, for a 
budget of £11 million, up to £55k is acceptable.   
 
Q – When would the school ask for funds provided from capital from the DCT? 
A - One off costs such as recruitment of the head teacher or school development 
projects. For example, Norwood has agreed to put a social worker into the school 2 
days/week and the school has asked for capital funds to match this investment. 
Historically certain school expenses were paid by trust but now only one item is covered, 
which is the salary of the person who manages the voluntary contributions who is 
employed by the school but her salary is reimbursed.  
 
The committee noted; 
8a) The End of October Management Accounts 
8b) The Updated 2017/18 outturn forecast 
8c) The updated reorganisation costs expenditure against accrual 
8d) The Updated Salary budget including increased costs due to sickness (Vulnerability 
Report). 
 
8e) -It was agreed that JP will make a full presentation to the FGB. 
 
9. 2018/19 Budget 
The committee will be presented with the 3-year budget at the next committee meeting in   
February 2018. 
 
10. Benchmarking – JP 
The School has now had time to review and will be reverting to KSSL by the end of 
December. They will need to update the forecast to accrue expenditure. Consultants 
called Local Partnerships have been funded by a donation secured by DL and they will 
be assisting the school with negotiations for both benchmarking and deductions.  
 
Graeme Pocock presented a paper to the Committee. 
 
11. Pinsent advice on PFI contract 
The Pinsent report needs some additional information to be added in relation to 
benchmarking.  
 
12. Third party income (TPI) and security buyout – JP 
The school is negotiating to buy out the Third-Party Income from the PFI contract. There 
are 3 elements, IT, security and income from rental. The IT element is too complex and 
will not be pursued currently.  
 
12.1TPI 

 

The current level of 3rd party income is low and could be increased significantly with 
better marketing. Currently JFS receives £32k / year and pays 50% of the marketing 
(which is only an advert in the school calendar.) JFS will continue to pay 1440 £32k / 
year regardless of the amount of profit the school generates.  
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or a third 
party; 

 
13.2 Security 
There is a change to security as the CST is not funding ‘out of school hours’ security 
and this is being paid by the DCT. If the cost of security was passed on to the school, 
this would wipe out any profit.  
The legal costs will be £12k. The PFI provider has asked for £19k from JFS as this is 
the profit they currently make by providing security. This is essentially a risk premium. 
JP said the figure is in dispute but does not think it will be a sticking point. JFS will deal 
directly with the security firm Safe who has indicated costs rising by 3 or 4%. The 
security manager will be employed by JFS. 12% of the role includes recording 
maintenance issues. There are no TUPE issues because they use agency staff. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or a third 
party; 

 
Questions; 
Q: Do you have a potential projection of profits? 
A – A local primary school near Wembley stadium provides parking and generates 
approximately £1 million / year although there are some additional costs to manage this. 
 
Q: Are there any issues about hiring out a Jewish school for events on Shabbat or other 
issues (such as statues being used in Hindu or Jain wedding ceremonies)? 
A – This can be looked into. It may be possible to put in place a third party to manage 
this. 
 
Q: - What is the proposal to the governing body? 
A – To move to the next stage. JP has met with someone who has a lot of experience in 
this area and has offered to help with the business case. 
 
Decision: There were no serious reservations from the committee and in principle it 
supports the presentation of TPI and security buyout from the PFI contractor to the 
governing body. 
  
Action agreed: JP to present a report to FGB regarding starting the business plan. 
 
13. Fundraising – Paper presented by JP. 
13.1 Key points; 
•  A new database for parental contributions and all fundraising is being 
embedded and data will be switched over completely in December. 
•  Oxford and St Georges visiting this week to discuss a second minibus 
•  The Grandparents’ teas have funded the first minibus. 
•  The Children’s’ Aid Committee has agreed to fund part of an informal 
educator’s salary 
•  Meeting next week with the Wohl Trust looks promising 
•  Fundraising events for next year include celebrating 15 years in Kenton 
•  Voluntary contributions commitments are now followed up by regular calls. 
DLe said he is happy to help with improving levels of voluntary contributions. 

 

•  Applications can be made to the Tobias Hitman Trust for grants to assist 
those who cannot make voluntary contributions 
•  The committee congratulated the fundraising team on its recent successes. 
 
13.2 Gift Aid 
New joiners to the school have not been asked to complete Gift Aid forms. 2 letters are 
to be sent to all parents not currently giving via Gift Aid, outlining that costs have 
increased but government grants have not kept pace proportionately and to emphasize 
the benefits JFS offers its students compared to other schools. There will also be a letter 
from CST regarding security. 
 
 
14.Premises update 
Communication with 1440 has improved, issues with the contract not being fulfilled have 
been acknowledged and there seems to be a willingness to address these issues.  
 
15. Risk Register – SA 
It was agreed this would be carried forward to the next committee meeting in February 
2018. 
 
16. Any Other Business 
None.  
 
 
Date of Next Meeting: Monday 19th February 2018 at 6.30pm. 
 
 
 
Signed: _______________________________________   Date: ____________________ 

 

 
 
 

MINUTES OF THE PART II MEETING OF THE GOVERNING 
BODY (GB) HELD ON MONDAY 12TH DECEMBER 2017 
 
Note: Items 1 – 2 were considered at 5.15 p.m. 
            Items 3 – 4 were considered at 7.45 p.m. 
Present:  
 
Chairman:    
    Ms Geraldine Fainer          
 
Governors: 
 
Mrs Julia Alberga   Dr Charlotte Benjamin   Mr John Cooper  
   
  
Mr David Davies    Rabbi Daniel Epstein   Mr Michael Goldmeier  
  
Mr Mark Hurst       Mr James Lake    
Mr Richard Martyn                 
Mr Paul Millett       Mr Andrew Moss          Mrs Naomi Newman Items 2 – 4 
Mrs Anne Shisler 
 
 
Clerk:   
 
     Dr Alan Fox   
 
 
1. 

HEADTEACHER RECRUITMENT 
 
The Governing Body received the report of the Selection Committee that had 
conducted shortlist interviews earlier in the day and which recommended the 
appointment as Headteacher of Mrs Rachel Harriet Fink, currently Headteacher 
of Hasmonean High School (Girls). 
 
The Governing Body approved the report unanimously and authorised the 
Chairman to offer the post of Headteacher to Mrs Fink with full power to 
negotiate the starting date and opening salary level. 
 
2. 
CHAIRMAN’S REPORT 
 
The Chairman said that she had encountered various challenges during the 
Headteacher selection process but she hoped that the settlement of this 
appointment would enable the GB to move in forward in January with a greater 
degree of co-operation to the benefit of the student body and the wider 
community. 
 
The Chairman added that Governors should also be aware,  on a strictly 
confidential basis,  that  a serious safeguarding complaint had been received, 

relating more to systems than individuals and that she was taking appropriate 
advice.   
Section 38 –  information that could prejudice the physical health, mental health or 
safety of an individual (this may apply particularly to safeguarding information); 

 
 
3. 
MULTI ACADEMY TRUST 
 
The Chairman reminded Governors that at the end of November she had 
circulated a report of a conversation with the Regional Schools Commissioner 
from which she had gathered that, whilst there would be advantages to JFS to 
be free of the local authority, there might not be any of the other benefits that 
likely to be derived by a smaller school. Caution should therefore be exercised 
and conversion to a Single Academy Trust should be considered along with a 
Multi Academy Trust. There were also the options of "soft" and "hard" 
Federations. In the Chairman's view there was no urgency in taking a decision. 
 
Mr Millett said that he felt uneasy at the prospect of JFS being the only 
secondary school in Brent not part of an Academy Trust, with a risk that it might 
be forced into a MAT with a different school in the lead. He would, therefore 
prefer a study to be undertaken followed by a full debate of the balance 
between the positive and negative aspects, taking into account the PFI contract 
and the problems with the United Synagogue over the land. It would probably 
be possible to obtain authority to become a Single Academy Trust (with room 
for other schools to enter later) and if the GB chose not to go down that route it 
should be for reasons that were clearly understood. 
 
The Governing Body agreed that the Trust issue should be fully debated at the 
March meeting on the basis of a study led by Mr Millett in conjunction with 
Messrs Cooper, Davies, and Goldmeier. 
ACTION NAMED GOVERNORS 
 
4. 

ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
There was none.  
 
 
 
Signed       …………………………………      
………………….  
(Chairman)  
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Date) 
 

 
 
 

MINUTES OF THE PART I MEETING OF THE GOVERNING 
BODY (GB) HELD AT 6.30 p.m. ON MONDAY 12TH DECEMBER 
2017 
 
 
Present:  
 
Chairman:    
 
Ms Geraldine Fainer          
 
Governors: 
 
Mrs Julia Alberga 
Dr Charlotte Benjamin        Mr John Cooper  
  
Mr David Davies 
Rabbi Daniel Epstein  
Mr Michael Goldmeier 
Mr Mark Hurst 
Mr James Lake  
 
Mr Richard Martyn          
Mr Paul Millett 
Mr Andrew Moss 
         Mrs Naomi Newman 
Mrs Anne Shisler 
 
 
Clerk:   
 
           Dr Alan Fox   
 
1. 
Apologies  
 
There were none. 
 
2. 

Declaration of Interests 
 
Rabbi Epstein reminded Governors that he was an employee of the United 
Synagogue. 
 
3. 

Membership 
 
3.1  
Salvete - The GB welcomed Mrs Naomi Newman appointed as a 
Foundation Governor for a three year term of office with effect from 23rd 
September 2017 and Mr David Davis, elected as a Parent Governor for a three 
year term of office with effect from 28th November, 2017.  
 
3.2   
Valete -The GB noted with regret the resignation of Mr David Lerner as 
a Foundation Governors with effect from 10th December. 
 
4.
 
MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The GB confirmed the draft minutes of the meeting held on 11th September 
2017.  

  
5.     MATTERS ARISING NOT COVERED BY SUBSTANTIVE AGENDA 
ITEMS 
 
5.1 
Item 7 – The GB noted that the new Instrument of Government was 
formally made by the Local Authority on 19th September 2017.  
 
5.2 
Item 18 – The Clerk advised governors that since the School had 
withdrawn support for Fronter in April no progress had been made with the 
provision of a website, accessible to members of the GB only, which could be 
used for the storage of reference documents including papers for past 
meetings or for the circulation of papers for current meetings. 
 
6. 
CHAIRMAN’S REPORT  
 
The Chairman referred to the selection of a new Headteacher completed earlier 
in the day.  
 
In discussion it was suggested that a ‘welcome back’ event should be held for 
staff in January. 
ACTION CHAIRMAN 
 
7. 

ACTING HEADTEACHER’S REPORT  
 
The GB accepted that, in the absence of all members of the SLT, substantive 
consideration of the Headteachers’ Report should be delayed until the January 
meeting. However, in a brief discussion the following points were made: 
 
•  There was a high level of stress amongst staff and that further 
consideration should be given to ending the Summer Term earlier and 
making up the consequential loss of school days by cutting out the short 
break in November.  
ACTION HEADTEACHER 
 
•  Additionally, all staff might be offered individually a one day break to 
give the opportunity of a long weekend of their choice. 
 
ACTION HEADTEACHER 
 
•  Around £20,000 had been spent on the reward scheme for good 
behaviour and consideration should be given to concerns whether this 
was the best use of a sum of this size. 
 
ACTION CSWAB & FINANCE & PREMISES CONNITTEES 
 
8. 
SELF EVALUATION AT SEPTEMBER 2017  
 
In the absence of all members of the SLT, substantive consideration of the Self 
Evaluation was postponed until the January meeting.  
 
9. 

KEY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMME 2017/18 
 
 


In the absence of all members of the SLT, substantive consideration of the Key 
Improvement Programme was postponed until the January meeting.  
 
10. 
JEWISH LIFE AND LEARNING  
 
The GB accepted that, in the absence of all members of the SLT, substantive 
consideration of the report by the Deputy Headteacher for Jewish Life and 
Learning should be delayed until the January meeting. However, in a brief 
discussion concern was expressed about the shortage of staff to teach Modern 
Hebrew that might result in its removal from the Year 9 curriculum. The 
possibility of recruiting in Israel was being investigated and a further report 
should be provided at the next meeting. 
ACTION HEADTEACHER 
11. 
ANNUAL AUDIT AND ACCOUNTS 
 
Mr Cooper reported that the Finance & Premises Committee had thoroughly 
examined the Accounts to end March 2017 against the background of the Audit 
by Littlejohn LLP. It was pleasing to note that there was a clean audit report. 
Overall, there had been a small deficit of £11,000 compared with a surplus of 
nearly £30,000 in the previous year, which represented a reduction in the 
Development Charitable Trust grant. 
 
In discussion, the following points were made: 
 
•  The timescale for the production of these accounts had slipped badly 
and must be produced much earlier next year  
 
•  Staff numbers during the year were shown at Note 4 to the Financial 
Statements. There had been a reduction in support staff following the 
restructuring exercise. However, two members dealing with attendance 
had left and this was causing problems that might lead to the need for 
fresh recruitment again. 
 
•  The only related party transactions were those in respect of the 
charitable trusts. The Finance & Premises Committee was requested to 
ensure the completion of the recommended review of the related party 
transactions disclosures 
ACTION FINANCE & PREMISES COMMITTEE 
 
The GB approved and authorized signature of:  
 
•  the Audit Findings Letter (incorporating the Letter of Management            
representation).  
 
•  the Annual Report and Financial Statements for 2016/17.   
 
•  the Statement of Internal Control.  
 
12. 
MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTS AND BUDGET 
 
 


Mr Cooper drew attention to the previously circulated PowerPoint presentation 
that provided a summary of the 2017/18 Budget and the latest outturn forecast 
based on the Management Accounts to end October. In so doing and in 
response to questions, the following points were made: 
 
•  Very broadly the annual budget was around £17 million with £10 million 
spent on staff, £5 million on premises and £2 million on other items. 
Grants from public funds amounted to around £15 million leaving £2 
million to be sourced elsewhere annually. 
 
•  Both total income and total expenditure were forecast to have increased 
by about £90k from the original budget and the latest projections 
showed that the School was on target 
 
•  However, the eventual outturn would be significantly dependent on 
staffing and the extent to which, at a time of very challenging 
circumstances, it became necessary to incur additional costs on supply 
staff and recruitment. 
 
•  Parental Voluntary Contributions provided one major source of 
additional income. However, many parents did not contribute the full 
sum suggested and some nothing at all. There was much room for 
improvement and it was important to foster a change in the culture. The 
GB agreed that parents/carers could be asked to continue with 
Voluntary Contributions once their child had left the school. 
 
ACTION MR COOPER 
 
•  A reduction in receipt of Voluntary Contributions had been temporarily 
offset on a one-off basis by receipt of the Gift Aid arrears. 
 
•  Gift Aid declarations, on which there had been a hiatus pending the 
recent issue with HMRC, were being pursued and overall a more 
professional approach was being adopted in an effort to produce an 
increase in the total sum collected. The GB requested a report on the 
how the arrangements were working at its next meeting. 
 
ACTION DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS 
 
•  The annual donation from the Trust was much lower than in earlier years, 
but further monies might be required to cover the CST shortfall.  
 
•  There had been extensive changes in the finance team where 
reorganisation was in process and new systems were increasing 
efficiency. 
 
•  A number of successful applications to educational trusts and individuals 
had resulted in an increase in fundraising income, but the GB requested 
that a Fundraising Plan should be provided at its January meeting. 
 
ACTION DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS 
 


 
The GB approved, without dissent, the draft 2017/18 Budget recommended by 
the Finance & Premises Committee. The Chairman recorded the GB’s thanks 
to all those responsible for the work leading to this successful conclusion. 
 
13. 
PFI CONTRACT 
 
The GB considered the level of Third Party Income (TPI) being realised by 
1440, which both the company and the School judged to be significantly lower 
than might be expected from a site of JFS’s size. Security costs were affected 
by the extent of third-party usage outside normal hours and the School had 
therefore raised a contract variation request to price the option of buying out 
both security and TPI from the PFI contract. Any change would involve legal 
costs and JFS would have to continue to pay 1440 a sum based on its average 
TPI return over the last three years and probably take over one employee. 
 
The balance of advantage was not yet clear and the GB requested that the 
Headteacher should provide a note setting out the pros and cons for discussion 
at its January meeting. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party;
 
 
ACTION HEADTEACHER 
 
More generally, Mr Millett and the School had recently held two meetings with 
the contractor. There was a general consensus that the level of service was 
improving, although it still remained significantly short of perfect and managing 
this was taking too much SLT time. Informal mediation was being arranged to 
determine an appropriate level of compensation for the service failures over the 
last 16 months. A claim was being made for a sum of just under £500k plus an 
additional amount for wasted management time. Advice was being taken from 
Local Partnerships and eventually it might become necessary to invoke formal 
dispute resolution.  
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party;
 
 
Mr Millett was thanked for acting as the principal Governor liaison on PFI and 
the Governing Body delegated to him authority to continue negotiations and to 
take such actions as he deemed appropriate including approval of a settlement 
figure. 
ACTION MR MILLETT 
14. 
MULTI ACADEMY TRUST 
 
The Chairman reported on the latest developments. 
 
15. 

NON-COMMITTEE POLICIES  
 
In the meantime, the GB noted that the Complaints Procedure due in the 
Summer Term, the Collective Worship & Religious Education Policy, and the 
Vision & Values Statement due during the Autumn Term were not yet available 
for GB consideration and requested that drafts should be provided for the 
Spring Term.    
 


ACTION HEADTEACHER 
16. 
   ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE 
 
16.1 -   The GB noted the Committee’s Report and the draft minutes of its 
meeting held on 23rd October.  
 
16.2 -  Mr Hurst explained that the Committee had considered several 
amendments to the Admissions Policy. In particular it wished to introduce the 
children of staff into the priority list and to clarify the SEN category. There were 
a number of other points that would best be considered within the planned 
external policy review. Accordingly, the GB agreed that the Admissions Policy, 
updated as above should be submitted for external consultation. It was agreed 
that when all comments had been received and considered, final GB approval 
could be sought via email.  
 
16.3 -  Mr Hurst also explained that it was proposed to offer more than 300 
places in the first tranche for entry in Year 7 in September 2018. This was 
contrary to the Local Authority’s policy in recent years and an approach had 
been made to Brent for approval. 
 
17. 

CSWAB COMMITTEE 
 
17.1 -  The GB noted the minutes of the meeting held on 2nd October and the 
draft minutes of the meeting held on 13th November.  
 
17.2 -  As recommended by the Committee, the GB approved the 
 
•  Attendance Policy and Procedures 
•  E-safety Policy.) 
•  The maintenance of the Attendance Targets at 95% for Years  
 7- 11 and 90% for Years 12-13. 
 
18. 
FINANCE & PREMISES COMMITTEE 
 
18.1 -  The GB noted the minutes of the meeting held on 16th October.  
 
16.2 -    As recommended by the Committee, the GB approved:  
 
•  the Finance Manual. 
 
•  the Annual PFI Report 
  
•  the Health & Safety Policy 
  
•  the Governors’ Allowances Policy  
 
19.  

PAY & PERSONNEL COMMITTEE 
 
19.1 -  The GB noted the minutes of the meeting held on 16th October and the 
draft minutes of the meeting held on 27th November.  
 
 


19.2 -  the GB further noted that the Committee was not yet ready to 
recommend for approval the Staff Discipline and Staff Capability Policies, due 
in the Autumn Term, because it had referred the texts to Stone King for advice. 
The GB requested that drafts should be provided for the Spring Term.  
 
 
ACTION CSWAB COMMITTEE 
 
20. 
POLICY REVIEW  
 
The Chairman said that the DfE had written to the School recently to highlight 
deficiencies in some School policies (although they had been checked by the 
retained solicitors and proved acceptable to the Ofsted Inspectors). It was the 
responsibility of governors to ensure that the policies were compliant with the 
relevant statutes and statutory guidance and the GB agreed that a number of 
policies, to be determined outside the meeting, should be referred to the lead 
adviser of the headteacher recruitment advisory team and to the School’s 
solicitors. The lead adviser would also be carrying out a management review. 
Both reviews were authorised by the GB. 
ACTION CHAIRMAN 
 
In the meantime, the GB noted the latest policy schedule and requested that an 
updated review plan should be made available for consideration at its January 
meeting
ACTION HEADTEACHER 
21. 
COMMITTEES  
 
21.1 -  The GB approved the appointment of Mrs Naomi Newman to the 
CSWAB Committee and Mr David Davis to the Finance & Premises Committee. 
 
21.2 -  Terms of Reference 
 
The GB noted: 
 
•  that the Admissions and the Finance & Premises Committees did not 
recommend any amendment to their ToR.  
 
•  that the CSWAB Committee and the Pay & Personnel Committees 
were not yet ready to make recommendations concerning their ToR 
and requested that these should be available in the Spring Term. 
 
ACTION CSWAB AND PAY & PERSONNEL COMMITTEES 
 
22. 

GOVERNOR TRAINING 
 
Governors were reminded that attendance at training courses should be 
advised to the Link Governor, Mr James Lake, who was maintaining a central 
record. 
 
23.
 
ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
There was none.  
 

 


 
 
Signed       …………………………………      
…………………. (Chairman) 
   
 
 
 
 
 
(Date) 
 
 


 
 
 

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY (GB) 
HELD AT 6.30 p.m. ON MONDAY 15TH JANUARY 2018 
 
Present:  
 
Chairman:    
 
Ms Geraldine Fainer          
 
Governors: 
 
Mrs Julia Alberga 
Dr Charlotte Benjamin        Mr John Cooper  
  
Mr David Davies 
Mr Michael Goldmeier  
Mr Mark Hurst 
  
Mr James Lake  
Mr Richard Martyn    
Mr Andrew Moss 
       
Mrs Naomi Newman Mrs Anne Shisler   
 
Associate Member:  Rabbi Dr Raphael Zarum (Items 1 – 10) 
 
SLT   Mr Anthony Flack 
Mr Daniel Marcus  (Items 1 – 10) 
 
Mr Jamie Peston     (Items 1 – 19)     
Mr David Wragg  
Miss Talia Thoret              
  
 
Observer: 
 
 
Mrs Rachel Fink (Headteacher designate) 
 
Clerk:   
 
           Dr Alan Fox   
 
 

1. 
APOLOGIES  
 
Apologies for absence were received and accepted from Rabbi Daniel Epstein 
and Mr Paul Millett.  
 
2. 

DECLARATION OF INTERESTS 
 
There were none. 
 
3. 

AGENDA  
 
The GB agreed to re-order the Agenda so that a member of the SLT could 
leave to attend a family shiva, with the result that exceptionally Jewish Life and 
Learning would not be taken as the first substantive item. 
 
5. 

MEMBERSHIP  
 
The GB noted with regret the resignation of Ms Debby Lipkin as 

Executive Headteacher, notice of which was given on 29th November and that, 
therefore, she automatically relinquished her membership as a governor. 
 
5. 
MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The GB confirmed the draft minutes of both parts of the meeting held on 11th 
December 2017.  
  
6.     MATTERS ARISING NOT COVERED BY SUBSTANTIVE AGENDA 
ITEMS 
 
6.1 
Item 5.2 - Fronter & Governor Website – Mr Wragg said that it 
appeared that the software promised by the contractor for June would not be 
available until the end of this term. However, it should be possible to give 
governors access to their own compartment in Office 365 in time for the next 
GB meeting. 
ACTION MR WRAGG 
 
6.2  
 Item 6 -  Welcome Back Event for Staff - The Chairman invited Mrs 
Alberga and Mrs Shisler to take soundings of the staff to find the most suitable 
"Welcome Back Event" and to make recommendations. 
 
ACTION MRS ALBERGA AND MRS SHISLER 
 
6.3 
Item 10 -  Ivrit Teacher Recruitment - the Headteacher reported that 
whilst investigations about filling vacancies continued the School had been 
successful in securing a teacher from Manchester. In the meantime, there was 
also a cover teacher who might be available in the longer term. To deal with the 
remaining gap Ivrit was no longer being taught to the lowest ability band in 
Year 9. 
 
Governors recognised the challenge of recruiting for Ivrit and the GB 
authorised expenditure of up to £5000 on a specialist headhunter.  
 
6.4 – Item 20 - External Policy Review – the Chairman reported that the review 
by Chris Ray of the JFS statutory policies and in particular of their consistency 
one with another, approved at the previous meeting, was currently in progress.  
 
7. 
FINANCE & BUDGET 
 
The Director of Operations said that the Budget for 2018/19 was now being 
prepared and a draft would be submitted to the Finance & Premises Committee 
at its meeting on 19th February, together with an indicative forecast of the 
position in the following two years.  
 
It was difficult to forecast income in the forthcoming academic year. The School 
had been advised that the core funding from Brent for Years 7 - 11 would 
increase by 2% (which was better than previously announced but still a 
reduction in real terms). However, this was dependent on the numbers 
admitted and, in addition, information on sixth form funding was still not 
available. 
 
 


No major increases in expenditure were anticipated.  
 
8.  

PFI CONTRACT BUYOUTS 
 
The Director of Operations introduced a note prepared at the request of the GB 
analysing the possible advantages and disadvantages of taking over 
responsibility for Third-party Income and Security from the PFI contractor. In 
response to questions, he explained that costing of the various alternatives was 
difficult. There was no doubt that other schools raised more money from letting 
facilities and that TPI should be higher than at present. However, the figures 
provided by KSSL were only indicative. Moreover, TPI was inextricably bound 
up with security and major items such as the size of the CST grant were known 
only until September.  
 
Mr Goldmeier said that no sensible decisions could be taken until there was a 
properly costed business plan. He accepted Mr Peston’s assessment that there 
was insufficient capacity in the School at the moment to provide this but Mr 
Davis offered to assist, in conjunction with a grandparent who was known to 
have relevant experience of similar work and for this purpose Mr Peston 
agreed to provide all the information currently available. 
ACTION MR PESTON & MR DAVIS 
 
9. 

FUNDRAISING 
 
The GB considered the written information provided by the Director of 
Operations on continuing fundraising activities for the two Charitable Trusts, 
the Trustees of which received formal reports. However, a general oversight 
and an indication to the Trustees of the donations that were needed to maintain 
the current levels of JFS activity was undertaken by the Finance & Premises 
Committee. 
 
Major capital grants as listed were being received from a number of charitable 
foundations. Much of this work had been spearheaded by Mrs Lipkin, 
sometimes after introductions by Lord Levy. Now that she had resigned contact 
with the Trustees and professional employees of the foundations was falling to 
the Headteacher and the Director of Operations. A large amount of time was 
being spent on analysing foundations and possible connections with them. 
 
In discussion of parental voluntary contributions and in response to questions by 
governors, the following points were made: 
 
•  A full report had been given so the Trustees at its meeting in December. 
 
•  Income had risen in the two years from £1.40 million in 2014/16 to £1.65 
million in 2016/17 but nevertheless the percentage of the total sum 
requested had dropped. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

•  Significant efforts were being made to increase the collection further 
including a reorganisation of the processes and active calling of all 
parents who had not previously made any donations. 
 


 
•  An increase had been seen since October and the target for the year had 
been set at £1.85 million. 
Section 43 –  information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the 
School and/or a third party; 

•  The outstanding Gift Aid claims have been settled and have made up the 
shortfall in forecast income. 
 
•  During the hiatus period new parents had not been asked to complete a 
Gift Aid form but were now being asked to do so. 
 
•  It was important to change the culture so that all parents understood that 
JFS had charitable status and that they could support it as they did other 
charities. Realistically, a change of culture of this kind could only be come 
from a positive campaign that educated parents how their donations to 
the Trusts was spent and on the other hand what would be lost without 
them. 
 
In further discussion it was noted that, in the past, the PTA had been weak and 
had not engaged in any significant fundraising. Although the School did not have 
the resources to provide administration, there were undoubtedly parents with the 
enthusiasm and capability of building up a strong Association and these should 
be sought out and encouraged. Examples were given of events that had been 
organised by parents - evening with Judge Rinder, fashion show with clothes 
donated by Lakeland and a cinema outing.  
 
10.  
JEWISH LIFE & LEARNING 
 
The Deputy Headteacher, Jewish Life & Learning, said that he had now been in 
his current position for about a year during which he had concentrated on 
development of the formal curriculum. This was the practical work under the 
umbrella of the Learning and Life Policy, an updated version of which was 
currently with governors for ratification. 
 
The Policy incorporated the School’s seven principal Jewish Life and Learning 
goals based on the motto “Orah Veyikar” and as defined at a Workshop 
moderated by Rabbi Zarum. A new paragraph 4 in the Policy sought to 
recognise charity and social action as key principles of Jewish life that needed 
to be absorbed into studies at JFS. Subsequent paragraphs laid out very briefly 
the means of achieving these goals through a combination of the formal Jewish 
Studies programme and the Informal Jewish Studies that provided experience 
outside the classroom, including a wide range of external visits. 
 
Paragraph 8 of the Policy emphasised the importance of prayer in Judaism but 
it had to be recognised that for a number of reasons this was not attractive to 
many JFS students. JFS provided teaching leading to familiarity with prayers 
and the synagogue service and the opportunity for those who wished to attend 
a voluntary morning service. But he had sought to broaden the approach by 
taking a wider definition of worship to include observance of religious 
commandments beyond the conventional understanding of prayer. 
 
 


Mr Marcus explained that with seven concepts the JFS programme was very 
ambitious and not too easy for all pupils to understand. He noted in passing 
that other Jewish secondary schools had much simpler mottos to live up to. 
The Pikuach inspectors would judge JFS by the standards that the GB laid 
down in its formal policy statement and there was much to be done over the 
next couple of years, including the promotion of greater parental support for the 
ethos. 
 
Mr Marcus was asked whether, bearing in mind that collective worship was 
compulsory in many faith schools, prayer should be a completely voluntary 
activity at JFS. For example, would it be possible to reintroduce the practice 
twice a week in Year 7 building on the familiarity that some entrants would 
bring with them from their Jewish primary schools? Mr Marcus said that for a 
sensitive topic of this nature it would be important to have the support of both 
staff and students and that trying to impose too many changes in too short a 
period might be counter-productive. 
 
The GB requested that the introduction of prayer should be considered 
carefully by the SLT and that their proposals should be brought to the GB 
during the next Autumn Term.  
ACTION HEADTEACHER 
 
Mr Marcus also responded to questions sent by Mr Goldmeier before the 
meeting. He said that the JS staff were somewhat divided about the 
introduction of more rigour and text into the curriculum, which inevitably made 
their task more onerous. Whilst all saw the value and were solidly behind the 
expansion of Hebrew reading, nevertheless there was limited enthusiasm 
amongst the staff and students, Progress was being made and he believed that 
by the time of the next Pikuach inspection in about 18 months a judgment on 
Jewish Studies of at least “Good” would be achieved.  
 
Governors asked whether more emphasis might be placed on education leading 
to B’nai Mitzvah and B’nos Mitzvah with associated programmes for parents. Mr 
Marcus said that whilst these were certainly laudable longterm aims, he judged 
them to be a step too far at present. Parent and pupils already had their ties to 
the wider community through synagogue membership, and there would be 
concern about anything that weakened those bonds. Tribe already provided a 
link between the School and US communities.  
 
In further discussion governors recognised that the JFS policy was evolving. 
The GB therefore approved the recommended Policy for the time being and 
asked for development to continue and the policy to be reconsidered in a year’s 
time. In this context Mrs Fink said that as thinking progressed she hoped that 
the policy would incorporate references to spirituality. It was her experience that 
some pupils who did not see the value of formal prayer responded better to the 
connected themes of meditation and mindfulness.  
 
11. 
CHAIRMAN'S REPORT 
 
The Chairman had previously circulated a bullet point report. In amplification 
she stressed how pleased the whole Governing Body was to hear that the 
 


Headteacher, Simon Appleman had just received his NPQH qualification and 
offered its congratulations. 
 
Mrs Fainer also said that the Headteacher had represented to her that the SLT 
was currently overloaded and had recommended several interim appointments. 
Dr Chris Ray had been engaged to undertake a quick review of these 
proposals and later in the term would undertake a more thorough study of 
management structure to inform Mrs Fink when she took over later in the year. 
 
12. 
HEADTEACHER’S REPORT  
 
The Headteacher said that he had passed the message to all JFS staff that it 
was business as usual in the interim period between the departure of Ms Lipkin 
and the arrival of Mrs Fink. As already explained, the SLT was very heavily 
loaded and unable to take on more tasks but was engaging together to ensure 
that everything necessary was being done to continue the improving standards 
of the last year. 
 
Introducing the report prepared for discussion at the previous GB meeting 
together with the ASP Report recently received from Ofsted, Mr Appleman said 
that the School Roll now stood at 1969. There was no waiting list for the current 
Year 7. It was not yet possible to say what the position was likely to be in 
2018/19. First choice applications for next September were slightly lower than 
previously but first and second choices in total were slightly higher. JCOSS 
was offering a bulge class again, but a beneficial effect should flow for the 
agreement that JFS could offer 330 places in the first round. 
 
Mr Appleman explained that the ASP report just received from OFSTED had 
replaced the RAISE online school data system.  He had no doubt that if 
OFSTED were to make an immediate further inspection the data in this first 
and highly positive report, with all but one the key attainment indicators in the 
highest category, should point to an overall outstanding judgement. The 
exception was attainment for those with low Key Stage 2 attainment data and 
the School was looking carefully into the underlying detail of the data.  
 
In discussion of student progress and in response to questions from governors, 
the following points were made: 
 
•  Grades in the GCSE mock examinations were slightly higher than at the 
same stage last year, but because of DfE methodology changes and 
new 9-1 specifications in all subjects should be regarded as slightly less 
secure. 
 
•  While the expectation was that students continue with all subjects, more 
than usual were withdrawing with parental support. Support for students 
with greater resilience and managing examination stress was being 
sought. 
 
•  All Year 13 students who had applied had university offers and, at this 
stage, Oxbridge offers were at the same level as last year's cohort. 
Current examination predictions were also the same but more 
information should become available after completion of the mocks. 
 


 
•  The intervention programme was not focused solely on the lower 
attainment cohort (flagged in the ASP) and should be considered in 
more detail by governors at the next meeting of the CSWAB Committee.  
 
ACTION CSWAB COMMITTEE 
 
In discussion of staffing and in response to questions from governors, the 
following points were made: 
 
•  Seven new staff had joined the School. 
 
•  16 teachers were currently engaged on a fixed term or agency 
contracts and, of these, the School would probably wish to retain 10 on 
a permanent basis. 
 
•  It was hoped that turnover would be less than in the last year and it 
was known that motivation of those staff members now looking outside 
was to achieve career progression.  
 
•  A governor queried whether governor presence at exit interviews 
should be standard. Another governor said he thought that last year 
was exceptional and that governor presence at exit interviews should 
not be the norm.  
ACTION CSWAB COMMITTEE 
 
 
13. 
SELF EVALUATION AT SEPTEMBER 2017 & KEY IMPROVEMENT 
PROGRAMME 2017/18 
 
The GB noted the reports, discussion of which had been postponed from the 
12th December meeting, and the Headteacher explained that these were living 
documents that were constantly reviewed and updated. They were shared with 
staff whose views were reflected where appropriate. The GB requested the 
production for its next meeting of a smaller document, preferably on a single 
side of A4 that summarised the position on priority items. 
 
ACTION HEADTEACHER  
 
To assist with student welfare the School currently had the benefit of the 
assistance of a Norwood Social Worker two days a week as part of the Health 
Hut provision. Suggestion was made to set up a parental support group and the 
CSWAB Committee was requested to give further consideration to the 
promotion of such a group.  
ACTION CSWAB COMMITTEE 
 
14. 
2018 - 19 TERM DATES 
 
The GB considered and approved the Headteacher’s proposal to revise the 
previously planned dates by creating a long weekend in November, 
compensating by adding a day at the start of the academic year and a day at 
the end. 
 


 
15.  
POLICIES 
 
15.1  
The GB approved the revised draft Vision & Values Statement and 
requested that it should be further reviewed in 2018-19 in conjunction with the 
Jewish Life & Learning Policy.  
 
15.2    The GB noted that that the reviewed Complaints Procedure requested 
for Summer Term 2016 was not yet available for consideration. The Clerk was 
requested to send to the Headteacher his earlier proposals so that a final 
version could be considered at the next GB meeting. 
ACTION CLERK  
 
15.3 
 The GB noted that the updated termly Policy Review Schedule was 
also not yet available for consideration. 
ACTION HEADTEACHER 
 
16.  
COMMITTEES 
 
16.1  
The GB approved the recommendation of the Pay & Personnel 
Committee that its current Terms of Reference be re-endorsed subject to the 
addition of "wellbeing" at end of third bullet. 
 
16.2 
The GB noted the CSWAB Committee was not yet able to make the 
requested recommendations concerning its Terms of Reference. 
 
ACTION CSWAB COMMITTEE 
 
17.  

DRESS CODE 
 
The Chairman raised concerns about the standard of dress at the recent 
Graduation Ceremony and wondered, additionally, whether there should be a 
standard JFS kippah. It was noted that, as in all other schools, the JFS code 
and standards varied cyclically, and the SLT was requested to consider the 
current position and whether it wished to recommend any changes. 
 
ACTION SLT 
18. 
 GOVERNOR TRAINING 
 
Governors were reminded that attendance at training courses should be 
advised to the Link Governor, Mr James Lake, who was maintaining a central 
record that he would share with the Chairman. 
 
19.
 
ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
There was none.  
 
 
 
Signed       …………………………………      
…………………. (Chairman) 
   
 
 
 
 
 
(Date) 
 
 



 
 
Admissions Committee. 
 
Minutes of meeting held on 29th January 2018 at 6:30 PM. 
 
Chairman:    

 Mr. Mark Hurst (MH) 
 
Members present:  
Mr. Michael Goldmeier (MG) 
 

Mrs. Anne Shisler (AS) 
 
Others present: 
Mr. Simon Appleman (SA) 
 
Ms. Maxine Ratnarajah (MR). 
 
1.  Apologies 
None. 
 
2.  Declaration of Interests. 
MH explained that he has a child applying for a place at JFS for entry in 
September 2018. 
 
3.  Membership 
The committee noted the resignation of Mrs Debbie Lipkin and Mr David Lerner. 
It was agreed that another governor should be appointed to the committee. 
 
Action agreed: MH to discuss with Chair of Governors, recruiting another 
governor to the Admissions Committee. 
 
4.  Minutes of the Previous meeting 
Item 2 -  Members of the committee - it was noted as there is no longer an 
Executive Headteacher this should read in future as 
‘To be quorate, there needs to be 3 governors and the Headteacher’. 
 
Item 12- A.O.B – this issue has now been resolved and the student has settled 
back into Year 10.  
 
The minutes of 23rd October 2017 were approved and signed. 
 
5.  Matters arising: 
The working party considering a bulge class is still reviewing the issue. 
 
6.  2018/19 Admissions Policy Consultation. 
9011400.DOCX version 1 

The consultation ended on Friday and the final policy has to be on JFS website 
by 28.2.18. Any changes need to be ratified by FGB but this can be done via 
email. There were two main changes under consultation. 
 
i) 
The Lower/Upper sibling policy. 
This has been pended as the drafting has proved too complex to write to avoid 
a number of loopholes. 
 
ii) 
Priority for children of staff members. 
There have been 3 areas of concern raised in the consultation. One parent was 
concerned about the legality of the change suggesting it may be discriminatory 
and in breach of Human Rights legislation. Stone King has reviewed their 
concerns and do not concur. 
 
There have also been concerns that it may impact on the Jewish character of 
the school. 
Michael Rollin, Admissions and School Organisation Manager at Brent Council 
raised an objection on the basis of requiring children of staff to produce a 
Certificate of Religious Practice (CRP) in order to gain priority. He said Brent 
are not opposed to children of staff gaining priority as a recruitment and 
retention tool but that this should be open to staff of all or no religion equally. 
He said that Para 1.39 of the Schools’ Admission Code says that further criteria 
can be set in only two circumstances (namely that the teacher has been 
employed for 2 or more years and/or recruited to post where there is a 
demonstrable skills shortage) and there is no mention of adding a further faith 
requirement. 
The committee considered the advice from Stone King who said point 1.36 of 
the Code (‘Schools designated by the Secretary of State as having a religious 
character (commonly known as faith schools) may use faith-based 
oversubscription criteria and allocate places by reference to faith where the 
school is oversubscribed’) is an overriding principle therefore para 1.39 does 
not apply. 
There was a discussion about how significant this option would be in recruiting 
and retaining teachers and the implications of jeopardising the school’s good 
relationship with Brent Council if the school implemented the policy. The 
committee decided to discuss the Stone King legal advice with Brent Council 
before making any decision. 
Action agreed:  
1.  MH to email Michael Rollin, Brent Council to discuss the legal advice from 
Stone King with regards to the interpretation of 1.36 of the Admissions Code 
and whether this overrides 1.39 of the Code or not.  
 
2.  MH to feedback outcome to the Committee and further discussion can be via 
conference call. 
9011400.DOCX version 1 

7.  Review of Admissions policy  
It was raised that the Admissions policy would benefit from a review to 
streamline it. 
 
Action agreed: Christopher Ray to be asked to review the policy next year 
alongside other policy reviews. 
 
8.  11+ Offers and statistics for Sept 2018 – MR 
There have been 775 applications this year and 116 applications with no valid 
CRP. So only 659 to be considered. This compares to 643 applications with valid 
CRPs in 2017, 687 in 2016. 
 
In March the school will offer 330 places made up of; 
•  192 sibling places,  
•  10 distance places,  
•  2 EHCP (Educational Health Care Plan) places,  
•  125 randomly allocated places. 
 
Action agreed: MR to send out statistic on distance places – actual distances – 
won’t know until other groups excluded. 
 
Questions: 
Q –What is the drop out rate of the Preference 1 group?  
A – From 5-year trends the number of acceptances from the Preference 1 group 
have dropped marginally but data on this year will not be available until 
September.  
 
Q – Will JFS have to open a bulge class 2019?  
A – The statistics provided to the community have not been borne out currently 
so it’s difficult to predict. A bulge class may put off prospective parents with year 
group of 330.  
 
Q – Is it still the case that there a communal agreement that any Jewish child 
who wants a place in a Jewish school will get one? 
A –  JFS is still committed to the agreement, but this means a place in any 
Jewish school, not necessarily at JFS. 
Q- Can you completely rule out the possibility of an intake of 330 as offering 330 
places? 
A – No but it looks unlikely based on the current figures for this year and what 
happened last year. The school is expecting approximately 275 acceptances out 
of the 330 offers and it usually takes up until the end of August and the final 
tranche of offers to gain the last 25 acceptances due to so much movement on 
secondary school waiting lists. 
 
Q – Does the council allocations (tranche 1) ignore preferences? 
9011400.DOCX version 1 

A – No as the first round is the only one actually co-ordinated with other schools 
so does take into account preferences. 
 
Q – Do any families send to non-Jewish schools if they don’t get their first 
choice? 
A – Some do. 
 
Q- Have there been applications from Etz Chaim and Rimon Primary schools? 
A – Yes from Etz Chaim. It is more local than Rimon and has a similar ethos to 
JFS. 
 
 
9.  Current Appeals statement discussion. 
MR raised the issue that admission appeals can no longer be refused on the 
basis that more than 300 children/ year would have a negative impact on other 
students. This is because JFS now have a policy of using the Published 
Admission Number (PAN) flexibly. It was suggested that a figure of 310/ year 
group would be the threshold (i.e. 1 additional child / class).  
It was noted that there were no appeals last year because there was no waiting 
list.  
Action agreed: MR to share the appeals statement with SA once the first round 
of offers has been completed. 
 
10. Mid-term applications – MR 
There have been 4 applications and one student started in year 7 today, 2 
students are starting in February (one in year 8 and one year 9) and one student 
who is relocating from Israel in mid-March. is due to start in year 10.  
These were agreed by the committee and signed off by MH and MG. 
 
There was a discussion about whether the committee needs to be notified of all 
mid-term applications. It was agreed that as it is a requirement of the policy this 
would continue. 
 
11. Training 
Governors would like training on Admissions processes. Stone King can provide 
a 2-hr training session to go through the Admissions Code and appeals if 
required. It was suggested that the committee should see what Brent Council 
can provide in terms of training to compare. It may be though that JFS requires 
bespoke training to address some of the unique features in its Admissions 
Policy. This training could take place in the summer term. 
 
Action agreed: MR to find out what training Brent can provide and identify who 
can sign off governors’ training. 
 
12. A.O.B 
 
9011400.DOCX version 1 

12.1 The committee expressed its condolences to MR on her recent 
bereavement. MR thanked the committee for its support over the last few 
weeks. 
 
12.2 There have been 65 external applications for 6th Form and there is one more 
week to apply. 
 
 

Date of Next Meeting: Autumn Term 2018 tbc. 
 
 
 
Signed: _____________________________   
Date: ________________ 
 
 
 
9011400.DOCX version 1 

 
 
JFS SCHOOL 
 
 

MINUTES OF FINANCE & PREMISES COMMITTEE MEETING HELD 
ON MONDAY, 19TH FEBRUARY 2018 
 
Present:
 
 
Chairman: 
  
Mr John Cooper  
 
Governors:  
Mr Mark Hurst 
Mr Richard Martyn    
Mr Paul Millett 
Mr Simon Appleman 
 
 
 
 
In Attendance: 
 
Ms Geraldine Fainer (Chairman of Governors) 
Mr Greg Foley 
Mr Jamie Peston (Director of Operations) 
Mrs Mary Nithiy (Financial Controller) 
 
Clerk: 
 
Dr Alan Fox 
 
1.   

APOLOGIES  
 
Apologies for absence were received from Mr Andrew Moss and Mr Graeme Pocock 
(Estates Manager). 
 
2. 

DECLARATION OF INTERESTS 
 
No declarations were made. 
 
3. 
MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The Committee approved the minutes of the previous meeting held on 27th 
November 2017 
 
4.  

MATTERS ARISING NOT COVERED BY SUBSTANTIVE AGENDA ITEMS  
 
4.1 
Item 4.3 - Gift Aid - the Operations Director reported that, as a result of the 
campaign to sign up more parents for Gift Aid, it had so far been possible to claim 
backdated refunds. It was planned to have a telephone day shortly when as many 
parents as possible would be requested to give oral permission for their contributions 
to be added to the list. 
  

4.2 
 Item 5b – 2017 Accounts Audit Letter - the Chairman was authorised to sign 
the letter following scrutiny. 
 
4.3  
Item 8 - Restructure Funding Approach to Trustees - the DCT had agreed to 
fund the restructuring exercise shortfall of £34,000. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or 
a third party; 

 
5. 
MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTS   
 
The Committee considered the end December Management Accounts and re-
forecast to the end of the financial year prepared by the Financial Controller in an 
updated version circulated at the meeting. In discussion the following points were 
made: 
 
•  Because of expenditure remaining to be booked and because income in March 
was less than in earlier months the apparent surplus would disappear by the 
end of the financial year. 
 
•  Nearly all budgetary items were proving close to budget except for SEN had 
lower than predicted income and higher expenditure. 
 
•  There were currently some unfilled staff vacancies that would lead to lower staff 
expenditure over the year. 
 
•  Indirect employee expenses, which were over budget, mainly represented 
recruitment cost. 
 
•  At £1.9 million, the bulk of donations were grants from the charitable trust 
deriving from voluntary contributions and gift aid thereon. 
 
•  The policy stood that no capital would normally be requested from the trusts for 
running costs and the School would request sums no greater that the income 
generated by the investment portfolio. The one-off exceptions this year were 
the cost of headteacher recruitment and the shortfall in the CST grant but this 
still allowed the trusts’ capital to grow by reason of the receipt of backdated gift 
aid. 
 
•  Parental voluntary contributions were below budget this year but it was 
expected that the collection initiatives would improve the situation from next 
year onwards.  
 
•  There was always some uncertainty about staff costs; one of the unpredictable 
factors was long-term sick leave payments that depended on the length of 
previous full-time service. 
 
6. 
JFS BUDGET 2018/19 
 
The Director of Operations gave the Committee a PowerPoint presentation of the 
draft budget prepared by the School, drawing out the main features and in particular 
 


the inevitable uncertainties in many of the individual elements. In discussion the 
following points were made: 
 
•  It was fairly certain that the grants for Years 7-11 would increase by 2%. The 
indicative forecasts for the Year' 8 and 9 were based on projections of 10 
more pupils. 
 
•  However, Sixth Form income would reduce by 4% due to the lower numbers 
in the previous year at the census point but the numbers of students were 
projected to increase significantly leaving a budgetary gap that would not be 
filled until the following year. 
 
•  Based on a prediction of the February 2018 RPI, the unitary charge, the grant 
for PFI charges would increase by 3.5%, but the increase in expenditure 
would be higher. 
 
•  SEN income would probably increase by 2% but with the growing demands 
this would leave the School more in deficit on this count. 
 
•  It was anticipated that the security grant from the CST would be lower.  
 
•  The budget would be significantly affected adversely unless the predicted 
increase in voluntary contributions was achieved.  
 
•  The Committee recognised that at this stage in the process there were a 
number of material risks. These included: 
 
•  It was difficult to quantify the impact of costs and income that would result 
from the buyout of Security and TPI. 
 
•  There was a similar uncertainty about the outcome of benchmarking. The 
1440 figures indicated a 5% per annum increase in the unitary charge but 
going to market testing might decrease or increase this figure 
 
•  There was little on which to base the outcome of the introduction of 
performance related pay for non-teaching staff later in the year and the 
Director of Operations was requested to make a presentation on this element 
to the Pay & Personnel Committee. 
ACTION DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS 
 
•  Charitable donations other than from the Trusts were inherently uncertain but 
the budget currently included £323,000 based on current knowledge. In 
addition, efforts were being made to recruit a rabbinical couple to work 
exclusively with the Sixth Form and, if successful, would be funded by Tribe. 
 
•  There was significant potential for increasing voluntary contributions. 
 
The Committee also considered options for changes that required further study, 
including the gradual reduction of Recruitment and Retention Allowances and of the 
volume of Teaching & Learning Responsibility Payments. Increasing the number of 
TLRs for Acting Heads of Year in Years 8 to 10 was still under consideration but the 
Committee believed that bringing forward non-teaching staff progression to April 
 


2018 should be avoided. Finally, it was felt that there was reasonable prospect of 
producing savings by re-tendering all insurances and leased items.  
 
The Committee agreed to consider a final draft of the Budget, updated to reflect the 
discussion and intervening events at its March meeting, prior to submission to the 
Governing Body for approval. 
 
7. 
THIRD-PARTY INCOME AND SECURITY BUYOUT 
 
Mr Davis reported that, as agreed at the recent GB meeting, together with the 
Director of Operations, he had been examining the viability of buying out third-party 
lettings and the provision of on-site security from the PFI contractor.  
Gross TPI income was gradually dropping because of the poor condition of facilities 
and last year had reduced by 13% to £254,000. The profit was £64,000, of which 
JFS received a 50% share at £32,000. This was likely to fall to £28,000 in the current 
year. The view of the 1440 lettings manager was that the sports facilities were used 
as much as they can be, given their state of maintenance. The sports halls were in a 
really poor condition as were the Astroturf pitches, scheduled to be replaced shortly. 
The cricket pitch was now unusable. 
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or 
a third party; 

 
The potential for increasing non-sports related facilities was however considerable. 
At the moment they had virtually no publicity and were therefore not much used. It 
was regarded as very feasible to increase gross income substantially and provided 
that it took over responsibility from 1440 (together with the member of staff they 
currently employed for the task) JFS could keep the entire profit. There was clearly 
much potential for use for social functions in the Jewish Community and exploratory 
meetings had already been held with the Kashrus Commission and with kosher 
caterers about a possible agreement to provide facilities for private kosher functions. 
 
In discussion, the following points were made: 
 
•  Some senior line management involvement would be necessary in a 
supervisory capacity. 
 
•  There would be some limited upfront legal costs, but there was confidence 
that the Trust would meet a request to fund what should turn out to be a 
lucrative investment. 
 
•  Full responsibility for TPI would devolve to JFS in 10 years time when the PFI 
agreement came to an end, but provided that satisfactory arrangements could 
be made, it would be advantageous to take it over straightaway. 
 
•  There was a limited ability to produce a fully costed business plan for a TPI 
takeover because the data was not complete and with no current marketing it 
was difficult to assess the potential revenue.   
 
•  However, If TPI were taken over, the worst case scenario was simply that JFS 
would be no better off than now; thus there was no downside. 
 
Tactically, it was felt that it would be preferable to tell 1440 that the GB wished to 
 


proceed as quickly as possible so that negotiations were not caught up as a 
relatively minor item in the much wider PFI contractual discussions due to start 
shortly. The Committee noted that, at the recent GB meeting, governor opinion was 
in favour of progressing the matter and agreed that and ex-Committee approach 
should be made quickly for confirmation that negotiations could be started.  
ACTION CHAIRMAN 
 
8. 
 PFI CONTRACT 
 
Mr Millet reported that performance was improving with the appointment of new 
KSSL staff to manage the contract. However, there remained a number of significant 
problems. 
 
First, the PFI contract required the provision of a Help Desk through which all 
contacts were processed but this had not functioned properly for at least the last two 
years. The contractor was required to report monthly what had been done and to 
reimburse JFS for obligations not carried out. These reports had been restored 
recently but no reports had been provided for the two years to end 2017 and so no 
reimbursement had been made. 
 
Secondly, the contractor was required to benchmark the services every five years. 
The last such exercise was carried out in August 2017, as a result of which the  
contractor was requiring a 5% per annum increase in the unitary payment, 
representing £4000 a month. As advised by Local Partnership, the School had 
challenged these figures, and had now written to say that it was withholding £10,000 
per month for 10 months and, in addition, £20,000 per month indefinitely until 
satisfied that the contract was delivering properly. 
 
The difficulty was that the JFS solicitors, Pinsent Masons, had advised that there 
was no legal power to withhold payments and no right to terminate the contract even 
for cause. A copy of the advice would be circulated to members of the Committee.  
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School and/or 
a third party; 

 
The Committee agreed that the priority was therefore to get the contract operating 
properly and all of the School’s issues would be aired at the forthcoming Projects 
Board meeting on 5th March. It noted that the GB had delegated negotiation powers 
to Mr Millett and requested a further report in due course. 
ACTION MR MILLETT 
 
9.  
SFVS (SCHOOLS FINANCIAL VALUE STANDARD) 
 
The Committee approved the draft response to the 2017 SFVS questionnaire for 
confirmation by the Governing Body.   
 
10.  
PREMISES UPDATE 
 
In the absence of the Estates Manager, the Committee noted his written report, and in 
particular: 
 
•  No real progress had been made with the land issues. This was not urgent but 
resolution would be required if it were decided to move to Academy status. 
 


 
•  A list of projects had been drawn up for inclusion in the next LCVAP application 
and would be discussed at the next meeting 
 
•  A response, now more than two months overdue. was still awaited from the 
Local Authority to the planning Pre-Application submission for the new 
Technology Block.  
 
•  A Fire Risk Assessment had recently been completed with a satisfactory 
outcome. Areas recommended for improvements were in discussion with 
KSSL. 
 
11. 
RISK REGISTER 
 
The Committee held a preliminary discussion of the draft Register that had been in 
preparation for some time and requested that it should be re-circulated for further 
discussion at its next meeting.  
 
12. 
ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
There was none 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Signed: ______________________ 
        Date: _______________________ 
 
(Chairman) 
 


 
 
 

MINUTES OF THE PART II MEETING OF THE GOVERNING 
BODY (GB) HELD ON MONDAY 26TH MARCH 2018 
 
 
Present:  
 
Chairman:    
 
   Ms Geraldine Fainer          
 
Governors: 
 
Mrs Julia Alberga 
   Mr Simon Appleman  
Dr Charlotte Benjamin        
Mr John Cooper            Mr David Davis    
Rabbi Daniel Epstein 
Mr Michael Goldmeier   Mr Mark Hurst 
   
Mr James Lake  
  
Mr Richard Martyn       Mr Andrew Moss            Mr Paul Millett           
Mrs Naomi Newman      Mrs Anne Shisler  
 
Associate Member:   
   Rabbi Dr Raphael Zarum 
 
 
           
  
Observer: 
 
 
   Mrs Rachel Fink (Headteacher Designate) 
 
Clerk:   
 
              Dr Alan Fox   
 
 

1. 
REPORT ON LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT OF THE SCHOOL  
 
The Chairman explained that the Part II meeting had been called to discuss in 
private the report produced by Dr Chris Ray at the request of the GB. Its 
purpose was to assist Mrs Fink in her consideration of the management level of 
JFS  and any changes she might wish to introduce. In formulating his report, Dr 
Ray had made two two-day visits to JFS, during which he met all but one of the 
members of the extended SLT, two groups of middle management staff and a 
group each of teaching and non-teaching staff. 
 
Mrs Fink said that she had found the report helpful up to a certain point but she 
was sure that governors would understand that she would not wish to firm up 
any recommendations until she had taken up post and had taken at least a little 
time to settle in and meet all the staff. She noted that Dr Ray had stressed the 
importance of reaching out to the widest community, mirroring her own thoughts 
about ethos already explained to the GB.  
 
Mrs Fink said that she shared Dr Ray’s findings about the apparent lack of logic 
in the current assignment of SLT responsibilities and the lack of clarity for staff 
about senior management responsibility for certain key aspects of their work. 
There appeared to be too many managers at the top level for clear governance. 

This was not to deny that other staff depending on their capabilities and 
experience could have an important impact. Even if the Assistant Headteachers 
were not members of the SLT, their talents should still be exploited and in some 
areas it might be desirable to draw them into small committees that supported a 
leaner top structure. 
 
Mrs Fink felt that the most important and priority areas for complete clarity were 
Teaching & Learning, Pastoral care, Jewish Studies and Operations & Finance. 
Allocations of responsibility to individual SLT members could not be left 
dependent on their individual skills. They must be based solely on the priority 
needs of students and other staff.  
 
Mrs Fink said that if she found restructuring necessary, it could not be achieved 
overnight and she wanted to use her first half term fact-finding, concentrating 
on the priority areas to produce proposals for implementation in September. 
She recognised that, after the last couple of turbulent years, the staff needed 
TLC and some feel good factors. In her first two weeks she would be out and 
about trying to meet and talk to as many members of staff as possible, both in 
meetings and individually. Having done this, she hoped to meet many parents 
before the end of term. 
 
Finally, Mrs Fink pointed out that it tended to be the more outspoken staff, 
students and parents who responded to opinion surveys. However, if their 
views were wrong, their perceptions were nevertheless important and had to be 
tackled. For example, you could have the finest SLT members, but this did not 
help a School if the rest of the community disagreed. 
 
Mr Appleman said that he had already had the opportunity of talking through 
these matters with Mrs Fink and he wanted to echo everything that she had 
said. He also thought it right to explain that the current SLT structure had 
evolved historically. He did not recognise Dr Ray's description and thought it 
wrong to suggest that the nine members were not hard-working. In connection 
with its current size, it should be remembered that the Rapid Improvement 
Group had said that it had insufficient capacity (although he accepted that 
numbers did not always correspond to capacity). During her time as Executive 
Headteacher, Debby Lipkin had moved the school from the category of "in 
need of improvement to "good". This now provided a breathing space for 
rethinking the management structure to find what was now the most 
appropriate to take the School forward. 
 
Mr Appleman said that there were differing professional opinions about some 
items in Dr Ray's report and further discussion was required. A good example 
was whether or not Heads of academic departments should or should not be 
involved with behavioural matters. There were different views within the current 
SLT. 
 
Mr Martyn said that it was quite right that Mrs Fink should not be drawn any 
further on her views on restructuring until she had taken up post and had an 
opportunity to look around. He noted, however, that in the past there had 
always been a clearly designated senior Deputy Headteacher to assist the 
Headteacher and he recommended that in her further thinking Mrs Fink should 
consider the possibility of restoring this practice. 
 
 


Mr Lake said that it was not always easy to be a Staff Governor and most 
members of staff did not appreciate that the post was not that of a union 
representative. The relationship between staff and governors was not always 
easy with fuzzy borders between the strategic and the operational. The role of 
critical friend should operate in both directions. 
 
Mrs Fink said that as well as structure, she knew that there were issues of 
behaviour to be tackled. The Ladder of Consequences came across as more 
suitable for a primary school and she wanted to have it reviewed with every 
single member of staff being involved. The underlying principle had to be based 
on a simple rule that could be formulated as "you will not behave in a way that 
limits your opportunities and the opportunities of others". There was a 
behavioural middle path. Adults must be respected by students but those staff 
must earn respect. 
 
Mr Millett said in his limited time as a governor he had found that that the GB 
did not always thank the SLT sufficiently for what it had achieved. Debby 
Lipkin's leadership had led to the introduction of professional systems and the 
finances had been brought under control in a very short time. However, it was 
also true that as many had felt bruised by the process; the key was in 
communication and passing the message often and clearly. 
 
Mr Millett added that he, too, had found the management structure opaque and 
had been much impressed by what Dr Ray had said. He knew that Simon 
Appleman understood that change was coming and was ready to give his full 
support. However, clearly some members of the SLT were stronger than others 
and he wondered whether the need for change was accepted by all of them.  
 
Mr Goldmeier said that he couldn't agree entirely with everything that had been 
said about the SLT. He recalled one of its members, with a complete 
misunderstanding of the foundation of school governance, asserting that the 
only duty of governors was to support the SLT. Whilst he agreed that the whole 
school owed a lot to the SLT and that many of its members had talents, at the 
same time a minority exhibited behaviour below the standard he expected from 
senior members of staff.  
 
Mr Moss said that it would be important to encourage staff to see the change in 
regime as a positive chance to bring the achievements of JFS up to a very high 
level and the relationship with the Local Authority should be managed to bring it 
fully on board. He also noted that underlying all, throughout the troubles and 
tribulations, there was a real joy in the School that didn't always come through 
and it might be that it should be broadcast more. 
 
Other members of the GB made similar statements and the discussion was 
drawn to a close. 
Section 36 – information which, in the opinion of the chair of governors of the School, 
would prejudice the effective conduct of the School.   

 
18. 
ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
There was none.  
 

 


 
 Signed   ………………………   (Chairman) 
…………………. 
(Date)  
 
 


 
 
 

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY (GB) 
HELD AT 6.00 p.m. ON MONDAY 26TH MARCH 2018 
 
Present:  
 
Chairman:    
 
Ms Geraldine Fainer          
 
Governors: 
 
Mrs Julia Alberga 
       Mr Simon Appleman  Dr Charlotte Benjamin        
Mr John Cooper  
       Mr David Davis  
Rabbi Daniel Epstein 
Mr Michael Goldmeier       Mr Mark Hurst     
Mr James Lake  
  
Mr Richard Martyn          Mr Andrew Moss         Mr Paul Millett          
Mrs Naomi Newman         Mrs Anne Shisler 
 
 
Associate Member:   
       Rabbi Dr Raphael Zarum 
 
  SLT  Mr Daniel Marcus 
      Mr Jamie Peston         Mr David Wragg  
             
  
Observer: 
 
 
     Mrs Rachel Fine (Headteacher Designate) 
 
Clerk:   
 
                Dr Alan Fox   
 
 

1. 
APOLOGIES  
 
There were no apologies for absence.  
 
2. 

DECLARATION OF INTERESTS 
 
There were none. 
 
3. 

MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETING  
 
The GB confirmed the draft minutes of both parts of the meeting held on 11th 
December 2017.  
  
4.     MATTERS ARISING NOT COVERED BY SUBSTANTIVE AGENDA 
ITEMS 
 
4.1 
Item 5.2 - Governor Website – Mr Wragg explained briefly that 
arrangements had now been made to give governors access to their own 

secure compartment in Office 365. Governors were each provided with a 
detailed letter of instruction and invited to try the facility and raise any questions 
they might have. Mr Wragg said that if there was sufficient demand, it should 
be possible to arrange a short training meeting in the near future. 
 
4.2  
 Item 6 -  Welcome Back Event for Staff - Mrs Alberga said that she 
and Mrs Shisler were recommending an informal breakfast meeting for 
governors either before or after the Shavuot holiday with the SLT. The precise 
date would be notified later.  
 
Mr Martyn said that, while he welcomed this proposal, it was just as important 
to do something to make all members of staff feel welcome and appreciated by 
the GB. Mrs Fink said that Hasmonean and many other schools organised a 
number of social occasions for governors to mix with staff and the PTA 
organised functions for parents and staff. 
 
4.3 
Item 8 - PFI Third Party Income & Security Buyouts - Mr Davis said that 
he was producing a note of a recent meeting with the PFI contractor at which it 
had been confirmed that the GB wished to take these two elements out of the 
contract. There had been subsequent discussions on a financial settlement and 
1440’s agreement written confirmation to the terms was awaited. 
 
5. 
CHAIRMAN'S REPORT 
 
The Chairman explained that there had been some confusion about the 
appropriate content of her report. She was obliged to let governors know of any 
action she had taken since the last meeting making use of our emergency 
powers. There had been none but she wished to draw to the GB's attention the 
very pleasing letter she had received from Lord Levy. 
 
Mr Moss also reported that, in his capacity as Vice-Chairman, he had very 
recently attended a Brent meeting with a particular focus on safeguarding, the 
particular responsibility of governors and the need to evidence continuing 
vigilance. He undertook to circulate a note. 
ACTION MR MOSS 
6.  
ETHOS 
 
Mrs Rachel Fink, Headteacher Designate, gave a brief presentation on her the 
way her thoughts were developing on what the School was for following her 
attendance at the meeting in January and following conversations with the 
Chief Rabbi and the SLT. 
 
It was clear that there were differing opinions about the principal purposes of 
the School and even knowledge of its Ethos  and motto. It was evident that if 
there were no clarity here, the ethos statement and the school motto, were not 
of assistance in charting the School’s future and deciding what it was educating 
pupils towards.   
 
Mrs Fink was not contemplating a change in the motto of Orah Viykar, which 
was as old as the School itself. However, it had recently been translated at JFS 
as “to be enlightened and valued”, which she believed placed too much 
 


emphasis on what students could expect to be done for them. Reverting to 
“Light and Honour” would place more stress on what students could do to earn 
honour by bringing light to themselves, their families, their school, their 
community, their society and to mankind generally. 
 
Mrs Fink hoped to be able to work towards bringing the concept into the 
forefront of thinking of all members of the school community. She would start 
by displaying the motto everywhere in appropriate formats, in all written 
material and by constant spoken reference both inside and outside the school. 
Pupils needed to be educated to feel that the more they gave to other people, 
the more they would receive and to ask not what the School could do for them 
but what they could do for the School and the outside world.  
 
In response to questions Mrs Fink said that for it to succeed governors and 
staff needed to buy wholeheartedly into the concept. With governors’ support 
she hoped to launch her ideas as soon as she arrived, with her opening 
meetings with staff in June and with individual year group assemblies. She 
hoped that by September it would be possible to start the process of ensuring 
that the ethos and the underlying philosophy would be built into every relevant 
school policy. 
 
7. 
HEADTEACHER REPORT TO GOVERNORS 
 
The Headteacher introduced his report for the Spring Term. Governors having 
confirmed that it had been read in advance, he summarised the headline items 
as follows: 
 
•  Whilst inevitably the school had had its problems, these should not be 
allowed to detract from a large number of highlights and educational 
achievements on a week by week basis. As well as those listed in his 
written report, he had just learned of a Young Enterprise success in the 
sixth form. 
 
•  He was grateful to the governors who were devoting much time and 
effort to the problems identified in reports on with emotional health and 
well-being. In the areas of Safeguarding Mental Health Provision and the 
Adequacy of Human Resources. There were well defined 
comprehensive action plans and rapid progress was being made. 
 
•  Substantial effort had been made to ensure that School was well placed 
to meet the new GDPR regulations, led internally by Dharmesh 
Chauhan and supported externally by the Brent Schools Partnership. 
 
•  The security of the Schools IT systems was the responsibility of 1440, 
but GDPR was acting as a spur to carry out all the necessary work. The 
supervising Imagile director had ensured that there was an improvement 
in the expertise and knowledge being applied. Office 365, which was 
inherently more secure, was being introduced. 
 
 


•  Freedom of Information requests were continuing to be received 
regularly. In most cases advice on the responses was obtained from 
Stone King and none had so far been challenged. 
 
•  Analysis of the Staff, Parents and Student surveys would not be 
completed until the end of April. 
 
The GB examined the various reasons given for pupils leaving the school. It 
noted that although a parent suggested that a Year 10 leaver had been very 
badly bullied, the School took a different view. 
 
In discussion about staffing, the following points were made: 
 
•  The situation in the English Department remained challenging with 
agency teachers not committing to the school and leaving with minimal 
notice. However, recruitment was going well and Mr Appleman was 
confident that the situation would have stabilised by the start of the 
September Term. 
 
•  As was common throughout the country there remained problems in the 
mathematics department. So far it had proved possible to recruit one 
new mathematics teacher for September 2018. The School might well 
have to resort to the expensive route of using Agencies to recruit to fill 
remaining vacancies.  
 
•  There were no resignations of permanent teaching staff at the end of the 
current year other than two retirements and he was only aware of a 
small number of staff intending to leave at the end of the Summer Term. 
While staff had until the end of May to notify resignations, there were 
currently fewer requests fro references than at the same time last year. 
Morale was undoubtedly improving although, very much in common with 
the national position, there remained a number of concerns about 
workload, parental behaviour and legacy issues relating to the 
restructuring. 
 
In response to further questions by Governors, the following points were made: 
 
•  There were inevitably a number of parents who were unhappy with 
decisions not to allow their children to take part in the Taste of Israel 
programme. It was noted that, as with all external activities, participation 
was not available as of right but at the School’s discretion. One of the 
important criteria applied was behaviour and the ease or difficulty of 
making reasonable adjustments for disruptive students. 
 
•  Purim in the snow had been a great experience. 
 
•  The change of policy introduced by the Executive Headteacher to allow 
students to use mobile telephones in certain circumstances for 
educational purposes was causing disruption in some places and was 
giving rise to a number of parental complaints. The policy would have to 
 


be kept under review to determine whether it should be rescinded or 
modified. 
 
8 .  
KEY IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2017/18 
 
The Headteacher introduced the updated version of the 2000 17/18 KIP, which 
was noted by the GB. 
 
9. 
 JEWISH LIFE & LEARNING 
 
The Deputy Headteacher, Jewish Life & Learning, gave a much appreciated 
brief summary of developments since the last regular GB meeting, as follows, 
 
•  UJIA had been sufficiently impressed by its contacts with JS staff 
that it was now considering increasing its bursary funding. 
 
•  Planning for activities directed to the “Yom” days was taking place. 
 
•  The number of images of Israel around the School were being 
increased 
 
•  The new Year 7 curriculum had been introduced last September 
and modifications were now under consideration based on the 
initial experience gained. 
 
•  The new Year 8 curriculum would come on stream in September. 
 
•  A sixth form JS educator was being sought to extend Jewish 
learning beyond the lower school and better to equip students for 
the outside world, to maintain alumni contact and to support them 
in their continuing learning. 
 
•  40 pupils had returned from LAVI and 210 would take part in the 
ATOI programme. 
 
•  Some JFS staff were visiting JCOSS and Hasmonean in preparation 
for Pikuach and for wider enhancement. 
 
10. 
BUDGET 2018/19 
 
The Director of Operations made a PowerPoint presentation summarising the 
principal features of the draft Budget for 2018/19 as recommended by the 
Finance & Premises Committee. In the course of his introduction and in 
response to questions from governors, the following points were made: 
 
•  Income received via the Local Authority for Years 7-11 was 0.5% 
higher than previously forecast, but this was partly offset by slightly 
lower funding for the Sixth Form. 
 
 


•  Expenditure on staff costs in 2017/18 was likely to finish up significantly 
lower than the budget due to the vacancies carried for various periods. 
The higher provision in 2018/19 reflected very positive recruitment 
assumptions.  
 
•  Contrary to normal business practice, the budget did not specifically 
provide a contingency fund. This was because there was a requirement 
that the budget must be presented on a balanced basis. However, the 
fact that there were major forecasting uncertainties in several areas 
provided an inbuilt contingency. 
 
•  Parental voluntary contributions were forecast to rise from £1.9 million 
in the current year to £2.6 million in two years time. This apparent 
major jump was to some extent artificial because this year's figure did 
not take account of any surplus retained by the Trust.  
Section 43 – information that would prejudice the commercial interests of the School 
and/or a third party; 

•  The higher contribution forecast was based on assumptions of the 
effectiveness of the changes being introduced in the contribution 
collection mechanism and the preparations made for early approaches 
to the parents of the forthcoming Year 7 intake. Gift Aid was being also 
approached more systematically. 
 
•  An over-optimistic contribution assumption could lead to a major deficit. 
However, the forecast for other donations had been drawn up on a very 
conservative basis, and reflected only pledges already made. This 
pessimistic assumption should balance out over-optimism elsewhere. 
 
•  As well as the factors listed in the PowerPoint presentation, like 
everything else the Budget was also sensitive to the changes in the 
overall economic position. Whilst, it was unlikely that most 2018/19 
figures would be affected developments in the UK would have to be 
watched carefully for future years. 
 
•  Arrangements were being considered to encourage Will bequests to 
help in future years. 
 
The GB approved the draft 2017/18 Budget as recommended by the Finance & 
Premises Committee and the Chairman offered the GB’s thanks to all those 
responsible for the work leading to this successful conclusion. 
 
11. 
 CRITICAL INCIDENT POLICY 
 
The GB approved the draft policy that had been presented to it. However, 
Governors were invited to advise the Headteacher, within the following 24-hour, 
of any final amendments they recommended. The Headteacher was requested 
to provide an updated text for consideration by the April meeting. 
 
ACTION GOVERNORS AND HEADTEACHER  
 
 


12. 
ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE  
 
12.1 
Mr Hurst reported that for the September 2018 Year 7 intake 330 offers 
had been made in Round 1 and the School had so far received 277 
acceptances. The Round 2 offers will be made at the end of March to take the 
theoretical intake back up to 330. If necessary, a final round of offers would be 
made at the end of May to bring the intake number to 300. 
 
12.2 
the GB approved the removal of the word "Executive" in the paragraph 
of the Committee’s Terms of Reference listing membership. It also authorised 
the removal of this word where it appeared in the Terms of Reference of other 
Committees. 
 
12.3 
the GB approved the appointment of Mr David Davis as a member. 
 
13. 
CSWAB COMMITTEE 
 
 The GB noted that the Committee did not recommend any changes to its 
Terms of Reference. 
 
14.  
SFVS QUESTIONNAIRE 
 
The GB approved the proposed responses to the 2017 Questionnaire. 
 
15.  
LINK GOVERNORS 
 
The GB approved the appointment of Mrs Naomi Newman in place of Ms 
Geraldine Fainer as Link Governor for Attendance & Behaviour 
  
16. 
ANY OTHER URGENT BUSINESS 
 
Dr Benjamin sought assurance on progress with the timetable for the next 
academic year. She hoped that the problems for 2017/18 where the timetable 
had not been formalised by the end of the preceding summer term for SEN 
department and for Jewish Studies timetable would not be repeated. 
 
Mr Wragg responded that some things would be improved but he believed that 
some challenges would remain. 
 
 
 
 
Signed       …………………………………      
…………………. (Chairman) 
   
 
 
 
 
 
(Date) 
 
 


Document Outline