This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request '2017 Examiners' Reports for History Final Honour School'.

FHS 2017  
History 
Examiners’ Report 
1

REPORT OF THE EXAMINERS IN THE FINAL HONOUR SCHOOL 
OF HISTORY 2017 
A. EXAMINERS’ REPORT
Overall Performance 
38.7% of candidates were awarded Firsts. This is compared with 34.8% in 2016, 29.61% in 2015, 31.44% in 
2014, 24.22% in 2013, 22.22% in 2012, and 29.4% in 2011. There were no Lower Seconds, Thirds, or Passes. 
61.3% of candidates were classified in the Upper Second Class (65.2% last year). 
The following general comments can be made: 
The 2.ii classification appears to be no longer awarded; the 2.ii mark is still infrequently used though its use 
was higher this year than in previous years.  The highest use of the 2.ii mark this year, unsually, was for the 
Compulsory Undergraduate Thesis, where 22 candidates (6 women, 16 men, 9.8% overall) were awarded a 
2.ii mark, the lowest use was for the Special Subject Extended Essay where 3 (1.3%) of candidates were 
awarded a 2.ii mark. 
41.3% of women got Firsts, the highest for over a decade. This is compared to 32.6% in 2016, 22.7% in 
2015, 28.6% in 2014, and 18.7% in 2013.  This is the first time ever that the number and percentage of 
women attaining Firsts has been greater than men (45 women, 42 men, 41.3% of women, 36.2% of 
men).  However, the gender balance of the top 20 Firsts was 14 men and 6 women, a return to the status 
quo after last year's promising 10 and 10.
B.  REPORTS ON INDIVIDUAL PAPERS 
History of the British Isles I: c.370-1087 
Twelve candidates took this paper.  Four candidates were awarded first class marks, six were awarded 2.1 
marks and two were awarded 2.2 marks.  Despite the small number taking this paper, eighteen of the twenty 
three questions attracted answers and there was none of the bunching that sometimes occurs.   Again in 
contrast to some years the British Isles as a whole received attention with some well-informed answers on 
the Picts (including Martin Carver’s work on Portmahomack) and the deployment of material on Irish kings 
and saints in more general comparative questions.  The best scripts engaged closely with the primary sources 
and were often able to place questions within the context of current debates; conversely the weakest scripts 
sometimes missed the purport of the questions, displayed little or no analysis, and were perfunctory in their 
handling of evidence.  But taking the paper as a whole the quality of the scripts was strong; they displayed a 
real sense of engagement.   The paper ends on a high note in its current form. 
History of the British History Isles II: 1042-1330 
Twenty seven candidates sat this paper, of whom 11 were given first class marks, 15 in the 2:1 bracket, and 
1 in the 2:2.  A refreshingly wide range of questions was attempted, with the most popular topics being 
gender, Jews, and failure in kingship; there was, however, a disturbing - and disappointing - absence of any 
essays on literary, visual or religious ‘culture’.  As ever, the best scripts came from those candidates who 
showed close familiarity with, and attention to, the complexities of the surviving primary sources, and those 
who concentrated on engaging with the exact terms of reference spel ed out in the phrasing selected by the 
examiners.  Outline papers are designed to test a student’s ability to think critically, creatively and flexibly, 
not to serve simply as an outlet for predictable and pre-digested material. 
2

History of the British Isles III: 1330-1550 
Thirty-two candidates sat the paper, and the overall standard was very good. There were eight first-class 
scripts and twenty-four upper second-class scripts; there were no lower seconds.  Most candidates answered 
questions across a range of social, political, and religious themes, and were able to adapt their knowledge 
to the questions set.  The better answers relied upon a wider range of reading and demonstrated knowledge 
of  how the  individual topics fitted  into  broader developments of  the  period,  as  well  as  showing  a  good 
knowledge of historiographical developments of the past thirty years or so.  The weaker answers adopted 
fixed positions, sometimes relying on older historiography (no bad thing in itself in many instances) without 
apparent awareness of more recent developments in the field.  Political history, heresy, revolts, gender, the 
Reformation, and non-English topics all received their share of very good answers, though some of the more 
specialised topics in social and economic history were not so popular.  This may reflect the time it is taking 
for the content of lectures to pass into what is regularly taught in tutorials. 
History of the British Isles IV: 1500-1700 
69 candidates, 12 of them in joint schools, sat the paper. The standard of performance was generally high. 
25 candidates emerged with agreed marks of 70 or above (36%), 43 with marks in the 60s, and only one with 
a mark below 60. There would have been still more first class marks had a number of candidates managed 
to  write  three  consistently  strong  answers;  a  handful  wrote  one  answer  for  which  they  were  less  wel  
prepared. Only the question comparing Scotland and England in the later seventeenth century attracted no 
takers. The most commonly tackled questions were those on the role of principle in making of religious policy 
(30 responses), witchcraft (22), patriarchy (19), popular politics (19), the threat of Catholicism/Puritanism 
(16), the British dimension of the civil wars (16), sixteenth-century Ireland (15), and parliaments (12). For 
someone who has not marked the paper for ten years, it was good to see that social and cultural topics were 
handled regularly and with both sophistication and variety; there was also significant engagement with the 
British dimension, sometimes in unexpected places.  The five specifically post 1660 questions only attracted 
11 responses between them, though candidates were willing to deploy post Restoration material on some 
of the asterisked questions, especially on witchcraft. The overall impression is very positive: the way the 
paper is studied clearly does not match some of the cruder stereotypes of British History lurking in some 
quarters.    There  are  areas  for  improvement.  Candidates  sometimes  need  to  pay  more  attention  to  the 
specific terms of questions: the issue of continuity in popular religious practice was sometimes avoided by a 
pre-packaged ‘impact of the reformation’ response; some of those tackling the question about the appeal 
of Restoration Anglicanism seemed to be in denial that it might have any, preferring to write about the 
challenge of Dissent. Definitional and historiographical issues were sometimes less well tackled: popular 
politics, for example, was regularly reduced to rebellions. Ideas and principles sometimes get short shrift: 
several candidates responding to the popular Q. 14 had a rather worryingly flexible notion of what a principle 
might be. 
History of the British Isles V: 1685-1830 
Thirty people sat the HBI V FHS paper this year, twenty nine single and one joint honours candidates. Eight 
achieved a first class mark overall, 2.1 an upper second, and one a third. The range of marks awarded was 
47-72, and the median mark was 67.   
Answers were attempted to 21 out of the 28 questions on the paper. Of these 21, however, eleven were 
answered  three  times  or  fewer.    The  most  popular  questions  were  in  order  of  preference  11  (Glorious 
Revolution),  answered  by  15;  22  (British  intellectual  life  and  culture)  and  4  (changing  attitudes  towards 
empire), both answered by nine; and 17 (support for political reform 1789-1820), answered by seven; and 
20 (middling sort) and 21 (evangelical religion), both answered by six.  There was a strong tendency, as in 
previous years, to choose questions on political topics, although, as noted above, intellectual history, social 
identities and gender attracted a fair number of takers. There was only one taker for each of questions 18 
(on black communities), 6 (corruption), 7 (changes to punishment of crime), 8 (the audiences for art and 
culture), and 26 (economic change). Question 20 was subject to an attempted clarification announced to 
candidates during the examination. The marks awarded answers to Q. 20 reflect that intervention. 
3

The best answers were distinguished by their analytical clarity, the degree of control that was exerted over 
the discussion, and the range of evidence provided in support of the main arguments. The capacity to range 
across the whole of the British Isles, where this was desirable or necessary, was quite uneven, although the 
better answers on q. 11 (Glorious Revolution) drew important contrasts between England and Scotland, and, 
in fewer cases, between these and Ireland. Similarly, the strongest answers to q.1 (on changes to British 
urban culture) displayed an appropriately broad geographical scope. The amount of attention to Ireland 
seems to have been a bit less than in previous years. Of the five candidates who tackled q. 12, on support 
for  and  opposition  to  union,  all  answered  on  the  Anglo-Scottish  Union.  The  answers  to  q.22  on  British 
AND/OR Irish enlightenment elicited a number of analytically acute, well framed, and sometimes quite subtle 
answers, although no candidate took on Ireland in this context, despite the recent growth of literature on 
this topic. Weaker answers here (as, indeed, on other questions) relied too heavily on assertion rather than 
systematic development of argument, and there was a tendency in quite a few answers to rely unduly on 
rehearsing the conclusions of historians.  How to integrate historiographical awareness in answers is an area 
where there is scope for considerable improvement, and name checking of historians is not a substitute for 
careful argument.  While some candidates had clearly thought hard about how to ground their arguments 
in appropriate evidence, it would have been encouraging to see more candidates prepared to think at the 
same time about the nature and limits of the available evidence, for example, in relation to q.4 (on attitudes 
to empire). Answers to this question would have been appreciably stronger had they managed to bring into 
clear focus specific contributions to relevant debates, and to explore more purposefully whose attitudes 
were being discussed. This was also a question that seemed to invite simplistic conclusions, usually because 
of overly schematic answers or a tendency to over-emphasize one aspect of attitudes towards empire at the 
expense  of  others.  A  notable  feature  of  answers  on  q.  24  (on  women’s  political  involvement)  was  the 
complete omission of any discussion of the lower orders, candidates too readily and uncritically perhaps 
following the lead here of some of the relevant secondary literature which has focused almost exclusively 
on the elites. 
Knowledge of the period was, as in previous years, uneven, and there were more errors (incorrect dates, 
names garbled) in answers than in previous years.  Candidates were better informed about the period before 
1760 than after, especially the 1790s onwards. In the case of several of the questions there were notable 
gaps in knowledge and understanding.  Most answers to q. 21 (on evangelical religion) omitted any detailed 
discussion of forms of lay piety and the role of gender. Answers to q. 17 on factors constraining support for 
political reform between 1789-1820, focused almost exclusively on the 1790s, omitting any discussion of the 
years after 1800, and thus the contrasts between the 1790s and the post 1815 period in respect of the 
amount and breadth of popular support for radicalism. Too many of the answers here also failed to bring 
into sufficiently sharp focus the key interpretative issues, tending, for example, to list repressive measures 
instead of exploring their character and impact.  Answers to q. 20, on the place of politeness and virtue in 
the  lives  of  the  middling  sort  were  on  the  whole  rather  better  formulated,  and  in  some  cases  notably 
sophisticated in how they framed the relationships between these two unstable categories and alert to the 
importance of change over the period. Nevertheless, the common (entirely contestable) assumption was of 
uniformity  of  experience  and  outlook  among  this  notably  diverse  group.    On  the  other  hand,  it  was 
encouraging  to  see  several  candidates  aiming  at  impressive  breadth  in  their  answers  to  some  of  the 
asterisked questions, covering most of the period, and able to impose a clear and promising interpretative 
pattern on developments and trends within this.  A key challenge on this paper, as ever, is to demonstrate 
depth and breadth of understanding across the three answers. 
History of the British Isles VI: 1815-1924 
Twenty  five  candidates  took  this  paper.    There  was  an  overall  level  of  competence,  reflected  in  the 
preponderance of 2.1 marks awarded.   Very few 2.2 marks were given.  However, there was also a relative 
paucity of 1st class work.   Candidates tackled a wide range of questions, and responded particularly well to 
the opportunities given to address social and cultural themes, and to consider Britain both as a multinational 
entity and as one with global diasporic connections.  Essays in response to questions on party political or 
constitutional history tended to be less ambitious and more conceptually and historiographically limited. 
4

Whiggish teleologies proved resilient.  The question on the role of socialism in the rise of the Labour Party 
(Q 29) was particularly popular, but elicited some surprisingly undifferentiated arguments; there was little 
evidence that real thought had been given to questions of definition.  A few candidates yielded to superficial 
journalistic analogies to current politics.  Across the paper as a whole the most successful essays were those 
which  drew  effectively  on  independent  reading  and  deployed  distinctive  case  studies  to  support  their 
arguments.    This  might  seem  too  obvious  a  point  to  be  worth  making,  but  it  was  striking  how  many 
candidates essentially relied on reproducing chunks of material from lecture notes rather than crafting their 
own  analytical  approaches  and  tackling  questions  critically.    Candidates  tended  to  play  safe  rather  than 
demonstrating their intellectual ambition.   
History of the British Isles VII: since 1900 
It would not be difficult to write a reasonably positive report on HBI 7 this year. All but one question got at 
least one taker, there were no short weight scripts and no third class essay marks. Candidates showed at 
least some knowledge of historiography through most of their answers. The proportion of decent firsts was 
reasonable. 
Yet there is an alternative view that requires stating. The median performance on essays was low 2.1 showing 
no more than diligence and basic competence. High 2.1 marks overall were usually driven by one good essay 
with two mediocre ones. It appears this is what most candidates are aiming for and as a result this is what 
they achieved. Tutors constantly state the importance of a focus on the actual question yet it still appears 
that most exam essays are lightly modified pre-prepared answers that do little more than pay lip service to 
the question. Sometimes the question twisting was particularly egregious, for example the answers on the 
exceptional nature of ‘two party politics’ were reframed as standard essays about 1950s consensus and none
of them made any attempt to explore the appeal of any party at any time other than Conservative or Labour. 
Similarly the candidates who answered the question on the impact of the Troubles in Great Britain wrote 
essays mostly or entirely about the impact of the Troubles in Northern Ireland. To clarify the distinction they 
probably should have looked at a UK passport.  Generally ‘the British Isles’ seems to have dropped away as 
a  framing for this  paper,  students  were  very  Anglocentric,  remarkably  little  was  written about Wales  or 
Scotland, although the little there was proved quite good. 
Essays also tend to follow a very rigid historiographical format and were overly focussed on name dropping 
historians at the expense of thinking about history. Three questions can usefully illustrate this. The question 
on the role of socialism in the growth of the Labour party saw very few candidates identify a single notable 
socialist or their ideas, the question on the impact of feminism saw the same issue regarding feminists and 
the question on whether Margaret Thatcher was constrained by her cabinets saw little sense of who was in 
those cabinets or what they did or what they thought beyond a few vague generalizations about ‘wets’ and 
‘dries’. 
There is something wrong when the vast majority of the proper nouns in a history exam essay are the names 
of historians. This is true even for an outline paper. The justification for 30 questions on small geographical 
area and a relatively short period must rest on the near infinite riches of primary material available literally 
at the click of a button.  If all we expect are precis of three or four books or articles then we should be asking 
fewer questions and possibly many fewer.   
As a Faculty we clearly need to talk about the responses to Question 12, ‘How useful is the term post-colonial 
in understanding Britain since 1947?’ This was by far the most popular question and one where the scripts 
were almost universally devoid of First Class quality. (See supplement.) 
This relates to the other highly revealing thing about the paper. Every question EXCEPT Question 30 was 
answered. 
Q.30 ‘Whose life stories in the British Isles during this period are most neglected by historians?’ 
This was an explicit invitation to go off the beaten track and demonstrate an enthusiasm for topics that were 
not constrained or defined by the standard ‘A writes x but B claims y’ essay plan and instead to interrogate 
larger historiographical prejudices and blind spots. It was quite sad that no one wanted to do this. It may be 
that  Theses  and  Special  Subject  essays  had  fulfilled  this  need  and  the  candidates  feared  penalties  for 
repetition. But the unwillingness of candidates to take on this open ended question may be more shaped by 
5

tutorialitis, the desire to make essays as close to standard tutorial ones as possible. It is noteworthy that q. 
19 on ‘ Was 1910-1922 a Constitutional Revolution’ got only one taker perhaps because it required synthesis 
across several standard tutorial topics and lectures. 
Because this is almost the end of the road for the current exam format we need to look to the future. The 
examining of this paper in the form of a take home paper provides a serious opportunity to raise standards. 
Freed from panicky reactions and time pressure we can hope that students will start to think very differently 
about what they are doing. The time and space to move away from the tutorial questions, to supplement 
secondary reading and look for interesting primary source illustrations and above all to properly address the 
examiners question may well be just the revolution this paper clearly needs.  This is a good moment to 
address our pedagogy. 
Supplementary comment on Q.12 
Some candidates reasonably challenged the question on the grounds that ‘postcolonial’ is a technical term 
which cannot be applied to a former Imperial metropole. This had some validity even if it was a bit narrow. 
Others  attacked  the  concept  of  postcolonial  by  claiming  that  Britain  remained  a  fully  colonial  society 
possessing overseas dependencies and governed by a strong sense of imperial mission. Again there is some 
truth in this but these essays tended towards hyperbole and also an ahistorical lack of interest in change
The normal authority appears to be Wendy Webster’s book, a study (largely of film representations) which 
should be noted ends in 1965. A lot of essays were a standard (pre-prepared) ‘decolonization’ narrative with 
a rote condemnation of British racism tacked on. The frequently repeated idea that the Commonwealth 
acted only as a mechanism for sustaining informal imperial control by Britain would certainly have come as 
a surprise to Margaret Thatcher. 
What was almost entirely absent was what the question setters had (perhaps over optimistically) hoped for, 
a sense of the agency of ex-colonial subjects, including ‘new Commonwealth’ immigrants and their children 
in  the  shaping  of  modern  Britain.  This  needn’t  and  indeed  certainly  shouldn’t  be  a  bland  celebration  of 
multicultural diversity and tolerance. It can and should emphasize contestation, exclusion and struggle as 
well as adaptation and hybridity. But the invisibility of actual BAME people in these essays was downright 
alarming. 
So, for example, there was no mention in any script of key BAME organizations that contested racism, not 
the BPP, not the Indian Workers Association, not the Southall Black Sisters.  There was hardly any mention 
of anti-imperialist or anti-racist movements at all. Important Black and Asian public intellectuals and activists 
such as C.L.R James, Stuart Hall, Darcus Howe and Tariq Ali passed unnoticed. One script mentioned Malcolm 
X in Oxford, none mentioned Muhammed Ali’s visits to the UK. Even on the students’ favoured ground of 
Westminster politics no one noted that the number of BAME MPs rose tenfold from the ‘famous four’ (none 
named) in 1987 to 41 in 2015. 
The only post 1970 film mentioned was Passage to India as a supposedly straightforward example of imperial 
nostalgia (if one ignores the actual plot). Gandhi (much bigger at the box office and more critically esteemed) 
was ignored. Whilst the latter can be criticized, it was hardly a valorization of Empire and the same point can 
be made about The Jewel in The Crown TV series again treated uncritically as pro-Raj. More significant was 
the complete absence of reference to counter-narratives in film and television by Black and Asian directors 
and writers, from My Beautiful Laundrette and Bend it like Beckham to Belle and a United Kingdom. Even 12 
Years a Slave 
had a Black British directorThere were no BAME actors. No Meera Syal, no Lenny Henry (whose 
career has seen remarkable change), no Idris Elba. 
A similar point can be made about art and literature. No mention of Benjamin Zephaniah or Chris Ofili (or 
again Steve McQueen) , no mention of Zadie Smith, Hanif Kureishi, Andrea Levy (all best sellers, all adapted 
for prime time television) or Monica Ali. Almost no mention of global literary figures based in Britain (there 
was a brief mention of Salman Rushdie in one essay). The latter include not only Asians,West Indians and 
black Africans but also a lot of ‘White Dominion’ figures also wrestling with colonial  and racial legacies. 
There was also no sense of the post-colonial economic power reversals which might be identified in TATA 
Land Rover-Jaguar or Mittal UK Steel (fun fact – the residual East India Company is now Indian owned). Or 
even the existence of Etihad and Emirates stadia in the Premier League. Even the Al-Fayed Harrods soap 
opera might have been worth a line. 
6

Popular music in these essays was invisible but it was implied it had stopped somewhere around Tommy 
Steele. No Reggae, no Two-Tone, no Northern Soul, no Bhangra influences, no Grime. 
The trials and tribulations of race in sport got no notice. No Fire in Babylon with the West Indies crushing 
Tony Greig to the delight of black audiences. But it is also perhaps worth mentioning that a dozen years after 
Norman Tebbit’s infamous ‘cricket test’ a British Muslim became England Cricket captain and that not much 
more than a decade after top division black footballers were showered with bananas on pitch, several of 
them would pull on the armband as England captain. Although the ‘rainbow’ team of the 2012 Olympics can 
be over sentimentalized – the wave of sound of boxing fans (not archetypal metro liberals) screaming on 
Nicky Adams tells us something. 
Finally there is the simple demographic issue. Urban life in Britain has been profoundly changed. But even 
suburban and rural areas became much less white and mono-cultural. And the presence of between 1.2 
million and 2 million British citizens who identified as ‘mixed race’ by 2011 is a social fact of real significance. 
In summary there was an absence of the sense of post-colonial complexity that is encapsulated for example 
by ‘Baroness Doreen Lawrence OBE’. 
Students might object ‘but this wasn’t in the reading’ or ‘this wasn’t in the lectures’. Which is not unfair – 
we must be frank and admit this is at least in large part the fault of the Faculty and we must address it.  But 
we are supposedly in the midst of a consciousness raising era as exemplified by Rhodes Must Fal  and yet 
consciousness  of  BAME  history  in  the  UK  still  seems  to  be  minimal  in  Oxford.  It  may  be  that  the  most 
conscious students are for various reasons not taking this paper. But the problem may be more fundamental, 
an unwillingness to think and read beyond the tutorial minimum.  None of the information above is esoteric 
or hard to find.   
General History I (285-476) 
Eight candidates sat the paper: there were two first-class marks, and six 2.1s. Candidates attempted eleven 
of the questions: the most popular topics were Q1 on the Tetrarchy and Q8 on the fall of Rome (five answers 
each); fol owed by Q19 on group solidarity (three); Q2 on Constantine, Q10 on persecution/toleration, and 
Q20  on  literary  al usion  in  texts  (two);  and  then  one  each  for  Q4  on  power-sharing,  Q9  on  Theodosian 
women, Q12 on regionalism in the church, Q13 on monastic communities and social norms, and Q18 on 
cities. As ever, the outstanding answers identified the crux of the precise question asked, showed awareness 
of and intelligent engagement with the relevant historiography, and supported their analysis with reference 
to specific texts and material evidence. In fact, all of the scripts showed a pleasing willingness to engage with 
a range of primary sources, whether they were coins, poems or sermons; particular rewards went to those 
who had thought carefully about what that evidence could and could not tell us. Answers on classic tutorial 
topics tended to lose focus on the actual issue raised: a number of essays in response to Q1 simply used it 
as a springboard for wider judgements on Tetrarchic policies, without thinking about how to rank greater 
military stability within that wider range of factors (or considering the prod in the question as to whether 
some of those other policies could be viewed as window-dressing). Some answers to Q8 were likewise too 
keen to slide away from identifying a fifth-century ‘tipping point’ in the West to a rehearsal of the causes of 
the  end  of  the  Western  Empire.  Those  who  challenged  themselves  to  answer  the  less  straightforwardly 
germane questions, like that on group solidarity (Q19), produced engagingly creative answers. The focus on 
the big political events which bookend the period was notable; it will be interesting to see whether this shifts 
as a result of the expanded GHI paper in two years’ time. 
General History II (476-750) 
 sat this paper (  Single Hons,  Joint Schools). 
 obtained first class marks, 
 II.I 
marks. A pleasing range of questions on the paper was attempted: eleven out of the twenty set, with only 
one question, on Islam, attempted by more than one candidate. This speaks well for the individuality of the 
candidates, and well also for health of ‘the global turn’ in medieval history. In general the answers showed 
a  commendable  willingness  to  think  in  expansive  and,  if  need  be,  comparative  terms,  while  showing 
awareness of the state of the historiography and issues of source criticism. In other words, this paper, like 
7

GH  I,  III,  and  IV  commands  a  niche  but  ‘high-end’  market:  this  promises  well  for  the  future  of  the  new 
European and World History paper, spanning the period 250-650. 
General History III (700-900) 
 candidates took this paper, a drop on the usual number.  However the quality was good with 
 
securing first class marks and 
 securing marks in the 65-68 range. 
 
  Nine 
of the 21 questions were attempted with the questions on images in East and West and the ways in which 
rule was legitimised and deligitimised each attracting three answers.  Candidates had a lot to say about 
images in Byzantium but were on less sure ground when it came to the West.  Similarly they had interesting 
things to say about legitimisation but had not thought about delegitimisation; reading the work of Phillipe 
Buc would have helped them here.  But overal  the level of engagement was very good and it was clear that 
candidates had enjoyed the paper and got a lot out of it.  All the scripts showed a readiness to engage with 
primary sources at a serious level and a willingness to make comparisons between different regions and 
regimes.  Looking to the future it was also clear that the work on this paper was already meeting the spirit 
of being both European and wider world – answers variously looked at Europe, Umayyad Spain, the Abbasids, 
Byzantium, the Khazars, and the world of the Eurasian steppes. 
General History IV (900-1122) 
The candidates who sat GH4 this year proved to be a competent cohort, who had clearly both enjoyed their 
studies and prepared carefully for the examinations. The standard of the essays was consistently high. While 
one or two individual essays were disappointing, all the candidates were placed in the 2:1 range or higher. 
As always, the very best scripts were the ones that engaged with the primary sources and handled complex 
and  contradictory  evidence  sensibly.  Only  a  few  candidates  mentioned  non-written  materials  such  as 
archaeology, numismatics and visual arts –those that did tended to produce the most impressive pieces of 
work. 
Unlike many previous years where only a handful of questions were attempted, in 2016-17, only half a dozen 
essay topics went untouched. Candidates wrote answers to eighteen different questions. While the vast 
majority were most comfortable understanding the period in terms of Western Europe, it was both positive 
and striking that this year there were candidates willing to look at Byzantium, the Seljuks and the Tang and 
Song dynasties in China. 
Several scripts were marked in the first class range. All showed promise and suggest that medieval studies 
at Oxford remain in rude health. 
General History V (1122-1273) 
Eight candidates sat this paper, including one from Joint Schools. One candidate achieved a first-class mark, 
six were spread across the upper second class bracket, and one candidate achieved a lower second. The 
most popular questions were those that related to heresy and Capetian France. The level of intellectual 
engagement was mixed. Stronger answers were distinguished by close engagement with the exact terms of 
the question and the critical deployment of a range of primary evidence (e.g. non-Catholic sources for heresy 
as well as inquisitorial records). Weaker answers were characterised by one or a combination of the following 
features: narrowness of focus (perhaps addressing only two substantive points); a wholly thematic approach 
to the exclusion of any consideration of change over time; an inattentiveness to the need to tether primary 
evidence to broader analytical discussion; and, finally, an inattentiveness to the exact wording of questions 
(e.g. q. 13 asked ‘How united was France under the Capetians?’, and not ‘How was France united under the 
Capetians?’)  With  only  eight  takers  it  is  difficult  to  draw  firm  conclusions  from  the  range  of  questions 
attempted,  but  the  fact  that  between  them  the  candidates  tackled  thirteen  questions  suggests  that 
candidates were willing to take advantage of the breadth of the paper, and the better scripts displayed a 
real appreciation for the paper’s social, intellectual, economic, and cultural dimensions. 
8

General History VI (1273-1409) 
Twelve candidates sat the paper.  There were eight upper second-class scripts, including several at the higher 
end of this range, and four first-class; there were no lower seconds.  Most candidates answered a good range 
of questions across several themes, and there was good use made of extra-European examples in several 
notable  answers.    The  better  answers  were  characterized  by  a  combination  of  precision  in  dealing  with 
evidence  and  argument,  and  a  broad  historiographical  awareness.    The  weaker  answers  showed  less 
engagement with sources and historiography, and in a few cases there did not seem to have been much 
wider reading and thought between the tutorial stage and the examination.  With this number of candidates 
several major areas of question inevitably went unanswered. 
General History VII (1409-1525) 
 sat the paper, 
.  
 
 
  
 
  The best answers were characterized by a very 
high level of detail, and a historiographical knowledge and understanding that was both broad and deep. 
The weaker answers were more reliant on fixed positions, showing little apparent development between 
the tutorial stage and the examination. 
General History VIII (1517-1618) 
This year 17 candidates took this paper, 15 from the main school and 2 from joint schools.  Six of these obtained a first 
class mark overall, 10 got 2i marks and one got an overall 2ii.   
The  most  popular  questions were on  the  French Wars  of  Religion  (10  answers),  the  Counter  Reformation (8 
answers), Justification by Faith (6), and with good take-up for women (5), Philip II (4), Calvinism (3), Reformation 
and literacy (3) and Witchcraft (3).  A range of other questions attracted single answers, and – to be expected in 
a relatively small group of candidates – nine questions attracted no takers at all.  Though the range of answers 
stretched across religious, political, economic, gender and social history, the answers were strongly concentrated 
on  a  Western  European  core  –  France,  Spain,  Italy  –  while  most  of  Central-East  Europe  (Poland  Lithuania, 
Muscovy, Scandinavia, HRE and Charles V) attracted no takers, nor did the Ottoman Empire or the wider non-
European world, with the exception of 2 answers on commercial/ cultural exchange with Asia.  As with last year, 
the existence of GH XVIII may be drawing off those whose interests might otherwise have gravitated towards 
extra-European topics.  War, poverty, political ideologies and republicanism also attracted no takers.   
The strongest scripts (35% achieved Firsts) demonstrated good knowledge of recent historiography, and could 
focus confidently on the questions asked rather than rehearsing more general tutorial essays, though quite a lot 
of the latter practice was in evidence.  In weaker answers there was a tendency to confine the historiography to 
an initial, cursory paragraph, rather than to try to integrate it into the larger structure.  Conversely the best essays 
managed  to  sustain  a  scholarly/historiographical  debate  or  theoretical  framework  throughout,  while  also 
demonstrating excellent command of supporting evidence and argument.  Both examiners would have welcomed 
more  willingness  to  adopt  and  deploy  comparison  more  widely,  and  to  think  more  broadly  about  the  larger 
concepts  and  issues  behind  questions;  there  was  a  lot  of  routine,  narrowly-focused  and  ‘safe’  answering  of 
questions, which is a pity given the evident breadth and thoroughness of reading indicated by many candidates.  
In cases of specific questions, too many candidates wasted time in the Counter-Reformation essay (Q 1) exercising 
the stale Counter v. Catholic Reformation historiography (for the most part a dialogue of the unread), when the 
question offered the opportunity to discuss the means and effectiveness with which reformed Catholicism sought 
to challenge Protestant ideas  and practices.  Again, the best essays seized the opportunity to discuss Justification 
by Faith (Q 6) in a wide range of theological contexts (including Catholicism), rather than as a peg for a rehearsed 
essay about the rise of Lutheranism.  The number of takers for the question on the French Wars of Religion 
surprised  the  examiners,  but  again  the  question  sifted  those  who  could  discuss  with  some  knowledge  the 
possibilities (and occasional achievements) of peacemaking, rather than telling the familiar story of dissatisfied 
Calvinists and nobles battering away at a weak crown.  Quite a number of low marks were given out on this 
question to candidates who refused to engage with the question as set.  Elsewhere, there were some excellent 
9

and thoughtful essays about women and agency, about (often non-)revolutionary Calvinism and about literacy 
and orality in the spread of the Reformation.   
General History IX (1618-1719) 
General History IX continues to attract low numbers, with just thirteen candidates sitting the exam this year 
(eleven from the main school and two from joint schools). As in previous years, quality compensated for 
quantity:  there  were  four  firsts  and  six  scripts  in  the  range  65-69.  There  was  no  mark  under  60.  Most 
candidates were able to produce three competent and well-illustrated essays. Fifteen out of the twenty-
seven questions were attempted, with the most popular topics being the Dutch Golden Age (8 answers) 
followed  by  Sweden  (5  answers)  and  the  Catholic  Church  (4  answers).  There  were  some  distinctive 
weaknesses in the lower-scoring scripts, in particular a tendency to ignore the international dimension to 
answers about particular countries and a reluctance to explore the analytical possibilities presented by the 
questions. 
General History X (1715-1799) 
Thirteen candidates sat General X this year, a marked decline in keeping with the drop in numbers for this 
paper in recent years. (50% lower than in 2011). Seven were MS candidates; 6 JH, which does show the 
sustained popularity of the paper among JH candidates. 
Out of 27 questions, only sixteen were attempted. The most popular questions attracted only five to six 
candidates. The most popular questions, attracting four or more answers, were all European, mainly political 
or intellectual/cultural history questions. Overall, there was a reasonably wide spread of questions answered 
within the band of the sixteen attempted, but they concentration, as in most years, was on European history. 
This is normal, and probably reflect both the expertise of those who teach the paper, but also, possibly, the 
fact  that  students  with  extra-European  interests  now  have  dedicate  GH  papers,  covering  this  period,  to 
choose from. 
The results were as follows: 2 Firsts; 9 Upper Seconds; 2 Lower Seconds, which is a slight decline in the 
number of Firsts, but not marked. 
General History XI (1789-1870) 
This  paper  was  taken  by  twenty  one  candidates.  The  overall  quality  of  the  scripts  was  good,  and  four 
achieved first class marks. 
There was, as usual, a good deal of bunching around certain questions. Over half the answers were on Q 13 
(Did national unification mark the victory or defeat of nationalism?), Q 11 (Were there clear consequences 
of the Revolutions of 1848?) and Q3 (Did Napoleon’s reshaping of Europe leave any lasting traces?). There 
was  very  little  interest  in  the  French  Revolution,  whether  Q1  on  its  violence  or  Q2  on  its  global  reach. 
Geographically, the Tanzimat reforms, Meiji restoration and Latin America as a ‘semi-colony’ were the only 
non-European questions tackled; there were no takers for the American Civil War or China. Q 10 on Russia 
as an ‘armed camp’ attracted three takers, Q 12 on the Crimean War and Q 14 on the Ausgleich one each 
but there was no interest in the two questions on France post Napoleon I. The more thematic questions 
attracted  uneven  interest.  Q  6  (Why  was  liberalism  more  influential  in  some  countries  than  others?’ 
attracted four answers, and there were two answers each on Q25 (secularism), Q26 (Jewish emancipation), 
and Q 27 (the audiences of Romanticism). There was one answer on Q15 (utopian/scientific socialism) but 
none on bureaucracy, education, globalization, industrialisation, or emigration. In this sense, the conceptual 
and comparative skills learned for the first-year GH papers seem to be largely dissipated by Finals. 
The best scripts adopted some sort of framework of analysis. They attempted a comparative analysis where 
appropriate and combined a structured argument with intelligent use of evidence and example. They had 
some grasp of historiographical debate. Rare candidates ventured into the cultural history of nationalist 
images and symbols and even the history of emotions. The weaker scripts were hampered by failure to 
define  concepts  such  as  liberalism  or  secularism,  failure  to  engage  with  the  specific  question  (the 
consequences of 1848 or the audiences of Romanticism), an unstructured argument often betrayed by lack 
of paragraphing, and poor presentation. 
10

General History XII (1856-1914) 
Seven students sat the exam this year. One received a first-class mark. The others were in the upper 2.1 
range.  In  general  the  scripts  showed  broad  competence.  Both  markers  agreed  that  there  were  few 
outstanding  answers.  Four  students  answered the question  (11)  about the  Italian  South.  Three  students 
answered the question (7) of whether anti-Semitism was a social movement. Other questions with a couple 
of takers addressed the ‘men on the ground’ in colonial expansion (14) and the upsurge in popular religiosity 
(25). It is difficult to discern any patterns in the scripts based on the small sample. Predictably, candidates 
focused on Europe; only two scripts answered questions focused on the non-European world. Including more 
comparative questions that integrate disparate world regions might address this issue. 
General History XIII (1914-1945) 
There is quite a lot of good news to report. The candidates tackled a very wide range of questions with only 
the question on Latin America, the question on discriminatory franchises in ‘democratic’ countries (eg sex in 
France, race in USA and Dominions) and ‘violent secularization’ (eg USSR, Spain, but potentially also Mexico, 
Mongolia  and Turkey)  finding no takers.  Sadly one of the either/or options was also neglected, this being 
the question of whether Genocide was gendered (an idea that has generated excellent  work in the last 10 
years- see comments below) The paper showed candidates willing to take on global and international history 
and  saw significant number of answers on Asia and the United States.  Although more Eurocentric than GH 
14 this paper has never been a purely European history paper and candidates answered with some fluency 
on Japan, India and China. At the top end there were some exceptionally good performances. One essay was 
independently judged by both examiners to be the best exam essay they had ever read. Similarly the number 
of truly poor performances was quite low. But the Faculty in its wisdom has ruled and next year will be the 
swansong of this paper.  
The two major flaws were in historiography and in the answering of two specific questions. Many candidates 
seemed to be relying on works that were seriously dated or of questionable academic credibility or both. So 
a question about genocide and the participation of ‘ordinary people’ was answered almost exclusively in 
terms of the Goldhagen/Browning bust up. Whilst candidates were often well informed about this (and were 
credited for that) it needs to be noted that this argument first occurred before most of the current finalists 
were born! The historiography has moved on in this generation and has come to include some very vigorous 
debates about material interests, the participation of non-Germans in the Shoah, the pressures of living in 
the ‘shatterzone’ and the comparativist perspective on genocides (only one essay mentioned the genocide 
of Armenians at all).  By notable contrast the best essays on ‘personality cults’ showed an impressively up to 
the minute sense of the historiography of Mussolini’s Italy. The essays on the USSR sometimes showed a 
worrying propensity to draw on dubious works of popularization and the more nuanced historiography of 
the Great War since the 1990s and that of the subsequent peace was mostly (although not completely) 
missing. There was a lot of Chris Clark in answers to Question 1 which was of limited use. 
Two  questions tripped  candidates  up badly.  Question  4  about  ‘protectionism’ before  and  after  the  Wall 
Street  Crash  inadvertently  and  worryingly  revealed  that  many  history  undergraduates  don’t  seem  to 
understand  what  the  word  ‘protectionism’  means.    Perhaps  even  more  extraordinary  was  the  wilful 
misreading  of  q.22  about  sexual  liberation  and  backlash  as  ‘tel   me  everything  you  know  about  women 
and/or gender relations during this period.’ This usually involved some material genuinely pertinent to the 
question and a lot of irrelevance. Very few candidates seem to have thought that ideas of sexual liberation 
might also involve men (both gay and straight).  Interestingly a lot of these essays might have been better as 
answers to Question 19 but were clearly triggered by the single word ‘liberation’. So basically the usual 
examiners’ lament that candidates should try to read and answer the actual question. 
General History XIV (1941-1973) 
Forty one candidates took this paper 
 
 This was the last time that General History 14 was set in its current form – the 
two new twentieth-century papers will cover longer periods and be divided between a global and a European 
11

paper.  The  most  popular  questions  were  on  the  origins  of  the  Cold  War;  1968;  gender  history;  the 
international  relations  of  the  Middle  East.  As  usual,  the  standard  of  these  answers  varied.  Some  of  the 
stronger essays were on social and cultural topics – for instance ‘1968’, consumerism and gender. While 
there were some excellent answers on the political topics relating to specific countries or regions, these 
essays suffered more frequently from a lack of engagement with the historiography and the more conceptual 
issues - for instance the nature of communism in the Soviet bloc, or the meaning of democracy in South Asia. 
It is hoped that more thematic questions and global scope of the new papers will remedy this, and allow for 
more stimulating and ambitious approaches to the period than the current format permits. 
General History XV (Britain’s North American Colonies from Settlement to Independence, 1600–1812) 
Nine  candidates  sat  this  year’s  examination,  five  of  whom  were  female.  The  ambient  performance  was 
competent. No script was ill-informed and all candidates received at least a II.1. However, too many answers 
paid too little attention to the terms of the question set and offered pre-prepared responses to imagined 
interrogatives (this was particularly notably in respect of Q. 15 on slave societies). Predictably perhaps just 
one candidate (female) received a First. Questions 4 (colonial hierarchy), 11 (Chesapeake and New England) 
15  (slave  societies)  proved  popular.  On  a  happy  note, question  24,  which  asked  candidates to discuss a 
generalisation  made  by  the  Harmsworth  Visiting  Professor  in  his  Inaugural  Lecture  and  the  book  it 
celebrated, attracted one taker -- who offered a very good appraisal.  
General History XVI (From Colonies to Nation: the History of the United States, 1776–1877) 
11 candidates, including three joint school’s candidates, sat General History XVI in 2017. Two candidates 
were awarded first class marks in this paper, with the remainder being of a high standard, there were no 
2.2s. About one half of the questions were answered by at least one candidate, not an ideal spread, but we 
were pleased that most of the candidates attempted at least one asterisked [*] question – some taking on 
two. The best responses to the asterisked  questions showed some intellectual ambition and probed large 
themes through discrete, analytical case studies; the weakest, were narrative answers. As usual, there was 
some clustering around the topics of the Revolution, Manifest Destiny, slavery, and the Civil War reflecting 
their popularity as tutorial topics. Most responses showed a strong grasp of the latest trends in American 
historiography, but this often came at the expense of independent argument as candidates chose to rely on 
the conclusions of existing scholarship. 
One of the Questions not taken on, number 19 (‘In what ways were the politics of the second party system 
defined by the American Whig Party?’), asked candidates to deploy familiar material from an unexpected 
angle  and  it  was  disappointing  that  candidates  tacked  toward  ‘safer’  and  more  discrete  (perhaps  even 
predictable) topics. This leads to one piece of concrete advice: candidates should be warned to consider the 
specific angle of the questions more carefully and beware of unconsciously inserting tutorial essays into 
exam responses. Questions 15, 20, and 26 seemed especially prone to this approach. On question 15 (‘Was 
the  election  of  Thomas  Jefferson  ion  1800  a  revolution’),  for  instance,  no  candidate  even  discussed  the 
election of 1800 itself, instead focussing on Jeffersonian statecraft. 
General History XVII (History of the United States since 1863) 
30 students took this paper this year: 22 straight historians, eight from joint schools.  The seven candidates 
who  secured  first-class  marks,  as  in  previous  years,  included  a  disproportionate  number  who  had  been 
adventurous  in  their  choice  of  questions--answering  less  obvious  questions,  and  covering  a  wide 
chronological range.  Pleasingly, every question drew at least one answer, and a larger number of candidates 
than in some years attempted at least one 'starred' question, often with good results.  Twenty candidate 
secured  an  upper  second  mark,  while  three  were  awarded  a  lower  second  grade.  In  the  latter  case, 
candidates were in general let down less by lack of knowledge than by a failure to answer the question. 
12

General History XVIII (Eurasian Empires, 1450-1800) 
A large number of candidates sat GH18 this year, demonstrating the rising interest in global history. Those 
that sat the paper proved to have a solid grounding in the histories of Eurasian empires. There were few bad 
papers, and indeed few poor essays. 
Those that were disappointing were often the final answer and were as much testimony to poor time keeping 
as to weak responses. 
There  was  a  concentration  of  responses  looking  at  the  spread  of  Islam  and  Christianity,  on  the  ‘great 
divergence’ and on the fall of Constantinople. Candidates attempted all but two of the questions. It was 
pleasing to come across such a wide range of answers that in turn points to the breadth of scope of the paper 
and the way it is taught in Oxford. 
Candidates worked most closely with secondary material, engaging with the major debates amongst modern 
historians  about  methodology  and  approach,  about  terminology  and  about  the  key  issues  worthy  of 
attention. Little use was made of primary sources and while a small number of the answers also brought in 
numismatics, visual arts and archaeology, most left these to one side. 
The weakest answers were those that were over-generalised and failed to structure a compelling arguments. 
The very best showed sophistication and real insight into relations between empires, impact (positive and 
otherwise) of rising contact between empires in this period and to wider change in the world. 
This is a challenging paper, introducing students to regions, peoples and cultures that many will not have 
been familiar with before. It was a delight, therefore, to see many being rewarded with good marks that 
reflect the hard work that has gone into preparing for this paper and the time spent thinking about Eurasian 
empires in this period. 
General History XIX (Imperial and Global History, 1750-1914) 
Fifteen candidates sat the examination this year. Marks were largely restricted to the range 60-75%, with 
most in the mid to upper 60s. The examination script offered 33 questions, including nine either/or, and 
most were utilized, but with clustering on questions concerning cultural imperialism and the ‘Black Atlantic’. 
I am interim convenor and this is my first report, so it is difficult to compare the quality of answers across 
time, but I was a little disappointed by a paucity of independent-mindedness. The two colleagues who have 
run the course in previous years are no longer with us, and have yet to be replaced, and I feel the course 
design is due for some refreshment when this occurs. It is important to note that this will have to be phased 
in carefully to ensure that students who attended lectures in previous years are not disadvantaged. 
Further Subject 
FS 12 - Writing in the early Modern Period, 1550-1750 (new) 
 
. The format of a take-home exam in the second year 
has worked very well. Given the number of takers, it would be inappropriate to give specific comments on 
question choice or performance. It is hoped that the number of takers will rise in subsequent years, and 
tutors might encourage students to consider this new Further Subject when it resumes in HT19. 
Special Subject 
SS 12 - The Thirty Years’ War (new)
The new Special Subject on the Thirty Years War ran for the first time in Michaelmas 2016, taught by Peter 
Wilson  and  David  Parrott.    It  attracted  twelve  students,  11  single  subject  History  and  one  joint  school 
candidate.  The examination did not vary from the standard Special Subject format, with an extended essay 
requirement submitted on the Friday of week 0 of Hilary term, and a 12-answer document paper set as a 
three-hour examination.   Despite the newness of the course, the results in the document paper were very 
encouraging, with 5 first-class marks awarded and 7 2i’s – clear evidence that the students had managed to 
master the body of set texts, could identify contexts and specific details, and had a confident sense of how 
the extracts related to a wider context.  And this applied both for the textual extracts and a section which 
included visual material.  The best papers showed for the most part an appropriate balance between focus 
13

on the specific matters arising from the text and the broader context, and also included some impressive 
cross-referencing  to  other  sources  and  case-studies.    Weaker  papers  tended  to  be  too  (redundantly) 
descriptive and insufficiently analytical, or could veer to the opposite extreme and focus overly on the wider 
contexts triggered by the document, failing to engage with the detail of the extract.  In other cases the 
answers  were  overly  brief  and  missed  obvious  matters  arising,  though  all  candidates  had  absorbed  the 
injunction to ensure that they discussed 12 extracts and there were no short-weight scripts, even though a 
few  showed  a  marked  deterioration  in  length  and  quality  as  the  script  progressed.    A  few  candidates 
performed more strongly in discussing visual material from the course, and it may be worth considering 
expanding the number of images to fill the whole of the fourth section of the paper.   
Disciplines of History 
The paper was prepared and reviewed in the usual manner by the main school board in collaboration, at all 
stages,  with  the  Joint  School  of  Ancient  and  Modern  and  with  History  Externals.  No  complaint  or  other 
response inviting comment has been received from AMH. 
The following remarks concern the main school. 225 candidates sat the paper. 116 of these were male, 109 
female. For 17 male candidates the agreed mark on Disciplines was the highest in their portfolio and 25 male 
candidates (21%) garnered an agreed mark of 70 or above. The high end of attainment for male candidates 
sitting Disciplines was, in percentage terms, a little down on the two years previous but not out of line with 
a five year average.  Turning to the 109 female candidates, for 12 of these candidates Disciplines was the 
highest agreed mark they received. 21 female candidates (19%) garnered an agreed mark of 70 or above. 
This  is  broadly  in  line  with  five  year  averages.  The  high  end  of  attainment  for  female  candidates  sitting 
Disciplines was roughly unchanged. At the lower end of attainment, an agreed mark of 60 or below, 6 female 
candidates  and  3  male  candidates  classified  in  this  band.  Over  the  preceding  three  years  the  numbers 
involved, though similarly small, have more nearly even as between male and female. 
Responses from Assessors suggest that there was nothing particularly unexpected or troublesome about 
questions set in this year’s paper. Two assessors noted a surfeit of answers on oral history which is perhaps 
more a comment on teaching cultures. In so far as this comment relates to the questions set, the substance 
of the comment concerned the potential for overlap between answers to question A2 and B29. Even the 
Assessor concerned noted that few candidates attempted both A2 and B29. As in previous years Assessors 
felt that the best answers were those that defined terms from the outset, particularly perhaps in respect of 
A17 and B38.  Assessors noted that poor answers, as in previous years, fixated on a term within the question 
set with insufficient regard to the question as a whole. One Assessor noted this tendency in answers to A6, 
which some candidates took to be “about” power relations. However, generally, questions on which the 
Board had spent energy constructing were answered and answered well. One final gripe from the Assessors. 
This year, as in some previous years, “political history” is apparently understood by undergraduates to be 
defined by chronology (modern) and geography (British). 
As for marking culture. 42 scripts (c. 19% of the total) received raw marks of 1 or less points apart. This 
compares to (c. 17%) in a large HBI paper. Equally 40 scripts (c. 18%) received raw marks 8 or more points 
apart. The equivalent figure for a large HBI paper is roughly 5%. An obvious explanation here involves the 
pairing of Assessors. There is anecdotal and perhaps statistical evidence to suggest that pairing a modernist 
with anything other than modernist is liable to produce a discrepancy in raw marks. There is no obvious or 
immediate solution to this, given that the comparative section of the paper requires discussion across time 
periods  and  therefore  needs  assessment  by  markers  with  different  specialisms.  The  Board,  including  its 
External members, were satisfied that the process of reconciling discrepant marks, where necessary by a 
third reading, was conducted with integrity. 
14

APPENDIX A.    REPORT ON FHS RESULTS AND GENDER (Main School only) 
GENDER STATS BY PAPER FHS 2017 
116
109W 

Paper 
F Avrg 
M Avrg  DIFF 




F 70 
F%
M70 +
M%
F< 
F%
M< 
M%
High  High
Low
Low
+
60
60
ALL 
67.21 
67.31 
0.1 
 
 18 
16.5 
23 
19.8 
2  
1.8 

BH 
66.26 
66.99 
0.73 
12 
17 
23 
14 
27 
24.8 
35 
30.2 
5  
4.6 

4.3 
GH 
66.19 
67.6 
1.41 

19 
21 
21 
22 
20.2 
32 
27.6 

7.3 

3.5 
FS 
67.55 
67.63 
0.08 
18 
21 
19 
13 
36 
33.1 
45 
38.8 
2  
1.8 

0.9 
SSg 
67.67 
67.36 
0.31 
19 
17 
11 
15 
41 
37.6 
35 
30.1 
3  
2.8 

3.5 
SSEE 
68.86 
68.42 
0.44 
40 
28 
10 
14 
46 
42.2 
46 
39.7 

1.8 

3.5 
DH 
65.87 
66.26 
0.39 
12 
17 
30 
33 
21 
19.3 
25 
21.6 

5.5 

2.6 
TH 
67.97 
66.6 
1.37 
32 
26 
23 
34 
43 
39.5 
37 
31.9 

5.5 
16 
13.8 
GENDER STATS BY PAPER FHS 2016 
115
129W 

Paper 
F Avrg 
M Avrg 
DIFF 
 F 



F 70 
F% 
M70 +  M% 
F< 
F% 
M< 
M% 
High  High  Low  Low 

60 
60 
ALL
67.29 
67.39 
0.1
19 
14.7 
19 
16.5 



BH
65.65 
67.18 
1.53 
17 
22 
32 
19 
24 
18.6 
35 
30.4 

5.4 

6.1 
GH
6729 
67.14 
0.15 
18 
18 
16 
19 
34 
26.4 
30 
26 

2.3 

5.2 
FS
66.94 
67.68 
0.74 
17 
25 
17 
15 
31 
24 
42 
36.5 

3.1 

3.5 
SSg
67.89 
67.91 
0.02 
23 
21 
12 
11 
44 
34.1 
40 
34.8 

3.1 

1.7 
SSEE
68.47 
68.18 
0.29 
32 
36 
12 
14 
51 
39.5 
48 
41.7 

0.8 

2.6 
DH
66.25 
66.7 
0.45 
21 
17 
33 
30 
23 
17.8 
34 
29.6 

3.9 

5.2 
TH
68.12 
67 
1.16 
34 
24 
27 
28 
49 
38 
35 
30.4 

4.7 

6.1 
GENDER STATS BY PAPER FHS 2015 
115

119W 
Paper 


DIFF  F 



F70  F% 
M70+  M% 
F< 
F% 
M<
M%
Avrg 
Avrg 
Hig
Hig
Low Low
+
60 
60 

h
ALL 
66.56 
67.09 
0.53 
 
11 
9.2 
22 
19.1 

1.7 

1.7 
BH 
64.25 
66.51 
2.26 
13 
18 
32 
27 
20 
16.8 
36 
31.3 
12 
10.1  10 
8.7 
GH 
66.04 
66.3 
0.26 
14 
11 
20 
18 
20 
16 
34 
29.6 

4.2 

5.2 
FS 
66.82 
67.82 

25 
19 
11 

31 
26.1 
45 
39.1 



2.6 
SSg 
66.25 
67.58 
1.33 
14 
17 
14 
13 
29 
24.4 
38 
33.1 

4.2 

4.3 
SSEE 
67.66 
67.9 
0.24 
32 
31 

19 
38 
31.9 
46 
40 

1.7 

6.1 
DH 
65.75 
66.15 
0.4 
15 
14 
29 
27 
26 
21.8 
28 
24.3 

7.6 

6.1 
TH 
66.77 
66.88 
0.11 
20 
20 
29 
22 
29 
22 
37 
32.2 
12 
10.1  8 
6.9 
GENDER STATS BY PAPER FHS 2014 
124

105W 
Paper 
F Avrg  M 
DIFF 
 F 



F70 
F% 
M70 +  M% 
F < 
F% 
M < 
M% 
Avrg 
High  High  Low  Low 

60 
60 
ALL 
BH 

64.83 
66.72 

19 
25 
11 
 12 
11.4 
33 
26.6 
11 
10.5 

4.8 
GH 
66.1 
66.69 
10 
26 
16 
16 
20  
19.1 
39 
31.5 

6.7 

6.5 
FS 
67.07 
67.24 
0.17 
20 
24 
14 
20 
36 
34.3 
48 
38.7 

5.7 

2.4 
SSg 
65.85 
66.45 
0.6 
14 
15 
12 
14 
22 
20.9 
34 
27.4 

4.8 

7.3 
SSEE 
68.12 
66.6 
1.52 
36 
23 

28 
41 
39.1 
36 
29 

3.8 
16 
12.9 
DH 
65.66 
65.76 
0.1 
15 
11 
26 
29 
20 
19.1 
 28 
22.6 
12 
11.4 
14 
11.3 
15

TH 
66.76 
66.48 
0.28 
25 
33 
22 
34 
37 
35.2 
35 
28.2 
15 
14.3 
16 
12.9 
16

APPENDIX B 
FHS RESULTS AND STATISTICS
 Note: Tables (i) – (iii) relate to the Final Honour School of History only. Statistics for the joint schools 
are included in tables (iv) and (v). 
(i)
Numbers and percentages in each class 
Class
Number 
2017 
2016 
2015 
2014 
I
87 
85 
69 
72 
II.1
138 
159 
160 
154 
II.2


 
 
III




Fail




Total
225 
244 
 
 
Class
Percentage
2017 
2016 
2015 
2014 
I
38.67 
34.8 
29.61 
31.44 
II.1
61.33 
65.2 
68.67 
67.25 
II.2



 
III




Fail




17

(ii)
Numbers and percentages of men and women in each class   
(a)        2017 
Class
Nos 
%
Men
Women
Women as % of 
(both 
total 
sexes)
in each class
Nos
%
Nos
%

87 
38.67
42 
35.90 
45 
41.67
51.72 
II.1
138 
61.33
75 
64.10 
63 
58.33
45.66 
II.2







III







Fail







Total
225 
100 
117 
100 
108 
100 

(b)        2016 
Class
Nos 
%
Men
Women
Women as % of 
(both 
total 
sexes)
in each class
Nos
%
Nos
%

85 
34.8 
43 
37.4 
42 
32.6 
49.4 
II.1
159 
65.2 
72 
62.6 
87 
67.4 
54.7 
II.2







III







Fail







Total
244 
100 
115 
100 
129 
100 

18

(b) 
2015   

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
total in each 
class 
Class
Nos 

(both 
Nos 

Nos 
sexes)

69 
29.61
41 
35.96 
28 
23.53
40.57 
II.1 
160 
68.67
71 
62.28 
89 
74.79
55.62 
II.2 
 
 
 
 
 
III 







Fail 







Total 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(c)  
2014 
Class
Nos 
%
Men
Women
Women as % of 
(both 
total 
sexes)
in each class
Nos
%
Nos
%

72 
31.44
43 
35.25 
29 
21.10
40.27 
II.1
154 
67.25
76 
62.30 
78 
72.90
50.65 
II.2
 
 
 



III







Fail







Total
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19

 (ii )  Performance of Prelims. Candidates in Schools (First and Thirds) and Vice Versa (HIST only) 
Prelims Nos 2015 
FHS Results in 2017 
Finals not 
taken in 
2017
I
II.1 
II.2
III
Pass 
Distinction: 71 
46 
21 




Pass:  






Prelims results in 2014/2015 
Prelims not 
Finals Nos 2017 
taken in 2014/15
Distinction 
Pass 
Class I: 87 
46 
35 

Class III/Pass: - 



20

(iv) Performance of candidates by paper 
a)
Thesis (Sex/Paper showing marks for that paper) 
Class
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes)
class
Nos
%
Nos
%
I
109 
35.17
56 
32.37 
53 
38.69
48.62 
II.1
164 
52.90
90 
52.02 
74 
54.02
45.12 
II.2
28 
9.03
19 
10.98 

6.57
32.15 
III
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pass 







Fail 

1.94

2.90 

0.72
16.66 
Total
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
b)
Special Subject Extended Essay (sex paper showing marks for that paper) 
Class
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes)
class
Nos
%
Nos
%
I
107 
41.48
55 
40.44 
52 
42.63
48.60 
II.1
144 
55.81
77 
56.61 
67 
54.91
46.53 
II.2

2.71

2.95 

2.46
42.85 
III







Fail 







Total
258 
100 
136 
100 
122 
100 

21

c) 
Disciplines of History (Sex/Paper showing marks for that paper) 
Class
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes)
class
Nos
%
Nos
%
I
57 
23.37
34 
26.15 
23 
20.17
40.36 
II.1
175 
71.72
90 
69.24 
85 
74.56
48.57 
II.2

3.69

2.31 

5.27
66.66 
III







Pass 

0.40

0.76 



Fail 

0.82

1.54 



Total 
244 
100 
130 
100 
114 
100 

d)
History of the British Isles (Sex/Paper showing marks for that paper) 
Class
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes)
class
Nos
%
Nos
%
I
69 
27.05
39 
29.32 
30 
24.60
43.47 
II.1
175 
68.62
88 
66.16 
87 
71.31
49.71 
II.2
10 
3.93

4.52 

3.28
40.0 
III
 


 
 
Pass 







Fail 







Total
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
22

e) General History (Sex/Paper showing marks for that paper) 
Class
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes)
class
Nos
%
Nos
%
I
86 
27.31
52 
30.06 
34 
23.95
39.53 
II.1
211 
66.99
114 
65.90 
97 
68.30
45.97 
II.2
17 
5.39

3.46 
11 
7.75
64.70 
III







Fail 

0.31

0.58 



Total
315 
100 
173 
100 
142 
100 

f)
Further Subjects (Sex/Paper showing marks for that paper) 
Class
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes)
class
Nos
%
Nos
%
I
105 
34.54
59 
35.55 
46 
33.33
43.80 
II.1
193 
63.49
104 
62.65 
89 
64.50
46.11 
II.2
 
 
 
 
 
III
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fail 

0.32



0.72
100 
Total
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
g) 
Special Subjects Gobbets (sex paper showing marks for that paper) 
Class
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes)
class
Nos
%
Nos
%
I
90 
34.88
45 
33.08 
45 
36.89
50.0 
II.1
158 
61.24
86 
63.24 
72 
59.02
45.57 
II.2
10 
3.88

3.68 

4.09
50.0 
III







Fail 







Total 
258 
100 
136 
100 
122 
100 
23

 (v) 
History and Joint Schools’ candidates taking each paper
(Figures include both Main and Joint Schools’ candidates – bracketed figures indicate the number 
of joint schools’ candidates) (withdrawn candidates have not been taken into account here)
2017 
2016
2015 
2014 
History of the British Isles
1.         c.300-1087 
12 
(2) 
18 
(5) 
19  (5) 
14 (3) 
2.        1042-1330 
27 
(3) 
37 
(2) 
28 
(1) 
25
(1) 
3.        1330-1550 
32 
(3) 
27 

32 
(3) 
30
(2) 
4.        1500-1700 
69 
(12) 
64 
(7) 
75 
(9) 
74
(9) 
5.        1685-1830 
30 
(1) 
24 
(8) 
34 
(7) 
24
(4) 
6.        1815-1924 
25 
(4) 
37 
(2) 
40 
(8) 
51 (10) 
7.        Since 1900 
60 
(6) 
65 
(6) 
49  (11) 
45
(9) 
General History
(i)         285-476 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

(3) 
(ii)   
476–750 
 
 

(1) 
 
 
 
 
(iii)    700–900 
 
 



(1) 
11 
(3) 
(iv) 
900–1122 
11 
(3) 
 
 


11 
(2) 
(v) 
1122–1273 

(2) 
 
 
 
 
10 
(2) 
(vi) 
1273–1409 
12 
(4) 
 
 



(3) 
(vii) 
1409–1525 
 
 
14 
(5) 

(1) 

(1) 
(viii)  1517–1618 
17 
(2) 
23 
(6) 
21 

25 
(2) 
(ix) 
1618–1715 
13 
(2) 
12 
(4) 
15 

20 
(4) 
(x) 
1715–1799 
13 
(6) 
12 
(5) 
21 
(8) 
27 
(6) 
(xi) 
1789–1870 
21 
(6) 
13 
(6) 
13 
(2) 
11 
(4) 
(xii) 
1856–1914 

(3) 
 
 

(1) 
10 
(4) 
(xiii)  1914–1945 
33 
(9) 
28 
(5) 
25 
(6) 
30  (10) 
(xiv)  1941–1973 
41 
(12) 
40 
(7) 
35  (12) 
44  (13) 
(xv)    (3028) History of the U.S. 1600-1812 

(3) 
18 
(4) 
15 
(2) 
13 
(3) 
(xvi)    History of the U.S. 1776-1877 
11 
(3) 
22 
(5) 
28 
(6) 
23 
(6) 
(xvii) History of the U.S. since 1863 
30 
(8) 
39 
(10) 
39 
(9) 
31 
(8) 
(xviii) Eurasian Empires, 1450-1800 (new
54 
(20) 
45 
(14) 
(xix) Imperial and Global History 1750-1914 
15 
(5) 
24 
(6) 
40  (14) 
21 
(7) 
24

2017 
2016
2015 
2014 
Further Subjects 
1.  Anglo-Saxon Archaeology of the Early 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Christian period 
2.  The Near East in the Age of Justinian and 

(5) 
11 
(3) 

(2) 
18 
(6) 
Muhammad, c. 527–c.700 
3.  The Carolingian Renaissance 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4.   The Viking Age: War and Peace c.750-1100 

(4) 
 
 
 
 

(1) 
5.  The Crusades 
17 
(2) 
16 
(5) 
12 
(4) 
19 
(6) 
6.  Culture and Society in Early Renaissance Italy, 
1290-1348 
 
 
 
 
 
 


7.  Flanders and Italy in the Quattrocento, 1420–
 
 
 
 




1480 
8.  The Wars of the Roses 

(1) 

(4) 
14 
(2) 

(2) 
9.   Women, Gender & Print Culture in 
Reformation England, c.1530-1640 
10 
(2) 

(2) 

(1) 
 
 
 
Literature and Politics in Early Modern 
 
 
21 
(5) 
18 
(1) 
England (FSEE) (A10711S9) 
10. Literature and Politics in Early Modern 
10 

18 
(1) 
England (A10711W1) 
11. Representing the City, 1558-1640 (A13762S1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(4) 
12. Writing in the early Modern period, 1550-
1750 (new) (A15060S1) 
 
 
13. Court, Culture & Art in Early Modern Europe, 
1580-1700 
 
 


10 
(1) 
 
 
14. The Military & Society in Britain & France, c. 
1650-1815 
11 
(2) 
 
 
 
 


15. The Metropolitan Crucible, London 1685-1815 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 

(1) 
16. First Industrial Revolution 1700-1870 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17. Medicine, Empire & Improvement, 1720 to 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
      1820 
18. The Age of Jefferson 


10 
(1) 
15 
(2) 
13 
(4) 
19. Culture and Society in France from Voltaire to 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balzac 
20. Nationalism in western Europe 1799-1890 
11 
(1) 
11 
(3) 
10 
(4) 

(2) 
21. Intellect and Culture in Victorian Britain 
 
 
 
 




22.The Authority of Nature: Race, Heredity &   
     Crime 1800-1940 
12 
(1) 
16 
(2) 
15 
(3) 
11 

23. The Middle East in the Age of Empire 
24 
(5) 
23 
(5) 
13 
(5) 
 
 
24. Imperialism and Nationalism, 1830–1966 
14 
(3) 
18 
(4) 
23 
(7) 
18 
(5) 
25. Modern Japan, 1868–1972 
11 
(3) 
12 
(4) 


11 
(4) 
26. British Economic History since 1870 (PPE
16 
(15) 
12 
(8) 
19  (14) 
-  (12) 
25

2017 
2016
2015 
2014 
27. Nationalism, Politics and Culture in Ireland, c
1870–1921 
 
 
14 
(5) 
 
 
10 
(1) 
28. Comparative History of the First World War 


15 
(1) 
16 
(4) 
14 
(5) 
29. China since 1900 (with old Regs) 
24 
(7) 
23 
(6) 
13 
(2) 
11 
(4) 
 
China in War and Revolution 1890–1949 (old 
       regs) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30. The Soviet Union 1924–1941 
10 
(5) 
14 
(3) 
 
 
 
 
31. Culture, politics & identity in Cold War 
16 
(3) 
19 
(5) 
22 
(4) 
21 
(7) 
      Europe, 1945-68 (A10735W1) (old regs)
      Culture, politics & identity in Cold War 
 
 
      Europe, 1945-68 (New Regs) (A10735X1)
32. Britain at the Movies: Film and National  
      Identity since 1914 (FSEE) 
10 
(1) 
16 
(2) 

(1) 
15 
(1) 
33. Scholastic and Humanist Political thought 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
34. The Science of Society 1650-1800 

(3) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
35. Political Theory and Social Science 
13 
(7) 

(2) 


(3) 
36. Postcolonial Historiography: Writing the 
 
 
 
 

(4) 
(Indian) Nation ) (A13763S1) 
Special Subjects
1.  St Augustine & the last days of Rome, 370-430 

(2) 


6
(1) 
10
(1) 
2.  Francia in the Age of Clovis and Gregory of 
 
 
 
 
 
6

Tours 
3.  Byzantium in the Age of Constantine 
Porphyrogenitus 

(1) 

(1) 
10
(1) 
10
(1) 
4.  The Norman Conquest of England 

(1) 
10 

10
(1) 
9

5.  The Peasants’ Revolt of 1381 (new title) 
 
 
     England in Crisis, 1374-88 
 
 
 
10

6.  Joan of Arc & her Age, 1419-1435 
10 



7
(1) 
8
(1) 
7.   Painting & Culture in Ming China 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8. Politics, Art & Culture in the Italian 
 
 
20 
(3) 
19
(3) 
8
(1) 
Renaissance, Venice & Florence c.1475-1525 
9. Luther & the German Reformation 
12 



7

10

10. Government, Politics and Society in England, 
 
 
 
 
8
(1) 
10
(2) 
1547– 1558 
11. The Crisis of the Reformation: Britain, France 
 
 
10 
(2) 
7

& the Netherlands 1560-1610 
12. The Thirty Years Wars (new) 
12 
(1) 
13. Scientific Movement in the Seventeenth 
13 
(2) 


15
(2) 
15
(1) 
Century (A10752W1)
13. Scientific Movement in the Seventeenth 
 
 
Century (A10752X1) 
26

2017 
2016
2015 
2014 
 
 
15
16
14. Revolution & Republic, 1647-16558 
(10) 

(2) 
(1) 
15. English Architecture, 1660–1720 


12 

18
(3) 
13

16. Debating social change in Britain & Ireland 
 
 
 
 
 
15
(3) 
       1770-1825 
17. Church, State, and English Society, 1829–54 
       (suspended 2016-17




-

-

18. Growing-up in the middle-class family: Britain, 
1830-70 
11 
(1) 
19 
(4) 
-

9
(1) 
19. Slavery and the Crisis of the Union, 1854–
1865 
18 
(1) 
19 
(1) 
13
(1) 
16
(1) 
20.  Art and its Public in France, 1815-67 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21. Race, Religion & Resistance in the United 
     States, from Jim Crow to the Civil Rights 
17 
(2) 
16 
(2) 
10
(2) 
7
(2) 
22. Terror & Forced Labour in Stalin’s Russia 

(1) 
 
 
 
Russian Revolution of 1917 


 
 
5
(1) 
7
(3) 
23. From Gandhi to the Green Revolution: India, 
18 
(2) 
19 
(1) 
16
(1) 
-

Independence & Modernity 1939-69 (A14633W1)
 SS. India, 1919-1939: Contesting the Nation 




 
14
(3) 
 (Old Regs) (A10761W1)
24. Nazi Germany, a racial order , 1933-45 
 
 

(1) 
 
 
25. France from the Popular Front to the 

(1) 
 
 
 
6

Liberation, 1936–44 
26. War and Reconstruction, 1939-45 
 
 
 
 
13
(3) 
15
(1) 
27. Britain from the Bomb to the Beatles, 1945-67 
12 
(2) 
14 
(2) 
8

7

28. The Northern Ireland Troubles 1965–1985 
15 
(4) 
17 

15
(3) 
10
(3) 
29. Britain in the Seventies  

(2) 
19 
(4) 
17

14
(3) 
30. Neoliberalism & Postmodernism: Ideas, 
Politics & Culture in Europe & North America, 
16 

15 
(1) 
13
(1) 
13
(1) 
1970-2000 
31. Revolutions of 1989 
13 
(1) 
12 
(1) 
7
(1) 
7
(1) 
Optional/Additional Theses  
 
 
 
 
 
- (40) 
Princeton assessment (A10773V1) (8999) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Disciplines of History 
244 
(19)  258 
(14)  249 (15)  243 (14) 
Compulsory Thesis (A10771S1) 
270 
(45)  244 
(49)  281 (47)  282 (53) 
Thesis in PPE (A12746S1)  (HPol) 

(11) 

(11) 
-
(8) 
-
(9) 
Thesis  (A11024S1) (Heco) 

(15) 

(8) 
- (13) 
- (11) 
Interd. Dissertation (HENG) (A14401S1) 

(9) 

(9) 
-
(8) 
Representing the City  (A11026S1) (9092) (HENG 
 
 
 
 
 
only) 
27

2017 
2016
2015 
2014 
Postcolonial historiography (A11027S1) (9791) 
(HENG only) 

(6) 
 
 
 
(vi)
Joint Schools - number of candidates taking each paper
AMH 
HECO 
HENG 
HML 
HPOL 
Total 
British History 
1. 
300–1087 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. 
1042–1330 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. 
1330–1550 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. 
1500–1700 





12 
7. 
1685–1830 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6.         1815-1924 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7.         Since 1900 






General History
(i) 
285-476 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(ii) 
476–750 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(iii) 
700–900 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(iv) 
900–1122 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(v) 
1122–1273 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(vi) 
1273–1409 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(vii) 
1409–1525 






(viii)  1517–1618 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(ix) 
1618–1715 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(x) 
1715–1799 






(xi) 
1789–1870 






(xii) 
1856–1914 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(xiii)  1914–1945 






(xiv)  1941–1973 





12 
(xv) 
History of the U.S. 1600–
 
 
 
 
 
 
1812 
(xvi)     History of the U.S. 1776-
 
 
 
 
 
 
1877 
(xvii)   History of the U.S. since 
1863 






(xviii)  Eurasian Empires, 1450-
1800 





20 
28

(xix)  Imperial & Global History 
1750-1914 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AMH 
HECO 
HENG 
HML 
HPOL 
Total 
Further Subjects 
1.  Anglo-Saxon Archaeology of the 
Early Christian period 






2.  The Near East in the Age of 
Justinian and Muhammad 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3.  The Carolingian Renaissance 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4.  The Viking Age: War and Peace 
c.750-1100 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5.  The Crusades, 1095-1291 





17 
6.  Culture and Society in Early 
Renaissance Italy, 1290-1348 






7.  Flanders and Italy in the 
Quattrocento, 1420–1480 






8.  The Wars of the Roses  
 
 
 
 
 
9. Women, Gender & Print Culture in 
Reformation England, c.1530-
 
 
 
 
 
 
1640 
10.  Literature and Politics in Early 
Modern England 






11. Representing the City, 1558-1640 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(A13762S1) 
12. Writing  in the early Modern 
period, 1550-1750 (A15060S1)






(new) 
13. Court, Culture & Art in Early 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Modern Europe, 1580-1700 
14. The Military & Society in Britain 
 
 
 
 
 
 
& France, c.1650-1815 
15. The Metropolitan Crucible, 
London 1685-1815 
 
 
 
 
 
 
16. The First industrial Revolution 
1700-1870 






17. Medicine, Empire & 
      Improvement, 1720 to 1820 






18 The Age of Jefferson 






19. Culture and Society in France 
from Voltaire to Balzac 






20. Nationalism in western Europe 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21. Intellect and Culture in Victorian 
Britain 






22. The Authority of Nature: Race, 
Heredity & Crime 1800-1940 
 
 
 
 
 
 
29

AMH 
HECO 
HENG 
HML 
HPOL 
Total 
23. The Middle East in the Age of 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Empire 
24. Imperialism and Nationalism, 
1830–1966 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25. Modern Japan, 1868–1972 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26.  British Economic History since 

15 



15 
1870 (PPE
27. Nationalism, Politics and Culture 
in Ireland, c. 1870–1921   
 
 
 
 
 
 
28. Comparative History of the First 
      World War 






29. China since 1900 (13392W1)






30. The Soviet Union 1924–1941 
 
 
 
 
 
 
31. Culture, Politics & identity in 
     Cold War Europe, 1945-68  (New 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regs) (A10735X1)
     Culture, Politics & identity in 
     Cold War Europe, 1945-68 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     (Old Regs) (A10735W1)
32. Britain at the Movies: Film and 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     National identity since 1914 
33. Scholastic and Humanist Political 






thought 
34. The Science of Society 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       1650-1800 
35. Political Theory and Social     
      Science 






36. Postcolonial Historiography: 
Writing the (Indian) Nation 






(A13763S1)
AMH 
HECO 
HENG 
HML 
HPOL 
Total 
Special Subjects
1.    St Augustine & the last days of 
Rome, 370-430 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2.  Francia in the Age of Clovis and 






Gregory of   Tours 
3.  Byzantium in the Age of 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Constantine Prophyrogenitus 
4.  Norman Conquest of England 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5.  England in Crisis, 1374-88 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6. Joan of Arc & her Age, 1419- 
    1435 






7. Painting & Culture in Ming China  
 
 
 
 
 
 
30

AMH 
HECO 
HENG 
HML 
HPOL 
Total 
8.   Politics, Art & Culture in the 
Italian Renaissance, Venice and 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Florence c.1475-1525 
9. Luther & the German Reformation






10. Government, Politics and Society 
in England, 1547–1558 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11. The Crisis of the Reformation: 
Britain, France & the 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Netherlands 1560-1610 
12. The Thirty Years’ War (new
 
 
 
 
 
 
13. Scientific Movement in the 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Seventeenth Century (A10735W1)
Scientific Movement in the 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Seventeenth Century (A10735X1)
14. Revolution & Republic, 1647-






1658 (A13773W1) 
15. English Architecture, 1660–1720 






16. Debating social change in Britain 






& Ireland 1770-1825 
17. Church, State, and English 
Society, 1829–54 (suspended 2016-






17)
18. Becoming a Citizen, c. 1860-1902 
(new title
 
 
 
 
 
 
19. Slavery and the Crisis of the 
Union, 1854–1865 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20. Art and its Public in France, 1815-






67 
21. Race, Religion & Resistance in 
      the United States, from Jim Crow 
 
 
 
 
 
 
      to Civil Rights 
22. Terror & Forced Labour in 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Stalin’s Russia  
23. From Gandhi to the Green 
Revolution: India, Independence 
 
 
 
 
 
 
& Modernity 1939-69 (A14633W1) 
24. Nazi Germany, a racial order, 
1933-45 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25. France from the Popular Front to 
the Liberation, 1936–44 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26. War and Reconstruction, 1939-
45 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27. Britain from the Bomb to the 
Beatles, 1945-67 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28. The Northern Ireland Troubles 
1965–1985 
 
 
 
 
 
 
29. Britain in the Seventies  
 
 
 
 
 
 
31

AMH 
HECO 
HENG 
HML 
HPOL 
Total 
30. Neoliberalism & Postmodernism: 
Ideas, Politics & Culture in 






Europe & North America, 1970-
2000 
31. Revolutions of 1989 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bridge essays/Interdisciplinary 
papers/Exams 



15 

15 
Princeton assessment 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Theses (A10771S1)
19 



26 
45 
Opt /BH/GH/FS/SS/Ad. Thesis 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Disciplines of History 
19 




19 
Politics theses                                            - 



11 
11 
HECO theses (A11024S1)                                 -
15 



15 
Interdisciplinary Dissertation (HENG) 





(A14401S1)         
Examiners:     
 
 
 
 
 
 
External Examiners: 
   
 
 
N:\Faculty office\Faculty office\FHS\2017\Examiners’ Report\FHS Examiners’ Report 2017-FINAL.docx 
Updated 4th October 2017
32