Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'ACF Regulations 2016'.


PREFACE 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AC 14233 
 
 
Army Cadet Force (ACF) 
 
 
Regulations 
 
 
 
 
 
 

AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 
 

 
 
ii 
 

link to page 8 link to page 153 link to page 275 link to page 341 Part 0.1  How to use these regulations 
0.1.1.1.1. AC 14233 – ACF Regulations lay down the Army’s Policy for management of the 
ACF.  It is sponsored by the General Officer Commanding Regional Command HQ on 
behalf of the Chief of the General Staff.  It is designed to be used by staff responsible for 
any aspect of the ACF, including Cadet Force Adult Volunteers (CFAV) and any other staff 
who deal with the ACF.  These regulations contain policy and direction on the organisation 
and operation of the ACF and guidance on the processes involved and best practice to 
apply these regulations. 
0.1.1.1.2. These regulations are divided into five sections: 
Section 
Title 

Organisation 

Personnel and administration 

Logistics, finance and medical 

Training and activities 

Security and communications 
0.1.1.2. Coherence with other Defence Authority Policy and Guidance 
0.1.1.2.1. Where applicable, this document contains links to other relevant publications, 
some of which are published by different authorities.  Where particular dependencies exist, 
these other authorities have been consulted in the formulation of the policy and guidance 
detailed in this publication. 
0.1.1.2.2. Any other documents that are referred to in this document and appear in bold 
underlined text 
are hyperlinks and can be found on the internet or the Cadet Force 
Resource Centre
 When a document is only available on the Defence Internal Intranet 
(DII) the hyperlink will not work for most cadet force users and a footnote will show that the 
link is DII only. 
0.1.1.3. Training 
0.1.1.3.1. In addition to the policy and guidance in these regulations CFAVs at all levels 
will receive appropriate training in how to discharge their duties in line with their Role 
Specification. 
0.1.1.4. Further advice and feedback - Contacts 
0.1.1.4.1. The owner of these regulations is Regional Command HQ Cadets Branch, who 
are responsible for ensuring that it is routinely updated.  For further information on any 
aspect of this guide, or questions not answered within the subsequent sections, or to 
provide feedback on the content, contact: 
Job Title/E-Mail 
Phone 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx
94222 7289 
 
01252 78 7289 

AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 1 link to page 3 link to page 4 link to page 9 link to page 15 link to page 23 link to page 25 link to page 27 link to page 29 link to page 33 link to page 35 link to page 37 link to page 41 link to page 43 link to page 45 link to page 49 link to page 51 link to page 55 link to page 57 link to page 63 link to page 65 link to page 67 link to page 71 link to page 73 link to page 73 link to page 75 link to page 77 link to page 79 link to page 81 link to page 83 link to page 85 link to page 87 link to page 89 link to page 91 link to page 91 Part 0.2  Contents 
Preface 
i 
Part 0.1 
How to use these regulations 
i 
Part 0.2 
Contents 
ii 
Part 0.3 
Glossary 
vii 
Part 0.4 
Values and standards 
xiii 
SECTION 1 - Organisation 
1-1 
Part 1.1 
Control and higher level structure 
1-3 
1.1.2 Army Cadet Executive Group (ACEG) 
1-5 
1.1.3 RC Cadet Training Working Group 
1-7 
1.1.4 Safeguarding Management Group 
1-11 
1.1.5 ACF Recruit Marketing Group (ACF RMG) 
1-13 
1.1.6 Cadet Training Centre (CTC) Frimley Park 
1-15 
1.1.7 Cadet Training Teams (CTTs) 
1-19 
1.1.8 The Reserve Forces’ and Cadets’ Associations (RFCA) 
1-21 
1.1.9 The ACFA 
1-23 
1.1.10 The Council for Cadet Rifle Shooting (CCRS) 
1-27 
1.1.11 ACF Shooting Committee 
1-29 
1.1.12 The ACF Association National First Aid Panel 
1-33 
1.1.13 ACF Public Relations 
1-35 
Part 1.2 
Organisation at county level 
1-41 
1.2.2 ACF County Staff 
1-43 
Part 1.3 
Establishments 
1-45 
1.3.2 ACF County establishment scales 
1-49 
Part 1.4 
Role specifications – National level 
1-51 
1.4.1 GOC RC – ACF Responsibilities and tasks 
1-51 
1.4.2 Representative Cadet Commandant 
1-53 
1.4.3 National DofE Award advisor 
1-55 
1.4.4 ACFA UK Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Development Manager 
1-57 
1.4.5 Chairman Cadet Force Shooting Committee 
1-59 
1.4.6 ACF National Chief Coach 
1-61 
1.4.7 ACF Chief Range Officer (CRO) 
1-63 
1.4.8 Army Cadet AT Adviser 
1-65 
1.4.9 National Navigation Officer 
1-67 
Part 1.5 
Role specifications – Brigade level 
1-69 
1.5.1 Brigade Commanders – ACF Responsibilities 
1-69 
ii 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 93 link to page 95 link to page 97 link to page 99 link to page 101 link to page 103 link to page 103 link to page 105 link to page 107 link to page 109 link to page 111 link to page 113 link to page 115 link to page 117 link to page 119 link to page 121 link to page 123 link to page 125 link to page 127 link to page 129 link to page 131 link to page 131 link to page 135 link to page 137 link to page 139 link to page 141 link to page 143 link to page 143 link to page 145 link to page 147 link to page 149 link to page 151 link to page 151 link to page 153 link to page 155 link to page 157 link to page 162 link to page 166 1.5.2 Brigade Shooting Officer 
1-71 
1.5.3 Brigade First Aid Training Adviser (Brigade FAA) 
1-73 
1.5.4 Regional Navigation Officer 
1-75 
1.5.5 Brigade DofE Award Advisor 
1-77 
Part 1.6 
Role specifications – Professional Support Staff 
1-79 
Part 1.7 
Role specifications – Volunteers (County level) 
1-81 
1.7.1 Cadet Commandant 
1-81 
1.7.2 Deputy Cadet Commandant 
1-83 
1.7.3 County Training Officer (CTO) 
1-85 
1.7.4 Assistant County Training Officer (ACTO) 
1-87 
1.7.5 Senior Chaplain 
1-89 
1.7.6 Regimental Sergeant Major Instructor (RSMI) 
1-91 
1.7.7 County AT Officer (CATO) 
1-93 
1.7.8 County Navigation Officer 
1-95 
1.7.9 County Shooting Officer 
1-97 
1.7.10 County Public Relations Officer 
1-99 
1.7.11 County First Aid Training Officer (CFATO) 
1-101 
1.7.12 County Sports Officer 
1-103 
1.7.13 County Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Officer 
1-105 
1.7.14 County CVQO Officer 
1-107 
Part 1.8 
Role specifications – Volunteers (Area level) 
1-109 
1.8.1 Area Commander 
1-109 
1.8.2 Area Staff Officer 
1-113 
1.8.3 Area Training Officer 
1-115 
1.8.4 Area Sergeant Major 
1-117 
1.8.5 Area First Aid Training Adviser (AFATA) 
1-119 
Part 1.9 
Role specifications – Volunteers (Detachment level) 
1-121 
1.9.1 Detachment Commander 
1-121 
1.9.2 Detachment Instructor 
1-123 
1.9.3 Detachment DofE Award leader 
1-125 
Part 1.10 
Sponsorship and affiliation 
1-127 
Part 1.11 
The Youth Service and other Cadet organisations 
1-129 
1.11.1 The Youth Service 
1-129 
1.11.2 Other Organisations 
1-131 
SECTION 2 - Personnel and administration 
2-1 
Part 2.1 
Safeguarding 
2-3 
2.1.2 Safeguarding: What you must do in the case of a safeguarding incident or concern 
2-8 
2.1.3 Safeguarding: Cadet Activities 
2-12 
iii 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 171 link to page 173 link to page 175 link to page 178 link to page 178 link to page 180 link to page 182 link to page 184 link to page 191 link to page 197 link to page 201 link to page 203 link to page 203 link to page 207 link to page 211 link to page 213 link to page 214 link to page 216 link to page 220 link to page 228 link to page 230 link to page 232 link to page 234 link to page 238 link to page 238 link to page 238 link to page 242 link to page 242 link to page 244 link to page 246 link to page 250 link to page 252 link to page 254 link to page 257 link to page 259 link to page 261 link to page 263 link to page 265 link to page 269 2.1.4 Safeguarding: Support for cadets and CFAVs 
2-17 
2.1.5 Cadet Discipline and Personal Conduct 
2-19 
2.1.6 Adult Discipline and Personal Conduct 
2-21 
Part 2.2 
Officers 
2-24 
2.2.1 General 
2-24 
2.2.2 Dual Appointments 
2-26 
2.2.3 Eligibility 
2-28 
2.2.4 Selection, appointment, tenure and training 
2-30 
2.2.5 ACF Officer Commissioning Procedures 
2-37 
2.2.6 Rank 
2-43 
2.2.7 Honorary Appointments 
2-47 
2.2.8 Transfer, reversion, resignation, retirement, relinquishment, termination, authorised 
absence and death 

2-49 
2.2.9 Appointment of Cadet Commandants and Deputy Cadet Commandants 
2-53 
Part 2.3 
Adult Instructors and Civilian Assistants 
2-57 
2.3.2 Dual Appointments 
2-59 
2.3.3 Adult Instructor application and enrolment process 
2-60 
2.3.4 The Adult Volunteer Agreement 
2-62 
2.3.5 Management of AIs 
2-66 
2.3.6 Termination of appointment for misconduct, indiscipline or inefficiency 
2-74 
2.3.7 Disciplinary procedures for ACF Adult Instructors – Handling 
2-76 
2.3.8 Allegations of misconduct - Preliminary Assessment 
2-78 
2.3.9 Handling procedures for allegations of misconduct of a criminal nature 
2-80 
2.3.10 Handling procedures for allegations of misconduct justifying termination of service 
without notice under common law and/or allegations of conduct contrary to the Army’s Values 
and Standards of discipline or efficiency 

2-84 
2.3.11 Handling procedures for allegations of misconduct giving rise to concerns that a minor 
may be at risk 

2-88 
2.3.12 Grievances 
2-90 
Part 2.4 
Cadets 
2-92 
2.4.2 Senior Cadet Appointments 
2-96 
2.4.3 The ACF Cadet Enrolment Ceremony 
2-98 
Part 2.5 
Honours and Awards 
2-100 
Part 2.6 
Remuneration of CFAVs 
2-103 
2.6.2 Limits on remuneration 
2-105 
2.6.3 Eligibility for remuneration 
2-107 
2.6.4 Accounting for remuneration 
2-109 
2.6.5 Allocation of remuneration 
2-111 
Part 2.7 
Medical 
2-115 
iv 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 269 link to page 271 link to page 273 link to page 275 link to page 277 link to page 281 link to page 283 link to page 289 link to page 293 link to page 293 link to page 297 link to page 301 link to page 305 link to page 309 link to page 311 link to page 313 link to page 313 link to page 315 link to page 317 link to page 319 link to page 323 link to page 331 link to page 341 link to page 349 link to page 353 link to page 355 link to page 357 link to page 363 link to page 365 link to page 367 link to page 367 link to page 367 link to page 369 link to page 373 link to page 375 link to page 377 link to page 381 link to page 383 2.7.2 CFAVs 
2-115 
2.7.3 Cadets 
2-117 
2.7.4 Pregnancy and maternity 
2-119 
SECTION 3 - Logistics, finance and medical 
3-1 
Part 3.1 
General 
3-3 
Part 3.2 
Dress 
3-7 
Part 3.3 
Equipment 
3-9 
Part 3.4 
Arms and Ammunition 
3-15 
Part 3.5 
Messing 
3-19 
3.5.2 A guide to messing procedures with particular reference to annual camp 
3-19 
Part 3.6 
Medical 
3-23 
Part 3.7 
Transport and travel 
3-27 
3.7.2 Vehicles for ACF use 
3-31 
3.7.3 Travel by road 
3-35 
3.7.4 Travel by air, rail and sea 
3-37 
Part 3.8 
Finances 
3-39 
3.8.1 The Cadet Resource Allocation Calculator 
3-39 
3.8.2 Annual grants 
3-41 
3.8.3 Non-public funds 
3-43 
3.8.4 Travel allowances 
3-45 
3.8.5 Indemnification, compensation and insurance for the ACF 
3-49 
Part 3.9 
Accommodation 
3-57 
Part 3.10 
Annual Camp 
3-67 
3.10.2 A guide for reconnaissance parties for annual camps 
3-75 
SECTION 4 - Training and activities 
4-1 
Part 4.1 
General 
4-3 
Part 4.2 
Training Safety 
4-5 
Part 4.3 
Training obligations of ACF adults 
4-11 
4.3.2 Induction training 
4-13 
4.3.3 Promotion Training 
4-15 
4.3.4 Qualifications required for training 
4-15 
4.3.5 Refresher training 
4-15 
Part 4.4 
Training of Cadets 
4-17 
4.4.2 Administration 
4-21 
4.4.3 Tests 
4-23 
4.4.4 Testing boards 
4-25 
Part 4.5 
Training assistance 
4-29 
Part 4.6 
Training Locations 
4-31 

AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 387 link to page 387 link to page 389 link to page 391 link to page 393 link to page 395 link to page 397 link to page 399 link to page 401 link to page 403 link to page 405 link to page 407 link to page 412 link to page 413 link to page 415 link to page 419 link to page 421 link to page 424 link to page 426 link to page 427 link to page 429 link to page 435 Part 4.7 
APC Subjects 
4-35 
4.7.1 Drill, Turnout and Military Knowledge 
4-35 
4.7.2 Skill at Arms and Shooting 
4-37 
4.7.3 Navigation 
4-39 
4.7.4 Fieldcraft and Tactics 
4-41 
4.7.5 First Aid 
4-43 
4.7.6 Expedition Training 
4-45 
4.7.7 Physical Recreation 
4-47 
4.7.8 The Cadet and the Community 
4-49 
4.7.9 Music 
4-51 
4.7.10 Signals 
4-53 
Part 4.8 
The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award 
4-55 
4.8.2 Points of contact between the APC syllabus and the DofE 
4-60 
Part 4.9 
AT and Challenge Pursuits 
4-61 
Part 4.10 
Activity Planning and Conducting Aide Memoire 
4-63 
SECTION 5 - Security and communications 
5-1 
Part 5.1 
Security 
5-3 
5.1.2 Control of administrative documents 
5-6 
5.1.3 Identity cards – Administration Instructions 
5-8 
5.1.4 Public Military Events (PMEs) 
5-9 
Part 5.2 
Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Acceptable Use Policy  5-11 
5.2.2 The use of Westminster for administration and activities 
5-17 
  
 
vi 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 63 link to page 63 link to page 63 Part 0.3  Glossary 
Term 
Definition 
2Lt 
Second Lieutenant 
A&E 
Accident and Emergency 
ABN 
Army Briefing Note 
AC 
Army Code 
ACDS 
Assistant Chief of the Defence Staff 
ACEG 
Army Cadet Executive Group 
ACF 
Army Cadet Force 
ACFA 
Army Cadet Force Association 
ACG 
Assistant Chaplain General 
ACI 
Assistant Chief Instructor 
ACOS 
Assistant Chief of Staff 
ACTO 
Assistant County Training Officer 
AED 
Automatic Electronic Defibrillator 
AF 
Army Form 
AFATA 
Area First Aid Training Advisor 
AFCC 
Armed Forces Chaplaincy Centre 
AFPAA 
Armed Forces Personnel Administration Agency 
AG 
Adjutant General 
AGAI 
Army General Administrative Instruction 
AI 
Adult Instructor 
AIC 
Advanced Induction Course 
AINC 
Army Incident Notification Cell 
ALARP 
As Low as Reasonably Practicable 
ALM 
Adult Leadership and Management 
AMP 
Additional Maternity pay 
AO 
Administration Officer 
AOSB 
Army Officer Selection Board 
APC 
Army Proficiency Certificate 
Area 
on page 1-41 
ASpec 
Assessment Specification 
ATC 
Air Training Corps 
AUO 
Adult Under Officer 
AWS 
Army Welfare Service 
BCU 
British Canoeing Union 
BCWO 
Brigade Catering Warrant Officer 
BEL 
Basic Expedition Leader 
Basic First Aid 
BFA 
Blank Firing Attachment 
BIC 
Basic Induction Course 
BOF 
British Orienteering Federation 
BOWO 
Brigade Ordnance Warrant Officer 
BPSS 
Baseline Personnel Security Standard 
A Regular Army Grouping made up of numerous units including the 
Brigade 
ACF Counties in the region.  In these regulations the term “Brigade” 
will also be taken to mean London District 
BSA 
Birmingham Small Arms 
A “Pearson” Brand (formerly acronym for Business and Technology 
BTEC 
Educational Council) 
C&G 
City and Guilds 
CA 
Civilian Assistant 
CAA 
Cadet Administrative Assistant 
Capt 
Captain 
CasAid 
Casualty Aid 
Category (O) 
on page 1-41 
Category (R) 
on page 1-41 
vii 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 63 link to page 63 Term 
Definition 
CBR 
Chemical, Biological or Radioactive 
CCAT 
Cadet Centre for AT 
CCF 
Combined Cadet Force 
CCFA 
Combined Cadet Force Association 
CCRS 
Council for Cadet Rifle Shooting 
Cdt 
Cadet 
CE 
Chief Executive 
CEO 
Cadet Executive Officer 
CES 
Complete Equipment Schedule 
CF STT 
Cadet Force Signals Training Team 
CF3 
Chaplain to the Forces Class 3 (Major equivalent) 
CF4 
Chaplain to the Forces Class 4 (Captain equivalent) 
CFATO 
County First Aid Training Officer 
CFAV 
Cadet Force Adult Volunteer 
CFCB 
Cadet Force’s Commissions Board 
CFRC 
Cadet Force Resource Centre 
CI 
Chief Instructor 
CILOR 
Cash In Lieu of Rations 
CIO 
Charitable Incorporated Organisation 
CISSAM 
Cadet Inter-Service Skill at Arms Meeting 
CLCP 
Common Law Claims and Policy 
CLF 
Commander Land Forces 
CO 
Commanding Officer 
Col 
Colonel 
Comdt 
Commandant 
COMPUSEC 
Computer Security 
COS 
Chief of Staff 
County 
on page 1-41 
CP 
Challenge Pursuits 
CPC 
Central Processing Cell 
CPD 
Continuous Professional Development 
CQM 
Cadet Quarter Master 
CRAC 
Cadet Resource Allocation Calculator 
CRB 
Criminal Records Bureau 
CRC 
Cadet Resource Calculator 
CRFCA 
Council of Reserve Forces and Cadets Associations 
CRO 
Chief Range Officer 
CSA 
Cadet Stores Assistant 
CSO 
Cadet Staff Officer 
CTC 
Cadet Training Centre 
CTLLS 
Certificate to Teach in the Life Long Learning Sector 
CTO 
County Training Officer 
CTSP 
Cadet Training Safety Precautions 
CTT 
Cadet Training Team 
Name of Vocational Qualifications charity specialising in rewarding 
CVQO 
Cadet achievements (previously an acronym for Cadet Vocational 
Qualifications Office) 
DACG 
Deputy Assistant Chaplain General 
DAIB 
Defence Accident Investigation Branch 
DBA 
Defence Bills Agency 
DBS 
Disclosure and Barring Service 
DC 
Detachment Commander 
DComdt 
Deputy Commandant 
DCY 
Director Cadets and Youth 
DDC 
Directorate of Defence Communications 
DDH 
Delivery Duty Holder 
Detachment 
1.2.1.2.1.c 
DfE 
Department for Education 
DFOT 
Director of Finance, Operations and Training 
viii 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

Term 
Definition 
DFRMO 
Defence Fire Risk Management Organisation 
DIN 
Defence Internal Notice 
DJEP 
Directorate of Judicial Engagement Policy 
DLE 
Defence Learning Environment 
DLO 
Defence Logistics Organisation 
DM(A) 
Defence Manning (Army) 
DofE 
Duke of Edinburgh 
DRSA 
Daily Rate of Subsistence Allowance 
DSAT 
Defence System’s Approach to Training 
DSCIS 
Defence School of Communications and Information Systems 
DSCO 
Designated Safeguarding of Children Officer 
DSIC 
Defence Signals Innovation Centre 
DVLA 
Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency 
DWP 
Department for Work and Pensions 
EAM 
Exercise Aide Memoire 
EASP 
Exercise Action and Safety Plan 
EBIS 
Electronic Booking Interface System 
ECO 
Exercise Conducting Officer 
EFAW 
Emergency First Aid at Work 
EHIC 
European Health Insurance Card 
ERNIC 
Earnings Related National Insurance Contribution 
ES 
Equipment Support 
F&A 
Familiarisation and Assessment 
FAA 
First Aid Advisor 
FAW 
First Aid at Work 
FMR 
Forward Maintenance Register 
FRAGO 
Fragmentary Order 
FTRS 
Full Time Reserve Service 
Ground Staff Sections 1-9: 
1.  Personnel and administration. 
2.  Security and operational intelligence. 
3.  Operations. 
4.  Logistics and medical. 
G1-91 
5.  Future plans 
6.  Communications and information Systems. 
7.  Training and doctrine. 
8.  Finance and contracts. 
9.  Civil interaction. 
GCWO 
Garrison Catering Warrant Officer 
GN 
Guidance Notes 
GOC 
General Officer Commanding 
GP 
General Purpose 
H&ML 
Hill and Mountain Leader 
HC 
Home Command 
HDT 
Home to Duty Travel 
HQ 
Headquarters 
HRG 
Hogg Robinson Group 
HSE 
Health and Safety Executive 
HSW 
Health and Safety at Work 
iaw 
In accordance with 
ICT 
Information and Communications Technology 
IIC 
Intermediate Induction Course 
ILM 
Institute of Leadership and Management 
Int 
Intelligence 
IPT 
Integrated Project Team 
ISCRM 
Inter-Service Cadet Rifle Meeting 
                                                
1 J = Joint, N = Naval, A = Air 
ix 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

Term 
Definition 
ISpec 
Instructional Specification 
JCCC 
Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre 
JCIC 
Junior Cadet instructor’s Cadre 
JPA 
Joint Personnel Administration 
JSAT 
Joint Services AT 
JSMEL 
Joint Service Mountain Expedition Leader 
JSMLS 
Joint Service Mountain Leader Summer 
JSP 
Joint Service Publication 
LADO 
Local Authority Designated Officer 
LANDSO 
Land Standing Order 
LEA 
Local Educational Authority 
LFSO 
Land Forces Standing Order 
LGV 
Large Goods Vehicle 
LR 
Long Range 
LSW 
Light Support Weapon 
Lt 
Lieutenant 
Lt Col 
Lieutenant Colonel 
Maj 
Major 
MIS 
Management Information System 
ML 
Mountain Leader 
MLT 
Mountain Leader Training 
MMA 
Motor Mileage Allowance 
MOD 
Ministry of Defence 
MOU 
Memorandum of Understanding 
MS 
Military Secretariat 
MSSC 
Marine Society and Sea Cadets 
 MTF 
Modular Training Foundation 
MTP 
Multi Terrain Pattern 
NAL 
Nationally Appointed List 
NCO 
Non Commissioned Officer 
NCVYS 
National Council for Voluntary Youth Services 
NGB 
National Governing Body 
NHS 
National Health Service 
NMC 
Nursing and Midwifery Council 
NNA 
National Navigation Advisor 
NNAS 
National Navigation Award Scheme 
NNO 
National Navigation Officer 
NOA 
National Operating Authority 
NoK 
Next of Kin 
NRA 
National Rifle Association 
NSRA 
National Small-bore Rifle Association 
NVQ 
National Vocational Qualification 
OC 
Officer Commanding 
ODH 
Operating Duty Holder 
ODR 
Ordinary Daily Rate 
OIC 
Officer in Charge 
OML 
Ordinary Maternity leave 
ORP 
Operational Ration Pack 
PCR 
Private Car Rate 
PCSPS 
Principal Civil Service Pension Scheme 
PCV 
Passenger Carrying Vehicle 
PGD 
Patient Group Direction 
PI 
Probationary Instructor 
PLCE 
Personal Load Carrying Equipment 
PME 
Public Military Event 
PMP 
Planned Maintenance Programme 
PR 
Public Relations 
PRO 
Public Relations Officer 
PRU 
Public Relations Unit 

AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

Term 
Definition 
PSS 
Professional Support Staff 
PSV 
Public Service Vehicle 
PTI 
Physical Training Instructor 
PTLLS 
Preparing to Teach in the Life Long Learning Sector 
Physical capacity, Upper limbs, Locomotion, Hearing, Eyesight, 
PULHHEEMS 
Mental capacity and Emotional stability 
PVG 
Protecting Vulnerable Groups 
QCBC 
Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct 
QGM 
Queen’s Gallantry Medal 
RAChD 
Royal Army Chaplain’s Department 
RAF 
Royal Air Force 
RAL 
Regionally Appointed List 
RAM 
Range Aide Memoire 
RAMC 
Royal Army Medical Corps 
RARO 
Regular Army Reserve of Officers 
RAuxAF 
Royal Auxiliary Air Force 
RC 
Regional Command 
RCC 
Representative Cadet Commandant 
RCO 
Range Conducting Officer 
RF&C 
Reserve Forces and Cadets 
RFA 
Reserve Forces Act 
RFCA 
Reserve Forces and Cadets Associations 
RG 
Recruiting Group 
Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences 
RIDDOR 
Regulations 
RLC 
Royal Logistics Corps 
RM 
Royal Marines 
RMG 
Recruit Marketing Group 
RMR 
Royal Marine Reserves 
RN 
Royal Navy 
RNR 
Royal Naval Reserve 
RPOC 
Regional Point of Command 
RSMI 
Regimental Sergeant Major Instructor 
RtL 
Risk to Life 
S³ 
Safe and Suitable for Service 
SAA 
Skill at Arms 
SAS 
Special Air Service 
SASC 
Small Arms School Corps 
SCC 
Sea Cadet Corps 
SCIC 
Senior Cadet Instructor’s Cadre 
SCOTVEC 
Scottish Vocational Educational Council 
SFM 
Soft Facilities Management 
SHE 
Safety, Health and Environment 
SI 
Sergeant Instructor 
SME 
Subject Matter Expert 
SMI 
Sergeant Major Instructor 
SMP 
Statutory Maternity Pay 
SNCO 
Senior Non Commissioned Officer 
SO 
Staff Officer 
SPIO 
Senior Press Information Officer 
SPS 
Staff and Personnel Service 
sS 
Single Service 
SS3 
Stores Systems 3 
SSI 
Staff Sergeant Instructor 
Sy 
Security 
T&S 
Travel and Subsistence 
TAG 
Tactical Advisory Group 
TCV 
Troop Carrying Vehicle 
TDA 
Training Development Advisor 
xi 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

Term 
Definition 
TDT 
Training Development Team 
TRA 
Training Requirements Authority 
TRHA 
Tri-Service Recruit Harmonisation Application 
TS 
Training Safety 
TSA 
Training Safety Advisor 
TSP 
Travel Service Provider 
UIN 
Unit Identity Number 
UKCC 
United Kingdom Coaching Certificate 
USO 
Unit Security Officer 
VA 
Volunteer Allowance 
VQ 
Vocational Qualification 
Westminster 
The Cadet Force Management Information System 
WG 
Working Group 
WGL 
Walking Group Leader 
WHT 
Weapon Handling Test 
WO 
Warrant Officer 
 
 
xii 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

Part 0.4  Values and standards 
0.4.1.1. Introduction 
0.4.1.1.1. In line with its Charter as a national voluntary youth organisation sponsored by 
the Ministry of Defence (MOD), the ACF upholds values and standards that are based on 
those of the Army.  The British Army has an excellent reputation for its high standards of 
professionalism, behaviour and self-discipline resulting from its clear values and 
standards.  Both the Army and the ACF depend on its members to work together as a 
team.  This comes from high quality training, leadership and trust.  Such trust can only 
exist on the basis of shared values, the maintenance of high standards, and the personal 
commitment of every individual to the task, the team and the organisation. 
0.4.1.1.2. Every adult, whether volunteer or PSS, by joining the ACF, has a duty to 
develop such trust and to uphold the values and standards described below. 
0.4.1.2. Charter of the ACF 
0.4.1.2.1. The ACF is a national voluntary youth organisation.  It is sponsored by the Army 
and provides challenging military, adventurous and community activities.  Its aim is to 
inspire young people to achieve success in life with a spirit of service to the Queen, their 
country and their local community, and to develop in them the qualities of good citizens.  
This is achieved by:  
a. 
Providing progressive Cadet training, often of a challenging and exciting nature, 
to foster confidence, self-reliance, initiative, loyalty and a sense of service to other 
people.   
b. 
Encouraging the development of personal powers of practical leadership and 
the ability to work successfully as a member of a team.   
c. 
Stimulating an interest in the Army, its achievements, skills and values.   
d. 
Advising and preparing those considering a career in the Services or with the 
Reserve Forces. 
0.4.1.3. Motto of the ACF 
0.4.1.3.1. The motto of the ACF is “To Inspire to Achieve”. 
0.4.1.4. Values 
0.4.1.4.1. Courage.  Occasionally adult volunteers may be faced with a situation where 
they are required to show physical courage, for example on a demanding senior fieldcraft 
exercise, in adverse weather conditions on an expedition, or when faced with threatening 
behaviour.  More often, adult volunteers and members of the PSS will be required to 
demonstrate moral courage - the courage to always do what is right.  Having both physical 
and moral courage means: 
a. 
Remaining calm and collected under all circumstances. 
xiii 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

b. 
Remaining in control when faced with physical danger. 
c. 
Facing up to difficult issues. 
d. 
Asking for help when needed. 
e. 
Facing one’s own fears. 
f. 
Admitting one’s own weaknesses and mistakes. 
0.4.1.4.2. Discipline.  To be effective, the ACF must be disciplined.  Young people 
generally value having boundaries in their lives and respond well to the structured and 
disciplined environment that the ACF provides.  Self-discipline is also very important and 
through this adult volunteers and members of the PSS will earn the trust and respect of the 
chain of command, their fellow ACF adults and their cadets.  Good discipline is maintained 
by: 
a. 
Setting and maintaining high standards.   
b. 
Completing tasks that individuals have taken on, agreed or offered to 
undertake. 
c. 
Exercising self-control. 
d. 
Ensuring that the rules of good behaviour, as defined in these regulations and 
other policy documents, are maintained in all ACF activities. 
e. 
Dealing with disciplinary matters in a timely and effective manner and in 
accordance with the rules of the ACF. 
0.4.1.4.3. Respect for others.  CFAVs and members of the PSS in the ACF have 
responsibility for leading, supervising, training and administering young people.  It is 
particularly important that they show the greatest respect, tolerance and compassion for 
cadets and other adults because comradeship, leadership, teamwork and trust all depend 
upon it.  Showing respect for others means: 
a. 
Always behaving courteously and with good manners. 
b. 
Treating everyone fairly and equally and ensuring that everyone has the same 
opportunities. 
c. 
Recognising, respecting and allowing for the diverse nature of individuals 
regardless of ability, race, religion, sex or sexual orientation. 
d. 
Showing consideration, tolerance and, when required, compassion to others. 
e. 
Ensuring that cadets and other adults always show respect to each other. 
f. 
Dealing with incidents of disrespect. 
g. 
Being respectful of others’ personal situations and sensibilities. 
h. 
Maintaining high standards of decency at all times and under all conditions. 
xiv 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

i. 
Respecting the rights of others. 
j. 
Showing neither prejudice nor favouritism.   
0.4.1.4.4. Integrity.  Integrity involves being honest, sincere and reliable.  It is an essential 
requirement of both leadership and comradeship.  Unless adult volunteers and members 
of the PSS maintain their integrity, neither their fellow adults nor their cadets will trust them 
and teamwork will suffer.  Integrity will sometimes require them to show moral courage 
because their decisions may not always be popular, but will always earn them respect.  
Having integrity means: 
a. 
Being open, honest and truthful. 
b. 
Acting with sincerity. 
c. 
Demonstrating clear moral and ethical principles. 
d. 
Acting with honour and decency. 
e. 
Accepting responsibility and being accountable for individual actions. 
0.4.1.4.5. Loyalty.  The ACF relies on the commitment and support of its adult volunteers 
and PSS.  This includes being loyal to the detachment, area, county and ACF.  It also 
demands loyalty to those in command, to fellow ACF adults and to cadets.  Being loyal 
means: 
a. 
Acting with discretion. 
b. 
Never spreading rumours, gossip or speaking ill of others. 
c. 
Discussing sensitive issues only with those who need to know.   
d. 
Discouraging others from gossiping or spreading irrelevant or inconsequential 
details. 
e. 
Supporting their cadets, subordinates, peers and the chain of command. 
f. 
Not letting others down. 
g. 
Not rebuking others, or criticising anyone or raising sensitive personal issues in 
public.   
0.4.1.4.6. Selfless commitment.  All adult volunteers and members of the PSS in the 
ACF must always: 
a. 
Put the needs of others before their own. 
b. 
Have the best interests of their cadets in mind. 
c. 
Attend regularly and, if they are unable to attend give timely notice and make 
alternative arrangements. 
d. 
Complete tasks to the standard expected without being reminded. 
e. 
Provide selfless support to others. 
xv 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

0.4.1.5. Standards 
0.4.1.5.1. Adherence to the law.  All members of the ACF, CFAVs and cadets, are 
subject to the civil law and have a duty to uphold it just like all other citizens.  The rule of 
law is the bedrock of any civilised society and it is the law which controls our behaviour 
and establishes the baseline for every citizen’s standard of personal conduct.  Moreover, 
cadets, as children, are protected under the law by various Acts of Parliament.  Officers in 
the ACF are also subject to Service Law when on duty and subject to the Army’s Values 
and Standards and Administrative Action at all times whether on duty with the ACF or not.  
Adherence to the law is incontrovertible but in the ACF it also means: 
a. 
Not only upholding the law but expecting others to do the same.  This may 
require intervening, if necessary and appropriate, to prevent anything illegal or 
unlawful taking place during ACF activities and reporting anything which has already 
taken place, This may include, for example, anything involving: 
(1)  Drugs. 
(2)  Drink driving. 
(3)  Discrimination. 
(4)  Harassment. 
(5)  Physical harm. 
(6)  Criminal violence. 
(7)  Theft (including others’ belongings and cadet funds). 
b. 
Ensuring that everyone is able to carry out their activities in an environment free 
from unlawful harassment, discrimination or intimidation. 
c. 
Not tolerating any behaviour that results in anyone, especially cadets, being 
unlawfully treated. 
0.4.1.5.2. Appropriate behaviour.  The ACF will not tolerate any behaviour which 
damages the trust and respect between ACF adult volunteers, members of the PSS and/or 
cadets.  Guidance on the cadet/adult relationship is given in AC 72008 Cadet Training 
Safety Precautions
 
known as the ‘red book’.  Unacceptable and inappropriate behaviour 
includes: 
a. 
Bullying or any behaviour that could harm others. 
b. 
Behaving inappropriately towards cadets or other adults. 
c. 
Failing to protect others from inappropriate behaviour. 
d. 
Conduct that offends others. 
e. 
Dishonesty and deceit. 
f. 
Social misconduct such as inappropriate behaviour at social events (eg 
humiliating, threatening or offensive behaviour or unwanted sexual advances) or 
xvi 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

undermining trust by having an intimate relationship with the spouse or partner of 
another ACF member. 
g. 
Intimate relationships between CFAVs and cadets regardless of age. 
h. 
Displays of intimacy between CFAVs while on ACF duty. 
i. 
Displays of intimacy between cadets while on ACF activities. 
j. 
CFAVs smoking in front of cadets. 
k. 
Cadets smoking. 
l. 
Swearing or using offensive language. 
0.4.1.5.3. Professionalism.  The ACF expects all adult volunteers and members of the 
PSS to act in a professional manner at all times.  This means: 
a. 
Avoiding any activity which undermines their professional ability and reputation, 
or puts others at risk, including alcohol abuse and drug abuse. 
b. 
Consuming any alcohol when on duty with cadets or consuming excessive 
amounts of alcohol when involved in any ACF activity. 
c. 
Maintaining, promoting and ensuring appropriate behaviour between CFAVs 
and cadets. 
d. 
Ensuring that all their own personal relationships are appropriate. 
e. 
Never abusing their authority. 
0.4.1.6. Duty of care 
0.4.1.6.1. All adult volunteers and members of the PSS in the ACF are in a position of 
authority, at some level, and have a duty of care towards their subordinates and cadets, 
looking after their best interests, and ensuring that they fully understand what is expected 
of them.  Duty of care also means: 
0.4.1.6.2. Protecting CFAVs and cadets from harm. 
0.4.1.6.3. Dealing with all duty of care and safeguarding issues promptly, appropriately 
and effectively. 
0.4.1.6.4. Following the guidance contained in Cadet Training Safety Precautions (the 
‘red book’). 
0.4.1.7. The service test 
0.4.1.7.1. Ultimately, the conduct and behaviour of every adult volunteer and member of 
the PSS in the ACF must be measured against the following test: 
xvii 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

Have the actions or behaviour of an individual adversely impacted or are they 
likely to impact on the efficiency or effectiveness2 of the ACF or the Army as a 
whole? 
0.4.1.8. Conclusion 
0.4.1.8.1. The values and standards described above should be understood and embraced 
by all members of the ACF and explained to those wishing to join the organisation.  By 
selflessly dedicating themselves to their cadets and by fulfilling their ACF duty adult 
volunteers and members of the PSS already show a commitment to the youth of this 
country that exceeds that of many others in the population.   
0.4.1.8.2. All adults joining the ACF are required to commit themselves to achieving and 
maintaining these values and standards. 
0.4.1.8.3. This commitment is necessary to underpin the ethos of the ACF, and it 
contributes directly to the maintenance of its effectiveness as a national voluntary youth 
organisation. 
0.4.1.8.4. It is therefore the duty of adult volunteers and PSS at all levels to ensure that 
these values and standards are accorded high priority, are fully explained to those joining 
the organisation, and are applied consistently 
 
 
                                                
2 Effectiveness is the ability of the ACF to function as a cohesive force and fulfil its charter."   
xviii 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
xix 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 


 
 
SECTION 1 - ORGANISATION 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1-1 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-2 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 1.1  Control and higher level 
structure 

1.1.1.1. General 
1.1.1.1.1. Control of the ACF as a voluntary youth organisation is effected in the main by 
the following whose functions and responsibilities to the ACF are interdependent: 
a. 
The Ministry of Defence (MOD) and the UK military chain of command. 
b. 
The RFCAs and Council of RFCAs. 
c. 
The ACFA. 
1.1.1.1.2. The general responsibilities of these organisations are set out in this section and 
the detailed division of responsibilities is promulgated by RC HQ Cadets Branch annually. 
1.1.1.2. ACF Control, management and support responsibility matrix 
1.1.1.2.1. This matrix is reviewed annually and can be found on the Cadet Forces 
Resource Centre
.
 
1.1.1.3. Cadet Reporter 
1.1.1.3.1. Statistical information on the strength, training output and achievements of ACF 
Counties, together with reports by Cadet Commandants and Brigade Commanders, are 
collected by Westminster and are displayed in a report known as the Cadet Reporter. 
1.1.1.4. Relationship with the Armed Forces 
1.1.1.4.1. The ACF is neither part of the Regular Army nor the Army Reserve and its 
members are not liable for any form of military service as a result of their membership, nor 
does membership of the ACF carry any obligation for cadets to join the Armed Forces.  
Nevertheless, the ACF is closely linked to the Army and is organised on military lines and 
mirrors the Army’s Values and Standards. 
1.1.1.5. Ministry of Defence 
1.1.1.5.1. The ACDS (RF&C) is responsible for the formulation of general policy in respect 
of matters concerning all Cadet Forces.  In this capacity ACDS (RF&C) acts as the adviser 
to other MOD Directorates and to other Government Departments. 
1.1.1.5.2. The committee system within ACDS (RF&C) is set up to formulate and frame 
policy in relation to Cadet Forces. 
1.1.1.6. UK Military Chain of Command 
1.1.1.6.1. Commander Land Forces (CLF) has command of all UK Land Forces.  Their 
Command is divided into a number of General Officers Commanding (GOC’s) including 
GOC Regional Command (RC) who maintains the military capability and infrastructure 
1-3 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 27 link to page 29 link to page 31 link to page 35 link to page 73 link to page 91  
support needed to meet CLFʼs operational requirements.  GOC RC commands the 
regional brigades and is commander of the Army’s Cadets. 
1.1.1.6.2. The ACF is under the command of GOC RC who exercises their authority 
through the normal military chain of command.  Matters of policy are processed through 
the ACEG, chaired by the GOC RC.  The composition and terms of reference of ACEG is 
on page 1-5.  Policy recommendations made by the ACEG are promulgated on behalf of 
GOC RC by the RC HQ Cadets Branch.  The ACEG has three sub-Committees: 
a. 
The Cadet Training Working Group (detailon page 1-7). 
b. 
Safeguarding Management Group (detailon page 1-11). 
c. 
The ACF Recruit Marketing Group (detailon page 1-13). 
1.1.1.6.3. GOC RCʼs main role in commanding the Army’s cadets is to develop, implement 
and manage policy relating to the organisation, training and discipline and the provision of 
equipment.  Their specific responsibilities are on page 1-51.  Responsibilities delegated to 
Brigade Commanders, are on page 1-69. 
1.1.1.6.4. At Brigade level there is a Cadet Force focal point in each Brigade HQ, there is a 
Staff Officer at Grade 2 as a minimum.  There is also a volunteer Colonel Cadets who acts 
as the Brigade Commander’s advisor on cadet matters. 
1-4 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.2 Army Cadet Executive Group (ACEG) 
1.1.2.1. Background 
1.1.2.1.1. As a result of an Army Management Consultancy study into the command and 
control of the ACF and the subsequent recommendation of a Cadet Steering Group, an 
Executive Committee, the ACEG, was established on 28 Mar 02 to form a focal point for 
the development of ACF policy. 
1.1.2.2. Composition 
1.1.2.2.1. The composition of the ACEG is: 
Appointment 
Remarks 
GOC RC 
Chairman 
ACOS Cadets 
Budget Holder 
Brigade Commander 
One representative 
General Secretary ACFA 
Ethos and activities 
Admin support and local 
Lead Chief Executive RFCA 
community links 
Representative Cadet Commandant 
 
SO1 Cadets Policy and Plans 
Secretary 
AD Army Youth Strategy 
In attendance 
Subject matter experts 
As required 
DCY CRFCA 
SLA 
1.1.2.3. Terms of Reference 
1.1.2.3.1. The terms of reference of the ACEG are: 
a. 
To originate Army direction to the ACF on behalf of GOC RC, in support of the 
ACF Charter. 
b. 
To consider, endorse and promulgate all relevant MOD/Government policy, 
strategy, instructions or direction issued from the MOD Inter Services Cadet 
Committee and HQ AG (lead for Army Youth Policy). 
c. 
Endorse and promulgate key policy, strategy instructions and direction to the 
ACF and CCF (Army) sections in order to ensure all Army Cadet Activity meets 
current legislative and health and safety requirements. 
d. 
Direct and monitor the work of the Cadet Training and Activities Committee and 
the Cadet Regulation and Safety Working Groups. 
e. 
Exercise sole authority for the ACF Responsibility Matrix and for the relevant 
sections of the CCF Responsibility Matrix as they affect CCF (Army) Sections or CCF 
activity for which the Army has lead responsibility. 
1.1.2.4. Frequency of Meetings 
1.1.2.4.1. The ACEG will meet at least once a quarter, or as required.  The timings of 
meetings should be linked to the reporting requirements of the Cadet Reporting System, in 
order that GOC RCʼs mid-year and end of year reporting periods to CLF can be staffed. 
1-5 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 29 link to page 31 link to page 35  
1.1.2.4.2. ACEG meetings are also to be timed to enable ACFA, CCFA and RFCA 
members to provide timely and accurate updates to their respective Councils. 
1.1.2.4.3. The ACEG is reported to by three sub-Committees: 
a. 
 The Cadet Training Working Group (detailon page 1-7). 
b. 
Safeguarding Management Group (detailon page 1-11). 
c. 
The ACF Recruit Marketing Group (detailon page 1-13). 
1-6 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.3 RC Cadet Training Working Group 
1.1.3.1. Background 
1.1.3.1.1. Cadet training review.  The Training Development Team (TDT) is leading the 
Cadet Forces’ training review.  The Army’s Cadet Forces1 are voluntary organisations 
where changes to long-established practices demand and deserve widespread 
consultation and support.  The review identified a great many areas where change is 
required and the on-going work that is bringing about these changes is overseen by the 
WG. 
1.1.3.1.2. Governance.  GOC RC is the Training Requirements Authority (TRA) for all 
Army sponsored Cadet Force training.  ACOS Cadets, RC, who is answerable to the 
ACEG, defines the training requirement on behalf of the TRA.  They delegate responsibility 
as follows through the WG, which they chair: 
Responsibility 
Delegate 
Army Cadet Training Review 
TDT 
Managing Training Development 
TDT 
ACF Counties 
Training Delivery 
CTTs 
CTC Frimley Park 
APC Syllabus 
Appointed sponsors 
1.1.3.1.3. Assurance.  The training review is underpinned by the need to ensure that all 
adults in the Army’s Cadet Forces are selected and trained in a way that will provide the 
assurance that the chain of command requires to demonstrate sound governance.  This is 
to be achieved by designing and mandating measures, procedures and training that will 
make the risk of placing children in the care of unsuitable or inadequately trained adult 
instructors as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP)2
1.1.3.1.4. Defence Systems Approach to Training (DSAT).  As required throughout 
Defence and as specifically recommended by the Defence Auditor and the Army 
Inspectorate, training is designed and developed using DSAT.  TDT is responsible for the 
analysis, design, development and evaluation of training across the Army’s Cadet Forces 
using DSAT only.  This training is delivered by ACF counties, the CTTs and CTC Frimley 
Park. 
1.1.3.1.5. APC syllabus and other cadet training.  As with the TDT’s training 
development activities, the WG also scrutinises, shapes and approves proposed changes 
to the APC syllabus and other cadet training. 
1.1.3.2. Responsibilities 
1.1.3.2.1. Purpose.  The purpose of the WG is to provide sound and thorough governance 
over the content, delivery and development of all CFAV and cadet training in the Army’s 
Cadet Forces.  It is to do this by providing subject matter expertise and experienced advice 
and counsel.  It is also to consult and communicate widely throughout the cadet 
                                                
1 The ACF and the Combined Cadet Force (CCF) 
2 ALARP is the test which is applied by law and defined in the Health & Safety at Work Act 1974. 
1-7 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
community so that changes are shaped and supported by it.  The WG is normally to meet 
at least three times a year. 
1.1.3.2.2. Change control 
a. 
The control of change to any training in the Army’s Cadet Forces is processed 
through the WG.  TDT acts as the secretariat for the WG essentially providing desk 
level staffing of any change.  In simple terms, changes can be categorised as: 
(1)  Minor changes which can be agreed at desk level and ratified by the WG. 
(2)  More significant changes which will be circulated to the WG for scrutiny 
and comment before approval at WG level. 
(3)  Changes which require scrutiny by the chain of command before approval 
by RC HQ. 
(4)  Major changes which may require approval by the ACEG. 
b. 
Once a change has been approved it is to be announced, with any 
implementation instructions, effective dates etc, by letter or email by or on behalf of 
the WG chairman to the chain of command, copied to the WG members, with a 
further copy posted onto the Westminster homepage.  Major changes may be 
announced by the COS or GOC RC.  Any new training materials or publications 
associated with the change should be posted simultaneously into the Cadet Forces 
Resource Centre
.  
For this reason, the announcement of any change is to be 
carefully coordinated. 
1.1.3.2.3. Westminster.  AWestminster records all personal attendance and 
performance on cadet and adult training it is important that SO2 Cadets (Westminster
(who sits on the WG) and their team are consulted on any change to ensure that 
Westminster is always consistent with that change. 
1.1.3.2.4. Changes to APC syllabus and adult training.  Every APC syllabus subject 
has a nominated sponsor who attends or is represented at the WG.  The change control 
process requires that any proposal to change the APC syllabus must come from the 
syllabus sponsor.  Proposed changes, whether to adult training or to cadet syllabus 
training, should be exposed to the WG or the chain of command, as appropriate, by the 
secretariat for scrutiny and comment. 
1.1.3.2.5. Syllabus Sponsors.  The APC Syllabus sponsors are listed below: 
Subject 
Sponsor 
Commandant (Comdt) 
Drill, turnout and military knowledge 
CTC Frimley Park 
Comdt CTC Frimley 
Skill at Arms 
Park (advised by 
SASC) 
Shooting 
Shooting advisor 
Navigation 
Navigation advisor 
Comdt CTC Frimley 
Fieldcraft 
Park 
Chairman National 
First Aid 
First Aid Panel 
Expedition training 
Expedition advisor 
1-8 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 30  
Subject 
Sponsor 
Physical Recreation 
Physical recreation and sport 
and Sport Advisor 
Director Finance, ops 
Cadet and the community 
and training ACFA 
SO1 Cadets CFSTT, 
Signals 
DSIC 
Music (bands and corps of drums) 
Col Cadet Force Music 
Col Cadet Force Pipes 
Music (pipes and drums) 
and Drums 
1.1.3.3. Composition 
1.1.3.3.1. Members of the WG are: 
Organisation 
Appointment 
Remarks 
ACOS Cadets 
Chairman 
ACF Representative Cadet 
 
Commandant 
ACF Training Advisor 
 
SO1 Cadets (Support) 
 
OC TDT 
Secretary 
TDT Training Development Advisor 
RC HQ 
 
(TDA) 
TDT SO2 Analyst 
 
SO2 Cadets (IM) 
 
SO2 Cadets (Plans) 
 
SO2 Cadets (Activities) 
 
SO2 Cadets (Log Sp) 
 
SO2 Cadets (Westminster) 
 
Comdt 
 
CTC Frimley Park 
CI 
 
ACI 
 
HQ SASC 
OC TAG (Reserves) 
 
OC CTT 
1 x representative 
CTTs 
TSA 
1 x representative 
CTO or other nominated ACF 
Brigades 
1 per brigade 
Officer 
Syllabus subjects 
Sponsors 
As per Para 1.1.3.2.5 
Army Cadet AT Advisor 
 
DofE Development 
SMEs 
Manager/Chairman.  ACFA DofE 
 
Advisory Panel 
CVQO representative 
 
Others 
Others 
Invited as required 
 
 
 
1-9 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
1-10 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.4 Safeguarding Management Group 
1.1.4.1. Introduction 
1.1.4.1.1. Although procedures are prescribed and part of policy, there is a limited 
understanding throughout the Cadet Forces of how these policies and procedures 
translate into responses to actions required in the event of a safeguarding concern.   
1.1.4.2. Role 
1.1.4.2.1. The role of the Army Cadet Safeguarding Management Group is to embed and 
to continually monitor and improve safeguarding practice in the Army’s Cadet Forces: 
a. 
Respond to Case Reviews.  This is to include but is not limited to; Serious 
Case Reviews, reviews of risk and incident reports, Serious Case Reviews affecting 
other cadet organisations, and the review of unusual or complex internal cases. 
b. 
Support development of procedures for safeguarding.  The Management 
Group will monitor implementation of recommendations and ensure all 
recommendations are acted upon as appropriate. 
c. 
Embed procedures for safeguarding throughout the organisation.  The 
Management Group will ensure, through SO2 Safeguarding, that good practice as 
directed by the Group is being embedded nationally without exception. 
d. 
Monitor risks.  Develop and maintain a Risk Register for the Army’s Cadet 
Force. 
1.1.4.3. Tasks 
1.1.4.3.1. In supporting the Army’s Cadets, the Safeguarding Management Group will 
carry out the following tasks: 
a. 
Response to Case Reviews.  Initially, this task will relate directly to 
recommendations made in accordance with the Serious Case Review of Child Q by 
Plymouth Safeguarding Children’s Board.  In future, internal monitoring of individual 
cases will inform this task. 
b. 
To inform the MOD Safeguarding Working Group and the Army.  
Development of good practice is to be monitored and the success of development 
reported to the MOD Safeguarding Working Group so that it may be shared with 
other cadet organisations. 
c. 
To receive guidance from the MOD Safeguarding Working Group and the 
Army.  In order to ensure safeguarding policies and procedures in the Army’s Cadet 
Forces are kept updated, feedback will be taken from the MOD Safeguarding 
Working Group.  This will include good practice shared from other cadet 
organisations. 
d. 
Review of Safeguarding Development Plan.  To ensure the Safeguarding 
plan stays up to date with all significant developments.   
1-11 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
e. 
Review of Risk Register.  Once developed, the Risk Register will need to be a 
working document and will require regular updates and maintenance. 
f. 
Review of Incidents Register.  To inform trend reports and to monitor complex 
or unusual cases to be discussed in the Safeguarding Management Group. 
1.1.4.4. Composition 
1.1.4.4.1. The Safeguarding Management Group brings together representatives from the 
Army’s Cadets and supporting organisations.  The composition of the group is: 
Appointment 
Remarks 
Chair 
ACOS Cadets 
RC HQ Cadets Branch 
Director Children and Young 
Safeguarding advisor 
People 
Director Cadets and Youth 
CRFCA 
SO1 Policy and Plans 
RC HQ Cadets Branch 
SO2 Safeguarding 
RC HQ Cadets Branch 
1.1.4.5. Timings 
1.1.4.5.1. The SMG will meet twice a year with the option of ad hoc meetings whenever 
necessary.  The timing and frequency of meetings will be reviewed regularly.  SO2 
Safeguarding is to update the GOC bi-annually.  In order for this feedback to be as 
reflective of current progress as possible, alternate Safeguarding Management Group 
meetings will occur immediately prior to these updates. 
1-12 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.5 ACF Recruit Marketing Group (ACF RMG) 
1.1.5.1. Role 
1.1.5.1.1. The Recruit Marketing Group (RMG) advises on the most effective means of 
achieving the recruiting and marketing objectives set by the ACEG.  To achieve this, the 
RMG will advise on the key work strands of: 
a. 
Improving awareness of the Army’s Cadets.  To maintain the positive 
perception of the Army’s Cadets with the public, there is a need to keep the cadets in 
the ‘public eye’ if it is to be able to attract, recruit and retain both cadets and CFAVs. 
b. 
Improving recruiting of CFAVs into the Army’s Cadets.  Delivering a 
challenging and exciting programme of activities to cadets required a dynamic and 
effective marketing and recruitment process to ensure there are sufficient high calibre 
adults joining the organisation each year. 
c. 
Improving recruiting of cadets into the Army’s Cadets.  The popularity of 
the Army’s Cadets continues to rise year on year.  However, to maintain this 
popularity, there is a continuing need to market fully these opportunities and to 
increase the awareness of what the Army’s Cadets do and what they can deliver to 
both potential cadets and their parents. 
d. 
Coordination of national and regional Army cadet marketing and 
recruiting.  In order to make the best use of resource, there is a need to coordinate 
the national and regional marketing plans and activities to achieve the goals and 
priorities set by the ACEG. 
1.1.5.2. Tasks 
1.1.5.2.1. In supporting the Army’s Cadets, the RMG will carry out the following tasks: 
a. 
Marketing Directive.  Publish the ACF Marketing Directive annually to set out 
the strategy for the year ahead to deliver the goals and priorities given by the ACEG. 
b. 
National and regional marketing activities.  Coordinate national and regional 
marketing activities to ensure that they are focused on meeting the goals and 
priorities set by the ACEG and that there is an effective use of resources. 
c. 
Branding and public presence.  Maintain the national ACF brand, by ensuring 
that ACF Counties use the ACF Brand Manual in all marketing, and regularly review 
the ACF branded material to support national, regional and local marketing activities. 
d. 
Recruitment of CFAVs into the Army’s Cadets.  Monitor the trends in 
recruitment of adults across the Army’s Cadets and promote the sharing of best 
practice in recruiting high calibre individuals into the organisation. 
e. 
Resourcing national and regional marketing activities.  Advise on the 
allocation of marketing resources against individual marketing activity bids. 
f. 
Reviewing marketing activities to inform future programmes.  Review and 
evaluate marketing activities against the goals and priorities set by the ACEG, and 
use this to inform the development of future marketing programmes. 
1-13 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.5.3. Composition 
1.1.5.3.1. The RMG brings together representatives from the Army’s Cadets and 
supporting organisations. 
1.1.5.3.2. The RMG composition is:  
Appointment 
Remarks 
SO1 Cadets Policy and Plans 
Chair 
Head of ACF Marketing and Communications 
 
Representative Brigade Colonel Cadets 
 
Usually President 
CFCB Representative 
CFCB 
ACF National Adviser on Public Relations  
Head ACF PR Unit 
A Deputy Chief 
RFCA representative 
Executive 
ACFA Representative 
General Secretary 
SO2 IM 
 
ACF Marketing and Communications Officer 
Secretary 
1.1.5.4. Timings 
1.1.5.4.1. The RMG will meet four times a year the timing and frequency of meetings will 
be reviewed regularly. 
1-14 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.6 Cadet Training Centre (CTC) Frimley Park 
1.1.6.1. General 
1.1.6.1.1. CTC Frimley Park is under the command of GOC RC.  The annual programme 
of courses and conferences at CTC Frimley Park is published by RC HQ on the Cadet 
Force Resource Centre. 
Title 
Address 
Tel 
Email 
CTC Frimley Park 
Frimley Road 
CTC Frimley Park 
Frimley 
01276 65155 
xxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
GU16 7HD 
1.1.6.2. Aim 
1.1.6.2.1. The aim of CTC Frimley Park Frimley Park is to act as the national centre for 
excellence for the cadet movement and thus be a source of inspiration and information. 
1.1.6.2.2. CTC Frimley Park achieves this aim by running a variety of courses, briefings 
and conferences as directed by Headquarters Land Forces. 
1.1.6.3. Motto 
1.1.6.3.1. Renovate Animos (Refresh the spirit). 
1.1.6.4. Adult Courses 
1.1.6.4.1. The main purpose of CTC Frimley Park is to train the volunteer CFAVs of both 
the ACF and CCF, teaching them to train their cadets safely and to inspire them in new 
ways of conducting training.   
1.1.6.4.2. Most courses cater for some 40 students and last five days (arriving on a 
Sunday and leaving on a Friday).  They are all carefully planned to develop the skills and 
the confidence needed to lead cadets. 
1.1.6.4.3. A key element of all courses is the opportunity to explore the core values, 
standards and leadership that are central to the management of these young people. 
1.1.6.4.4. All courses must be booked via Westminster with applications normally closing 
around six weeks before the course begins. 
1.1.6.4.5. The Adult Courses run by CTC are: 
a. 
Adult Leadership and Management (ALM) Course. 
b. 
Cadet Force Skill at Arms Instructor’s (CF SAA Inst) Course. 
1-15 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
c. 
Cadet Force “M”3 Qualification (CF “M” Qualification) Course. 
d. 
Area Commander’s Course. 
e. 
Commandants and Senior Officer’s Course. 
f. 
First Aid Courses. 
g. 
CCF Basic Courses. 
1.1.6.5. Cadet courses 
1.1.6.5.1. While the main purpose of CTC Frimley Park is to train the volunteer CFAVs of 
both the ACF and CCF, it also runs a highly prestigious course and a national competition 
for senior cadets. 
a. 
The Master Cadet Course normally runs three times a year and is open to 4-
star cadets 
b. 
The Champion Cadet Competition is open to nominated Master Cadets and 
takes place each September, with the winner being declared the ACF's best cadet for 
that year. 
1.1.6.6. Conferences 
1.1.6.6.1. CTC Frimley Park also runs specialist courses and hosts a number of briefings 
and conferences each year.  Amongst these are: 
a. 
ACF Duke of Edinburgh's Award conferences and training courses. 
b. 
ACF PR Training Team courses and conferences. 
c. 
ACF Sports Officers' conferences. 
d. 
ACF Training Officers' conferences. 
e. 
ACFA Outreach conferences. 
f. 
Cadet exchange conferences. 
g. 
Cadet Target Rifle courses. 
h. 
CTT briefings and Commanders' conference. 
i. 
Cadet Training Working Group meetings. 
j. 
Regular Army and Army Reserve briefing days. 
k. 
School Heads' briefing day. 
l. 
Shooting Officers’ conference. 
                                                
3 Qualifies CFAVs to plan and conduct exercises with blank ammunition and pyrotechnics.  Small Arms 
Courses are assigned a letter from the alphabet when created, “M” does not stand for something. 
1-16 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
m. 
Headquarters Land Forces Cadet Convention. 
1.1.6.7. Cadet Centre for AT (CCAT) 
Title 
Address 
Tel 
Capel Curig Training 
Camp 
01690 720308 
CCAT 
Betws y coed 
Conwy 
LL24 0DS 
1.1.6.7.1. The Cadet Centre for Adventurous Training (CCAT) is established to deliver 
Adventurous Training (AT) qualification and experience courses for Cadet Force Adults 
Volunteers (CFAV’s) and Senior Cadets aged 16+ from the Army Cadet Force (ACF) and 
Combined Cadet Force (CCF). 
1.1.6.7.2. They offer a wide range of challenging, inspirational, progressive and safely 
managed courses at all levels from basic Foundation through to Intermediate and 
Leader/Instructor qualifications through both the Joint Service and Nationally accredited 
schemes. 
1.1.6.7.3. They provide a pathway for CFAV’s to gain National Governing Body (NGB) 
accredited Hill Walking, Mountaineering, Rock Climbing, Trail Cycling, Skiing and Paddle 
sport qualifications with the intention of creating an increasing nucleus of AT qualified 
instructors/leaders with the skills and experience to deliver safe, fun and progressive 
activities within the ACF and CCF. 
1.1.6.7.4. The Senior Cadets (16+) can embark on a pathway to gain a basic Foundation 
and Intermediate skills qualification in Summer, Winter and Alpine Mountaineering, Rock 
Climbing, Winter Climbing, Caving, Open Canoeing, Kayaking (Sea & Inland) and Skiing. 
1.1.6.7.5. CCAT has three main UK based delivery centres, Capel Curig Training Camp 
located in the heart of the Snowdonia National Park, North Wales, Halton Training Camp 
near Lancaster on the banks of the River Lune just 20 minutes south of the Lake District 
and Dingwall CTC just north of Inverness located within easy reach of the Scottish 
Highlands and the Cairngorm National Park.  They also use overseas bases to deliver a 
range of fantastic courses in Germany, France, Norway, Spain and Switzerland. 
1.1.6.7.6. More information can be found on the CCAT website4
1.1.6.8. CF STT 
Title 
Address 
Blandford Camp 
CF STT 
Dorset DT11 8RH 
1.1.6.8.1. The Cadet Force Signals Training Team (CF STT) is established to deliver 
Signals qualification and experience courses for CFAV’s and Senior Cadets from the ACF 
and CCF. 
                                                
4 http://www.armycadetadventure.co.uk/ 
1-17 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.6.8.2. There are currently three different courses for cadets run by the Cadet Forces 
Signals Training Team at HQ DSCIS Blandford.  These are: 
a. 
Five day Cadet Signaller course (run in February and October each year, 
hopefully in half term weeks).  There are no prior requirements to attend this course, 
though it is an advantage to have at least 1* (ACF cadets) and to know the phonetic 
alphabet. 
b. 
Five day Cadet Communicator course.  This requires students to have 
passed their Cadet Signaller qualification before attending.  These courses are run at 
Easter and in the summer holidays each year. 
c. 
Five day Cadet Advanced Communicator course.  These courses are also 
run at Easter and in the summer holidays each year.  It is essential, to have attended 
the Cadet Communicator course described above. 
1.1.6.8.3. More information can be found on the Cadet Force Signals website5
 
                                                
5 https://www.cadetsignals.org.uk/ 
1-18 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.7 Cadet Training Teams (CTTs) 
1.1.7.1. General 
1.1.7.1.1. CTT are allocated to Brigade Commanders as necessary by RC HQ Cadets 
Branch.  Brigade Commanders are responsible for assigning CTTs to their normal tasks 
and for arranging for their location with a sponsor unit for administration.  RC HQ retains 
the authority to re-deploy CTTs for limited periods on specific tasks as necessary.  CTTs 
are composed of members of the Regular Army and Full Time Reserve Service (FTRS) 
(Home Commitment (HC)) and their role is primarily to train the trainers in the CCF and 
ACF within their areas of responsibility, and secondly to train senior cadets as 
circumstances allow. 
1.1.7.1.2. Training Safety Advisers (TSA) are part of CTTs on FTRS (HC) contracts in the 
rank of WO2.  They are under the command of their OC CTTs and are scaled one per 
ACF County.  Their role is to advise to Cadet Commandants on safe training, to monitor 
safety on training throughout the County and to assist in the training of ACF CFAVs in 
training safety matters. 
1.1.7.2. Courses 
1.1.7.2.1. The main courses run by CTTs for the ACF are: 
a. 
The Advanced induction Course (AIC). 
b. 
Short Range Course. 
c. 
Long Range Course. 
d. 
The Senior Cadet Instructor’s Course. 
 
 
1-19 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
 
1-20 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 65 link to page 99 link to page 259  
1.1.8 The Reserve Forces’ and Cadets’ Associations (RFCA) 
1.1.8.1. General 
1.1.8.1.1. The RFCAs are statutory autonomous bodies established under Part XI of the 
Reserve Forces Act 1996.  There are 13 RFCAs in the UK.  Each has its own Scheme of 
Constitution drawn up by the Defence Council under the authority of this Act of Parliament.  
Their boundaries are not in all cases the same as those of Army Brigades.  Their details 
are given in the Location Statement published by RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
1.1.8.1.2. The RFCA have statutory powers and responsibilities connected with the 
organisation and administration of the Army Reserve and the ACF and, to a lesser extent, 
with other MOD sponsored Cadet Forces.  In connection with the ACF, RFCA have 
particular responsibility for the provision and maintenance of accommodation, equipment 
and stores, for the recruiting of cadets and adults and for the selection, employment and 
management of the ACF Professional Support Staff at County level. 
1.1.8.2. Composition 
1.1.8.2.1. The composition of each RFCA includes a number of naval, military and air force 
members, Cadet Force members, representative and co-opted members.  The number of 
members varies considerably among the RFCA but all include important people in the 
RFCA area representing employers, local authorities, trades unions, universities, 
professional bodies and other influential organisations. 
1.1.8.2.2. Each RFCA has the following officials: 
Appointment 
Remarks 
President 
Lord Lieutenant of one of the counties in the RFCA area 
Vice presidents 
The rest of the Lord Lieutenants in the RFCA area 
Chairman 
Responsible for the smooth running of the RFCA 
Responsible for managing the routine business, headed by a Chief 
A permanent staff 
Executive. 
1.1.8.2.3. Each RFCA employs, within each ACF county, the Professional Support Staff 
listed at Para 1.2.2.2.1. 
1.1.8.2.4. The members of the ACF Professional Support Staff (PSS) are employees of the 
RFCA and are Crown Servants.  Their terms of service are contained in RFCA Staff 
Regulations and their job specifications are at 1.5.5.  They support the Cadet 
Commandant in the administration of the ACF but the Chief Executive RFCA is 
responsible for the efficient performance of their duties.  Those who are also members of 
the ACF may qualify for Volunteer Allowance as per para 2.6.2.3. 
1.1.8.3. Responsibilities 
1.1.8.3.1. RFCA have statutory powers and duties connected with the organisation and 
administration of the ACF.  These responsibilities include: 
a. 
In accordance with Joint Service Publication 893 and Army General Admin 
Instructions (AGAIs) Vol 3 Chapter 119 the RFCAs act as the Nominating Authority 
for the Army Cadet Force (ACF) and are therefore responsible for leading on 
1-21 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
administrative processes and ensuring that required checks have been completed 
prior to an individual being accepted as a volunteer within the ACF.   
b. 
The identification of potential Cadet Commandants and involvement in their 
selection and appointment. 
c. 
The provision and maintenance of accommodation and the furnishing, heating, 
lighting and cleaning of such accommodation. 
d. 
The issue, storage, maintenance and accounting of public stores and of non- 
public equipment and stores. 
e. 
The management of health, safety, environmental protection and fire safety in 
relation to ACF accommodation, equipment and stores. 
f. 
The annual audit of non-public funds. 
g. 
The general overseeing and support of the ACF Professional Support Staff in 
their duties. 
h. 
The provision of vehicles and trailers to the ACF Counties. 
i. 
Supporting regional and local recruiting activities for CFAVs and cadets.   
j. 
Recruiting, local publicity and the promotion of good relations with the public. 
k. 
Encouraging and fostering co-operation and good relations between the Army 
Reserve and the ACF. 
l. 
Encouragement and fostering affiliation and sponsorship of ACF detachments 
by Regular or Army Reserve units in conjunction with Brigade HQ. 
1.1.8.4. The Council of RFCAs 
1.1.8.4.1. The Council of RFCAs, representing all RFCAs, is the body that advises MOD, 
GOC RC and ACFA on general policy matters affecting RFCA responsibilities to the ACF.  
Conversely MOD and RC HQ consult the Council on matters of policy and problems 
arising from RFCA responsibilities affecting more than one RFCA.  When necessary the 
Council of RFCA will consult the ACFA.  The Council is served by a small Secretariat. 
1.1.8.5. Army Cadet Executive Group (ACEG) 
1.1.8.5.1. The Council of RFCA provides a representative Chief Executive RFCA on the 
ACEG as well as the Director Cadets and Youth. 
1-22 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.9 The ACFA 
1.1.9.1. Constitution 
1.1.9.1.1. The ACFA is a registered charity in England and Wales (No: 305962) and in 
Scotland (No: SC039057).  It is also a company limited by guarantee (Registered Number 
293432) and not having a share capital.  It is governed by its Memorandum and Articles of 
Association and has a membership comprised of ACF Counties and individuals. 
1.1.9.2. Activity 
1.1.9.2.1. The ACFA has several areas of operation that are agreed upon between the 
ACFA and RC HQ Cadets Branch in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). 
1.1.9.2.2. The ACFA promotes the ACF; taking cadet values to new areas of the 
community.  Promoting the good work of the ACF, or sponsoring links overseas, the ACFA 
seeks to ensure that everyone sees the best of the ACF.  The main ways the ACFA seeks 
to achieve this are: 
a. 
Facilitation of the ACFA Youth Outreach programme. 
b. 
Development of the Cadet2Career programme. 
c. 
Administration of the ACF National Marketing and Communications Team who 
are based at ACFA in London. 
1.1.9.2.3. The ACFA fosters the rounded development of cadets.  In particular it serves as 
the national focus for a wide range of educational, sporting and development programmes, 
each designed to develop self confidence, promote leadership qualities and strengthen the 
character of cadets.  In particular, ACFA: 
a. 
Facilitates national sporting competitions. 
b. 
Sets the policy for and accredits first aid training, music and piping and 
drumming. 
c. 
Is the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award (DofE) National Operating Authority for Army 
Cadets. 
d. 
Helps to resource ACF signals training; adventurous training; competitive 
shooting; music and piping & drumming. 
e. 
Promotes ACF activities through committees for: competitive shooting; physical 
recreation and sport; first aid; bands; piping & drumming and the DofE. 
f. 
Awards grants to CFAVs and cadets to enable them to take part in activities. 
1.1.9.2.4. The ACFA advances the interests of ACF CFAVs; providing advice and 
representing views from across the ACF on matters related to its charitable objects.  All 
ACF Counties are members of ACFA by virtue of which all enrolled CFAVs may access 
membership services. 
1-23 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
a. 
The ACFA’s independent advisory role is available to both the chain of 
command and individual CFAVs and is an important support to the effective 
functioning of an ACF County.   
b. 
The ACFA advises the MOD and other government agencies on ACF affairs 
and represents the ACF in matters not within the province of the MOD, such as 
dealing with DfE and the National Council for Voluntary Youth Services (NCVYS). 
c. 
The ACFA provides a regimental focus and national forum for the ACF 
d. 
The ACFA coordinates insurance covering the needs of the ACF outside the 
MOD liability. 
1.1.9.3. Membership 
1.1.9.3.1. All ACF Counties are required to be affiliated to the Association.  Further to this, 
the Association comprises individual members who may be serving or retired CFAVs, or 
other supporters. 
1.1.9.4. Organisation  
1.1.9.4.1. The business of the Association is managed by its trustees, who normally meet 
three times a year.  Trustees are elected at the Annual General Meeting by the members.  
ACF County Members are represented by their Cadet Commandant (or their nominee) 
while Individual Members can exercise a personal vote.  Regional Trustees, who are 
usually serving or retired Cadet Commandants, represent the views of their local ACF 
Counties and CFAVs to the ACFA. 
1.1.9.4.2. The trustees are supported in their work by grants, donations and subscriptions 
made by Government departments, charitable trusts, businesses and institutions and by 
individuals.   
1.1.9.4.3. The ACFA employs a small staff which provides its secretariat and executes its 
policies.  This staff works in co-operation with the Army, MOD, the Council of RFCAs and 
the individual RFCAs.  It maintains close relations with NCVYS, of which the ACFA is a 
constituent member, and with the Combined Cadet Force (CCF), the Sea Cadet Corps 
(SCC), the Air Training Corps (ATC) and other major youth organisations.   
1.1.9.4.4. The ACFA branches in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales are official 
committees of ACFA and have a degree of autonomy in how they support the ACF in the 
devolved nations. 
1.1.9.5. Headquarters ACFA 
Address 
Contact Number 
Web 
Holderness 
House 
Tel 
020 7426 8377 
Website 
www.armycadets.com/acfa  
51-61 Clifton 
Street 
PA-
LONDON 
Fax 
020 7426 8378 
Email 
xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx  
EC2A 4DW 
 
1-24 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.9.6. Army Cadet Volunteer Magazine 
1.1.9.6.1. The house magazine of the ACF is “Army Cadet Volunteer”.  It is published three 
times a year and is produced at the offices of the ACFA. 
1.1.9.7. Annual Review 
1.1.9.7.1. ACFA publishes an Annual Review of ACFA Activity and submits Annual 
Reports to the Charity Commission, Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator and 
Companies House. 
 
 
1-25 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-26 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.10 The Council for Cadet Rifle Shooting (CCRS) 
1.1.10.1. Constitution 
1.1.10.1.1. CCRS is a Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO) and has a Registered 
Charity Number 1151650. 
1.1.10.2. Aims 
1.1.10.2.1. CCRS acts as a central body, which can speak with authority and give advice 
on cadet shooting matters.  Its responsibilities, exercised with the approval of the Ministry 
of Defence, include liaison between other representative shooting authorities and units of 
the MOD Sponsored Cadet Forces and the dissemination of information on shooting 
matters effecting cadets.   
1.1.10.2.2. In addition to arranging and administering shooting competitions, postal 
matches, coaching courses and other shooting events for cadets at schools and units in 
the Commonwealth, CCRS also provides administrative support for cadet teams selected 
to represent Great Britain in National and International matches, both at home and 
overseas.   
1.1.10.3. Membership 
1.1.10.3.1. Both individuals and ACF Counties can become members of CCRS for a fee.  
Details can be found on their website6
1.1.10.4. Headquarters CCRS 
Address 
Contact Number 
Web 
CCRS 
Derby Lodge 
Tel 
01483 473095 
Website 
www.ccrs.org.uk 
Bisley Camp 
Brookwood 
Woking 
Fax 
01483797598 
Email 
xxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx 
Surrey 
GU24 0NY 
 
 
 
                                                
6 www.ccrs.org.uk/members-area 
1-27 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-28 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 93 link to page 93 link to page 83 link to page 85  
1.1.11 ACF Shooting Committee 
1.1.11.1. Role 
1.1.11.1.1. The role of the ACF Shooting Committee is to: 
a. 
Provide advice and support to RC HQ Cadets Branch for the setting of ACF 
shooting policy and for the planning of ACF shooting activity each year. 
b. 
Provide advice and support to ACFs on all matters relating to skill at arms and 
shooting in the ACF. 
1.1.11.2. Membership 
1.1.11.2.1. The Committee membership is: 
a. 
A Chairman. 
b. 
A Secretary.  Secretariat to be provided by the CCRS. 
c. 
A representative from each of the following organisations: 
(1)  RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
(2)  National Rifle Association (NRA). 
(3)  National Small-bore Rifle Association (NSRA). 
(4)  A Brigade Shooing Officer from each brigade (Role Specification is on 
page 1-71
).
 
(5)  An ACF National Chief Coach (Role Specification is on page 1-61). 
(6)  An ACF CRO (Role Specification is on page 1-63). 
(7)  Any other representatives as deemed necessary by the Chairman. 
1.1.11.3. Meetings 
1.1.11.3.1. The Committee will normally meet twice in each year and at any other time 
considered necessary by the Chairman. 
1.1.11.4. Tasks 
1.1.11.4.1. ACF Shooting Directive.  Advise RC HQ Cadets Branch on the ACF Shooting 
Directive which will be reviewed from time to time as necessary.  The Directive will provide 
direction, on all ACF shooting matters, to: CCRS; regional Brigades; ACF counties; the 
ACF Shooting Committee. 
1.1.11.4.2. Advice and support to RC HQ Cadets Branch.  Provide advice and support 
on all matters relating to skill at arms and shooting training for ACF cadets and CFAVs 
including: 
1-29 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
a. 
The APC (ACF) Syllabus for skill at arms and shooting. 
b. 
The Cadet Training Manual Skill at Arms & Shooting. 
c. 
Shooting and skill at arms related pamphlets. 
d. 
Adult training and qualifications relating to shooting and coaching. 
e. 
The Royal Canadian Army Cadet Leader Instructor Marksmanship Course. 
f. 
Rifles and equipment. 
g. 
Shooting resources and the Cadet Resource Calculator. 
1.1.11.4.3. Support to ACF Counties.  Provide support and guidance on all matters 
relating to skill at arms and shooting including: 
a. 
The training and testing of cadets in accordance with the APC (ACF) Syllabus 
for skill at arms and shooting. 
b. 
The training of CFAVs. 
c. 
Shooting competitions available to ACF CFAVs and cadets. 
1.1.11.4.4. Shooting Officers’ Conference.  Plan and deliver an annual conference for 
County Shooting Officers. 
1.1.11.4.5. Coaching Courses.  Plan and deliver target rifle Coaching Courses for the 
training of CFAVs and cadets. 
a. 
Brigade Coaching Courses, for CFAVs, one in each region per year. 
b. 
National Coaching Course, for CFAVs, one per year. 
c. 
Pre-Bisley Coaching Course, for CFAVs and cadets, one per year 
1.1.11.4.6. Small-bore .22 Rifle Competitions.  Administer and provide support for: 
a. 
The annual ACF Cadet Hundred competition. 
b. 
The ACF team in the annual Inter-Service competition for the Whistler Trophy. 
c. 
The annual NSRA News of the World ACF detachment team competition. 
d. 
The annual NSRA Walter Kirke ACF detachment team competition. 
e. 
The ACF detachment teams in the annual Inter-Service competition for the 
Punch Trophy. 
1.1.11.4.7. Inter-Service Cadet Rifle Meeting (ISCRM) (Target Rifle). 
a. 
Administer the allocation of places to ACF unit teams and provide assistance 
and guidance to those teams. 
1-30 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
b. 
Administer the selection of cadets to represent the ACF in the Inter-Service 
Match and organise the teams in that match. 
1.1.11.4.8. Cadet Inter-Service Skill at Arms Meeting (CISSAM) (Service Rifle). 
a. 
Administer the allocation of places to ACF unit teams and provide assistance 
and guidance to those teams. 
b. 
Administer the selection of cadets to represent the ACF in the Inter-Service 
Match and organise the teams in that match. 
1.1.11.4.9. Overseas Teams (Target Rifle).  Provide guidance, support and training for 
ACF cadets who are nominated for and selected to overseas teams. 
 
 
1-31 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-32 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.12 The ACF Association National First Aid Panel 
1.1.12.1. Constitution 
1.1.12.1.1. The ACF Association (ACFA) National First Aid Panel (the Panel) was 
constituted on 1 January 2006.  The Council of the ACFA will annually appoint a 
Chairman.  This will usually be the ACFA First Aid Advisor. 
1.1.12.1.2. Membership of the Panel will comprise each of the Brigade First Aid Advisers 
(Brigade FAAs). 
1.1.12.1.3. ACFA will appoint a secretary to support the Panel. 
1.1.12.2. Role 
1.1.12.2.1. The role of the Panel is to advise ACFA about all aspects of First Aid training 
that fall within the remit of ACFA.  The Panel will routinely report this advice through its 
Chairman to the ACFA Director of Finance, Operations and Training (DFOT). 
1.1.12.2.2. The Panel will meet twice annually.  Sub committees may be formed for 
specific tasks and the Panel may correspond or meet informally as and when required.  
The Minutes of the formal meetings are taken by HQ ACFA and distributed to Army HQ, 
county and Brigade headquarters and to such other bodies as required. 
1.1.12.3. Tasks 
1.1.12.3.1. The panel will advise CTC Frimley Park about the content and standards for 
First Aid courses run at CTC Frimley Park and will ensure that suitably qualified and 
experienced trainers are made available to CTC Frimley Park as assistant directing staff to 
run those courses.   
1.1.12.3.2. The Panel will arrange and conduct the County First Aid Officer (CFATO) 
Conference or Course annually at CTC Frimley Park. 
1.1.12.3.3. The Panel will manage the National First Aid Competitions for the ACF and 
CCF and find sufficient expertise and staff to run that event as a model of excellence in 
practical First Aid training and as an example to brigades, ACF counties and the other 
Cadet Forces. 
1.1.12.3.4. The Panel will provide advice and assistance to all agencies of the Cadet 
Forces and related bodies and organisations. 
1.1.12.3.5. The Panel will, through its Brigade FAAs, assist counties in implementing Army 
Headquarters First Aid Policy.  This includes: 
a. 
Progressive delivery over Basic Training to 2 Star of an externally accredited 
Youth First Aid qualification.  Brigade FAAs will in particular ensure that cadets 
achieving a 2 Star First Aid pass receive the appropriate certificate and account to 
ACFA for the certificates issued. 
b. 
Delivery of First Aid at 3 Star to a standard that can be accredited toward an 
adult First Aid qualification at 4 Star. 
1-33 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
c. 
Delivery of an adult First Aid qualification at 4 Star.  Brigade FAAs will ensure 
that qualified trainers and assessors are used and that adult courses are properly 
registered and certificated. 
1.1.12.3.6. Brigade FAAs will arrange regular Brigade First Aid Panel meetings to include 
CFATOs, First Aid competition coordinators and the First Aid training verifier (if not the 
Brigade FAA).  The Brigade FAA will act as Chair or Secretary.  Where the Brigade FAA 
acts as Secretary arrangements should be made to appoint a Chairman who may be a 
senior officer or adult volunteer but will not be a CFATO.  The Brigade First Aid Panel 
advises and reports to the Brigade Commander but will also advise and represent Cadet 
Commandants and their First Aid staff.  The Brigade Panel will advise and communicate 
with but not report to ACFA (ACFA will however advise Brigades on suitable appointments 
and will appoint training verifiers). 
1.1.12.3.7. The Brigade FAA will facilitate a brigade level First Aid competition conducted 
in accordance with the national competition core framework.  The Brigade FAA may 
appoint a competition coordinator and CCF liaison officer.  The Brigade FAA will discuss 
suitable arrangements with the ATC regional First Aid representative and where found to 
be mutually beneficial run the brigade event in conjunction with the ATC event. 
1.1.12.3.8. The Brigade FAA will remain in close touch with their parent brigade 
headquarters and ensure that the brigade’s First Aid activities are included in the brigade’s 
calendar, forecast of events as far ahead as planning allows, and where appropriate in 
brigade resource planning and forecasts.  The Brigade FAA should be included in relevant 
conferences and Cadet Training Working Groups. 
1.1.12.3.9. The Brigade FAA will support CFATOs in ensuring that Cadet Commandants 
and others are aware of the value of the services provided to them through ACFA. 
1-34 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.1.13 ACF Public Relations 
1.1.13.1. General 
1.1.13.1.1. The main aim of ACF Public Relations (ACF PR) is to establish and maintain 
the general understanding and sympathetic support of the ACF and its reputation by the 
general public through media initiatives. 
1.1.13.1.2. The subsidiary aims include: 
a. 
The recruitment of the required numbers of ACF CFAVs, of good quality, 
without which the ACF cannot succeed. 
b. 
The attraction of a healthy level of ACF cadet enrolment. 
1.1.13.1.3. Specific ACF PR target categories include: 
a. 
The Regular Army, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) and Service organisations, 
upon whose active support and sponsorship, the ACF depends critically. 
b. 
The Army Reserve, with which the ACF works and lives closely. 
c. 
The educational world from where the cadets come. 
d. 
Parents and guardians, who naturally are the greatest influence on the cadets. 
e. 
The local community including local authorities; public and emergency services; 
and other non-political community organisations and, in particular, would-be 
employers and the business community as potential supporters and sponsors. 
f. 
National audiences, such as government departments, agencies and public 
bodies; politicians; non-governmental organisations; and "opinion formers" for whom 
knowledge of the ACF would be of benefit. 
1.1.13.1.4. None of the above target categories may be assumed to have either an 
accurate or a comprehensive knowledge of the ACF. 
1.1.13.2. Defensive PR 
1.1.13.2.1. In situations calling for defensive PR (or which may need it), it is essential that: 
a. 
Speedy action is taken to establish the facts accurately. 
b. 
The Chief ACF National PR Training Team, the local RFCA and Media Ops at 
the Brigade HQ are contacted quickly. 
1.1.13.2.2. It is also good practice to advise Cadets Branch at RC HQ and the ACFA, 
although they would not be expected to handle media relations.  While acceptance of the 
fact that “accidents can happen in the best regulated families” may ultimately be 
appropriate, apologies must not be made in haste and that, particularly where insurance 
claims may become involved, acceptance of liability is to be avoided. 
1-35 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 271  
1.1.13.3. The ACF Image 
1.1.13.3.1. The following strategic factors must be borne in mind when ACF subjects are 
presented to the public through media outlets: 
a. 
The ACF is a voluntary national youth organisation sponsored by the MOD 
(through the Army); it is not part of the Army but it is managed by the Army’s chain of 
command. 
b. 
The ACF offers a disciplined, well organised framework upon which a spirit of 
service and social responsibility is developed among young people.  It also 
contributes to the spread of knowledge and understanding of the Army and Army 
Reserve.  The experience of responsibility and the encouragement of self-discipline 
develop personal qualities that may be of benefit for future employment in any walk 
of life. 
c. 
Suitable young people are helped in their preparation to join either the Armed 
Forces or the uniformed civilian services but there is no commitment or pressure on 
any cadet to do so.  The ACF also helps to produce future citizens who are aware 
and supportive of the work and role of the ACF and HM Armed Forces. 
d. 
Membership of the ACF is an opportunity to have access to the Army’s 
unrivalled ability to instruct, interest and inspire young people as well as to enjoy 
some opportunities of challenge, adventure and widening of experience. 
e. 
As far as is practicable, the ACF is inclusive (see para 2.7.3.1.1). 
1.1.13.3.2. There is an essential need to counter any general misperceptions concerning 
the ACF by presenting it in its role as a national youth organisation that offers varied, 
interesting and personally challenging activities to young people regardless of their 
background. 
1.1.13.3.3. It should also be noted that the ACFA is an operating authority for the DofE 
Award and through it and their ACF activities, both ACF CFAVs and cadets, may gain 
BTEC/SCOTVEC awards. 
1.1.13.4. The Direction of ACF Public Relations 
1.1.13.4.1. At the national level, ACF PR is a command responsibility of ACOS Cadets, 
RC HQ Cadets Branch, delegated to the Chief ACF PR, ACF National PR Training Team.  
There are also essential inputs from Media Ops, RC HQ Cadets Branch, ACDS (RF&C), 
Directorate of Defence Communication (DDC), and the MOD as well as the ACFA. 
1.1.13.4.2. Army Brigade HQ and, in particular, their Commanders, are closely concerned 
with the “public image and defensive PR” of the ACF; RFCA also have a role in the area of 
recruitment; both provide general PR support to the ACF. 
1.1.13.4.3. The ACF National PR Training Team comprises volunteer ACF officers with 
professional and academic experience in PR, journalism and marketing communications.  
Its tasks include: 
a. 
The provision of specialist ACF PR advice to: 
1-36 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 119  
(1)  ACOS Cadets and the Army chain of command. 
(2)  Media Ops, RC HQ Cadets Branch; Ops; Director Defence 
Communications (DDC) and Army Brigade Headquarters on media relations 
affecting the ACF. 
b. 
The training and professional support of ACF County Public Relations Officers 
(PRO). 
c. 
The coordination of Regional ACF PR activities and strategy. 
1.1.13.4.4. PR is a fundamental function of command and must therefore receive overall 
inspiration and direction from Commanders at all levels.  All Cadet Commandants should 
appoint an ACF County PRO to undertake the specialised tasks involved (see Role 
Specification on page 1-99).  ACF County PRO must have ready access to their ACF 
Cadet Commandants; as well as receive the appropriate training through the ACF National 
PR Training Team and should also attend the annual ACF County PRO Conference. 
1.1.13.4.5. The ACF County PRO has three functions: 
a. 
To provide attractive and accurate advance information, as a result of which the 
media may assign staff to cover an ACF function or event. 
b. 
Should the media be unable to cover an ACF event, to provide the coverage 
themselves; they must therefore be able to write their own reports for publication. 
c. 
Be constantly looking for “hooks” on which to hang the portrayal of the ACF 
image. 
1.1.13.4.6. In addition, the PRO is a conduit for information of all kinds, to both internal and 
external agencies, using appropriate and professional communication skills and tools that 
reflect ACF national corporate identity. 
1.1.13.5. The Means of ACF PR 
1.1.13.5.1. Dealing with the press, radio and TV at the national level normally falls to the 
ACF National PR Training Team assisted by Media Ops, RC HQ Cadets Branch and the 
Ministry of Defence, in so far as issues of public and/or media interest are concerned.  All 
national level media must be approved by MOD’s DDC.  The ACF National PR Training 
Team will therefore provide guidance to ACF County PRO on these matters.  For recruit 
marketing campaigns (where the general thrust of PR will be to create the climate of 
general awareness and understanding necessary to provide the background for successful 
local PR and recruiting) ACF Marketing may provide, with the authority of ACOS Cadets, 
and in consultation with the ACFA, national PR activity through an external agency, 
advised by the Commanding Officer ACF National PR Training Team.  The main source of 
guidance is the “The ACF Public Relations Handbook”; which is available as a download 
from the ACFA at www.armycadets.com. 
1.1.13.5.2. ACF Counties are not authorised to contact or communicate with any UK 
National media or international media sources; they must inform their Brigade Media Ops 
and alert the ACF PRU, of any such approach.  At the ACF County level, there are 
requirements to maintain and develop: 
1-37 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
(1)  A steady level of contact with the local press, radio and TV. 
(2)  Common sense contacts with the local community. 
b. 
This is to be achieved by: 
(1)  Invitations to attend internal ACF County detachments and other activities. 
(2)  Periodical meetings with parents and teachers. 
(3)  Speedy response to either expressions of interest or cases where things 
may have gone wrong, in the form of responsible explanation or action to put 
the matter right. 
c. 
It must be emphasised that imaginative community work can make an 
enormous contribution to local PR. 
1.1.13.5.3. Good PR may often be the presentation of an ordinary activity with a special 
and personal angle of approach.  It must also be based on honesty and openness.  One 
piece of deliberate misinformation can destroy the credibility of an individual and their unit 
for years to come. 
1.1.13.6. Lines of Communication 
1.1.13.6.1. The ACF County PRO should maintain regular, and practical, PR contacts with 
the following: 
a. 
The ACF National PR Training Team.  Who provide professional guidance 
and advice on PR activities or issues of public and/or media interest that may have 
an adverse impact on the reputation of the ACF or the Army. 
b. 
The National Marketing Manager, ACF.  Who will provide marketing 
communications materials to support both national and local adult and cadet 
recruitment programmes; issue corporate identity guidelines; and provide advice and 
assistance on the use of non-editorial communications tools, such as the Internet and 
exhibitions. 
c. 
The RFCA.  The RFCA are responsible for regional recruit marketing 
particularly that dealing with enrolment and recruitment.  Financial support for PR 
work in the ACF County is provided by HQ RC through the RFCA. 
d. 
Media Ops Officer at the Brigade HQ (whose offices are accessible 24 
hours a day).  They are an immediate professional source of advice on PR contacts 
and PR methods.  They may be able to offer practical help – e.g.  finance for visits by 
professional reporters.  Speedy contact with Brigade Media Ops is essential 
whenever any situation arises that may call for any form of defensive PR. 
e. 
Directorate of Defence Communications (DDC).  It is normally the 
responsibility of Regional Media Ops at the Brigade HQ, to inform the Duty Press 
Officer at Director of News (D NEWS) Press Office, at the MOD, and alert the Chief 
of the ACF PRU, directly of the facts of any situation likely to attract large scale 
attention.  In an emergency, and only when the Duty Media Ops Officer, or Duty Staff 
Officer, at the Brigade HQ is unable to be contacted, it may be appropriate for the 
1-38 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
County to contact the MOD Duty Press Officer direct; where this has been the case 
the County is to persevere with their attempts to contact their Brigade Media Ops 
Duty Officer until they has been brought up-to-date with the situation.  The underlying 
philosophy is that adverse national media attention should not come as a surprise. 
f. 
ACF Marketing and Communications Group and “The Army Cadet 
Volunteer” Magazine.  The ACF Marketing and Communication Group should be 
informed of PR activity in Counties generally, and regular contributions of national 
significance to “The Army Cadet Volunteer” Magazine are welcome.  The journal is 
not only a form of domestic ACF PR; it is also a means of reaching the wider 
audience of opinion- formers throughout the UK Defence community, as well as 
associated overseas Cadet Forces. 
g. 
Local Media.  Ideally ACF County PRO should be on calling terms with their 
local newspapers and local radio and TV stations.  They must be aware of the 
particular MOD rules regarding contact with the media, as well as ACF involvement 
in non-news television programmes.  Approaches and requests from broadcasters 
should be directed to the ACF National PR Training Team, who are to liaise with the 
appropriate department at the MOD. 
h. 
Regimental/Corps Journals.  These provide an ideal communications link with 
the affiliated units as well as with the Regular Army and Army Reserve in general. 
 
 
1-39 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
 
 
1-40 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 1.2  Organisation at county level 
1.2.1.1. General 
1.2.1.1.1. The ACF is predominantly organised on a county basis. 
1.2.1.1.2. In accordance with MOD policy to discourage any further proliferation of titles in 
the ACF, no changes to grouping at county level or to nomenclature at any level may be 
made without the consent of RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
1.2.1.2. Definitions 
1.2.1.2.1. The following terms used in these regulations are defined as: 
a. 
ACF County.  An ACF County comprises all CFAVs and cadets under the 
command of a Cadet Commandant, although the cadets may be located in more than 
one administrative County.  In some counties, the term “Battalion” is used instead of 
County titles to denote a Cadet Commandant’s level of command, while in London 
and the West Midlands, the term “Sector” is used.  All name changes require 
authorisation by RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
b. 
ACF Area.  An ACF Area is an intermediate level of command between that of 
the County and the Detachment.  An Area may adopt the title of Company, 
Squadron, Battery or Group, and usually consists of five to ten Detachments. 
c. 
ACF Detachment.  An ACF Detachment is a group of cadets parading at one 
location.  Although officially titled “Detachment”, they are normally prefixed with a 
number and place name (eg No 1 Brighton Detachment) to aid identification, a 
Detachment may be styled “Troop” or “Platoon” with the appropriate Regimental or 
Corps prefix or suffix, with the agreement of the Regiment or Corps concerned and 
the approval of RC HQ, providing the word “Cadet” or “ACF” also appears in the title.  
ACF Detachments are categorised as follows: 
(1)  Open.  A Detachment that is open to all young people in the 
neighbourhood. 
(2)  Restricted.  A Detachment based in an educational establishment and 
whose membership is restricted to pupils/students of that establishment. 
1.2.1.3. Cadet Commandant 
1.2.1.3.1. The Cadet Commandant is the Commanding Officer of the ACF within the 
geographical limits of their command.  Cadet Commandants are selected by a Brigade MS 
Board or by a panel promulgated and chaired by their Regional Brigade Commander and 
are appointed by the MOD.  They are under the operational command of their Regional 
Brigade Commander.   
1.2.1.3.2. The Cadet Commandant, is accountable to GOC RC through the Brigade 
Commander for the organisation, training, discipline, welfare, safety and specified aspects 
of the administration of the officers, adult instructors and cadets under their command.  
The Commandant is the Delivery Duty Holder (DDH) for ACF activities conducted by their 
ACF County. 
1-41 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 45 link to page 45 link to page 103 link to page 103  
1.2.1.3.3. The Cadet Commandant is to liaise closely with: 
a. 
RFCA.  Chief Executive RFCA for the general administration of their command 
and for the administration of the CFAVs under their command. 
b. 
ACFA.  General Secretary for the execution of all activities mentioned on page 
1-23. 
1.2.1.3.4. Role Specification.  The Role Specification of the Cadet Commandant is on 
page 1-81
.
 
1-42 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 101 link to page 101 link to page 102 link to page 102 link to page 178 link to page 71 link to page 182 link to page 158  
1.2.2 ACF County Staff 
1.2.2.1. Introduction 
1.2.2.1.1. To assist them, the Cadet Commandant may have the following full-time PSS 
and voluntary CFAVs. 
1.2.2.2. ACF Professional Support Staff (PSS). 
1.2.2.2.1. The members of the PSS are: 
Job 
Sub-unit 
Appointment 
Rank 
description 
(Page) 
Cadet Executive Officer (CEO) 
Maj 
1-79 
Cadet Quartermaster (CQM) 
Capt 
1-79 
County HQ 
Cadet Staff Officers7 
Capt 
 
Cadet Stores Assistant 
 
 
Administrative Officer (AO) 
 
1-80 
Area HQ 
Cadet Administrative Assistant (CAA) 
 
1-80 
1.2.2.3. ACF Officers 
1.2.2.3.1. Individual volunteers may be directly commissioned into the ACF if they have 
previous commissioned service, or may apply to be commissioned on joining or having 
joined to be an AI.  Successful applicants are appointed by the MOD to an Army Reserve 
General List Section B Commission for service with the ACF and while conducting ACF 
activities are expected to act in accordance with best values and standards of the British 
Army.  Eligibility rules, commissioning procedures and terms of service are aPart 2.2.  
The Cadet Commandant is responsible for the employment of the officers under their 
command in accordance with the establishments given on page 1-49.  The Cadet 
Commandant may utilise officers in un-established appointments according to need, 
providing the overall establishment is not exceeded in any rank.  Officers in County and 
Area HQ are categorised as “Staff Officers” for the purposes of applying age limitations to 
ACF service as set out on page 2-28. 
1.2.2.3.2. All ACF Officers are subject to Service Law whenever undertaking ACF duties 
and are subject to the Army’s Values and Standards and administrative action at all times.  
On initially joining the ACF as an adult and every five years after that they are subject to 
having undergone an appropriate background check8.  The Cadet Commandant, assisted 
by the CEO, is responsible for the career development of ACF Officers.  
Recommendations for promotion up to the rank of Major must be endorsed by the Chief 
Executive RFCA and endorsed and promulgated by the MOD subject to length of service 
eligibility, the appropriate course qualification and establishment vacancies.  The 
appointments of Cadet Commandant are subject to a Brigade Board. 
                                                
7 Peculiar to ACF Counties in Wales 
8 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
1-43 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 211 link to page 313 link to page 158  
1.2.2.4. ACF Adult Instructors 
1.2.2.4.1. The eligibility rules, appointment procedures and terms of volunteering for ACF 
Adult Instructors (AI) are on page 2-57 In accordance with the provisions laid out in RFA 
96
 
the RFCAs administer AIs who are civilian volunteers within the ACF.  Although they 
are not subject to Service Law, they are required to wear military uniform and rank while 
conducting ACF activities and are expected to act in accordance with the values and 
standards of the British Army.  On initially joining the ACF as an adult and every five years 
after that they are subject to having undergone an appropriate background check9. 
1.2.2.4.2. The only ACF AI non-commissioned ranks are listed below, regimental 
peculiarities may be used when addressing CFAVs but all administration and records are 
to use the standard nomenclature: 
a. 
Regimental Sergeant Major Instructor (RSMI). 
b. 
Sergeant Major Instructor (SMI). 
c. 
Staff Sergeant Instructor (SSI). 
d. 
Sergeant Instructor (SI). 
1.2.2.4.3. Warrants are not accorded to ACF AIs. 
1.2.2.4.4. An AI who is appropriately qualified may be appointed to be a Detachment 
Commander when there is no officer available.   
1.2.2.5. Civilian Assistants 
1.2.2.5.1. A Civilian Assistant (CA) is any individual not serving in either the Armed Forces 
or Cadet Forces who is invited, on the authority of the Cadet Commandant, either to 
instruct Cadets or to assist at a Detachment or on an activity, either in an instructional or 
an administrative role.  A CA does not wear military uniform, is not entitled to receive ACF 
remuneration or allowances but is allowed to claim reasonable expenses in accordance 
with Part 3.8 They are not permitted to supervise cadets unless there is an ACF officer or 
AI present.  A CA may be included in the ACF collective insurance scheme. 
                                                
9 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
1-44 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 71 link to page 71 link to page 103 link to page 105 link to page 113 link to page 113 link to page 107 link to page 199  
Part 1.3  Establishments 
1.3.1.1. General 
1.3.1.1.1. An establishment of ACF officers and AI for each ACF County is authorised by 
RC HQ Cadets Branch.  The criteria used for calculating establishments starts on page 1-
49
 
and shows the number of officers and AI by rank and by category in certain areas.  
Based on information received from RFCA, Brigade HQs are responsible for submitting 
establishment proposals to RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
1.3.1.1.2. ACF officers and AI may be given individual appointments at national and 
regional level, controlled through the operation of a NAL and RAL by RC HQ Cadets 
Branch.  Personnel who are on the RAL are still held on the strength of their parent county 
for administrative purposes but do not count against their establishment.  Authority for RAL 
appointments is renewed annually by RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
1.3.1.1.3. If a County’s strength is below establishment in any particular rank and 
category10, it may not hold officers above establishment in other ranks and categories with 
the following exceptions: 
a. 
If there is a vacancy in any rank in a particular category, an additional officer 
may be held in a lower rank in the same category. 
b. 
If there is a vacancy for a County HQ staff officer, an additional officer may be 
held in the same or lower rank as a Detachment officer. 
c. 
If a County strength is below establishment in Detachment officers, AI may be 
held in lieu of officers. 
1.3.1.1.4. The employment of officers within the establishment is at the discretion of the 
Cadet Commandant providing they are employed in the correct category. 
1.3.1.1.5. The list of established appointments along with ranks is as follows: 
a. 
Primary appointments.  Below is a list of ACF primary appointments.  Every 
CFAV with an ACF County11 must have one of the following as their primary role and 
this must be recorded as their appointment in Westminster. A CFAV can at most hold 
only one of the following appointments:  Cadet Commandant, Area Commander and 
Detachment Commander. 
Sub-unit 
Appointment 
Abbreviation 
Rank range 
Col/Lt 
Cadet Commandant 
Comdt 
Col/Maj12 
Deputy Cadet Commandant 
DComdt 
Lt Col 
County 
Regimental Sergeant Major 
County SMI 
RSMI 
Instructor (RSMI) 
County Training Officer (CTO) 
CTO 
Maj 
                                                
10 Categories are: County, Area and Detachment. 
11 ACF CFAVs may also hold a post on the NAL as their primary appointment. 
12 The Cadet Commandants of the Isle of Man, Orkney and Shetland ACF are to hold the acting paid rank of 
Major.  All other Cadet Commandants will hold the paid acting rank of Lt Col and may hold the unpaid acting 
rank of Col iaw par2.2.6.2.3.b. 
1-45 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 119 link to page 126 link to page 126 link to page 126 link to page 123 link to page 123 link to page 121 link to page 111 link to page 131 link to page 134 link to page 134 link to page 136 link to page 136 link to page 139 link to page 143 link to page 145 link to page 115 link to page 117  
Sub-unit 
Appointment 
Abbreviation 
Rank range 
Assistant County Training Officer 
ACTO 
SI - Capt 
County Shooting Officer 
Sh Off 
SI - Capt 
 
County Duke of Edinburgh’s 
DofE Off 
SI - Capt 
Award Officer 
County First Aid Training 
CFATO 
SI - Capt 
Officer (CFATO) 
County Public Relations Officer 
PRO 
SI - Capt 
Senior Chaplain 
Snr Chap 
CF4 - CF3 
Chaplain 
Chap 
CF4 - CF3 
County Music Officer 
Music Off 
SI - Capt 
Area Commander 
OC 
Maj 
 
2IC 
2Lt - Capt 
Area Staff Officer 
Area 
 
TO 
2Lt - Capt 
Area Training Officer 
Area Sergeant Major 
Area SM 
SMI 
Detachment Commander 
DC 
SI - Capt 
Detachment 
Detachment Instructor 
DI 
SI - Lt 
b. 
Secondary appointments.  Below is a list of ACF secondary appointments.  
CFAVs within an ACF County13 may have one of the following as their secondary role 
and if they do this must be recorded on Westminster.  
Sub-unit 
Appointment 
Abbreviation 
County AT Officer (CATO) 
CATO 
County Bandmaster 
BM 
County Drum/Bugle Major 
Drum / Bug Maj 
County Events Officer 
Ev Off 
County Expedition Officer 
Exped Off 
County 
County Navigation Officer 
NO 
County CIS Officer 
CISO 
County Sports officer 
Sport Off 
Cadet Vocational Qualifications 
CVQ Off 
Officer 
Area AT Officer 
Area AT Off 
Area DofE Officer 
Area DofE Off 
Area Expedition Officer 
Area Exped Off 
Area First Aid Training Advisor 
AFATA 
Area Navigation Officer 
ANO 
Area 
Area PR Officer 
APRO 
Area Shooting Officer 
A Sh Off 
Area Signals Officer 
ASigO 
Area Sports Officer 
A Sports Off 
Area Cadet Vocational 
ACVQ 
Qualifications Officer 
Detachment 
Music Instructor 
MI 
 
 
                                                
13 ACF CFAVs may also hold a post on the RAL as their secondary appointment. 
1-46 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 101 link to page 101 link to page 101 link to page 101 link to page 102 link to page 102 link to page 70  
1.3.1.2. ACF Professional Support Staff (PSS). 
1.3.1.2.1. The members of the Professional Support Staff (PSS), are full-time employees 
of the RFCA and are Crown Servants.  Their status and terms of employment are 
contained in the RFCA Staff Regulations and their job descriptions are at the pages listed.  
They are: 
Role 
Sub-unit 
Appointment 
Rank 
Specification 
(Page) 
CEO 
Maj 
1-79 
Cadet Quartermaster (CQM) 
Capt 
1-79 
County HQ 
Cadet Staff Officers14 
Capt 
1-79 
Cadet Stores Assistant 
 
1-79 
Administrative Officer (AO) 
 
1-80 
Area HQ 
Cadet Administrative Assistant (CAA) 
 
1-80 
1.3.1.3. Adjustments to Establishments 
1.3.1.3.1. RFCA and Brigade HQ should keep ACF establishments under review and 
forward proposals to RC HQ Cadets Branch for a reduction when necessary, particularly 
when a Detachment is to be closed.  If an increase to establishment is required to form a 
new Detachment, the appropriate proposal is to be submitted through the RFCA and the 
Brigade HQ to RC HQ Cadets Branch.  A proposal to increase the establishment of 
County or Area HQ staff is to be fully justified in writing. 
1.3.1.4. Opening New Detachments 
1.3.1.4.1. A new Detachment may only be opened with the approval of the Regional 
District/ Brigade HQ, in consultation with the RFCA, and the authority of RC HQ Cadets 
Branch.  Before a new Detachment is opened the following conditions are to be met: 
a. 
Suitable CFAVs are to be available.  The minimum requirement is two adults. 
b. 
There must be a sufficient number of potential cadets in the local area. 
c. 
Suitable accommodation is to be available without incurring undue expense. 
1.3.1.4.2. An application to open a new Detachment is to be submitted on the appropriate 
form
 
found on the Cadet Forces Resource Centreaccompanied by the appropriate 
proposal to increase the County establishment.  The Application is to be approved by the 
RFCA and the Brigade HQ before being submitted to RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
1.3.1.5. Closing Detachments 
1.3.1.5.1. A Detachment which falls below the minimum standards set out in Paragraph 
1.3.1.5.2 below is to be investigated by the Cadet Commandant in consultation with the 
RFCA.  If the Detachment is failing in one respect, the Cadet Commandant may consider 
that compensating factors exist that merit the Detachment remaining open.  If a 
Detachment is failing and is unable to improve in the course of a year, the Cadet 
Commandant should give serious consideration, with the endorsement of the Regional 
                                                
14 Wales only. 
1-47 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 69 link to page 69  
Brigade HQ and RFCA, to applying to RC HQ Cadets Branch for the Detachment to be 
closed. 
1.3.1.5.2. Standards that a Detachment is expected to achieve annually: 
a. 
At least two adults should have attended regularly for evening and weekend 
training. 
b. 
There should have been an average strength of not less than 15 cadets 
throughout the year. 
c. 
There should have been a satisfactory standard of training based on Star 
qualifications gained during the year.  Qualifications gained in the Duke of 
Edinburgh’s Award should also be considered. 
d. 
At least 50% of the CFAVs and cadets on strength, who have more than a 
year’s service, should have attended Annual Camp. 
1.3.1.6. Relocation of Detachments 
1.3.1.6.1. If the Cadet Commandant decides that a Detachment is to be relocated they are 
to ensure that the new location meets the criteria at Para 1.3.1.4.1 and that the form at 
mentioned at Para 1.3.1.4.2 is submitted (the proposal to increase the establishment is not 
required). 
1.3.1.7. Resubordination of Detachments 
1.3.1.7.1. A detachment may be resubordinated as long as the losing and gaining units 
agree and it is authorised the appropriate level as follows: 
a. 
Within an ACF County.  Authorised by Cadet Commandant as long as it will 
not change the number of established posts of any rank within the county.  If the 
number of established posts will change then the change must be authorised by SO1 
Policy and Plans at RC HQ Cadets Branch 
b. 
Between ACF Counties.  Authorised by SO1 Policy and Plans at RC HQ 
Cadets Branch. 
1.3.1.7.2. Once authorised the Westminster Support team are to be notified who will 
make the appropriate changes on Westminster. 
 
 
1-48 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.3.2 ACF County establishment scales 
1.3.2.1. Number and Rank of Adults in all Detachments 
Officers16 
AIs 
Number of cadets15 
Capt17 
Lt/2Lt 
SSI/SI 
0-25 
 


26-50 
 


51-75 



76-10018 



1.3.2.2. Number and Rank of HQ Area Staffs 
Number of 
Officers 
AIs 
detachments 
Maj 
Capt 
Lt19 
SMI 
<420 




4-7 



>8 




                                                
15 A viable ACF detachment should normally have a minimum of 25 Cadets on strength.  It is recognised that 
because of unique local circumstances that figure may be difficult to attain, and a waiver might have to be 
obtained from RC HQ Cadets Branch on the understanding that if the Cadet strength fell below 15 the 
detachment might have to close. 
16 AI, normally SMI, may be held on establishment in lieu of officers. 
17 A Captain may be held against a subaltern’s vacancy for every four subalterns on the strength of a county 
or equivalent ACF. 
18 The establishment of a detachment with over 100 Cadets will be decided by RC HQ Cadets Branch based 
on the recommendations of the detachment’s parent formation headquarters. 
19 CAA.  The Orkney ACF and Shetland ACF are not entitled to a CEO.  The functions of CEO, CQM and 
CAA in those Counties will be carried out by a CAA. 
20 No fixed establishment for Area HQ with fewer than five detachments.  RC HQ Cadets Branch will decide 
each case individually based on the recommendations of the area HQ parent formation headquarters. 
1-49 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 199  
1.3.2.3. Number and rank of county HQ staff 
 
Officers 
AIs 
Number of 
 
D of E 
detachments 
Cadet 
Deputy Cadet 
Training 
Award 
CEO 
CQM2 
Staff Officers 
Chaplain3 
RSM 
Commandant 
Commandant 
Officer 
Officer1 
 
<6 

 
 
6-19 

1 x Capt 
1 x CF4 
 
20-31 
1 x Lt Col 
1 x Capt 
2 x CF4 
Col/Lt Col/Maj4 
Maj 
Capt 
Maj 
Capt 
RSMI 
 
32-40 
2 x Lt Col 
 
2 x Capt 
3 x CF4 
>41 
3 x Lt Col 
 
1.3.2.3.1. AI may be appointed within the authorised establishment by Cadet Commandants to perform the duties of cooks and/or drivers 
in addition to their normal duties. 
1.3.2.3.2. An ACF County may be authorised by RC HQ Cadets Branch from time to time to hold officer(s) in excess of their 
establishments for the exclusive purpose of filling regional RAL appointments.
                                                
1 The entitlement for these officers exists only for ACF Counties operating the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award. 
2 RFCA Wales also have Cadet Staff Officers who have the same terms and conditions as CQMs. 
3 Senior Chaplain at the parent Brigade HQ is to be responsible for confirming the nomination of the Senior Chaplain in those ACF Counties entitled to two or more 
chaplains.  ACF Counties who wish to overbear extra chaplains should represent their cases to their Senior Chaplain at their Brigade HQ.  ACF chaplains must be 
ordained clergymen.  Vacancies in the establishment for chaplain’s officers may not be fil ed by ACF officers. 
4 The Cadet Commandants of the Isle of Man, Orkney and Shetland ACF are to hold the acting paid rank of Major.  All other Cadet Commandants will hold the paid 
acting rank of Lt Col and may hold the unpaid acting rank of Col iaw para 2.2.6.2.3.b. 
1-50 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 1.4  Role specifications – National 
level 

1.4.1 GOC RC – ACF Responsibilities and tasks 
1.4.1.1. General 
1.4.1.1.1. Command of the ACF is delegated to GOC RC by Commander Land Forces.  
The authority is contained in CLFs Directive.  The main tasks are repeated from the 
directive below. 
1.4.1.2. Responsibilities 
1.4.1.2.1. GOC RC is to deliver cost effective, safe, challenging and rewarding Army 
themed cadet experience in order to develop young people and increase awareness and 
understanding of the Army’s role in society and of career opportunities in the Army’s 
Regular and Reserve Forces: 
a. 
Improve Community Links.  Develop and implement a programme to optimise 
cadet units and increase the Army’s reach and influence in the communities it serves 
and from which it draws its support. 
b. 
Resilience.  Deliver flourishing and resilient ACFs that provide challenging 
military themed and adventurous training in a secure and safe environment while 
retaining the confidence and support of a fully recruited team of effective and 
motivated adult volunteers and PSS. 
c. 
Safety.  Develop a cadet training safety inspection capability to provide 
assurance on training support safety for both ACF and CCF (A). 
d. 
Safeguarding.  Refresh and implement a safeguarding plan that ensures 
appropriate training and education for all adult military and civilian personnel working 
with the Army’s Cadet Forces. 
e. 
Government and Youth Initiatives.  Support, as directed, the Government 
youth agendas both in schools and communities, and other programmes as they 
evolve. 
 
 
1-51 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
1-52 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.4.2 Representative Cadet Commandant 
1.4.2.1. Background 
1.4.2.1.1. With many Cadet Commandants spread nationwide, it is not simple to obtain a 
corporate Cadet Commandant’s view on any matter.  Furthermore, Cadet Commandants’ 
concerns on RC HQ Cadets Branch’s proposals take time to pass up the various Chains of 
Command and can lose their coherence on route. 
1.4.2.2. Role Specification 
1.4.2.2.1. The Representative Cadet Commandant (RCC) is to be the focal point of contact 
for all Cadet Commandants and for RC HQ Cadets Branch, and is to be used by the latter 
as a conduit for seeking corporate views and by the former as a means to air concerns at 
the highest levels. 
1.4.2.2.2. The RCC is to have the following additional responsibilities that will give them 
the means to receive and pass views and concerns to those that can take action: 
a. 
The RCC is to be the ACF Member of the ACEG and must attend all meetings.  
The RCC must be given the opportunity to seek the views of Cadet Commandants on 
agenda items before each meeting. 
b. 
The RCC is to attend the ACF Cadet Training Working Group that meets twice 
yearly at CTC Frimley Park and is to canvas Cadet Commandants for Training issues 
before the Committee meets. 
c. 
The RCC is to attend the Regular and Army Reserve Training Day at CTC 
Frimley Park and is to deliver the appropriate lecture. 
1.4.2.2.3. The RCC may also be the ACF Brigade Representative in their own Brigade. 
1.4.2.3. Criteria 
1.4.2.3.1. The RCC should be an experienced (long serving) ACF Officer and have been a 
Cadet Commandant for at least 12 months.  They must be able to put aside considerable 
periods of time over and above their normal Cadet Commandant’s duties.  For practical 
considerations the RCC should be based within travelling distance of London and CTC 
Frimley Park.  They should be able to deliver lectures at CTC Frimley Park confidently and 
competently. 
1.4.2.4. Tenure of Office 
1.4.2.4.1. The RCC must be a serving Cadet Commandant.  On retirement from the latter 
post the RCC automatically ceases to be eligible for the post of RCC.  The outgoing RCC 
must therefore give at least 9 months’ notice to RC HQ Cadets Branch so that a new 
Cadet Commandant can be identified and proposed at the Cadet Commandants’ meeting. 
1.4.2.4.2. In the event of the RCC proving to be unequal to the task (lack of time, inability 
to lecture at CTC Frimley Park, loss of confidence of either Cadet Commandants or RC 
HQ Cadets Branch) RC HQ Cadets Branch will ask Cadet Commandants to nominate 
another RCC as soon as possible. 
1-53 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.4.2.5. Selection of Replacement 
1.4.2.5.1. Once it is known that an incumbent is about to relinquish their post as the RCC, 
RC HQ Cadets Branch will write to all Cadet Commandants and ask for volunteers to 
apply for the position. 
1.4.2.5.2. Once all replies are received, a board will be convened, consisting of 
representatives from RC HQ Cadets Branch, ACFA and RFCA, to select a suitable 
candidate.  The board’s selection will then be presented to the ACEG for final approval. 
1-54 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.4.3 National DofE Award advisor 
1.4.3.1.1. The National Adviser – DofE is the senior volunteer officer responsible for 
maintaining advice and support on DofE matters.  They are responsible for the functional 
management of the Panel Cadet Force Adult Volunteers in the roles of Regional Advisers 
and other Specialist Advisers. Also being responsible for maintaining a full membership of 
the Panel and for planning the succession of members, in conjunction with the ACFA UK 
DofE Development Manager.  
1.4.3.1.2. The National Adviser - DofE will also: 
a. 
Be responsible for organising Panel meetings and sub-meetings. 
b. 
Be responsible for the annual ACF DofE Conference and Training Calendar. 
c. 
Liaise with HQ Regional Command Training Development Team and be a 
member of the ACF Training Development Working Group (in conjunction with the 
UK DofE Development Manager). 
d. 
Communicate with the Brigade Colonel Cadets, Brigade DofE Advisers and 
Cadet Commandants to provide advice, information and support on all aspects of the 
DofE. 
e. 
Deliver presentation briefings to conferences and courses as required at CTC 
Frimley Park and other venues as needed. 
f. 
Liaise with and support the UK DofE Development Manager in ensuring the 
quality assurance of the DofE within the ACFA Licenced Organisations is maintained. 
g. 
Support the UK DofE Development Manager on matters relating to DofE Award 
polices. 
h. 
Work alongside the UK DofE Development Manager in relation to the ACF’s 
Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Development Plan focusing on improved participation 
and achievement. 
i. 
Liaise on DofE Award matters with the Air Training Corps, Sea Cadet Corps, 
the Combined Cadet Force and other youth organisations. 
j. 
Consider matters relating to vocational qualifications associated with DofE. 
1.4.3.1.3. The National Adviser - DofE will prepare an annual report on panel activities and 
achievements. 
1.4.3.1.4. The post holder reports to the ACFA Director of Finance, Operations and 
Training (DFOT), with dotted line responsibility to ACOS Cadets Branch in HQ Regional 
Command. 
 
 
1-55 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-56 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.4.4 ACFA UK Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Development Manager 
1.4.4.1. General 
1.4.4.1.1. The UK DofE Development Manager is a full time employee of ACFA who runs 
the DofE programme for the ACF and associated CCFs throughout the UK.  The UK 
Development Manager is the DofE Manager for the ACF in England and Wales and for 
associated CCF Contingents, and works with the DofE Managers in ACFA Northern 
Ireland and ACFA Scotland to ensure the on-going development of DofE throughout the 
UK. 
1.4.4.2. Tasks 
1.4.4.2.1. The DofE Development Manager will: 
a. 
Promote, organise and administer training in DofE Leadership and Management 
in the ACF and associated CCF Contingents. 
b. 
Carry out the duties of DofE Manager for the ACFA in England and Wales and 
for associated CCF Contingents. 
c. 
Work with National ACFA DofE Managers in Northern Ireland and Scotland to 
develop the DofE in the ACF and to represent them where necessary; be the lead 
DofE Manager for the ACFA Operating Authorities. 
d. 
Chair the ACFA DofE Advisory Panel. 
e. 
Encourage and support all leader training throughout the UK. 
f. 
Liaise with DofE National and Regional officers to promote the DofE, particularly 
in the ACF and, where appropriate, CCF. 
g. 
Be the ACFA/CCFA point of contact on DofE matters. 
h. 
Represent the DofE in the ACF/CCF on the Army HQ Cadet Training Working 
Group. 
i. 
Deliver DofE input to CTC Frimley Park and other Courses and Conferences as 
appropriate. 
j. 
Represent the DofE in the ACF/CCF at Conferences as appropriate. 
k. 
Liaise with ACFA Panel / Committee Chairmen and with CVQO to promote the 
interests of the DofE in the ACF. 
l. 
Attend Gold Award presentations where possible. 
m. 
Carry out investigations into any problems arising from ACF/CCF participation 
in the DofE. 
n. 
Keep up to date with new practices and initiatives from the DofE. 
o. 
Ensure ACF/CCF DofE literature is up to date. 
1-57 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
p. 
Advise on promotion and publicity of the DofE in the ACF/CCF. 
q. 
Monitor overseas expeditions. 
r. 
Monitor Quality Control of the DofE in the ACF and associated CCF 
Contingents. 
s. 
React to current developments. 
 
 
1-58 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 49 link to page 49  
1.4.5 Chairman Cadet Force Shooting Committee 
1.4.5.1. Status 
1.4.5.1.1. The position of Chairman ACF Shooting Committee holds an established post 
on the NAL.  The list is controlled by RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
1.4.5.2. Duties and responsibilities 
1.4.5.2.1. Terms of reference.  The Chairman of the ACF Shooting Committee is 
responsible for ensuring that the tasks set out in the Shooting Committee’s Terms of 
Reference are undertaken fully and within budget.  The Terms of Reference are on page 
1-29
.
 
1.4.5.2.2. Management of membership.  The Chairman is responsible for maintaining a 
full membership of the Committee and for planning the succession of members.  They are 
also responsible for the functional management of the Committee’s CFAVs in the roles of 
regional representatives, ACF National Chief Coach and ACF CRO. 
1.4.5.2.3. Liaising with other organisations.  In carrying out their duties and 
responsibilities, the Chairman will liaise with the following organisations. 
a. 
RC HQ Training Development Team and the SO2 IM.  The Chairman will be 
a member of the ACF Training Development Working Group. 
b. 
CTC Frimley Park.  The Chairman will deliver presentation briefings to 
conferences and courses as required by the Chief Instructor. 
c. 
CCRS.  The Chairman will set annual targets for ACF shooting competitions 
and ACF training courses to be delivered by the CCRS and will monitor and report on 
delivery and output.  In addition, the Chairman will represent ACF interests at all 
levels within the CCRS. 
d. 
Other Youth Organisations.  The Chairman will liaise on cadet shooting 
matters with the Air Training Corps, the Sea Cadet Corps, the Combined Cadet 
Force and other appropriate youth organisations. 
e. 
National Small-bore Rifle Association (NSRA).  On matters relating to air rifle 
and .22 rifle shooting and competitions. 
f. 
National Rifle Association (NRA).  On matters relating to full-bore target rifle 
shooting and competitions. 
1.4.5.2.4. Budget Management.  The Chairman will produce an annual activity plan with 
forecast costs for VA and Travel and Subsistence relating to all Committee members. 
1.4.5.2.5. Reporting.  The Chairman will prepare an annual report on Committee activities 
and achievements. 
1.4.5.3. Qualifications and experience 
1.4.5.3.1. The Chairman of the ACF Shooting Committee must: 
1-59 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
a. 
Have held a senior ACF appointment and have a broad experience in ACF 
shooting at county and regional level. 
b. 
Have a thorough knowledge and understanding of: 
(1)  The rudiments of marksmanship and coaching. 
(2)  The APC (ACF) Syllabus and test requirements for skill at arms and 
shooting. 
(3)  The contents of the Cadet Training Manual Skill at Arms & Shooting. 
(4)  The skill at arms and shooting training requirements for adult volunteers. 
(5)  The rules and conditions of shooting competitions and opportunities 
available to the ACF. 
c. 
Have experience in the planning and delivery of training programmes. 
d. 
Have experience in the preparation and delivery of briefings and presentations 
to formed groups of all ranks. 
1.4.5.4. Personal attributes 
1.4.5.4.1. The post holder is required to be: 
a. 
Perceptive, open minded and of sound judgement. 
b. 
Computer literate and an articulate communicator at all levels. 
1.4.5.5. Reporting chain and lines of responsibilities 
1.4.5.5.1. The post holder reports to ACOS Cadets RC HQ. 
1-60 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.4.6 ACF National Chief Coach 
1.4.6.1. General 
1.4.6.1.1. The ACF National Chief Coach will be a CFAV member of the ACF Shooting 
Committee and will report to the Chairman. 
1.4.6.2. Status 
1.4.6.2.1. The position holds an established post on the NAL.  The list is controlled by RC 
HQ Cadets Branch. 
1.4.6.3. Duties and responsibilities 
1.4.6.3.1. The Chief Coach will provide advice and support to: 
a. 
The annual Shooting Officers’ Conference. 
b. 
The annual ACF Target Rifle Coaching Course. 
c. 
The ACF Pre-Bisley Coaching Course. 
d. 
The Inter-Service Cadet Rifle Meeting. 
e. 
Regional target rifle coaching courses. 
f. 
The training and preparation of ACF Cadets selected for overseas teams. 
g. 
Any other shooting matters as required by the Chairman. 
1.4.6.3.2. In addition, the Chief Coach will assist on activities undertaken by the CCRS 
which may include: 
a. 
Training Ex Maple Taste. 
b. 
The Athelings Pre-Selection course. 
 
 
1-61 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-62 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.4.7 ACF Chief Range Officer (CRO) 
1.4.7.1. General 
1.4.7.1.1. The ACF CRO will be a CFAV member of the ACF Shooting Committee and will 
report to the Chairman. 
1.4.7.2. Status 
1.4.7.2.1. The position holds an established post on the NAL.  The list is controlled by RC 
HQ Cadets Branch. 
1.4.7.3. Duties and responsibilities 
1.4.7.3.1. The ACF CRO will provide support to: 
a. 
The annual Shooting Officers’ Conference. 
b. 
The annual Target Rifle Coaching Course at CTC Frimley Park. 
c. 
The ACF Pre-Bisley Coaching Course. 
d. 
The Inter-Service Cadet Rifle Meeting. 
e. 
The Cadet Inter-Service Skill at Arms Meeting. 
f. 
Any other shooting activity as required by the Chairman. 
 
 
1-63 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-64 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.4.8 Army Cadet AT Adviser 
1.4.8.1. General 
1.4.8.1.1. The Army Cadet AT Adviser is a full time employee of the ACFA, who advises 
RC, ACFs and CCFs throughout the UK.  Their role consists of advising on policy, devising 
suitable policy, undertaking the training assurance for the use of Mobile Climbing Towers 
and the training and assessment of climbing supervisors and operators. 
1.4.8.2. Reporting and Discipline: 
1.4.8.2.1. The Line Manager for reporting purposes will be the General Secretary, ACFA. 
1.4.8.2.2. The Line Manager on a day to day basis is ACOS Cadets. 
1.4.8.2.3. Appraisal: The ACFA Appraisal Procedures will be followed.  The General 
Secretary will conduct the appraisal following consultation with the Colonel Cadets. 
1.4.8.2.4. Discipline: The ACOS Cadets will report disciplinary matters to the General 
Secretary ACFA.  The General Secretary ACFA will then initiate disciplinary procedures in 
line with the ACFA Disciplinary and Disciplinary Dismissal Procedures contained in the 
ACFA Employee Handbook. 
1.4.8.3. Main Tasks 
1.4.8.3.1. To undertake the role of Cadet Adviser to the CCF (Army) and ACF units by 
providing them with help and information on AT. 
1.4.8.3.2. To undertake the Liaison role between CCAT and the Army Cadet Organisation. 
1.4.8.3.3. To advise HQ Land on AT Policy for the CCF (Army) and ACF. 
1.4.8.3.4. To liaise with the equivalent of the Cadet AT Adviser for the CCF RN, CCF RAF, 
MSSC and ATC. 
1.4.8.3.5. To provide the Quality Assurance for the operation and supervision of Mobile 
Climbing Towers fitted with automatic belay devices. 
1.4.8.3.6. Advise CCAT in relation to the effects and implications of civilian outside 
agencies e.g.  schools, exam boards. 
1.4.8.3.7. To produce and present the Army Cadet Expedition (ACE) budget (to include the 
Bacon Bursary contributions) in consultation with the ACE Leader. 
1.4.8.3.8. To moderate and assist in the delivery of:  
a. 
Mobile Climbing Tower Award and Provider courses. 
b. 
CCAT courses for cadets and Adult Instructors in order that they have the 
opportunity to gain refresher training, proficiency awards and NGB qualifications 
providing appropriate qualifications are held. 
1-65 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
c. 
Expedition First Aid courses – also to advise on content in consultation with the 
ACE Leader. 
1.4.8.3.9. Advise and lead a National Army Cadet expedition biennially including the 
training of participants, CFAV development and delivery of the Expedition Planning 
Leadership and Management workshop. 
1.4.8.3.10. Advertise, oversee and arrange the Bacon Bursary for ACF cadets including 
selection. 
1.4.8.4. Requirements of the Post: 
1.4.8.4.1. The Skills required by the job holder are: 
a. 
Essential 
(1)  Significant experience in the Army’s Cadet forecast. 
(2)  Proven administration skills. 
(3)  Computer literate. 
(4)  Proven expertise in AT. 
(5)  Proven management experience of volunteers. 
(6)  Ability to work flexible hours. 
(7)  Mobile. 
(8)  Proven ability to speak and deliver presentations to large audiences. 
(9)  Proven ability to motivate and enthuse others. 
(10)  Able to work from home. 
b. 
Desirable 
(1)  Knowledge of NGB awards. 
(2)  Knowledge of the JSAT system. 
(3)  AT Qualifications in several disciplines. 
(4)  Knowledge of the issues affecting both CCF (Army) and ACF. 
(5)  Long term planning ability. 
(6)  Experience of running AT events/expeditions. 
(7)  Knowledge of the CCF and ACF, MSSC and ATC organisations. 
(8)  Ability to represent the Army Cadet Movement on NGB committees. 
 
1-66 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.4.9 National Navigation Officer 
1.4.9.1. General Description 
1.4.9.1.1. The National Navigation Officer (NNO) will have governance and oversight of 
the Navigation syllabus by supporting the development and delivery of the APC Cadet 
Training Syllabus and also through liaison with the national governing body (NGB), the 
NNAS.  The NNA will: 
a. 
Oversee the progressive introduction of the Navigation syllabus. 
b. 
Monitor, evaluate and maintain the delivery of the navigation syllabus. 
c. 
Support a network of County and Brigade/Regional navigation officers.   
d. 
To oversee the training of navigation trainers and assist in the delivery of 
training the trainer where required.   
e. 
Conduct the vetting and registration of Army Cadet NNAS course tutors and the 
updating of their personal profiles on Westminster. 
f. 
Ensure the moderation of 2-star and 4-star navigation assessments that are 
also to be used as assessments for bronze and silver level NNAS awards 
respectively. 
g. 
Be the designated Navigation syllabus sponsor and attend Training Review 
Working Group meetings, undertaking tasks relating to the maintenance and 
development of the Navigation syllabus as required. 
h. 
Become a Board member of the NNAS, attend Board meetings and represent 
the interests of the Army's Cadet Forces to this NGB. 
i. 
The post holder will work from home. 
j. 
The post holder will have to manage a budget. 
1.4.9.2. Terms and conditions 
1.4.9.2.1. The post holder will be employed in their ACF rank and appointed to the NAL or 
RAL.  The post is for an ACF or CCF(Army) Officer, payment is by VA plus reasonable 
T&S and is administered by the ACFA.  A formal contract will be signed by both parties.  
The Terms and Conditions are those laid down for all ACFA employees in the Employee 
Handbook, which is obtainable from the ACFA. 
1.4.9.3. Requirements of the Post 
1.4.9.3.1. Essential: 
a. 
Meets the criteria for potential ACF Officers. 
1-67 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 158  
b. 
Undergo an appropriate background check1. 
c. 
Experience of the Army's Cadet Forces. 
d. 
Competent administrative skills including being conversant with Army staff 
procedures. 
e. 
Articulate and able to present in public forums. 
f. 
Computer literate. 
g. 
Hold one or more of the following outdoor awards that permit the delivery of 
NNAS Bronze and Silver award training and assessment courses: 
(1)  Civilian awards: WGL (soon to be H&ML), ML or higher, NNAS Gold, BOF 
UKCC Level 2 Coach. 
(2)  Military awards: MLT, JSMEL/JSMLS or higher, SAS Mountain Cadre, 
Royal Marines ML2/ML1. 
h. 
Ability to plan and manage a budget. 
i. 
Ability to manage volunteers. 
j. 
Ability to work with a National Governing Body (NGB) and knowledge of NGB 
procedures. 
k. 
Ability to work flexible hours. 
l. 
Car owner, with no more than 6 points on driving license on appointment. 
m. 
Ability to motivate and enthuse others, especially volunteers. 
1.4.9.3.2. Desirable: 
a. 
Holder of NNAS Silver Course provider or NNAS Gold trainer and assessor 
accreditation. 
b. 
Experience of delivering Silver or Gold NNAS training and assessment courses. 
c. 
Experience of delivering BEL, WGL (soon to be H&ML), ML or NNAS Gold 
courses. 
d. 
Long term planning ability. 
e. 
Experience of working with NGBs. 
                                                
1 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
1-68 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 1.5  Role specifications – Brigade 
level  

1.5.1 Brigade Commanders – ACF Responsibilities 
1.5.1.1. General 
1.5.1.1.1. Advise GOC RC, through the chain of command, and the appropriate RFCA, on 
the organisation and establishment of the ACF including the formation and disbandment of 
ACF detachments. 
1.5.1.1.2. Advise Cadet Commandants. 
1.5.1.1.3. Visit ACF Annual Camps. 
1.5.1.1.4. Direct affiliated and sponsor Regular Army and Army Reserve units to provide 
as much assistance as possible to meet the requirements of ACF Detachments, 
particularly for out of camp training. 
1.5.1.1.5. Lead in the identification, selection and appointment of ACF Honorary Colonels 
and Cadet Commandants and assist in the selection, appointment and promotion of other 
ACF officers. 
1.5.1.1.6. Assist Cadet Commandants in ensuring the continued efficiency of all 
Detachments in their counties. 
1.5.1.1.7. Through the Training Safety Advisers (TSA) ensure that standards of safety in 
training and standards in health and safety, as it applies to training, are maintained. 
1.5.1.1.8. Ensure that ACF CFAVs have and maintain a standard of training appropriate to 
their appointments. 
1.5.1.2. Detachment inspections 
1.5.1.2.1. The Brigade Commander, or an Army officer nominated by them, accompanied 
by the Cadet Commandant or their representative, is to make at least one annual visit to 
every ACF Detachment in its own location.  The nominated officer should be of field rank.  
Where it is not possible to nominate an officer of field rank, the nominated individual must 
be a commissioned officer.  The purpose of this inspection is to: 
a. 
Meet the Detachment Commander, other officers and AI and help resolve any 
problems. 
b. 
Examine Detachment records, ensure that training is being carried out in 
accordance with current policy and instructions in the Army Proficiency Certificate 
(APC(ACF)) Syllabus, and ensure that all training is being conducted safely. 
c. 
Inspect the accommodation and training facilities, to ensure that the 
arrangements for the security of arms and ammunition are in accordance with LFSO 
2901
and that SHE instructions are known and being complied with. 
1-69 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
d. 
Report problems and irregularities through the chain of command to RC HQ 
Cadets Branch, RFCA or ACFA as appropriate. 
1.5.1.2.2. The inspecting officer is to record the annual inspection on AFE 7502 – The 
Detachment Inspection Report and distribute the report in accordance with the instructions 
on it. 
1.5.1.3. ACF Conferences 
1.5.1.3.1. Brigade Commanders are to hold a Cadet Force Conference or Study Period 
annually to discuss matters and problems affecting their ACF counties.  The following 
should be invited to attend: 
a. 
General Secretary ACFA or their representative. 
b. 
Representative from RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
c. 
The Chief Executive of the appropriate RFCA or their Deputy. 
d. 
Cadet Commandants. 
e. 
Brigade HQ staff as appropriate. 
f. 
CTT Commanders. 
1.5.1.4. GOC RCs Detailed Tasks Directive to Brigade Commanders 
1.5.1.4.1. As directed annually in the GOC RC Plan. 
1-70 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.5.2 Brigade Shooting Officer 
1.5.2.1. General 
1.5.2.1.1. Each Brigade will be represented on the Committee by the Brigade Shooting 
Officer appointed by the Brigade HQ.  The Brigade Shooting Officer should be the subject 
matter expert for skill at arms and shooting training and will often be a County Shooting 
Officer within the region.  The Brigade Shooting Officer is responsible for fostering and 
maintaining an interest in ACF shooting, including competitions, and for enhancing 
shooting standards and participation. 
1.5.2.2. Status 
1.5.2.2.1. Each Brigade Shooting Officer holds an established post on the RAL which is 
controlled by RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
1.5.2.3. Duties and responsibilities 
1.5.2.3.1. The Brigade Shooting Officer will: 
a. 
Be proactive in encouraging the development of shooting skills and the 
participation in competitions throughout the Brigade. 
b. 
Liaise with County Headquarters and Shooting Officers in the region, to provide 
advice and support on all aspects of shooting, particularly competitions and adult 
training courses. 
c. 
Liaise with Brigade HQ and CTT to provide advice and support on ACF 
shooting matters. 
d. 
Advise and assist the CTT in the planning and delivery of the annual Brigade 
Cadet Target Rifle and Skill-at-Arms Meetings. 
e. 
Attend all meetings of the ACF Shooting Committee to represent all Brigade 
shooting matters and to disseminate information back to the Brigade and Counties. 
f. 
Attend the annual ACF Shooting Officers’ Conference at CTC Frimley Park. 
g. 
Plan and deliver, with the assistance and support of Brigade HQ and County 
Shooting Officers, an annual regional target rifle coaching course for ACF adult 
volunteers. 
h. 
Undertake any other shooting related task as directed by Brigade HQ. 
1.5.2.4. Knowledge, skills and training 
1.5.2.4.1. To be able to discharge those duties and responsibilities, the Brigade Shooting 
Officer will: 
a. 
Have a thorough knowledge and understanding of: 
(1)  Range management, marksmanship and coaching 
1-71 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
(2)  The APC (ACF) Syllabus and test requirements 
(3)  The contents of the Cadet Training Manuals. 
(4)  The contents of AC 71855-C: Regulations for Cadets Training with 
Cadet Weapon Systems and Pyrotechnics
.
 
(5)  Rules and conditions of shooting competitions and opportunities available 
to the ACF. 
b. 
Acquire and maintain a high level of personal skill and knowledge of shooting 
and coaching by attendance at: 
(1)  Cadet Range Management Courses. 
(2)  ACF Shooting Officers’ Conferences. 
(3)  ACF Target Rifle Coaching Courses. 
(4)  National Rifle Association Cadet Officers/Instructors Coaching Courses. 
(5)  The Inter-Service Cadet Rifle Meeting. 
(6)  The Cadet Inter-Service Skill-at-Arms Meeting. 
1-72 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.5.3 Brigade First Aid Training Adviser (Brigade FAA) 
1.5.3.1. Role 
1.5.3.1.1. The Brigade FAA is responsible for providing advice and support to ACF 
counties and to CCF (Army) sections.  The Brigade FAA will also support where 
practicable other sections of the CCF and other Cadet Forces.  Specific responsibilities 
are: 
a. 
Co-ordinate and manage: 
(1)  Resources. 
(2)  Brigade First Aid Competition. 
(3)  Brigade First Aid Panel. 
(4)  Trainer Verification. 
(5)  Support for trainer qualifications (PTLLS/CTLLS). 
b. 
Monitor 2 Star/Youth First Aid training; maintain records of training completed 
and issue certificates. 
c. 
Deliver appropriate CPD and development training/updating. 
d. 
Represent Brigade on the ACFA National First Aid Panel. 
e. 
Support CTC Frimley Park/ACFA First Aid events. 
1.5.3.2. Communication: 
1.5.3.2.1. The Brigade FAA: 
a. 
Is responsible to the Brigade Commander via SO2/SO3 Cadets. 
b. 
Will communicate with CFATOs to provide, advice, information and support. 
c. 
May seek advice and information from ACFA, and communicate with ACFA on 
all matters relating to First Aid.   
1.5.3.3. Qualification: 
1.5.3.3.1. The Brigade FAA should: 
a. 
Hold a current full First Aid certificate. 
b. 
Be a currently registered First Aid trainer. 
c. 
Hold recognised teaching, assessing and verification qualifications. 
 
 
1-73 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-74 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.5.4 Regional Navigation Officer 
1.5.4.1. General Description 
1.5.4.1.1. Navigation forms a key element of the APC Cadet Training Syllabus.  The recent 
changes to the Navigation syllabus, which is directly linked to the NNAS has highlighted 
the need to appoint regional Navigation Advisers to further improve the governance and 
oversight of the new syllabus at brigade/regional level.  The role of this regional adviser is: 
a. 
To oversee the progressive introduction of the Navigation syllabus within a 
Regional setting. 
b. 
To monitor, evaluate and maintain the delivery of the navigation syllabus at a 
Regional level. 
c. 
To furnish the National Navigation Adviser with Regional navigation assessment 
course statistics as required. 
d. 
To lead the development of Navigation at a regional level. 
e. 
To organise the training of navigation trainers and enable the delivery of training 
the trainer where required at Regional level. 
f. 
To promote the identification to the National Navigation Adviser and support the 
training of suitable Army Cadet NNAS course tutors. 
g. 
The external moderation of 2-star and 4-star navigation assessments that are 
also to being used as assessments for bronze and silver level NNAS awards 
respectively. 
h. 
To attend national navigation meetings and undertake tasks relating to the 
maintenance and development of the Navigation syllabus at County/Contingent level 
as required. 
i. 
To chair regional navigation meetings with unit navigation officers as required. 
1.5.4.2. Terms and conditions 
1.5.4.2.1. The post holder will be included on the RAL for a period of three years to act as 
the representative for that Brigade.  This post attracts a grant of up to 10 VA plus 
reasonable T&S administered through their home ACF County.   
1.5.4.3. Requirements of the post 
1.5.4.3.1. Essential: 
a. 
Is an established CFAV within the Brigade. 
b. 
Hold a civilian (WGL, ML or higher, NNAS Gold, BOF UKCC Level 2 Coach) or 
military outdoor award (MLT, JSMEL, SAS Mountain Cadre, Royal Marines 
ML2/ML1) that permits the delivery of NNAS Bronze and Silver award training and 
assessment courses. 
1-75 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
c. 
Is an authorised Army Cadet NNAS Course Tutor. 
d. 
Ability to communicate with volunteers and able to deliver training courses in 
public forums. 
e. 
Computer literate. 
f. 
Ability to implement and manage a training programme. 
g. 
Ability to motivate and enthuse others, especially volunteers. 
1.5.4.3.2. Desirable: 
a. 
Experience of delivering Bronze or Silver NNAS training and assessment 
courses. 
b. 
Attendance at an NNAS Course Tutor workshop 
c. 
Proven administrative skills. 
d. 
Long term planning ability. 
e. 
Experience of working within NGB guidelines. 
 
1-76 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.5.5 Brigade DofE Award Advisor 
1.5.5.1. General 
1.5.5.1.1. There are a number of DofE Advisors constituting the Advisory Panel, chaired by 
the ACFA UK DofE Development Manager.  Each Advisor represents a specific part of the 
United Kingdom or particular area of activity (including associated CCF Contingents).  All 
members of the Advisory Panel will be serving CFAVs and will be on the National or 
Regional Employment List: their main tasks will be: 
a. 
Essential Tasks. 
(1)  Advisory Service.  Advisors will make themselves available to answer 
queries and help to deal with problems arising in the Counties or area of activity 
they represent.  They should make contact with each County/Contingent DofE 
Officer and ensure lines of communication are established.  Problems beyond 
the ability of the Advisor to solve should be referred to the appropriate ACFA 
HQ.  Where DofE participation is low, the Advisor will be expected to be 
proactive in contacting the County/Contingent and discussing a strategy for 
improvement. 
(2)  Be proficient in the use of eDofE.  Advisors will normally be the first 
point of contact for enquiries from their Country / Region about the DofE’s on-
line recording and administration system eDofE.  They will have a good working 
knowledge of the system, and will have a process in place to enable the 
approval all Silver awards in their Country / Region. 
(3)  DofE Leadership Training.  Advisors will make themselves familiar with 
the DofE’s Modular Training Framework (MTF) and Country / Region Advisors 
will arrange to have sufficient qualified Course Directors and Course Tutors 
available to make their Country / Region self-sufficient in provision of the DofE’s 
Introduction to the DofE course.  Advisors will also respond to demand in their 
Country / Region for the DofE’s Expedition Supervisor Training course. 
(4)  Attendance at Panel Meetings.  Panel meetings are held at least once 
annually at a venue to be advised.  Each Advisor will be expected to submit an 
annual report on the progress of the DofE in their area of responsibility.  
Advisors will be expected to contribute to other discussions of a general nature 
arising during these and any other ad hoc meetings. 
(5)  Contact with DofE Director and Staff of UK Offices.  The Advisor 
should establish contact with their local Office of the Duke of Edinburgh's Award 
to provide an overview of the progress of the DofE in the ACF and associated 
CCF Contingents in their area. 
b. 
Other Tasks. 
(1)  In addition to the essential tasks listed above, Advisors may carry out 
other tasks as considered necessary, within the constraints of their time and 
ability.  Some examples are given below. 
1-77 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 99  
(a)  National/Regional Conference.  The Advisor may deem it 
advantageous to arrange occasional Conferences for CFAVs experienced 
in DofE leadership, to discuss matters of common interest. 
(b)  Attendance at Events Arranged by DofE Directors.  When 
possible these events – usually meetings or conferences - should be 
supported by the Advisor to ensure the ACF is represented. 
(c)  Presentations.  The Advisor may be able to assist Counties with 
arranging suitable high profile events for the presentation of certificates to 
young people. 
(d)  Centrally Organised Expeditions.  The Advisor may wish to 
arrange or support expedition ventures, particularly at Silver and Gold, and 
possibly overseas, for the Counties in their area. 
(e)  Tri-Service Discussions.  Where opposite numbers in the ATC and 
SCC can be identified, the opportunity may arise to discuss matters of 
mutual interest and perhaps offer joint activities where appropriate. 
1.5.5.1.2. The list is not exhaustive, and some Advisors may wish an even wider 
involvement in promoting the DofE; however, it is emphasised that only the tasks in Para 
1.5.5.1.1.a are mandatory. 
1.5.5.1.3. Development Network: Advisors are encouraged to identify people interested in 
and committed to the DofE, and to form a development network to promote the DofE in 
their area of responsibility. 
1.5.5.1.4. These would include MTF Course Directors and tutors and people with useful 
skills and experience which can be used, such as in eDofE and expedition 
training/assessment.  It is envisaged that future DofE Advisors will be identified from 
volunteers involved in the Development Network. 
1-78 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 259  
Part 1.6  Role specifications – 
Professional Support Staff 

1.6.1.1. General 
1.6.1.1.1. The CEO and the CQM, CSO, CSA and CAAs are currently obliged by their 
terms of employment to be members of the ACF; the CEO in the rank of Major, the CSO 
and CQM in the rank of Captain.  The CSA and CAA may be considered for a commission 
but must complete the same commissioning process as the voluntary members of the 
ACF.  The establishment for AO is normally 2 per County HQ and for CAA is one per 8 – 
12 detachments.  A brief description is given of the Professional Support Staff (PSS) roles 
below.  These are RFCA employees and therefore the full Role specifications are held by 
RFCAs.  They may receive ACF Remuneration in accordance with para 2.6.2.3. 
1.6.1.2. Cadet Executive Officer (CEO) 
1.6.1.2.1. The CEO is a senior employee of the RFCA and as such is the professional 
adviser to the Cadet Commandant, working full time to support them in the execution of 
their duties as defined in these regulations. 
1.6.1.2.2. The CEO shall, as a condition of employment, serve in the ACF.  They hold the 
paid acting rank of Major within the authorised establishment of the appropriate ACF. 
1.6.1.2.3. The CEO is responsible for the day-to-day administration of the ACF County in 
which they are supported by a Cadet Quartermaster (CQM), a Cadet Stores Assistant 
(CSA), a number of Cadet Administrative Assistants (CAA), each of whom is normally 
responsible for the administration of an ACF Area, and two Administrative Officers (AOs) 
for clerical duties. 
1.6.1.2.4. The CEO is the Designated Safeguarding of Children Officer (DSCO) for the 
county. 
1.6.1.2.5. In matters of organisation, administration and SHE, the CEO is responsible to 
the Chief Executive of the regional RFCA. 
1.6.1.3. Cadet Quartermaster (CQM) 
1.6.1.3.1. The CQM is a full-time employee of the RFCA and is responsible to the Chief 
Executive RFCA, through the CEO, for all stores, accounting, supply, maintenance, 
vehicles and logistic support in accordance with policy laid down by the RFCA and The 
Defence Logistics Framework
.
 
1.6.1.3.2. In the absence of the CEO, the CQM is to deputise for them and, therefore, they 
are to be aware of the CEO’s main responsibilities. 
1.6.1.3.3. As a condition of their employment they shall serve in a rank not exceeding the 
paid acting rank of Captain within the establishment of the relevant ACF County. 
1-79 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.6.1.4. Cadet Staff Officer 
1.6.1.4.1. The CSO position is specific to Wales and is a result of the amalgamation of the 
Counties in Wales.  The CSO supports the CEO in the execution of his duties within 
County satellite Headquarters. 
1.6.1.5. Cadet Stores Assistant (CSA) 
1.6.1.5.1. The CSA is a full time employee of the RFCA and is responsible for assisting the 
CQM in managing the full range of equipment required to allow the ACF County to 
function. 
1.6.1.6. Cadet Administrative Assistant (CAA) 
1.6.1.6.1. The CAA is a full time employee of the RFCA and is responsible to the CEO for 
all administrative and G4 matters within their allocated Area/Detachments. 
1.6.1.6.2. CAA may be appointed to a commission as a Lieutenant (if selected by CFCB) 
or enrolled as an Adult Instructor at the discretion of the RFCA.  If commissioned a CAA 
may only be promoted to the paid acting rank of Captain if they are carrying out additional 
voluntary duties in an ACF established post.   
1.6.1.7. Administrative Officer (AO) 
1.6.1.7.1. The AO is a full-time employee of the RFCA at the ACF County HQ and works 
directly for the CEO who is their line manager.  The AO provides administrative and 
clerical support to the ACF County as directed by the CEO and acts as office manager at 
County HQ. 
1.6.1.7.2. The AO is not bound by their terms of employment to attend any ACF training or 
activities including annual camp, but may do so by arrangement with the CEO.  The AO 
may choose to volunteer to serve in the ACF on the same terms as any other adult 
volunteer. 
1-80 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 207 link to page 207  
Part 1.7  Role specifications – Volunteers 
(County level) 

1.7.1 Cadet Commandant 
1.7.1.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Brigade Commander 
Col-Maj 
1.7.1.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Selected iaw 
Col-Maj 
Selected iaw sec2.2.9 
sec2.2.9 
1.7.1.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Command all personnel within the county in accordance with: 
a. 
ACF Regulations. 
b. 
All relevant military pamphlets and current health and safety 
1.1 
legislation. 
c. 
RC HQ Command, Brigade and RFCA Standing Orders and 
Instructions. 

Command 
Command all Officers within the county in accordance with ACF 
1.2 
Regulations. 
Managing the training and development of all Officers and AI.  This includes 
1.3 
the mentoring of newly commissioned officers through the Junior Officer 
Course or selecting a suitably senior representative to do so. 
Holding regular briefings and conferences with Senior County Staff to 
1.4 
ensure that effective communication is maintained throughout the County. 
Acting as the Delivery Duty Holder (DDH).  Ensuring that safe training for 
cadets is conducted as prescribed in the APC (ACF) syllabus, training 
2.1 
manuals anAC72008 Cadet Training Safety Precautions. 
 
Ensuring that Health and Safety and Safeguarding regulations have the 

Assurance 
highest priority with all CFAVs. 
2.2 
Ensuring that security guidelines and policies are being implemented and 
adhered to. 
Maintaining the welfare of all Officers, AI and cadets in the County while 
2.3 
attending ACF activities. 
3.1 
Recruiting and selecting Officers and AI to Establishment. 
Appointing suitably qualified Officers and AI to all appointments within the 
Recruiting and 
3.2 

County. 
appointing 
3.3 
Planning and maintaining a key personnel succession plan. 
3.4 
Enhancing the retention of Senior cadets in the County. 
Ensuring that an appropriate balance is maintained between military, 
4.1 
adventurous and citizenship training. 

Training 
Promoting physical recreation, sport and adventure training in addition to 
4.2 
traditional military skills. 
1-81 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Encouraging and overseeing the County’s involvement in the Duke of 
4.3 
Edinburgh’s Award Scheme and the BTEC Scheme. 
 
4.4 
Planning, attending and controlling Annual Camp. 
4.5 
Attending County and Area Training and County & Regional Sports events. 
Producing a costed business plan for their ACF County to enable it to be 
5.1 
efficient, effective and within budget. 

Finance 
Ensuring all public and non-public funds within the unit are run within 
5.2 
regulations and audited annually as agreed with regional RFCA. 
6.1 
Performance and tasking of the County Permanent staff. 
6.2 
Administration of the County. 
Liaison with 
6.3 
Accommodation 

RFCA about: 
6.4 
County Transport 
6.5 
Recruiting 
6.6 
Honours and Awards 
7.1 
Duke of Edinburgh’s Award. 
7.2 
BTEC Scheme. 
7.3 
Sport. 
Liaison with 

7.4 
Citizenship Training. 
ACFA about: 
7.5 
First Aid. 
7.6 
Bands/Corps of Drums. 
7.7 
ACFA Collective Insurance Scheme. 
Promoting the ACF within the community, enhancing the awareness of the 
8.1 
Army and keeping the County in the public eye by fostering effective Public 
Relations. 
8.2 
Representing the ACF County within the local community. 
Liaising and fostering links with the local Civic Community, including Lord 
Representation 
8.3 

Lieutenants, Deputy Lieutenant, High Sheriffs and Mayors. 
and liaison 
Maintaining close links with the Army, (Regular and Reserve) locally, 
8.4 
including the CTT, and also the CCF, SCC and ATC. 
Establishing new detachments in areas where potential exists, arranging the 
8.5 
resources to support them and closing detachments which are no longer 
sustainable. 
 
 
1-82 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 198  
1.7.2 Deputy Cadet Commandant 
1.7.2.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
Lt Col 
1.7.2.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Planning and organising. 
Solving problems. 
Eligible for 
Making decisions. 
promotion to 
Lt Col 
Communicating orally and in writing. 
Maj iaw para 
Motivating, and maintaining the morale of, Cadets and adult volunteers. 
2.2.6.2.2.a(2) 
Managing change. 
Assessing and managing risk. 
1.7.2.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 

Deputising 
1.1 
Deputising for the Cadet Commandant in their absence. 
2.1 
All matters relating to the management, training and welfare of all ranks.   
Guiding and supporting Area HQs and Detachments in the implementation 
2.2 
and administration of current policies and objectives. 

Assurance 
Advising on the safety and welfare of the Officers, Adult Instructors and 
2.3 
Cadets in the Area. 
2.4 
Visiting County, Area and Detachment activities. 
2.5 
Monitoring the adult Compulsory Testing 
Advising on the deployment, development, discipline of the Officers, Adult 
3.1 
Instructors and Cadets in the Area. 
Identifying, with Area Commanders, possible locations for new 
3.2 
Recruiting and 
detachments. 

appointing 
Identifying strengths and areas for development within the Areas and 
3.3 
advising the Cadet Commandant accordingly. 
Building an effective team of staff, having the common purpose of pursuing 
3.4 
and achieving excellence in all that is done. 
Monitoring the effectiveness of Area and Detachment training and 
4.1 

Training 
APC(ACF) achievement. 
4.2 
Contributing to the production of the County’s Annual Forecast of Events. 
5.1 
Attending regular, weekly meetings with the Cadet Commandant and CEO. 
Maintaining regular and effective contacts with the CQM, Training Officer 
Liaison with 
5.2 

and other County HQ Staff Officers, in person, by email and by telephone. 
County Staff 
Attending, and contributing to, the Cadet Commandant’s conferences and 
5.3 
meetings, as identified on the Annual Forecast of Events. 
Liaising with Regular and Army Reserve units, other cadet and civilian 
6.1 
organisations within the County area. 
Liaison with 

External 
Ensuring that the County is kept in the public eye, using the County PRO as 
agencies 
6.2 
appropriate. 
1-83 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
7.1 
Coordinating and managing all external events. 
7.2 
Representing the County in all Defence Relationship Management activities. 
7.3 
The management of the County Training Team. 
7.4 
Advising on all aspects of safe training policy and practice. 
7.5 
Chairing regular meetings of the County Training Team. 
Additional 
Ensuring that CFAV and cadet training opportunities are well communicated 
7.6 
duties that may 
and understood. 

be assigned to 
Integrating, and developing a high profile for AT within the County in 
Deputy Cadet 
7.7 
consultation with the CCAT. 
Commandants 
Monitoring and developing greater participation in Vocational Qualifications 
7.8 
for Adult staff and cadets. 
Direct liaison with the ACFA DofE Panel, the ACFA First Aid Panel, the 
7.9 
ACFA Shooting Committee, CTC Frimley Park and the CTT. 
Monitoring and evaluating the County PR, media and marketing output in 
7.10 
conjunction with the Chief of PR (ACF) and the RFCA. 
1-84 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 198  
1.7.3 County Training Officer (CTO) 
1.7.3.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
Maj 
1.7.3.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Planning and organising. 
Solving problems. 
Eligible for 
Making decisions. 
promotion to 
Maj  
Communicating orally and in writing. 
Maj iaw para 
Motivating, and maintaining the morale of, Cadets and adult volunteers. 
2.2.6.2.2.a(2) 
Managing change. 
Assessing and managing risk. 
1.7.3.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Generally supervise all training and exercises and monitor 
1.1 
assessment standards. 
Consult the Cadet Commandant on training and advise ACF Area 
1.2 
Commanders and their training staff on the implementation of the 
Cadet Commandant’s Training Directive. 
Oversee APC assessments at 2 and 3 Star level and in progressive 
1.3 
subjects at 4 Star levels, including the appointment of the presidents 
of Testing Boards and the approval of assessors. 
 
1.4 
Organise JCIC and 3 Star Cadres. 
 
Cadet 
Visit ACF Area and Detachment training to monitor, advise and assist 

1.5 
Training 
where appropriate. 
Arrange and oversee specialist training approved by the Cadet 
1.6 
Commandant (shooting, first aid, signals, adventurous training) using 
the appointed officers accordingly. 
 
Promote and facilitate the D of E and BTEC schemes throughout the 
1.7 
County. 
Organise and conduct any internal county level military skills/skill-at- 
arms competitions and arrange for the training of any County 
1.8 
shooting and military skills teams, including arranging entry into 
Regional and National competitions. 
Provide initial/induction training or give guidance to ACF Area 
Commanders in such provision, to prepare adults to attend the 
2.1 
Advanced Induction Course (AIC) held by CTT and other training 
courses. 
Organise and conduct adult progressive and refresher training, 
2.2 
including the compulsory testing, and additional training for 

Adult Training 
Detachment Commanders. 
Ensure that all officers and AI attend the qualification and course 
training required of their appointments in accordance with regulations, 
2.3 
and encourage and prepare officers and AI to receive specialist 
training, particularly in range conduct, first aid, obstacle course 
supervision and in adventurous pursuits and sporting disciplines. 
Formulate the annual camp training programme at County level and 
3.1 
coordinate ACF Area and cadre programmes. 

Annual Camp 
In conjunction with the CEO, CQM, specialist training staff and CTT, 
3.2 
arrange training facilities and resources and any training support 
1-85 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
needed from the Regular Army or Army Reserve. 
In conjunction with the CEO/AO ensure that all training information is 
4.1 
kept up to date on Westminster. 
Maintain (in conjunction with the TSA) a library of generic risk 
4.2 
assessments for all regular training activities and conduct an annual 
review. 

Other 
Contribute to planning the County annual programme of training, 
4.3 
activities and events.  
Attend Cadet Commandant’s conferences and hold regular meetings 
4.4 
for County and ACF Area training staff. 
Attend national ACF County Training Officers’ Conferences as 
4.5 
appropriate. 
1-86 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.7.4 Assistant County Training Officer (ACTO) 
1.7.4.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
County Training Officer 
SMI - Capt 
1.7.4.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Planning and organising. 
SA (LR) (07)  

Solving problems. 
 Cadets 
Making decisions. 
SMI - 
 
Communicating orally and in writing. 
Captain  SA (M) (07)  

Motivating, and maintaining the morale of, Cadets and adult volunteers. 
Cadets 
Managing change. 
 
Assessing and managing risk. 
1.7.4.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Assist the County Training Officer with the supervise of all training 
1.1 
including ranges, exercises and other training monitoring and 
assessing standards. 
Consult with and support the County Training Officer on training and 
advise ACF Area Commanders, Area Training Officers and their 
1.2 
training staff on the implementation of the Cadet Commandant’s 
Training Directive. 
Assist with overseeing APC assessments at 1, 2 and 3 Star level and 
1.3 
in progressive subjects at 4 Star levels.   
Assist with the organisation of JCIC and other County run Courses 
1.4 
and events. 
 
Cadet 

Visit ACF Area and Detachment training to monitor, advise and 
Training 
1.5 
support where appropriate. 
Support the County Training Officer with specialist training approved 
by the Cadet Commandant (eg shooting, first aid, signals, and 
1.6 
challenge pursuits) using appointed appropriate and qualified officers 
accordingly. 
 
Promote and facilitate the DofE, BTEC and other programmes 
1.7 
throughout the County.   
Support the County Training Officer organise and conduct any 
internal county level military skills/skill-at- arms competitions and 
1.8 
facilitate the training of any County shooting and military skills teams, 
including arranging entry into Regional and National competitions. 
Support initial/induction training or give guidance to ACF Area 
Commanders in such provision, to prepare adults to attend the 
2.1 
Advanced Induction Course (AIC) held by CTT and other training 
courses including Cadet Training Centre, Frimley Park 
Assist with the organise and conduct of adult progressive and 
2.2 
refresher training, including the compulsory testing, and additional 

Adult Training 
training for Detachment Commanders and CFAVs. 
Ensure that all officers and AI attend the qualification and course 
training required of their appointments in accordance with regulations, 
2.3 
and encourage and prepare officers and AI to receive specialist 
training, particularly in range conduct, first aid, obstacle course 
supervision and in adventurous pursuits and sporting disciplines. 

Annual Camp 
3.1 
Assist the formulation of the annual camp training programme at 
1-87 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
County level and coordinate ACF Area and cadre programmes. 
In conjunction with the CEO, County Training Officer, CQM, specialist 
training staff and CTT, assist or arrange training facilities and 
3.2 
resources and any training support needed from the Regular or 
Reserve Forces 
In conjunction with the CEO/County Training Officer/AO ensure that 
4.1 
all training information is kept up to date on Westminster. 
Maintain (in conjunction with the County Training Officer and TSA) a 
4.2 
library of generic risk assessments for all regular training activities 
and conduct an annual review or more frequent if policy changes. 

Other 
Contribute to planning the County annual programme of training, 
4.3 
activities and events.  
Attend appropriate conferences as directed by the County Training 
4.4 
Officer  
Maintaining appropriate qualifications to discharge the duties of the 
4.5 
post 
1-88 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.7.5 Senior Chaplain 
1.7.5.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
CF4 – CF3 
1.7.5.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
CF4 – 
NA 
Prior service as an ACF Chaplain or in a comparable post 
CF3 
1.7.5.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
The allocation and coordination of tasks among the Chaplains 
1.1 
within the County. 
Arranging Chaplains’ visits to Detachments and to training and 
1.2 
activities. 

Management 
Providing Chaplaincy cover at annual camp and arranging for 
1.3 
the provision of the necessary stores and equipment to enable 
the Chaplains’ duties to be carried out at Camp. 
Arranging facilities for all faiths as necessary and when 
1.4 
possible. 
Fostering cooperation between ACF Chaplains and Regular 
2.1 
Army and Army Reserve Chaplains as appropriate. 

Liaison 
Advising the Cadet Commandant on all matters relating to the 
2.2 
spiritual and moral wellbeing of all members of the ACF. 
Recruiting potential Chaplains to the ACF in conjunction with 
2.3 
the Cadet Commandant and the ACG HQ HC PSC2. 
 
 
                                                
2 Amended by ACF RAN 1.4 (25 May 16) 
1-89 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-90 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 221  
1.7.6 Regimental Sergeant Major Instructor (RSMI) 
1.7.6.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
RSMI 
1.7.6.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Ideally has previously been a DC and CSM 
The leadership skill necessary to guide, advise and earn the respect of 
adult instructors. 
Eligible for 
Decision making and problem solving skills beyond those required of a 
promotion to 
Detachment Commander. 
RSMI 
SMI iaw para 
An ability to manage risk and to supervise others in their management of 
2.3.5.3.1.b 
risk. 
An ability to manage change. 
Information technology literacy including complete awareness and full 
use of the Cadet management information system, Westminster. 
1.7.6.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
1.1 
Discipline of AIs within the County 
Appointing and monitoring suitable officials to administer the 
1.2 
Sergeants’ Mess 
Discipline and 

Ensuring ACF Area Sergeant Majors are fully briefed about 
Management 
1.3 
events/issues concerning them, and that they communicate 
with the Senior Ranks in their ACF Areas. 
Visiting Detachments at least annually, and at other times if 
1.4 
requested 
Attending, and contributing to, Cadet Commandant’s 
Meetings and 
2.1 

Conferences, as identified on the Annual Forecast of Events. 
conferences 
2.2 
Representation of the AIs’ Mess 
Arranging parades and other ceremonial events as directed by 
3.1 

Activities 
the Cadet Commandant 
3.2 
Assisting the County Training Officer as necessary 
 
 
1-91 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-92 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.7.7 County AT Officer (CATO) 
1.7.7.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
NA (Secondary appointment) 
1.7.7.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Experience in managing events 
NA 
NA 
Experience in managing staff 
Relevant AT qualifications may be useful but are not necessary 
1.7.7.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
1.1 
Advise the Cadet Commandant on all matters relating to AT 
Oversee all AT carried out in the County and ensure standards of 
1.2 
safety and professionalism are maintained 

Assurance 
Put in place a system to monitor the log book progression of Officers, 
1.3 
AIs and senior cadets seeking or holding Supervisors qualifications 
Keep up to date with the latest techniques, equipment, qualifications 
1.4 
and activities by regular contact with Cadets Branch, RC HQ, Brigade 
AT staff and by obtaining relevant military and civilian publications 
2.1 
Promote the benefits of AT to al  members of the county 
2.2 
Encourage participation in AT at Detachment and Area level 
Encourage Officers and AIs showing an interest in AT to pursue the 

Promotion 
2.3 
required supervisors qualifications 
Encourage the older Cadets to commence gaining Supervisors’ 
2.4 
qualifications in their chosen activity(s) 
2.5 
Be aware of local opportunities and facilities for AT 
3.1 
Set up and command a team of qualified Supervisors and trainers 
Draw up and monitor a programme of activities so that those wishing 
3.2 
to undergo Stage 2 and 3 activities are able to do so 
Ensure the county holds the necessary equipment for the fullest 
Organisation 
3.3 

possible range of activities 
and training 
3.4 
Maintain the equipment in good order, and replace it when necessary 
Liaise with the County Training Officer, the County DofE Officer, CEO 
3.5 
and Area Commanders to ensure AT receives the appropriate 
support 
1-93 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
1-94 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.7.8 County Navigation Officer 
1.7.8.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
NA (Secondary appointment) 
1.7.8.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Ability to communicate with volunteers and able to deliver training 
courses in local public forums. 
Computer literate. 
Ability to plan and manage a training programme 
Ability to motivate and enthuse others, especially volunteers. 
BEL or NNAS 
Hold a civilian or military outdoor award that permits the delivery of 
NA 
Silver award 
NNAS Bronze and Silver award training and assessment courses. 
Experience of delivering Bronze or Silver NNAS training and 
assessment courses. 
Proven administrative skills. 
Long term planning ability. 
Experience of working within NGB guidelines. 
1.7.8.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
1.1 
Monitor, evaluate and maintain the delivery of the navigation syllabus 
Furnish the Regional Navigation Officer with navigation assessment 
1.2 

Assurance 
course statistics as required 
Moderation of 2-star and 4-star navigation assessments that are also 
1.3 
to be used as assessments for bronze and silver level NNAS awards 
respectively. 

Promotion 
2.1 
Assist in the development of Navigation at a regional level 
At County level to oversee the training of navigation trainers and 
3.1 
assist in the delivery of training the trainer where required. 
Organisation 

and training 
Assist in the identification and training of potential Army Cadet NNAS 
3.2 
course tutors 
Attend regional navigation meetings and undertake tasks relating to 
3.3 
the maintenance and development of the Navigation syllabus at 
County/Contingent level as required 
1-95 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
1-96 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.7.9 County Shooting Officer 
1.7.9.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
SI - Capt 
1.7.9.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Have a thorough knowledge and 
Acquire and maintain a high level of 
understanding of: 
personal skill and knowledge of skill at 
(1)  Marksmanship and basic 
arms, shooting and coaching by 
coaching. 
attendance at: 
(2)  The APC (ACF) Syllabus and 
test requirements. 
(1)  Cadet Force Skill at Arms 
Instructor’s Course.
(3) 
 
How shooting activities satisfy 
the requirements of the Duke of 
(2)  Cadet Range Management 
Edinburgh’s Award.
SI 
 
Courses. 
(4)  The contents of the Cadet 
(3)  ACF Shooting Officers’ 
Training Manuals relating to shooting 
Conferences. 
and skill at arms. 
(4)  ACF Target Rifle Coaching 
(5)  Rules and conditions of shooting 
Courses. 
competitions and opportunities 
(5)  National Rifle Association 
available to the ACF. The Inter-Service 
Cadet Officers / Instructors 
Cadet Rifle Meeting. 
Coaching Courses. 
(6)  The Cadet Inter-Service Skill-at-
Arms Meeting. 
1.7.9.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Advise the county Cadet Commandant on all aspects of skill at 
1.1 
arms and shooting. 
Advise and assist Detachments and ACF Area HQs on all 

Assurance 
1.2 
aspects of skill at arms and shooting training and coaching. 
Liaise with the Training Safety Advisor (TSA) on the 
1.3 
management and safe use of the unit’s indoor ranges. 
Publicise regional and national shooting/coaching courses and 

Promotion 
2.1 
competitions throughout the county, co-ordinate entries and 
arrange the training and selection of individuals and teams 
3.1 
Organise county inter-detachment and inter-area competitions. 
Advise and assist the CTO on the delivery of the adult Basic 
3.2 
Shooting and Coaching Course 
Submit bids for the use of ranges in liaison with the CEO and 
3.3 
Organisation 
CTO 

and training 
3.4 
Liaise with the Brigade Shooting Officer 
Liaise with the CEO and CQM on shooting stores and 
3.5 
equipment, including Equipment Care Inspection matters. 
Undertake any other shooting related task as directed by the 
3.6 
Cadet Commandant 
 
1-97 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
1-98 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.7.10 County Public Relations Officer 
1.7.10.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
SI - Capt 
1.7.10.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Naturally an ACF County PRO must be good at explaining 
ACF operations; speaking with the public and the media; 
Introduction to PR Course  drafting correspondence; editing and designing 
NA 
(can be attended after 
publications or a website perhaps directing or shooting 
appointment) 
video; and advising their Commandant on how to manage 
media interviews themselves 
1.7.10.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Supervise all social media activities emanating from the County HQ, 

Assurance 
1.1 
Areas or Detachments. 
Instigate and implement the Cadet Commandant’s County PR 
Strategy and Annual Plan with the aim of building a positive image, 
reputation and awareness of the ACF, at all levels throughout the 
2.1 
County area and the wider community, in order to create an effective 
climate for the recruitment of adult leaders and Cadets, so as to 
maintain the reputation of the ACF 

Promotion 
Generate appropriate news releases, feature material and local 
2.2 
stories for the media in accordance with MOD and ACF PR 
guidelines. 
Supervise the maintenance of an accurate, up to date microsite in 
2.3 
accordance with ACF guidance and branding. 
Arrange for photographic cover of worthwhile ACF activities 
2.4 
throughout the ACF County area, at all levels. 
Advise the Cadet Commandant on the likely media reaction to ACF 
County decisions and activities, and to advise all adult members of 
3.1 
the ACF County on all PR, recruitment, marketing matters and local 
events. 
Establish and maintain a working relationship with: 
(1)  The Senior Press Information Officer (SPIO) of the ACF 
County’s Brigade HQ and the Comms Officer of the local RFCA in 
3.2 
order to ensure that all are aware of the ACF matters that are of 

Advise/liaise 
interest to the media or public interest. 
(2)  Local Army Reserve Unit Press Officers. 
Develop and maintain effective relationships between the ACF and its 
3.3 
local stakeholders. 
Assist and advise the Cadet Commandant on all aspects of external 
3.4 
communication and marketing of the ACF, the use of PR and the 
implementation of the ACF national Recruit Marketing plan locally. 
3.5 
Develop and improve the effectiveness of the ACF County’s internal 
1-99 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
communication; including the editing, production and distribution of 
any internal journals/newsletters. 
Attend the relevant ACF National PR Training Team, PR Training 
3.6 
Courses and Conferences. 
Advise the Cadet Commandant on, and provide, ACF PR awareness 
3.7 
training for all the adult volunteer members of the ACF County. 
1.7.10.4. Limits to Responsibility 
1.7.10.4.1. In accordance with MOD PR Instructions, the ACF County PRO must not 
contact any national media outlets or regional television stations without the specific 
authority of the Brigade SPIO and with the knowledge of the Chief ACF National PR 
Training Team. 
1.7.10.4.2. The Brigade SPIO, Chief ACF PR and the RFCA are to be immediately 
informed of all situations, incidents or actions that may require defensive PR, or that might 
lead to an issue of national public and/or media interest in order that they may produce an 
authorised statement.  In this event, the ACF County PRO must not make or release any 
other unauthorised statements to any media or public source. 
1-100 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.7.11 County First Aid Training Officer (CFATO)  
1.7.11.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
SI - Capt 
1.7.11.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Maintain and develop personal skills and qualifications: 
Maintain a portfolio record of personal competence and 
Attend CFATO Course 
development. 
SI 
Hold a current full adult First 
Be currently registered with ACFA as a First Aid trainer 
Aid qualification. 
and assessor. 
Collect evidence in a portfolio, requalification and CPD 
requirements. 
1.7.11.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 

Assurance 
1.1 
Advise the Cadet Commandant on all aspects of First Aid training. 
Nominate to ACFA for recognition Cadets who render praiseworthy 
2.1 
First Aid. 

Promotion 
Maintain links with, provide advice to and communicate with the 
2.2 
County Cadet Commandant; other CHQ staff; Area Commanders and 
AFATAs. 
The provision of progressive training over Basic Training to 2 Star 
3.1 
leading to the award of an externally accredited Youth First Aid 
certificate on completion of 2 Star. 
Providing the Youth First Aid certificate and uniform badge on 
3.2 
completion of First Aid training at 2 Star. 
Progressive training over 3 and 4 Star leading to the award of the 
Organisation 
3.3 
externally accredited Activity First Aid certificate on completion of 4 

and training 
Star. 
3.4 
Training of CFAVs in First Aid as part of adult induction. 
3.5 
Registration with ACFA of all 4 Star and adult First Aid courses 
Provide scenario based practical continuation training to include an 
3.6 
event to select and train teams for the Brigade First Aid Competition. 
Attend the County First Aid Training Officers Conference/Course at 
3.7 
CTC Frimley Park. 
Ensure sufficient adult leaders hold a current full adult First Aid 
4.1 
certificate to meet the needs of the APC syllabus. 
Ensure requirements of the Safety and Responsibility Guidelines for 
Provision of 
4.2 

adult leaders are met. 
trainers 
4.3 
Ensure trainers and assessors are appropriately qualified 
Ensure CFAVs used to train 4 Star and adults are assessed, 
4.4 
registered with ACFA and meet requalification and CPD requirements 
 
 
 
1-101 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
1-102 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.7.12 County Sports Officer 
1.7.12.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
NA (Secondary appointment)t 
1.7.12.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Managing and organising. 
NA 
NA 
Compliance with NGB guidelines 
1.7.12.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
1.1 
Advise the Cadet Commandant on all aspects of Sports. 
To be responsible for implementing the County sports policy on 
1.2 
behalf of the County Cadet Commandant. 
To be aware of the legal and safety requirements of sport in the ACF 

Assurance 
1.3 
and the values of the governing body under which the event is being 
conducted. 
To maintain achievements records of cadets selected for County & 
1.4 
Regional teams and that cadet participation & representation is 
entered onto the Westminster record system. 
2.1 
Be a member of the County Sports Committee 
To select members of and disseminate information to a Team 
2.2 
Detachment /Area Sports representative 

Promotion 
Although outside the remit of the specific duties of a County Sports 
Officer, it is desirable that he/she should be proficient in the sports 
2.3 
aspect of the APC Syllabus, similar aspects of the D of E Syllabus 
and, in some instances, Adventurous Training activities. 
To attend all meetings/seminars on behalf of the Commandant and to 
3.1 
report the contents and recommendations made 
To be aware of dates, times and venues of Regional, National and 
3.2 
Inter-Service events and plan the County Sports Programme 
accordingly. 
To be responsible for the organisation, control and administration of 
3.3 
the full programme of County Sports Competitions. 
Organisation 

3.4 
To organise Leagues, Pools and Knockout Competitions. 
and training 
3.5 
To select County teams and to be responsible for their administration. 
To liaise with the Regional Secretary/Committee with regard to travel 
3.6 
and administrative arrangements for cadets selected to represent the 
Region in National or Inter-Service events. 
To be responsible for the organisation, control and administration of 
3.7 
the Annual Camp Sports Programme with special emphasis on major 
and minor team games with full integration of female cadets 
 
 
1-103 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
1-104 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.7.13 County Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Officer 
1.7.13.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
SI-Capt 
1.7.13.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Planning and organising. 
Solving problems. 
Certificate in 
Making decisions. 
DofE 
SI 
Communicating orally and in writing. 
Leadership (if 
Motivating, and maintaining the morale of, Cadets and adult volunteers. 
at all possible) 
Managing change. 
Assessing and managing risk. 
1.7.13.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Being familiar with and proficient in the use of the DofE’s on-
1.1 
line administration system, eDofE; they will normally be the 
DofE Centre Coordinator 
Monitoring the delivery of the DofE information period in APC 
1.2 
Cadet and the Community at Star levels 1 and 2. 
Maintaining a supply of Participation Places, literature and 
1.3 
other information for distribution to Areas and Detachments. 
Maintaining records of participation and arranging for annual 
1.4 
statistics of the County’s performance to be available through 

Administration 
eDofE and WESTMINSTER. 
1.5 
Attending periodic DofE Conferences. 
Attending and contributing to county training and/or 
1.6 
Conferences. 
Keeping up to date with new practices and changes in the DofE 
1.7 
programme. 
Ensuring that the quality and standards of the DofE are being 
1.8 
maintained. 
1.9 
Advising the Cadet Commandant on all aspects of the DofE. 
2.1 
Co-ordinating DofE activities within the county. 
Encouraging Area Commanders to appoint a suitably trained 
2.2 
and experienced DofE leader to assist detachments to run the 
DofE. 
Arranging for completed Bronze programmes to be verified and 
2.3 
approved. 
Arranging for completed Silver programmes to be verified and 

Delivery 
2.4 
then approved by the Brigade Advisor 
Arranging for completed Gold programmes to be verified and 
2.5 
forwarded to the ACFA UK DofE Development Manager. 
2.6 
Ensuring potential new DofE Leaders are appropriately trained. 
Promoting the DofE and encouraging participation by Cadets 
2.7 
and young CFAV’s. 
 
1-105 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
3.1 
Informing the PRO of all DofE successes 

Promotion 
Assisting in the arrangement of high profile ceremonies for the 
3.2 
presentation of badges and certificates. 
1-106 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.7.14 County CVQO Officer 
1.7.14.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
County HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
SI-Capt 
1.7.14.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Planning and organising. 
Solving problems. 
ILM/City & Guilds 
Making decisions. 
Leadership & 
Communicating orally and in writing. 
SI 
Management 
Motivating, and maintaining the morale of, Cadets and adult 
qualification (if at 
volunteers. 
all possible) 
Managing change. 
Assessing and managing risk. 
1.7.14.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Keeping up to date with new practices and changes in the various 
1.1 
vocational qualification programmes. 
Apply to CVQO for a “CVQO Online” account al owing them to 
1.2 
monitor the involvement and progress of Adults and Cadets from 
their County in CVQO-led qualifications. 
Ensuring that ”VQ Numbers” issued by CVQO are entered against 
the relevant Cadets on their Westminster record allowing 
1.3 
achievements which can contribute  to the completion of their 

Administration 
CVQO-led qualifications to be automatically submitted to CVQO. 
Maintaining records of participation and arranging for annual 
1.4 
statistics of the County's performance to be available.  
Attending and contributing to County Training and/or 
1.5 
Administration Conferences. 
Advising the Cadet Commandant on all aspects of vocational 
2.1 
qualifications. 

Delivery 
Arranging for Workbook weekends/days for Cadets registered on 
2.2 
BTEC Level 2 programmes as appropriate. 
Giving feedback to registered Cadets regarding their progress 
2.3 
towards a qualification. 
2.4 
Attending periodic CVQO “Train the Trainer” events. 
Promoting and co-ordinating vocational qualification activities 
3.1 
within the County and encouraging maximum participation by 

Promotion/liaison 
Cadets and Adults by visiting Detachments and Area events.  
Maintaining a supply of literature and other information, as 
3.2 
appropriate, for distribution to Area, Detachments and individuals. 
1-107 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Encouraging ACF Area Commanders to appoint a suitably 
3.3 
experienced ACF Area CVQO Officer to assist Detachments with 
vocational qualifications. 
Maintaining contact with other County specialist officers whose 
subject areas are relevant to vocational qualifications, particularly 
3.4 
the Bandmaster and also for example County DofE Officer and 
Sports Officer. 
Maintaining contact with other local County CVQO Officers, their 
3.5 
nominated CVQO point of contact and CVQO head office. 
Informing the County PRO of all vocational qualification successes 
3.6 
and liaising with CVQO’s Corporate Communications Department. 
Assisting in the arrangement of high profile ceremonies for the 
3.7 
presentation of certificates. 
1-108 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 198  
Part 1.8  Role specifications – Volunteers 
(Area level) 

1.8.1 Area Commander 
1.8.1.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
Area HQ 
Cadet Commandant 
Maj 
1.8.1.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Planning and organising. 
Solving problems. 
Eligible for 
Making decisions. 
Maj (on 
promotion to 
Communicating orally and in writing. 
appointment) 
Maj iaw para 
2.2.6.2.2.a(2)
Motivating, and maintaining the morale of, Cadets and adult volunteers. 
 
Managing change. 
Assessing and managing risk. 
1.8.1.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Recruitment, including initial interview and posting of Adult 
1.1 
Instructors. 
Development of Adult Instructors including: 
1.  Induction training of all new AI. 
2.  Ensuring timely attendance on the AIC and at other courses. 
3.  Identifying those willing to take on specialist training such as 
1.2 
range conduct, obstacle course supervision, AT and DofE 
management. 
4.  Identifying those requiring refresher training using the offices of 
the Training Officer and/or Cadet Training Team. 
Leadership 

and 
Liaising with the Cadet Commandant and CEO regarding the 
management 
1.3 
deployment of instructors to Detachments. 
Dealing with breaches of discipline beyond the scope of the 
1.4 
Detachment Commander. 
1.5 
Mediating in disputes. 
Holding regular meetings of Detachment Commanders for 
1.6 
communicating current issues, exchanging of ideas, and airing 
problems. 
1.7 
Arranging, where appropriate, cross posting of Cadet Instructors. 
1.8 
Interviewing Senior cadets for promotion to Cadet Sgt and above. 
1.9 
Ensuring the effective use of the 4-Star and Master Cadets. 
Appointing Officers or Adult Instructors to co-ordinate specialist 
1.10 
areas, eg Shooting, Sports, DofE, First Aid, etc, having regard to their 
normal Detachment roles. 
2.1 
Checking and vetting programmes for Detachment training. 

Training 
Carrying out checks on the quality of the instruction offered in 
2.2 
Detachments. 
1-109 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Conducting assessments up to 2-Star level in the APC(ACF) 
2.3 
Syllabus. 
Maintaining accurate training records, and carrying out checks of 
2.4 
Detachment records. 
Monitoring the progress of Cadets through APC star levels and taking 
2.5 
corrective action where unnecessary delays occur. 
Co-ordinating Senior Cadet training in conjunction with the Training 
2.6 
Officer for 3-Star subjects where Detachments are unable to provide 
adequate training themselves. 
Encouraging active participation in all competitions or activities for 
2.7 
which detachments are eligible. 
Holding Area training events, particularly Weekend Training Camps 
2.8 
and competitions. 
Ensuring that Detachment staff are trained to conduct Risk 
2.9 
Assessments. 
Ensuring that the Safe System of Training is in place and that 
2.10 
appropriate Risk Assessments are in place. 
Ensuring that Detachment staff are trained in conducting training and 
2.11 
activity safety briefs. 
Encouraging and assisting in non-military training such as sport, The 
2.12 
DofE Award and BTEC Schemes, Cadet & Community projects, visits 
etc. 
Maintaining effective contacts with CEO, CQM, Training Officer, other 
3.1 
County Staff Officers and CTT. 
Maintaining close supervision of the accounts held within the Area 
3.2 
and Detachments and carrying out quarterly checks, as laid down in 
this Manual and SOP. 
Identifying new potential Adult Instructors and personally overseeing 
3.3 
their enlistment and induction. 
Advising the Cadet Commandant on the personal ability of the CFAVs 
3.4 
within their Area.  Submitting any recommendations for promotions to 
the Cadet Commandant. 
Monitoring and advising Detachment Commanders on Cadet 
3.5 
recruitment within their Detachments. 
Acting as a focal point for returns and information within the Area and 
3.6 
ensuring standardisation of procedures. 
3.7 
Holding social events at Area level. 
3.8 
Ensuring standardisation of procedures. 

Administration 
Maintaining close liaison with schools, parents and other community 
3.9 
leaders within the local area. 
Advising Detachment Commanders in the preparations for Annual 
3.10 
Inspections, in addition to carrying out the required pre-inspection. 
Auditing ACF remuneration, home to duty travel, travel expenses and 
3.11 
public account claims on a regular basis. 
Ensuring that all Detachment activities are properly authorised and 
3.12 
notified to the Cadet Commandant in accordance with SOP. 
Monitoring the management of all clothing, equipment and stores on 
3.13 
charge to the Area. 
Ensuring that the security of arms and ammunition within the Area is 
3.14 
in accordance with regulations anLFSO 2901. 
Liaising with Regular and Army Reserve units, other Cadet and 
3.15 
civilian organisations within the area. 
1-110 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Ensuring that the Area is kept in the public eye using the PRO, as 
3.16 
appropriate. 
Attending and contributing to any Cadet Commandant’s Conferences 
3.17 
that take place. 
 
 
1-111 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
1-112 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 198  
1.8.2 Area Staff Officer 
1.8.2.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
Area HQ 
Area Commander 
Capt 
1.8.2.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Eligible for 
promotion to 
Capt 
Ideally has previously been a DC 
Capt iaw para 
2.2.6.2.2.a(1) 
1.8.2.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
As directed by the Area commander and in conjunction with the 
Cadet Administrative Assistant (CAA), oversee the administration of 
1.1 
the Area headquarters and its detachments and their staff and 
facilities. 
Act as the Area commander’s focal point for returns and 
communications within the Area, maintaining standardised 
1.2 
procedures in accordance with ACF policy and county standard 
operating procedures (SOPs). 
Leadership 
Organise Area level events, including social events, awards 

and 
1.3 
ceremonies, sports competitions etc. 
management 
Assist the Area commander with a programme of routine visits to the 
1.4 
Area’s detachments 
1.5 
Assist the OC in the resolution of problems and issues. 
Maintain the Area non-public fund account in accordance with RFCA 
1.6 
and the county Cadet Commandant’s policies. 
Routinely inspect the Area’s detachment non-public fund accounts 
1.7 
and offer advice and assistance to Detachment Commanders where 
necessary. 
In conjunction with the county public relations officer, manage the 
Area’s recruiting and public relations strategy, ensuring that the Area 
2.1 
and its detachments are kept in the public eye, as directed by the 
Relationship 

Area commander. 
management 
Liaise with local Army units and CCF, SCC and ATC units and other 
2.2 
appropriate bodies to provide support, share resources and facilities 
etc. 
 
 
1-113 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
1-114 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 198  
1.8.3 Area Training Officer 
1.8.3.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
Area HQ 
Area Commander 
Capt 
1.8.3.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Ideally has previously been a DC 
The leadership skill necessary to guide, advise and earn the respect of 
subalterns and adult instructors. 
An ability to plan and organise at Area level. 
Decision making and problem solving skills beyond those required of a 
Detachment Commander. 
Eligible for 
Communications skills sufficient to allow the effective application of 
promotion to 
Capt 
defence writing and email conventions and an ability to write routine 
Capt iaw para 
2.2.6.2.2.a(1)
correspondence, event administrative instructions and training 
 
programmes etc. 
An ability to manage risk and to supervise others in their management of 
risk. 
An ability to manage change. 
Information technology literacy including complete awareness and full 
use of the Cadet management information system, Westminster. 
1.8.3.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Ensuring the Completion of the necessary administration, including: 
a. 
Authority to train. 
b. 
Training programme. 
1.1 
c. 
Administrative instruction. 
d. 
Risk assessment. 
e. 
EASPs, RAMs and EAMs. 
1.2 
Booking training areas and ranges. 
1.3 
Carrying out reconnaissance visits. 
Arranging personnel and materiel training support and resources 
Plan and 
including qualified instructors, logistic and administrative support, 
1.4 

implement 
accommodation, catering, transport, training aids, arms and 
training 
ammunition, training stores and equipment. 
Liaise with the CTT, particularly with the Training Safety Adviser 
1.5 
(TSA) assigned to their county, when necessary, to ensure that all 
training within the Area is compliant with the safe system of training. 
Monitor the Area’s detachment training programmes to ensure safe 
1.6 
system of training compliance and offer advice and assistance as 
required. 
Coordinate Cadet training and testing in accordance with ACF and 
1.7 
county policy. 
1.8 
As required by the CTO, arrange and conduct adult induction training 
1.9 
Assist the CTO with county training events as required. 
Relationship 
Liaise with the county specialist officers to promote 

2.1 
management 
maximum participation at Area level in sports events, 
Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, vocational qualifications for 
1-115 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
CFAVs and cadets etc. 
Liaise with local Army units and CCF, SCC and ATC units and 
2.2 
other appropriate bodies to provide support, share resources 
and facilities etc. 
Advise the Area commander on the performance and potential 
2.3 
of junior officers and adult instructors in the Area and 
recommend individuals, including cadets, for awards. 
 
 
1-116 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 221  
1.8.4 Area Sergeant Major 
1.8.4.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
Area HQ 
Area Commander 
SMI 
1.8.4.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Ideally has previously been a DC 
The leadership skill necessary to guide, advise and earn the respect of 
adult instructors. 
Eligible for 
Decision making and problem solving skills beyond those required of a 
promotion to 
Detachment Commander. 
SMI 
SMI iaw para 
An ability to manage risk and to supervise others in their management of 
2.3.5.3.1.b 
risk. 
An ability to manage change. 
Information technology literacy including complete awareness and full 
use of the Cadet management information system, Westminster. 
1.8.4.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Maintain good order and discipline throughout the Area during any 
1.1 
ACF training or activity but especially during weekends and at annual 
camp. 

Discipline 
Compliance with the ACF’s values and standards, the customs of the 
service and Army Dress Regulations (all ranks) – Part 8 – Dress 
1.2 
regulations for Combined Cadet Force (Army Sections) and the 
ACF
 
as they pertain to the ACF.   
Work closely with the Area commander with commitment, loyalty and 
2.1 
candour providing honest and impartial advice, comment, opinion and 
support. 
Advise the Area commander on the performance and potential of PIs 
2.2 
and AIs in the Area. 
Make regular visits to detachments within the Area to assist, advise 
2.3 
and observe. 
Assist and advise with the organisation and delivery of training, 
2.4 
selection (F&A), sporting and social events and other activities in the 
Area. 
In consultation with Area HQ officers, liaise with local authorities in 
Advise and 
the organising and conducting of marching parades and other 

consult 
ceremonial events in the community; if necessary, and when invited, 
2.5 
taking the lead on this.  Provide advice and assistance to Detachment 
Commanders who may be required to do the same thing in their own 
locations. 
2.6 
Regularly consult and work closely with the CAA assigned to the Area 
2.7 
Support and assist the Area HQ officers as required. 
2.8 
Attend and contribute to Area conferences. 
Consult regularly with the RSMI and seek their advice on any 
2.9 
measures that may be required to deal with indiscipline by AIs or PIs 
in the Area. 
Assist and support the RSMI with the running of the county sergeants’ 
2.10 
mess and the allocation of duties at annual camp. 
3.1 
Deliver Area training and conduct assessments as required. 

Training 
When training away at weekends or at camp ensure that: 
3.2 
a. 
The administrative needs of the Area (feeding, 
1-117 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
ammunition etc) are met. 
b. 
Weapons and ammunition are secure and accounted for 
at all times. 
 
 
1-118 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.8.5 Area First Aid Training Adviser (AFATA) 
1.8.5.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
Area HQ 
Area Commander 
NA (Secondary Role) 
1.8.5.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Have attended Area First Aid Training 
Experience teaching and testing first aid 
SMI 
Advisors Course 
Experience in managing 
Hold a full first aid certificate 
1.8.5.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
1.1 
Conduct/test Basic Training and 1 Star CasAid courses. 
Conduct/test 2 Star First Aid courses for the award of a recognised 

Training 
1.2 
full Youth First Aid certificate. 
1.3 
Train a team for the County First Aid Competition. 

Advise 
2.1 
Advise the Area Commander on all aspects of First Aid training. 
 
 
1-119 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-120 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 1.9  Role specifications – Volunteers 
(Detachment level) 

1.9.1 Detachment Commander 
1.9.1.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
2Lt-Capt 
Detachment 
Company Commander 
SI-SMI 
1.9.1.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
Planning and organising. 
Solving problems. 
Making decisions. 
SI 
ALM 
Communicating orally and in writing. 
Motivating, and maintaining the morale of, Cadets and adult volunteers. 
Managing change. 
Assessing and managing risk. 
1.9.1.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Establish and maintain discipline, values and standards and good 
1.1 
order. 
1.2 
Implement all unit policies. 
Leadership 
1.3 
Recruit Cadets and adult volunteers. 

and 
1.4 
Develop Cadets and adult volunteers (inc self). 
management 
1.5 
Carry out designated duties at weekend and annual camps. 
Develop a Community Engagement programme to ensure good 
1.6 
community relationships. 
2.1 
Ensure Cadets are trained and tested in APC syllabus subjects. 
Monitor the training of detachment CFAVs and provide guidance on 
2.2 
further training requirements. 
Enable Cadets and adult volunteers to make the most of non-APC 

Training 
2.3 
syllabus training, activities and opportunities. 
Contribute to wider area, county and ACF activities, including acting 
2.4 
as ACF Area representative (eg for First Aid, shooting, DofE, sport), 
when required. 
Apply the Safe System of Training and the Army’s Cadet Forces’ 
3.1 
Safeguarding Policy. 
Ensure the safety, security and good welfare of Cadets, adult 
3.2 
volunteers, civilian assistants and visitors. 
3.3 
Manage and report accidents and incidents. 

Supervisory 
3.4 
Ensure the security of the detachment premises and its contents. 
Ensure that all CFAVs and CAs are kept up to date with any new or 
3.5 
amended safety legislation, regulations and instructions. 
Where held, ensure the safe management of weapons and 
3.6 
ammunition in accordance with Annex D tLFSO 2901. 
Ensure correct completion and submission of all relevant personnel 
4.1 
and other documentation. 

Administration 
Maintain accurate and up to date personal training records and 
4.2 
achievements for all Cadets and ensure all relevant details are 
1-121 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
recorded, without delay, on Westminster.   
In conjunction with the CAA, manage detachment stores, equipment 
4.3 
& publications. 
4.4 
In conjunction with the CAA, manage detachment infrastructure. 
4.5 
Manage detachment funds. 
4.6 
Prepare for and host detachment inspections. 
4.7 
Establish and maintain a weekly detachment night routine. 
 
1-122 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.9.2 Detachment Instructor 
1.9.2.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
2Lt-Lt 
Detachment 
Detachment Commander 
SI-SSI 
1.9.2.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
SI 
AIC 
Nil 
1.9.2.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
1.1 
Safeguard cadets iaw the Army Cadet Force Safeguarding Policy 
1.2 
Inspire Cadets to achieve iaw the ACF Motto 
Develop Cadet’s Confidence, self-reliance, initiative and sense of 
1.3 

Pastoral 
service to others iaw the ACF Charter 
1.4 
Develop Cadet’s practical leadership skil s iaw the ACF Charter 
1.5 
Develop the Cadets ability to work as a team iaw the ACF Charter 
Encouraging an interest in the British Army and supporting those 
1.6 
wishing to join iaw the ACF Charter 
2.1 
Instruct cadets in syllabus subjects (less SAA and First Aid) 
2.2 
Instruct cadets in SAA if appropriately qualified 
2.3 
Instruct cadets in First Aid if appropriately qualified 

Training 
Encouraging cadets to participate in the DofE award and other 
2.4 
vocational qualifications 
Supporting cadet participation in competitions, sports, social and 
2.5 
other activities 
3.1 
Ensuring safety and security of cadets 
Ensuring proper supervision and the good order and discipline of 
3.2 
cadets 
3.3 
Promoting and maintaining high standards of turnout and hygiene 
3.4 
Maintaining liaison and contact with parents 

Supervisory 
Deal with emergencies at detachment level under the supervision of 
3.5 
the Detachment Commander, or in the absence of the Detachment 
Commander. 
Apply the rules and guidance for dealing with accidents and 
3.6 
emergencies. 
Maintain records of cadet attendance and achievements using 
4.1 
Westminster 
Maintaining any additional registers, records and logs, and controlling 
the issues and returns of weapons, ammunition, equipment, 
4.2 
pamphlets and uniforms as directed by the Detachment Commander. 
Administrative 
 

(in support of 
4.3 
Accurate accounting for any detachment funds. 
the DC) 
Promoting and maintaining good housekeeping within the 
4.4 
detachment. 
Ensuring their own record oWestminster is accurate and up to 
4.5 
date, including ensuring that any training activities and qualifications 
are recorded. 
1-123 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Prepare for and manage a detachment training evening in the 
4.6 
absence of the Detachment Commander. 
Training in the Detachment on all occasions when Cadets are present 
5.1 
or whenever visitors attend.  They are to inform the Detachment 
Commander when unable to attend 
Weekend and annual camps with the Detachment and ACF Area, 

Attendance 
5.2 
carrying out tasks as directed. 
Other local, county, regional or national activities, carrying out tasks 
5.3 
as directed. 
5.4 
Personal training and qualification courses as directed. 
6.1 
Annually pass written test on AC 72008 CTSP 

Governance 
6.2 
Annually pass Responsible for Information (General User) 
6.3 
Annually attend a Safeguarding briefing 
 
1-124 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
1.9.3 Detachment DofE Award leader 
1.9.3.1. General 
Duty Location 
Reports To 
Rank Range 
Detachment 
Detachment Commander 
NA 
1.9.3.2. Eligibility 
Rank 
Qualifications 
Experience 
SI/CA 
Introduction to 
Knowledge of the DofE 
the DofE (if 
Knowledge of the APC Syllabus 
possible) 
Experience in guiding and coaching 
1.9.3.3. Responsibilities 
Ser 
Duty 
Ser 
Task 
Supplying the Participation Places and Welcome Packs and 
1.1 
collecting the fee. 
Keeping records of the participant’s progress through their 
1.2 
DofE programme, and where possible ensuring progress is 

Administration 
recorded on WESTMINSTER. 
1.3 
Monitoring the appropriate approval of DofE activities. 
Maintaining contact with the County DofE Officer (or Area DofE 
1.4 
Officer if one is appointed). 
1.5 
Establishing contacts outside the ACF for mutual support. 
Delivering the DofE input to APC Cadet and the Community at 
2.1 
1 and 2-star. 
2.2 
Helping the participant choose from the range of activities. 

Delivery 
2.3 
Identifying and briefing instructors, supervisors and assessors. 
2.4 
Ensuring DofE conditions have been fulfilled. 
2.5 
Reviewing progress regularly with the participant. 
3.1 
Promoting the DofE using resources available, including eDofE. 

Promotion 
3.2 
Organising local presentation events. 
 
 
 
1-125 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-126 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 1.10 Sponsorship and affiliation 
1.10.1.1. Sponsorship 
1.10.1.1.1. Regional Brigade Commanders are expected to appoint a Regular Army or 
Army Reserve unit or sub-unit to be the Sponsor Unit for each ACF Detachment in their 
Region.  Sponsor Units need not be of the same Regiment or Corps as those to which the 
ACF Detachment is affiliated but should be located with or reasonably near to the 
Detachment being sponsored.  The purpose of Sponsor Units is to provide support and 
assistance to ACF Detachments in addition to that given by CTT through: 
a. 
The provision of instructors and equipment for training. 
b. 
The use of accommodation and facilities for training including barrack ranges. 
c. 
Inviting the Detachment to participate in joint training and activities. 
1.10.1.2. Affiliation 
1.10.1.2.1. An affiliation is a permanent and close association between the ACF and a 
Regiment or Corps at County, ACF Area or Detachment level.  The aim is to enable the 
ACF to develop an esprit de corps based on the traditions of the regiment or corps to 
which it is affiliated. 
1.10.1.2.2. ACF Detachments may adopt the cap badge, headdress and stable belt and, in 
No2 Dress, the collar badges and buttons of the Regiment or Corps to which they are 
affiliated.  The adoption of any other forms of Regimental or Corps items of uniform, or 
insignia and accoutrements to be worn on uniform, are subject to the approval of the Army 
Dress Committee.  ACF members are not permitted to wear any formation flashes or 
tactical recognition flashes. 
1.10.1.2.3. The procedure for obtaining/changing an affiliation approval is given below: 
a. 
Action by ACF County.  The ACF county should apply to the RPOC Brigade 
for a new (or change of) affiliation.   
b. 
Action by RPOC Brigade. 
(1)  The RPOC Brigade are to consider if the new affiliation or change of 
affiliation is suitable. 
(2)  If the RPOC Brigade consider the application to be suitable they are to 
forward the application to RC Cadets Branch. 
c. 
Action by RC Cadets Branch. 
(1)  HQ RC will decide if the affiliation can be changed.  This decision will be 
based upon: 
(a)  The comparative balance of affiliated cadet units to the balance in 
the Regular Army and Army Reserve at a national level. 
1-127 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
(b)  The local footprint of Regular Army and Army Reserve cap badges. 
(c)  If the new affiliation is suitable for the cadet unit in question. 
(d)  Discussion with the regimental or corps HQ of the proposed 
affiliation. 
(e)  Change of affiliation only.  Discussion with the regimental or corps 
HQ of the current affiliation. 
(2)  When the affiliation is approved,  RC HQ Cadets Branch will: 
(a)  Inform the ACF County, the RPOC Brigade and Regiment/Corps 
concerned.  
(b)  Update the unit affiliation on Westminster. 
1.10.1.3. Affiliations with overseas Cadet Forces 
1.10.1.3.1. Affiliations or twinning arrangements between the ACF, normally at County 
level, and ACFs overseas are encouraged where the conditions for the arrangements are 
practicable and capable of being sustained for an appreciable period of time.  Proposals 
for such affiliations are to be made to RC HQ Cadets Branch and, when approved, will be 
published in the Location Statement. 
1-128 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 1.11 The Youth Service and other 
Cadet organisations 

1.11.1 The Youth Service 
1.11.1.1. General 
1.11.1.1.1. It should be recognised that the ACF is a national voluntary youth organisation, 
sponsored by the MOD, which bases its values and standards on that of the British Army; 
at the same time the major aim of its Charter is to inspire young people to achieve success 
in life with a spirit of service, and to develop in them the qualities of good citizens.  This 
aim of developing the qualities of good citizenship and spirit of service is one which 
parallels that of the nation’s Youth Services in general.  It is important, therefore, that 
whenever possible, the ACF, as a voluntary youth organisation, should cooperate fully at 
all levels with other youth organisations and play its part in the Youth Service as a whole. 
1.11.1.2. The National Council for Voluntary Youth Services 
1.11.1.2.1. The National Council for Voluntary Youth Services (NCVYS) is a body to which 
most of the Youth Services belong.  It exists in order to provide a forum, a means of 
representation to Government departments or other authorities and a source of information 
for the voluntary element of the Youth Service as a whole.  NCVYS as such represents 
England and Wales and there are equivalent bodies in Scotland and Northern Ireland. 
1.11.1.2.2. ACF is a constituent member of the NCVYS and should be represented on 
similar bodies, where they exist, at Regional, County and local levels. 
1.11.1.3. Assistance from Educational Funds 
1.11.1.3.1. As part of the Youth Service, the ACF is entitled to apply for grants from 
educational funds to assist in the non-military side of their work.  Applications should be 
made through the appropriate Local Education Authority (LEA).  Each authority is 
autonomous and can decide whether or not it will help the ACF. 
1.11.1.3.2. Assistance may take the following forms: 
a. 
Cash grants in aid of purchase of equipment, eg furnishings, recreational and 
band equipment. 
b. 
Help with the remuneration of specialist instructors. 
c. 
Assistance with activities of an educational nature, such as overseas travel, 
attendance at short courses connected with youth work other than those run by the 
Army. 
d. 
The loan of equipment. 
e. 
On occasions, grants towards capital expenditure on property through RFCA. 
1-129 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
f. 
Grants from educational funds are intended to supplement voluntary effort and 
are therefore grants in aid.  It is generally a condition of LEA grants that the members 
of the organisation (ie the Cadets) are expected to subscribe towards its running. 
g. 
ACF Counties, ACF Areas or Detachments requiring information on grants or 
assistance should approach the appropriate LEA in the first instance.  The authority 
will have a Youth Officer whose advice should be sought. 
1-130 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 158  
1.11.2 Other Organisations 
1.11.2.1. Ministry of Defence Cadet Organisations 
1.11.2.1.1. The MOD supports the 3 other Cadet organisations: 
a. 
The Combined Cadet Force (CCF). 
b. 
The Sea Cadet Corps (SCC). 
c. 
The Air Training Corps (ATC). 
1.11.2.1.2. All are increasingly using the same rules on Training Safety, Safeguarding and 
checking that people have undergone an appropriate background check3.  Co-operation at 
the local level between units and detachments is encouraged and this commonality allows 
this to be done fairly easily. 
1.11.2.2. Quasi-Military Organisations 
1.11.2.2.1. The co-operation with other youth organisations should not be extended to 
quasi or paramilitary organisations.  In the past there have been attempts by such groups 
to claim semi-official status and to bolster these claims by seeking to associate with official 
bodies and to share in their training and other activities.  Great caution should be 
exercised in any dealings with such groups.  No action should be taken that could be 
construed as official MOD endorsement of groups of this nature; should they seek 
assistance, full details of the help required accompanied by background information on the 
group’s charter, organisation, local status etc, are to be referred to RC HQ Cadets Branch 
for a decision through the normal chain of command. 
1.11.2.3. Political Organisations and Pressure Groups 
1.11.2.3.1. While CFAVs and cadets are free to attend political meetings and seminars so 
long as it is clear that they are doing so as private individuals, and do not wear uniform, 
MOD has directed that the CCF and ACF as corporate entities are not to become officially 
involved with political factions 

 
 
                                                
3 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
1-131 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
1-132 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

  
 
SECTION 2 - PERSONNEL AND 
ADMINISTRATION 
 
 
 
2-1 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-2 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 2.1  Safeguarding 
2.1.1.1.1. It is the primary duty of ALL adult members of the Army’s Cadet Forces and 
those working with Cadets to safeguard their moral, psychological and physical 
welfare, 
regardless of gender, religion, race, ability, disability, sexuality and social 
background by protecting them from any form of physical, emotional or sexual abuse or 
neglect. 

2.1.1.1.2. All children have the right to protection from all forms of abuse and harm when 
engaged in Cadet activities and when in contact with members of the Army’s Cadet 
Forces.  All adults involved in training Cadets have a duty of care, which makes them 
responsible both for safeguarding children in their care from abuse and harm, and to 
promote wellbeing and safety of Cadets by responding swiftly and appropriately when 
suspicions or allegations of abuse arise. 
2.1.1.2. General 
2.1.1.2.1. Safeguarding Cadets is both a function of command and an individual 
responsibility.  The safety and welfare of Cadets must be the paramount 
consideration at all times and in all circumstances.
 
2.1.1.2.2. While the ACF, as an organisation, and the MOD (through the Army), as its 
sponsor, have a general responsibility in law for the actions of all ACF members, legal 
responsibility also rests with the individuals entrusted with the care of children.  Within the 
ACF, this applies equally to CFAVs of any rank, appointment, qualification or experience.  
Any ACF adult who fails to observe proper safeguarding standards for Cadets in their care 
may well be in breach of the law and liable to court action.  It is also likely that they will be 
in breach of the accepted code of practice in the ACF, as expressed in these guidelines, 
and subject to possible disciplinary action or dismissal. 
2.1.1.2.3. The principle legislation governing safeguarding law is The Children’s Act 1989, 
which confers certain rights upon children and obligations on adults entrusted with their 
care.  Also of note is Working Together to Safeguard Childrenwhich gives direction as 
to the extent to which organisations should share information in the interests of protecting 
young people.  In law, a child is defined as anyone before they have reached their 18th 
birthday.  In Scotland, someone who has reached their 16th birthday, until they reach their 
18th birthday is referred to in law, as a young person.  Cadets over the age of 18 are 
therefore considered in law to be adults, and are required to undergo an appropriate 
background check1 and to undergo the same safeguarding training as adults, if they are 
expected to be unsupervised with younger Cadets at any point. 
2.1.1.2.4. These guidelines lay down the responsibilities of ACF CFAVs.  Some of these 
responsibilities are clearly defined in law while others are rules and conventions 
appropriate to the CFAVs.  The ACF’s organisational responsibilities are laid down in the 
government publication Working Together to Safeguard Children.  All are framed to 
protect ACF CFAVs and cadets from actions and their consequences that may cause 
injury or adversely affect the rights or welfare of others.  AC72008 Cadet Training Safety 
Precautions
 
is the principal document within the ACF that is issued to every CFAV in 
                                                
1 By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or Access Northern 
Ireland. 
2-3 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 246  
accordance with these guidelines and lays down the safety rules governing all ACF 
activities.  Neither of these documents can account for every combination of 
circumstances that may be encountered but between them, they aim to cover the majority 
of considerations that will need to be taken into account. 
2.1.1.2.5. ACF Cadet Commandants are to ensure that their ACF adults are familiar with 
these directions.  Training in safeguarding is essential for all adults joining the ACF, many 
of whom may have little comprehension of the personal responsibility in law that they will 
be assuming.  Therefore, mandatory training in safeguarding must form part of the 
Induction training given to all adults.  Refresher courses are to be undertaken each year by 
all adults within the ACF. 
2.1.1.2.6. The County’s Designated Safeguarding Children Officer (DSCO) is trained to 
lead in safeguarding concerns regardless of a person’s position in the CoC, the direction of 
this person in matters of safeguarding must be followed. 
2.1.1.2.7. The DSCO can obtain further advice from SO2 Safeguarding RC HQ Cadets 
Branch. 
2.1.1.3. Background checks2. 
2.1.1.3.1. All CFAVs must undergo an appropriate background check before having 
unsupervised access to cadets.  The appropriate checks are: 
a. 
For CFAVs training cadets in England and Wales.  An enhanced level check 
by the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS).  This check must be redone every 5 
years.   
b. 
For CFAVs training cadets in Northern Ireland.  An enhanced level check by 
Access Northern Ireland.  This check must be redone every 5 years. 
a.c.  For CFAVs training cadets in Scotland.  Registration with the Protecting 
Vulnerable Groups (PVG) scheme.  The ACF is then to request a Scheme Record 
Update every 5 years. 
2.1.1.3.2.1.1.4. Cadets over the age of 183. 
2.1.1.4.1. Even though the majority of cadets in the ACF are aged under 18 there are still 
some over the age of 18 in the ACF (see 2.4.1.1.1.b) and there are cadets from the other 
MOD Cadet Forces that are over the age of 18.  Cadets over the age of 18 are considered 
in law to be adults and therefore the following must be considered where cadets either 
side of 18 are on the same activity: 
a. 
Accommodation and ablutions.  All of the following are permissible but are 
listed in order of preference: 
(1)  Over 18s and under 18s accommodated separately. 
(2)  Over 18s accommodated only with over 16s. 
                                                
2 Amended by ACF RAN 1.6 (25 May 16) 
3 Amended by ACF RAN 1.5 (25 May 16) 
2-4 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
(3)  Over 18s and under 18s accommodated together. 
b. 
Safeguarding training.  It is good practice for senior cadets (especially cadet 
NCOs) to receive a safeguarding brief as it is likely that they will be the first point of 
contact for junior cadets.  This should not be the full safeguarding brief delivered to 
CFAVs but should concentrate on identifying if there is an issue and the importance 
of reporting to a CFAV. 
a.c.  Background checks.  There is no requirement for over 18 cadets to have a 
background check conducted.  Over 18 year old cadets are still cadets and therefore 
should not be planning and conducting any activities without supervision from a 
qualified and authorised CFAV.  Legally background checks are not required for an 
adult to be present with cadets but only when they are conducting unsupervised 
regulated activity. 
2.1.1.4.2.1.1.5. Child Abuse 
2.1.1.4.1.2.1.1.5.1. All CFAVs in the ACF have a duty to act if they believe a Cadet is 
being abused, even if the abuse is taking place outside the ACF.  Child Abuse is a term 
used to describe a situation where someone is causing harm to a person under the age of 
eighteen.  The perpetrator of the abuse may be an adult, or another child.  Any incident of 
child abuse, whether suspected by an adult or reported by a child or a friend of the child, 
must be reported to the DSCO. 
2.1.1.4.2.2.1.1.5.2. Types of child abuse that might occur: 
a. 
Physical abuse may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or 
scalding, drowning, suffocating, or otherwise causing physical harm to a child or 
failing to protect a child from that harm.  Physical harm may also be caused when a 
parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces illness in a child. 
b. 
Emotional abuse is the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to 
cause severe and persistent adverse effects on the child’s emotional development.  It 
may involve conveying to children that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or 
valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person.  It may feature age- or 
developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children.  These may 
include interactions that are beyond the child’s developmental capability, as well as 
overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child 
participating in normal social interaction.  It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-
treatment of another.  It may involve serious bullying causing children frequently to 
feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children.  Some level 
of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, though it may 
occur alone. 
c. 
Sexual abuse involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in 
sexual activities, including prostitution, whether or not the child is aware of what is 
happening.  The activities may involve physical contact including both penetrative 
and non-penetrative acts such as kissing, touching or fondling the child's genitals or 
breasts, vaginal or anal intercourse or oral sex.  They may include non-contact 
activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, 
pornographic material or watching sexual activities, or encouraging children to 
behave in sexually inappropriate ways. Sexual exploitation involves exploitative 
situations, contexts and friendships where young people (or a third person or 
2-5 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
persons) receive ‘something’ (eg food, accommodation, drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, 
affection, gifts, money) as a result of performing and/or others performing on them, 
sexual activities. 
d. 
Neglect is the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or 
psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or 
development.  Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal 
substance abuse.  Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing 
to provide adequate food and clothing; shelter, including exclusion from home or 
abandonment; failing to protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger; 
failure to ensure adequate supervision including the use of inadequate care-takers; 
or the failure to ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment.  It may also 
include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs. 
e. 
Bullying may be defined as deliberately hurtful behaviour, usually repeated over 
a period of time, where it is difficult for those bullied to defend themselves.  It can 
take many forms, but the three main types are physical (e.g.  hitting, kicking, theft), 
verbal (e.g.  racist or homophobic remarks, threats, name calling) and emotional (e.g.  
isolating an individual from the activities and social acceptance of their peer group).  
The damage inflicted by bullying can frequently be underestimated.  It can cause 
considerable distress to children to the extent that it affects their health and 
development or, at the extreme, cause them significant harm (including self-harm).  
All settings in which children are provided with services or are living away from home 
should have in place rigorously enforced anti-bullying strategies.  Bullying of Cadets 
by adults is considered child abuse.  Bullying of Cadets by other Cadets may not 
amount to abuse but must still be stopped.  A Cadet being bullied may not wish to 
report it for fear that it will become worse, it is important that adults remain aware of 
behaviour at Detachment nights and activities so that they may intervene in any 
bullying they become aware of.  Discriminative language must be corrected, whether 
it is believed to be intended as bullying or not.  Any form of bullying should be dealt 
with as quickly and effectively as possible. Cyber bullying is the use of the internet 
and social media for harmful or harassing behaviour. It can incorporate the spread of 
videos and/or photographs against an individual’s wishes, rumours, or other actions 
that might harm or humiliate another person.  
f. 
The following are signs that may indicate abuse, neglect or bullying- please 
note, this is in no way an exhaustive list.  The majority of concerns will likely come to 
light once a cadet is known to an adult, as behaviour changes will be more 
noticeable. 
(1)  Sudden or dramatic change in behaviour, particularly in the presence of 
certain individuals. 
(2)  Sudden or dramatic change in style of dress or lifestyle (has new things or 
significant amounts of money unusually often). 
(3)  Poor concentration, easily distracted. 
(4)  Not wishing to leave adults during training, or finding excuses to stay 
behind after activities or Detachment nights. 
(5)  Seems frightened of walking to or from training. 
2-6 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
(6)  Has unexplained injuries, or injuries that do not fit with their explanation. 
(7)  Anxious, or becomes easily upset or withdrawn. 
(8)  Reacts excessively to praise or criticism. 
(9)  Arrives regularly in ill-fitting or weather-inappropriate clothing. 
2.1.1.4.3.2.1.1.5.3. If abuse, neglect or bullying is identified within the ACF, it must be 
reported at the first opportunity to the DSCO.  The DSCO must raise an incident report on 
form Annex A to LFSO 3202C for each incident brought to their attention. 
a. 
If an adult is suspected of abusing, neglecting or bullying a Cadet, it is likely that 
the Commandant will opt to suspend them whilst the incident is investigated. 
b. 
For instances of cadet on cadet bullying the following actions are to be taken: 
(1)  If a cadet bullying or abusing another cadet is apparent, the victim is to be 
offered space to talk with the Detachment Commander, another adult or 
independent listener.  All precautions, as advised later in this chapter, are to be 
followed when a Cadet wishes to speak to an adult privately. 
(2)  Discussions should be had within the group, to allow the Cadet who is 
bullying the opportunity to manage their behaviour without direct intervention.  
This is a particularly useful tool if the victim of the bullying does not wish to 
disclose the name of the person bullying them. 
(3)  If group discussions on the effects of bullying are not successful, the 
Cadet who is bullying (if identified) should be advised that their behaviour is 
inappropriate and involved in mediation if both parties agree to it. 
(4)  If the bullying continues even after the behaviour has been discussed, 
disciplinary action may be necessary.  This could be the suspension or 
dismissal of the cadet who is bullying and potentially a referral of the case to 
social services if the bullying continues. 
2-7 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.1.2 Safeguarding: What you must do in the case of a safeguarding 
incident or concern 
2.1.2.1. General 
2.1.2.1.1. All incidents and concerns of a safeguarding nature must be reported or 
recorded.  Dependant on severity of the issue, below are guidelines for managing such 
incidents and concerns. 
a. 
If there is an immediate threat of harm to a Cadet or adult, or harm has been 
caused to a Cadet or adult, the emergency services must be contacted immediately. 
b. 
If there is an allegation of a crime, or a crime has been witnessed, the 
emergency services must be contacted immediately. 
c. 
If a cadet discloses something that causes concern - if the concern relates to an 
immediate threat, the emergency services must be contacted.  If the concern is 
regarding on-going behaviour towards the cadet (for example, at home or at school) 
the concern must be forwarded to the DSCO who must forward concerns to the local 
safeguarding board or children’s services. 
d. 
If an incident results in an external case review or a serious case review then 
the findings of this review (as authorised by the LADO or police) should immediately 
be reported to SO2 Safeguarding4 at RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
e. 
If a cadet discloses something that causes concern but does not highlight a 
specific risk, the concern must be recorded locally to enable monitoring of the cadet’s 
wellbeing, and must also be reported to the DSCO to make them aware that there is 
a potential concern and to allow them to link concerns with any additional information 
that they may be privy to. 
2.1.2.2. Disclosures and concerns – what to do 
2.1.2.2.1. If someone wishes to speak about an incident or suspected abuse, it is 
important that they are listened to.  They may be offered the opportunity to speak with an 
independent listener such as a chaplain or medical officer, or offered use of a telephone to 
contact ChildLine if they do not feel comfortable having a conversation in person. 
2.1.2.2.2. If a cadet wishes to speak in private with an adult, it is essential that the adult 
seeks out a space that provides privacy enough for the child to feel comfortable to speak 
openly, but allows enough supervision for the adult to feel protected from any suspicions of 
other cadets or adults.  For example, an outdoor space may provide enough distance but 
be in plain view of other adults; an office with an open door may provide a similar 
environment, provided the adult is within sight or hearing distance of others. 
2.1.2.2.3. If the cadet wishes to speak regarding a concern, incident or disclosure, it must 
be made clear to them that there is no guarantee that information will be kept confidential.  
Some information may need to be shared in order to keep them safe.  The cadet can be 
reassured that only essential information will be shared. 
                                                
4 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx 
2-8 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.1.2.2.4. Information should be shared where necessary for safeguarding, but otherwise, 
any concerns, disclosures or allegations made by cadets is not to be shared in casual 
discussions or gossip. 
2.1.2.2.5. Everything the cadet says should be recorded, in their own words.  Grammar 
and language use must not be corrected.  An adult may prefer to record the conversation 
as it happens or to make a record immediately after the conversation has finished.  Times 
and dates of conversations must be recorded. 
2.1.2.2.6. If a cadet makes an allegation, it must be taken seriously.  It is not for the adult 
to challenge statements, make judgements as to the truth of statements, or give personal 
opinions on the statements.  It is for the adult to provide support to the cadet and report 
the allegation onto the appropriate authorities to investigate.  The adult must also provide 
information to the cadet about who they intend to share the information with. 
2.1.2.2.7. Allegations are to be reported to the DSCO as soon as possible as they will 
need to forward the report to the appropriate agencies. 
2.1.2.2.8. The DSCO may need to discuss the incident with you or the cadet.  If the 
incident involves an offender within the ACF , the DSCO may need to share information 
with the Commandant to allow consideration of the appropriate action to take. 
2.1.2.2.9. Any advice forwarded from social/children’s services must be acted upon.  Any 
such advice will reach Detachments through the DSCO. 
2.1.2.2.10. The DSCO will inform the parent/guardian of the Cadet if appropriate.  If a 
parent/guardian is implicated by something a Cadet has shared, it may not be appropriate 
to discuss disclosures or allegations with a parent/guardian. 
2.1.2.2.11. Senior cadets are to be advised of appropriate actions to take in instances that 
they become concerned about younger Cadets.  Many young people will speak more 
openly with another young person and so ensuring senior cadets are aware that this may 
happen, and that they must report any allegations and disclosures will help, to ensure they 
feel equipped to handle these difficult situations. 
2.1.2.2.12. If an adult is concerned that an allegation has been made against them, they 
are not to investigate or approach the Cadet or their family.  An adult in this situation may 
seek legal advice and support from the ACFA legal team on 0845 293 0695. 
2.1.2.2.13. Information that is required by the media will be provided through the 
Formation HQ staff that will be advised by the DSCO.  An adult within the ACF is not to 
take it upon themselves to share information with the media, and should seek advice from 
HQ staff if approached by the media. 
2.1.2.3. Recording, Reporting and Investigating 
2.1.2.3.1. A visitors log must be kept at each ACF Detachment for use when people from 
outside of the ACF visit.  All visitors are to be accompanied throughout their visit; this is of 
particular importance if cadets are present in the building. 
2.1.2.3.2. All incidents no matter how minor should be recorded in the copy of MOD Form 
315 – Occurrence Book
 
that must be kept at that location. 
2-9 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.1.2.3.3. Records must be kept of any concerns relating to accidents, any injury that 
requires medical treatment, any concern relating to a child’s welfare or wellbeing, 
disclosures made by a cadet, information shared from statutory agencies regarding the 
welfare of a cadet, concerns shared from external parties regarding the wellbeing of a 
Cadet (this may be a concern shared from another child, a report from an external 
individual, school, family member etc that is likely to require awareness by the ACF to 
ensure appropriate safeguards are put in place whilst in the care of the ACF), of any 
allegations made either by cadets, or against adults of the ACF. All such incidents must be 
recorded on (Annex A to LFSO 3202C) and forwarded to RC-Cdts-INCREP-
xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx
.
 
2.1.2.3.4. When a cadet is enrolled into the ACF, parents/guardians are to be made aware 
of the accepted method for making a complaint against a member of the ACF or the 
organisation itself.  It is preferable that a complaint against the ACF be made directly to the 
organisation rather than another agency.  In the first instance a complaint should be made 
to the Cadet’s Detachment Commander.  If the complainant feels they are not receiving 
the desired response, or the complaint relates to the Detachment Commander, the 
complaint should be made in writing to the Cadet Commandant and addressed to the ACF 
County HQ.  ACF Adults should deal sympathetically with complaints and attempts should 
be made to deal with all complaints to the satisfaction of all parties.  Any complaints made 
by a parent/guardian are not to impact on the cadet’s experiences with the ACF.  If the 
complaint relates to an allegation of a criminal offence, emergency services must be 
contacted immediately.  Adults within the ACF are not to investigate any concerns or 
allegations as this may hinder any subsequent police investigations.  Social services and 
Child Protection Units within police forces are highly trained to investigate child protection 
concerns and they must be allowed to do their job.  Any Cadets or adults implicated in 
allegations are to be suspended without prejudice pending investigations. 
2.1.2.3.5. Investigations are to be conducted by the appropriate authorities5.  If no further 
action is taken by the appropriate authorities after an investigation has been completed, 
the Cadet or adult whom the complaint names is to remain suspended pending an 
investigation by the ACF into the balance of probability of the complaint’s grounding and 
whether it warrants discipline or dismissal from the ACF6. 
2.1.2.3.6. All records and reports are to be written factually and objectively.  Personal 
opinions, assumptions and beliefs of the person making the record or report are to be 
omitted.  CFAVs and cadets (and families of cadets) have a right to access information 
held about them by organisations. 
2.1.2.3.7. All records are to be kept on Westminster in the appropriate area.  Only adults 
with the appropriate level of access are to be permitted access to sensitive records.  Paper 
copies must be destroyed after the information is transferred onto the system, except in 
cases of child protection records during the timeframe of Justice Goddard’s Independent 
Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse. 
                                                
5 Depending on the incident this may be low level by the county, by the Civil Police or the Army in 
accordance with JSP 832 - Guide to service enquiries anLFSO 3207 - Conduct and management of 
service enquiries
 (
both DII only). 
6 In order to prosecute an individual the crown prosecution service must be satisfied that there is sufficient 
evidence to prove the case beyond reasonable doubt.  Where the authorities decide not to prosecute an 
individual may still be in breach of the service test for which the proof required is a simple balance of 
probabilities.  Where allegations have been made against an individual the commandant must assess 
whether the individual is in breach of the service test and therefore subject to an appropriate sanction. 
2-10 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.1.2.3.8. If an adult or cadet is subject to a disciplinary interview, the officer or AI 
conducting the interview is to arrange for another adult to be present to witness what is 
said.  A record should be made at the time of the interview or immediately afterwards.  
This record should be added to the adult or cadet personal record on Westminster with 
permission set to, “CEO Only”. 
2.1.2.3.9. Records of mediation between Cadets should not be minuted.  A brief record to 
include the date, time, attendees and a brief outline of the incident and outcomes will 
suffice. 
2.1.2.4. Data Protection and Sharing Information 
2.1.2.4.1. Individuals CFAVs and cadets (or families of cadets on their behalf) can request 
access to any information that is held about them with the ACF. 
2.1.2.4.2. It can be an offence to share personal information about an individual without 
their consent, unless there is a justifiable reason for doing so. 
2.1.2.4.3. This is not a barrier to sharing information with professionals regarding the 
safeguarding of a cadet.  As prescribed in ‘Working Together to Safeguard Children 2004’, 
information relating to safeguarding and child protection is considered the highest priority 
for all agencies involved with children and will take precedence over data protection where 
the two are in conflict. 
2-11 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 246 link to page 166  
2.1.3 Safeguarding: Cadet Activities 
2.1.3.1. Parental consent 
2.1.3.1.1. Joining. 
a. 
An AF E 529 should be filled in recording the arrangements made between the 
ACF and the parent, concerning: 
(1)  Confirming the potential cadet meets the eligibility requirements at para 
2.4.1.1.   
(2)  Participation in the APC syllabus, sport and travel in military/ACF 
transport. 
(3)  Acceptance that the cadet is responsible for issued clothing and 
equipment and a charge may be payable if it is not returned in a decent state 
(fair wear and tear expected). 
(4)  Travel arrangements to and from the Detachment. 
(5)  Any disability, medical or dietary requirements. 
(6)  Indemnity and insurance cover, which does not include cover for personal 
possessions. 
(7)  Agreement on whether the cadet’s likeness7 can be used in ACF 
promotional material. 
b. 
The parental consent section of the AF E 529 must be signed by the parent 
before being scanned and attached to the cadet’s record on Westminster Once this 
has been done and the personal information input to Westminster the AF E 529 
should be destroyed. 
2.1.3.1.2. Extra activities. 
a. 
Throughout the cadet’s service in the ACF, written consent must be obtained on 
the Activity Consent Form on each occasion the cadet carries out activity outside of 
their detachment location and/or outside of their normal parade times. 
b. 
The parental consent section of the Activity Consent Form must be retained 
either in hard copy for three years or be scanned8 and attached to the cadet’s record 
on Westminster.  The personal information section should be checked against 
Westminster (and Westminster updated if necessary) this section should then be 
destroyed. 
2.1.3.1.3. Photo consent.  The consent given at para 2.1.3.1.1.a(7) covers images of 
cadets appearing in cadet force publications but specific parental permission must be 
gained if an image is going to be used in leaflets or posters that will be more persistant 
than a news article, where the cadet is effectively ‘the model’. Problems can arise where 
                                                
7 Photographs or video footage. 
8 Or a photo of sufficient quality that details may be read. 
2-12 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 166  
images have been taken for one purpose and used for another. A new image should be 
obtained and cleared specifically for the desired purpose. 
2.1.3.1.4. Withdrawal of parental consent.  Parental consent can be withdrawn at any 
time by either parent. 
a. 
When parental consent is required for an activity, the consent of one parent is 
enough.  However, if one parent objects when the other does not, the cadet is not 
permitted to take part in that activity. 
b. 
If the cadet’s legal guardianship changes a new AF E 529 should be completed 
and the procedure at para 2.1.3.1.1.b followed.
2-13 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.10 (6 Feb 17) 
 
2.1.3.2. Supervision 
2.1.3.2.1. Risk assessment.  All cadet activities should have an assessment made to 
ensure that the correct level of supervision is present at all times.  A common sense 
approach should be applied, taking into account the following factors: 
a. 
The number of cadets involved. 
b. 
The maturity, experience and training of the cadets involved. 
c. 
The maturity, experience and training of the adults involved. 
d. 
The nature of the activity that is being undertaken (this may include suggested 
or mandatory ratios from guidance related to that activity). 
2.1.3.2.2. General guidance. 
a. 
All cadet activity MUST fit into one of the descriptions below: 
(1)  Be supervised by at least two authorised adults. 
(2)  Be supervised by at least one authorised adult and have more than one 
cadet present. 
(3)  Exceptionally, one cadet being supervised by one authorised adult with 
specific permission by the parent or guardian1. 
(4)  Cadets carrying out unsupervised cadet activity2 with specific written 
permission from the parent or guardian. 
b. 
For any outdoor activity, whenever possible, there should be one authorised 
adult present for every ten cadets (1:10). 
c. 
All cadet activities must be planned and conducted by a suitably qualified 
person. 
d. 
Cadets who are given supervisory responsibilities towards other cadets, 
including cadet NCOs, are to be comprehensively briefed on their responsibilities by 
an ACF adult who is current with their Safeguarding training. 
2.1.3.2.3. Overnight activities. 
a. 
When cadets are accommodated overnight (in any location including Cadet 
Training Centres and during field training).  The following conditions are to be 
imposed: 
(1)  An authorised adult MUST be located somewhere where any cadets 
needing assistance (or any other agency who needs to contact someone in 
                                                
1 The safety and welfare is the most important factor, eg if an adult being alone with a cadet is necessary to 
take them to A&E or the alternative is to abandon the cadet (and it is impossible to contact a parent) then 
common sense must be applied and, the CoC must be notified as soon as possible. 
2 This will normally be limited to travel, cadet in the community activity and expeditions where cadets are 
remotely supervised however, there may be other occasions. 
2-14 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.10 (6 Feb 17) 
 
relation to the cadet force) can quickly locate them.  This adult is considered to 
be on duty and therefore may not consume any alcohol. 
(2)  Before the cadets are left to sleep for the night a patrol should be made of 
the site to ensure there are no security, fire or other issues.  Cadet’s 
accommodation should be checked to ensure they are reasonably quiet and 
that there are no obvious problems. 
(3)  Consideration should be given to the use of battery-operated smoke-
alarms in buildings not provided with a fire-alarm system, and a fire risk-
assessment must be carried out and acted upon. 
(4)  Care should be taken to ensure CFAVs are not too tired to perform duties 
the next day (specifically for safety critical activities including driver’s hour’s 
regulations). 
(5)  A CFAV of the same sex as the cadets should be present if there is a 
reason to enter cadet accommodation.  If necessary to enter the 
accommodation of cadets of the opposite sex then it must be reported to the 
DSCO as soon as possible. 
(6)  Whilst on residential activities, cadets are to be enabled to contact home. 
b. 
In camp training.  In addition to the rules above, when staying in camp it is 
imperative that camp standing orders are obeyed. 
c. 
Expedition training.  Supervision of expedition training should take into 
account the guidance in AC 71849 – Army Cadet Adventurous Training and Other 
Challenge Pursuits manual
this is specifically important for Duke of Edinburgh’s 
award expeditions which are remotely supervised. 
d. 
Fieldcraft training.  During overnight fieldcraft training an authorised adult 
should make regular patrols ensuring that cadets are using their sleeping systems 
correctly and to supervise cadets when changing the states of their weapons. 
.
2-15 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 271 link to page 271  
2.1.3.2.4. Other considerations. 
a. 
Guidance for the enrolment and training of cadets with disabilities is given at 
para 2.7.3.1 and para  2.7.3.2 respectively.  Adult leaders have the same 
safeguarding responsibilities for cadets with disabilities as they do for able-bodied 
cadets and are expected to provide only such additional care as is described in these 
regulations. 
b. 
Arrangements for female cadets to participate in ACF activities during 
pregnancy are to be agreed and a risk assessment to be completed by their Training 
Safety Advisor along with their parent/guardian and the cadet herself.  All adults in 
charge of training a cadet during pregnancy must be briefed in full on identified risks 
and pre-agreed mitigating actions. 
c. 
Cadets are not to be obliged to take part in a religious service against their 
wishes, nor prevented from taking part in a religious observance should they so wish.  
For any communal act of worship (including drumhead services, church parades and 
acts of remembrance in a religious location or with overtly religious content), each 
cadet must be specifically asked if they wish to take part.  Where cadets chose not to 
take part a suitable alternative activity should be offered where appropriate.  Cadets 
are not to be admonished or demeaned in any way if they choose not to take part. 
 
 
2-16 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.1.4 Safeguarding: Support for cadets and CFAVs 
2.1.4.1. Support for cadets 
2.1.4.1.1. Children and young people have a right to access independent counselling.  
This may be through an ACF appointed individual such as the chaplain, or if the cadet 
would like to speak to someone outside of the organisation, some useful contact numbers 
are listed below: 
a. 
ChildLine, confidential advice and support, including telephone or online 
counselling services – 0800 1111. 
b. 
Samaritans, offering emotional support for those struggling to cope with suicidal 
thoughts, or concerned about someone else – 08457 90 90 90 (ROI – 1850 60 90). 
c. 
National Youth Advocacy Service, for any form of legal advice or advocacy 
(available 0900 – 2000 weekdays and 1000 – 1600 on Saturdays) – 0808 808 1001. 
2.1.4.2. Support for CFAVs 
2.1.4.2.1. CFAVs may find that providing support to a cadet can sometimes create a need 
for support of their own.  The following agencies may be able to assist: 
a. 
NSPCC 24hr Child Protection Helpline, for independent advice on what to do 
about a safeguarding concern – 0808 800 5000 
b. 
Army Welfare Service, for any CFAV who require support after supporting a 
cadet with a safeguarding concern to be directed to their local AWS (operating hours 
are 1030hrs – 1930hrs on weekdays) – 02072 189 000 
c. 
ACFA 24hr legal advice, for any legal advice relating to ACF activities required 
by an adult involved with cadets – 0845 293 0695. 
 
 
2-17 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-18 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 253 link to page 15 link to page 253  
2.1.5 Cadet Discipline and Personal Conduct 
2.1.5.1. Discipline 
2.1.5.1.1. Whilst maintaining discipline, adults are to bear in mind the range in age and 
level of maturity of their cadets.  Cadets should however, be expected to adhere to their 
cadet promise (at para 2.4.3.3and observe good behaviour at all times.  This should 
include encouragement to monitor their language for anything that is discriminatory or 
offensive. 
2.1.5.1.2. There are no sanctions or punishments available to enforce discipline other 
than: 
a. 
Suspension. 
b. 
Dismissal. 
c. 
Reduction in rank (Cadet NCOs only). 
2.1.5.1.3. If any of these actions are taken they are to be recorded in the notes section of 
the cadet’s record on Westminster and the CoC informed. 
2.1.5.1.4. It is good practice for parents to be consulted when any of these sanctions are 
implemented.  In the case of suspension or dismissal parents must be consulted before it 
is enacted. 
2.1.5.2. Personal conduct 
2.1.5.2.1. Cadets are expected to abide by the Army’s Values and Standards (at Part 0.4 
as well as the Cadet Promise (at para 2.4.3.3throughout the time they are in the ACF. 
2.1.5.2.2. Cadets are not permitted to possess or consume alcohol at any time when with 
the ACF.  Any Cadet found to be intoxicated must be removed from the activity.   
2.1.5.2.3. Cadets are not permitted to smoke1 or possess smoking paraphernalia when on 
any activity with the ACF. 
2.1.5.2.4. Breaches of criminal law by cadets whilst with the ACF are not tolerated.  Any 
cadet found, or suspected to be in breach of criminal law is to be suspended immediately 
pending investigation.  If an adult is made aware of a breach of law by a cadet, they are to 
report it. 
2.1.5.2.5. If a cadet is suspected of being in possession of an illegal or stolen substance or 
object, the DSCO should be contacted immediately who will be required to contact the 
police and the Cadet’s parent/guardian.  An adult should not attempt to forcibly remove 
anything from a cadet if the cadet does not give up the substance or item willingly.  Unless 
there is an immediate threat to others, the matter should await police arrival. 
2.1.5.2.6. Sexual relations between cadets are forbidden when engaged in ACF 
supervised activities. 
 
                                                
1 “Smoking” includes tobacco products (cigarettes, cigars and pipes), menthol cigarettes and e-cigarettes. 
2-19 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-20 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 211 link to page 15  
2.1.6 Adult Discipline and Personal Conduct 
2.1.6.1. Discipline 
2.1.6.1.1. Disciplinary procedures are different for Officers and Adult Instructors in the 
ACF: 
a. 
Officers.  ACF Officers are members of the Army Reserve and their disciplinary 
procedures are to be in line with those laid down in AC 72030 The Reserve Land 
Forces Regulations
.
 
b. 
Adult Instructors.  ACF Adult Instructors are not members of the Army or Army 
Reserve and their disciplinary procedures are detailed at Part 2.3 of this section. 
2.1.6.2. Personal conduct 
2.1.6.2.1. Adults must ensure that their behaviour meets the Army’s high standards at all 
times and should follow the Army’s Leadership Code and maintain the Army’s Values and 
Standards (aPart 0.4) throughout their service with the ACF.  Adults must ensure that 
they and anyone under their command do not place themselves in a situation from which 
an allegation of abuse may develop. 
2.1.6.2.2. If at any time a CFAV is suspected of a criminal offence they are to report this 
matter to the Cadet Commandant.  Failure to do so could result in disciplinary action even 
if they are found to be innocent of the initial offence. 
2.1.6.2.3. Adult leaders must be sensitive to the conflicting demands of ensuring that 
Cadets are properly supervised, and allowing a reasonable degree of freedom and 
privacy.  A sensible test is to ask “would the general public consider it reasonable and 
appropriate to treat children or young people in this way?” 
2.1.6.2.4. When supervising Cadets, adults must ensure that they do not allow themselves 
to be compromised in any way.  This includes, but is not limited to, adults avoiding being 
alone with Cadets without another adult being present, unless it is absolutely essential to 
do so, where the harm caused by not being alone with a Cadet would be greater than the 
potential for allegations.  For example- if a Cadet requires immediate medical attention, to 
take them in an adult’s private vehicle to a hospital would be more appropriate than 
allowing them to remain at an activity that is inaccessible to ambulances, or if a Cadet’s 
parent is unexpectedly unable to collect them at the end of a Detachment night where the 
Cadet would be put at risk if they were to make their own way home.  If such a situation 
should arise, it is important to inform the DSCO before taking the Cadet home or to the 
hospital and to confirm that the adult has left after the Cadet arrived at their destination 
safely.  If it is not practicable to inform the DSCO before the event, it must be reported to 
them as soon as possible after the event.   
2.1.6.2.5. If an adult believes that they have been placed in a compromising situation, they 
should report it to the DSCO to allow any resulting allegations to be dealt with as efficiently 
as possible. 
2.1.6.2.6. Adults may encourage cadets to overcome their fears in tackling challenging 
pursuits.  However adults should be careful not to cross the line into compelling cadets to 
take part in any activity which they genuinely believe to be beyond their capability.   
2-21 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 168  
2.1.6.2.7. All adults in the ACF must remember that their behaviour is under close scrutiny 
by Cadets who often model their own behaviour on that of the adults around them.  The 
ACF is observed regularly by the Regular Army and by the public and adults are therefore 
expected to observe the highest standards of personal conduct and discipline. 
2.1.6.2.8. Adults are not to swear or use discriminatory language at, or in the presence of 
Cadets.   
2.1.6.2.9. Adults are not to behave towards a cadet in a way that might be considered a 
physical threat or assault and must take all reasonable actions to protect cadets from 
others who might act in this way.  Any form of bullying against another adult or a cadet will 
be considered a breach of good discipline, and will likely result in disciplinary action being 
taken against the offender. 
2.1.6.2.10. Adults suspected of using or being in possession of illegal substances are to be 
suspended from duty pending investigation and reported to the police. 
2.1.6.2.11. No individual is to smoke2 while in uniform in view of the general public, when 
engaged in any activity with cadets or when travelling in public. CFAVs are permitted to 
smoke provided that they are not in sight of cadets or the general public.  Smoking must 
be done in designated smoking areas. 
2.1.6.2.12. Adults involved in relationships with other adults within the ACF should conduct 
their relationships discreetly and separately from the ACF. 
2.1.6.2.13. Relationships between ACF CFAVs and cadets, except familial relationships, 
are inappropriate in the ACF.  Intimate relationships between CFAVs and cadets, even if 
permitted in law, are a breach of ACF terms and will result in dismissal from the ACF. 
2.1.6.2.14. Adults within the ACF may transport other members of the ACF, adult or cadet, 
provided they have a valid driving license and the vehicle is properly insured by an 
insurance company that has agreed to them doing so (in some cases, this may require 
specific business insurance - some policies will include this but this will vary from policy to 
policy).  An adult must not be alone with an individual cadet, unless in exceptional 
circumstances.  Wherever possible two adults must be present in the vehicle.The 
supervision rules at Para 2.1.3.2 must be followed.3 
2.1.6.2.15. Adults are not to make physical contact with cadets apart from in exceptional 
situations, for safety reasons or to prevent an individual from harming themselves or 
others.  Any physical restraint used must be for the shortest time period possible and must 
use the minimum amount of force necessary.  If at all possible, any physical restraint 
should only be used with another adult present.  All adults should be mindful not to 
compress the stomach, chest or throat area in any situation that requires physical restraint, 
to reduce any risk of positional asphyxia.  Parents/guardians are to be notified as soon as 
possible after the incident, when reasons for holding the cadet and how the Cadet was 
held should be explained in full.  Incident reports are to be filled in to include all of the 
information, as shared with parents/guardians. 
 
 
                                                
2 “Smoking” includes tobacco products (cigarettes, cigars and pipes), menthol cigarettes and e-cigarettes. 
3 Amended by ACF RAN 1.10 (6 Feb 17) 
2-22 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 177  
2.1.6.2.16. Alcohol. 
a. 
Adult volunteers are not to consume or be under the influence of alcohol in the 
presence of cadets and while conducting cadet activities (but see sub-para e). 
b. 
Adult volunteers are not to be unduly under the influence of alcohol where they 
are attending an event in an official capacity representing the Army’s Cadets. 
c. 
Adult volunteers are not to conduct activities while consuming or under the 
influence of alcohol where this would cause a breach of national legislation; this 
includes supplying alcohol to cadets or permitting cadets to purchase alcohol. 
d. 
There is no absolute ban on adult volunteers drinking while participating in the 
ACF or supporting other cadet forces’ activities; rather the intent that alcohol is 
consumed in a manner that would not damage the reputation of the Army’s Cadets.  
All adult staff members have a responsibility to maintain public confidence in their 
ability to safeguard the welfare and best interests of children and young people.  
During periods where they are not directly supervising, supporting or delivering an 
activity (and may be considered ‘off duty’), adult volunteers need to take into account 
the effects alcohol can have and how it may affect their fitness to fulfil their cadet 
duties. 
e. 
The default position is that no alcohol should be consumed by adult volunteers 
in the presence of cadets; however, it is accepted that there will be, from time to time, 
regional or national events (such as awards events where family members or the 
public may also be in attendance) where there may be valid reason to allow adults to 
consume alcohol in the presence of cadets.  In these cases, an exemption to this 
policy should be sought from Brigade HQs for regional (including County) events and 
from Cadets Branch for national events. 
 
 
2-23 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 2.2  Officers 
2.2.1 General 
2.2.1.1. Authority 
2.2.1.1.1. This part sets out the terms of service and commissioning procedures for ACF 
Officers.  The authority for the grant of Army Reserve General List Section B commissions 
to ACF officers is vested in AC 72030 The Reserve Land Forces Regulations.  
Executive authority to appoint eligible and qualified individuals to Army Reserve General 
List Section B Commissions, on behalf of the Army Commissions Board, lies with GOC 
RC.  The commissioning procedure and subsequent career management of ACF officers, 
up to and including the rank of Major is exercised, on behalf of GOC RC, by Cadet 
Commandants.  The selection and appointment of Lieutenant Colonels and Colonels is 
made by via selection board convened by the Regional Brigade or DComd Cadets UK RC 
HQ. 
2.2.1.2. Appointments to Commissions 
2.2.1.2.1. ACF officers, other than Medical Officers and Chaplains, are appointed to the 
Army Reserve General List Section B.  Medical and Nursing Officers are appointed to the 
RAMC (Reserve) General List Section B.  Chaplains are appointed to the RAChD 
(Reserve) General List Section B by the Chaplain General through ACG HQ HC 4PSC. 
2.2.1.3. Status 
2.2.1.3.1. Officers have a liability for call out under the Reserve Forces Act 1980 or 1996 
(as appropriate) but will not be called out by virtue of their appointment to the Army 
Reserve General List Section B for service with the ACF.  Any such officers however, who 
hold appointments in other Army Reserve units or pools in addition to their ACF duties, 
may be called out in that capacity. 
2.2.1.3.2. Officers of the Cadet Forces are subject to Service Law whenever they are on 
duty.  Officers of the Cadet Forces are subject to the Army’s Values and Standards and 
Administrative Action at all times. 
2.2.1.3.3. Discipline policy for ACF officers is laid out in AC 72030 The Reserve Land 
Forces Regulations
 
and policy on administrative action is laid out in AGAI 67- 
Administrative Action
.
 
2.2.1.4. Rank and Precedence 
2.2.1.4.1. All ACF officers hold the substantive rank of Lieutenant except for those on 
probation who hold the rank of 2Lt. 
2.2.1.4.2. ACF officers, while serving with the ACF, have the precedence of an ACF officer 
irrespective of any other type of commission they may hold and their precedence will be as 
follows: 
                                                
4 Amended by ACF RAN 1.4 (25 May 16) 
2-24 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
a. 
According to the date of promotion to their current rank, acting or substantive, in 
the ACF. 
b. 
Officers of the same seniority in their substantive ranks are to take seniority 
according to the date of their appointment to a commission. 
c. 
Officers of the ACF are to take precedence after officers in Groups A or B of the 
Army and Army Reserve of the same rank. 
2-25 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 158  
2.2.2 Dual Appointments 
2.2.2.1. Dual Regular Army/ACF Appointments 
2.2.2.1.1. Members of the Regular Army may not hold a position in the ACF.  They may 
assist occasionally as “Service Helpers” with authority from their Commanding Officer and 
the Cadet Commandant of the ACF County. 
2.2.2.2. Dual Army Reserve/ACF Appointments 
2.2.2.2.1. Officers on the Active List of the Army Reserve may also hold commissioned 
appointments in the ACF, but their Army Reserve duties take precedence.  To hold a dual 
appointment, an officer must undergo an appropriate background check5. 
2.2.2.2.2. WOs, NCOs and soldiers are not permitted to hold a commissioned appointment 
in the ACF while serving in the Army Reserve. 
2.2.2.3. Dual CCF and ACF Appointments 
2.2.2.3.1. ACF officers may also serve as CCF officers (and vice versa) but only with the 
prior agreement of the Cadet Commandant and CCF Contingent Commander concerned, 
who must satisfy themselves that the dual appointment will not create any conflict of 
duties.  The ACF County to which a CCF officer is to be appointed is to ensure that a 
suitable vacancy exists and take the necessary JPA action to make the appointment.  The 
CCF Contingent to which an ACF officer is to be appointed will apply to the Brigade which, 
having verified that the proposed appointment has the approval of the school Principal, will 
take the necessary JPA action to make the appointment. 
2.2.2.3.2. Applications for dual appointments that would result in an individual 
commissioned in one Cadet Force and not in another are not to be approved. 
2.2.2.4. Members of RARO 
2.2.2.4.1. Officers who are members of the Regular Army Reserve of Officers (RARO) 
may be granted commissions in the Army Reserve General List Sect B, RAMC (Reserve) 
General List Sect B or RAChD (Reserve) General List Sect B.  When serving as such their 
duties and obligations are those of an officer of the ACF. 
2.2.2.4.2. A member of RARO may be attached for service with the ACF provided that, if 
their substantive rank is higher than Lieutenant, they certify that they are willing to revert to 
that rank.  They will be reinstated in their former rank when they cease to serve with the 
ACF. 
2.2.2.4.3. An officer attached from RARO may be appointed to an acting rank against an 
establishment vacancy. 
2.2.2.4.4. An officer attached from RARO must undergo an appropriate background check6 
                                                
5 By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or Access Northern 
Ireland.See par2.1.1.3 
2-26 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 180 link to page 158  
2.2.2.5. Officers of the Army Reserve Attached to the ACF. 
2.2.2.5.1. An officer of the Army Reserve may be attached to the ACF for a period of not 
more than one year on the following conditions: 
a. 
The attachment is approved by the Commanding Officer of the Army Reserve 
unit. 
b. 
The officer must be a volunteer in the rank of Lieutenant, Captain or Major. 
c. 
The officer must complete the equivalent of their normal Army Reserve training 
liability during the year they are serving with the ACF.  During this year they need not 
also carry out duties with their Army Reserve unit. 
d. 
Not more than one officer may be attached to the ACF from any major unit 
which has an ACF affiliated to it. 
e. 
The officer will remain on the establishment of their Army Reserve unit and 
remain subject to call-out. 
f. 
The officer must undergo an appropriate background check6. 
                                                                                                                                                            
6 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
2-27 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 269  
2.2.3 Eligibility 
2.2.3.1. Security Clearance 
2.2.3.1.1. All ACF Officers must obtain Security Check (SC) and therefore anyone wishing 
to apply for a commission must fulfil the eligibility for, and be able to obtain SC. 
2.2.3.2. Nationality and Residence 
2.2.3.2.1. There are no nationality requirements to be an officer in the ACF. 
2.2.3.2.2. Applicants should have resided in the UK for a minimum of five years, preferably 
immediately preceding their application.  In certain circumstances, particularly when the 
applicant is of UK origin, a shorter period of residence may be accepted and a waiver of 
part of the requirements may be granted by the Brigade Commander, provided that 
evidence of assimilation into UK can be demonstrated.  Further advice may be sought 
from SO2 G1 of the Brigade. 
2.2.3.3. Age Limits 
2.2.3.3.1. Age Limits.  The age limits for officers to be commissioned in the ACF are:  
a. 
The minimum age for appointment to a commission is 21 years.   
b. 
The normal maximum age for appointment to a commission is under 57 years.   
c. 
Any request for an exception to these limits must be approved by DM(A). 
2.2.3.4. Medical Standard 
2.2.3.4.1. An officer applicant must have an appropriate medical certificate before 
applying to the Cadet Forces Commissioning Board (CFCB). 
2.2.3.4.2. The minimum medical standards both for entry and for retention are detailed at 
para 2.7.2.2. 
2.2.3.5. Educational Standard 
2.2.3.5.1. No formal educational qualifications are required however the candidate must be 
able to provide evidence of literacy, numeracy and reasoning when attending CFCB. 
 
 
2-28 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-29 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 182 link to page 182 link to page 185 link to page 185 link to page 185 link to page 186  
2.2.4 Selection, appointment, tenure and training 
2.2.4.1. General 
2.2.4.1.1. This part sets out the various processes by which a candidate may be granted 
an Army Reserve General List Sect B commission in the ACF and/or selected for a 
specific appointment in the ACF.  All applicants for a commission in the ACF must meet 
the eligibility criteria defined at paras 2.2.3.1 - 2.2.3.5 and are divided into the following 
categories: 
a. 
Those applicants already serving as AI in the ACF who will attend the CFCB. 
b. 
Those applicants who are currently serving as commissioned officers, or who 
have previously served as commissioned officers in the UK or Commonwealth Armed 
Forces, or who have gained a pass at the Army Officer Selection Board (AOSB) or 
equivalent, who are assessed by the AOSB Transfer Board. 
c. 
Those applicants who wish to be commissioned/appointed into a specialist role, 
who are subject to MS procedures. 
2.2.4.1.2. Individuals who do not fall into any of these categories, and who wish to become 
an officer in the ACF, should join the ACF initially as an AI.  Following completion of the 
AIC they may apply for a commission, submitting their application in writing to their Cadet 
Commandant who must approve their application. 
2.2.4.2. Qualification for Appointment 
2.2.4.2.1. The following applicants may be appointed to an Army Reserve General List 
Sect B Commission: 
a. 
Those who have attended the CFCB and have secured a suitable 
recommendation – see 2.2.4.3.1.a. 
b. 
Those currently serving as commissioned officers or who have previously 
served satisfactorily as commissioned officers in the Regular, Reserve or Auxiliary 
Forces of the Crown, or the naval, military or air forces of the Commonwealth or the 
Republic of Ireland and who are confirmed as suitable by the AOSB Transfer Board - 
see 2.2.4.3.1.b. 
c. 
Those who have gained a pass at AOSB or equivalent – see sub-paragraph 
2.2.4.3.1.b. 
d. 
Those who are fully ordained clergymen of a recognised denomination with at 
least two years’ experience of parish work following ordination and who have the 
permission of their church authority to undertake service with the ACF – see 
2.2.4.3.1.c. 
2.2.4.3. Commissioning Boards 
2.2.4.3.1. All applicants for appointment to a commission are subject to one of the 
following: 
2-30 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 182 link to page 182 link to page 190 link to page 181  
a. 
Cadet Forces Commissions Board (CFCB).  All AI who wish to apply for a 
commission in the ACF are to attend CFCB.  The sponsoring ACF County is 
responsible for ensuring that a candidate satisfies the eligibility regulations contained 
at Para 2.2.3.1 to Para 2.2.3.5 and gains the necessary training and experience 
2.2.4.7.2.a.  The ACF County is also responsible for preparing the documentation 
required for the commissioning process, for preparing applicants to attend CFCB and 
for applying to CFCB.  The CFCB is conducted at the Army Officer Selection Board 
(AOSB) with the purpose of recommending an applicant to hold a probationary Army 
Reserve General List Sect B commission for service with the ACF. 
(1)  Outline Description.  The CFCB is conducted at weekends, under the 
control of the AOSB, by selected ACF Officers.  Attendance includes briefings, 
some limited training and selection tests that include command tasks, a 
planning exercise, syndicate discussions, lecturettes, individual interviews and a 
Mental Aptitude Profile Test. 
(2)  Potential Officer Criteria.  The criteria that CFCB expects applicants to 
meet in order to be considered suitable to attend CFCB are on page 2-27.  
When a Cadet Commandant particularly wishes to recommend an applicant to 
CFCB who is unable to meet the medical standards required, they are to seek 
an exemption from RC HQ Cadets Branch with the endorsement of their 
Brigade Commander. 
(3)  Candidate Preparation.  Cadet Commandants are responsible for 
ensuring that applicants meet the criteria and are suitably prepared for 
attendance at CFCB.  Applicants are sent a copy of the AOSB pre-Board 
Mental Aptitude Profile Test preparation with their joining instructions.  An 
insight into the CFCB may be gained from the AOSB Website7 and from the 
CFCB DVD issued to every ACF County.  Cadet Commandants and ACF 
officers in charge of the preparation of applicants are encouraged to visit a 
CFCB by prior arrangement with AOSB. 
(4)  Results.  Individual results are despatched to an applicant’s nominated 
address following the CFCB and are confirmed to the applicant’s sponsor ACF 
County.  Results are not open to appeal but a Cadet Commandant may apply to 
AOSB for a letter of explanation 
(5)  Attempts at CFCB.  An applicant is normally permitted up to three 
attempts at CFCB but may be granted a fourth attempt providing the sponsoring 
Cadet Commandant gains the formal written agreement of AOSB.  Intervals 
between attempts at CFCB are: 
(a)  Between first and second attempts: Minimum of one year. 
(b)  Between second and third attempts: Minimum of five years. 
(c)  Between third and fourth attempts: Unspecified. 
b. 
Transfer Board.  Applicants who are currently serving as commissioned 
officers, or who have previously served as commissioned officers, or who have 
                                                
7 www.army.mod.uk/aosb  
2-31 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 191  
already gained a pass at AOSB or equivalent, are subject to confirmation by the 
Transfer Board, normally without the candidate attending a CFCB.  The sponsoring 
ACF County is responsible for preparing the documentation required for the 
commissioning process and for preparing applicants to attend the AOSB Transfer 
Board if required.  The Transfer Board, which is held at the AOSB under the 
Chairmanship of the President AOSB, has the responsibility to confirm an applicant’s 
suitability to be appointed to an Army Reserve General List Sect B Commission for 
service with the ACF.  This is done by the Transfer Board assessing the suitability of 
a candidate using documentary evidence.  However, the Transfer Board may direct a 
candidate to attend for interview at the Transfer Board itself, or to attend CFCB if the 
Transfer Board considers that there is insufficient documentary evidence to assess 
the candidate properly. 
c. 
ACF Chaplains.  Appointment to RAChD (Reserve) General List Section B 
Commission is by MS procedure instigated by the DACG at the Brigade with regional 
responsibility, and the responsibility of the ACG at HQ HC 8PSC. 
2.2.4.3.2. Detailed commissioning procedures for applicants attending the AOSB Transfer 
Board and CFCB are contained at para 2.2.5. 
2.2.4.4. Appointment on Probation 
2.2.4.4.1. The following applicants, on being appointed to an Army Reserve General List 
Sect B commission in the ACF, are subject to a probationary period as follows: 
a. 
Those who obtain a commission via CFCB.  The probationary period is 
served in the rank of 2Lt and must be completed satisfactorily in order for the 
commission to be confirmed and the officer to be promoted to substantive Lieutenant.  
Probationary periods are as follows: 
(1)  One Year.  Those who were previously substantive Warrant Officers in the 
Regular Army or Army Reserve and those who have completed not less than 
one year’s service as an RSMI. 
(2)  Two Years.  All other candidates commissioned via CFCB. 
b. 
Those with a previous AOSB pass or who have previously held a 
Probationary Commission but did not complete their Probationary Period.  
Having been confirmed by the AOSB Transfer Board as suitable to be granted an 
Army Reserve General List Sect B Commission, applicants are commissioned in the 
rank of 2Lt and are subject to the same probationary period as those who obtain a 
commission via CFCB but may count their previous commissioned service towards 
the total. 
2.2.4.4.2. Initial Officer Training (IOT)9.  During this probationary period all officers must 
complete IOT.  Upon successful completion of CFCB Joining Instruction’s will be issued to 
candidates explaining how to register for the course.  Those officers in sub-para 
                                                
8 Amended by ACF RAN 1.4 (25 May 16) 
9 This paragraph only applies to those officers who complete CFCB or are confirmed by the transfer board 
after 1 Nov 15. 
2-32 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 186 link to page 363 link to page 198 link to page 186 link to page 199  
2.2.4.4.1.b should, upon confirmation from the transfer board, apply to IOT Course 
Director
10
 to enrol on the course. 
2.2.4.5. Appointment without Probation 
2.2.4.5.1. The following applicants, on successful selection, are appointed to an Army 
Reserve General List Sect B Commission in the substantive rank of Lieutenant without a 
period of probation: 
a. 
Those who obtain a commission on the recommendation of the AOSB 
Transfer Board.  The appointment is to an Army Reserve General List Sect B 
Commission.  Training obligations on appointment are defined aPart 4.3 
Regulations pertaining to acting rank are at para 2.2.6.2.  Exceptions to this are 
those who have previously gained an AOSB or equivalent pass but who have no 
previous commissioned service (see Paragraph 2.2.4.4.1.b). 
b. 
ACF Chaplains.  The appointment is to a RAChD (Reserve) General List 
Section B Commission.  Rank on appointment is CF4.  Chaplains are eligible for 
promotion to CF3 in accordance with the terms identified at para 2.2.6.3.
                                                
10 xxx.xxxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
2-33 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 201 link to page 207 link to page 65  This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.11 (6 Feb 17) 
2.2.4.6. Appointment periods and extensions 
2.2.4.6.1. General.  Officers are appointed to an established role using the processes set 
out in these regulations for a defined period as detailed below.  All appointments and 
extensions are to be notified in writing to the officer, including the date of expiry of their 
appointment or extension.  Appointments or extensions are made for the periods below, or 
until the officer reaches their 65th birthday, whichever is the earliest. The planned end date 
should be added to the relevant appointment on Westminster. 
2.2.4.6.2. Nationally Appointed List (NAL) and Regionally Appointed List (RAL) roles. 
Officers of all ranks appointed to the NAL or RAL are appointed for a period of three years. 
Appointments on the NAL are confirmed by SO1 Cadets Policy & Plans at HQ Regional 
Command Cadets Branch. Appointments on the RAL are confirmed by the respective 
brigade HQ. 
2.2.4.6.3. Honorary Colonels.  Honorary Colonels are appointed in accordance with para 
2.2.7.1. 
2.2.4.6.4. Brigade Colonel Cadets. Brigade Colonel Cadets are appointed by the brigade 
HQ for a period of three years. They may be extended by up to a further two years by the 
Brigade Commander where it is felt that such an extension is in the best interests of the 
ACF.  Thereafter, annual extensions can be allowed with the written authority of HQ 
Regional Command Cadets Branch.  This period in role also applies to their deputies 
where they are appointed. 
2.2.4.6.5. Cadet Commandants and Deputy Cadet Commandants.  Officers appointed 
in the rank of Col and Lt Col as a Cadet Commandant or Deputy Cadet Commandant are 
appointed for an initial period of three years by the Brigade Commander.  This may be 
extended by up to a further two years by the Brigade Commander where it is felt that such 
an extension is in the best interests of the ACF County.  The following procedure applies: 
a. 
Notification of intention to retire of extend. Written notification of intention to 
retire or application to extend beyond three years is to be sent to the relevant Brigade 
HQ at the earliest opportunity. 
b. 
For extensions beyond three years and up to five.  The Brigade Commander 
may extend an individual if they believe it is in the best interest of the ACF.  If the 
Brigade Commander decides to extend a Cadet Commandant beyond three years 
they should write to the Cadet Commandant and explain their decision. 
c. 
For extensions beyond five years.  The incumbent must be considered by a 
selection board alongside all other applicants as per 2.2.9 If they are successful, 
they will be appointed for three years with the possibility of extending to 5 (exactly as 
if it was their initial appointment). 
2.2.4.6.6. RFCA PSS.  Members of the PSS who are compelled to be commissioned 
members of the ACF by their terms of employment are appointed into the appropriate 
establishment rank for the duration of their employment.  Not all RFCA PSS are compelled 
to be commissioned, only those with a rank indicated against them in the table at para 
1.2.2.2. 
2.2.4.6.7. All other officers. Appointment of all officers in the rank of Maj or below are for 
a period of three years at the discretion of the Cadet Commandant. Where there is more 
2-34 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 188 link to page 269  This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.11 (6 Feb 17) 
than one suitable candidate for a role, Cadet Commandants are to ensure that the 
selection process is fair and transparent. Officers in the rank of Maj or below may be 
extended in role by the Cadet Commandant for up to three years at a time, until they reach 
their 65th birthday. 
2.2.4.6.8. Extensions to officers of all ranks 65 years and over.  Annual approval must 
be sought from RC HQ Cadets Branch for all officers (except those RFCA PSS mentioned 
at Para 2.2.4.6.6if there are exceptional circumstances to extend beyond the age of 65.  
The process to be followed is: 
a. 
The officer should informally approach the Cadet Commandant to see if the 
they are willing to endorse the application. 
b. 
If the Cadet Commandant agrees then either: 
(1)  Those officers who do not have UK Regional Command consent to 
serve over 65.
 
(a)  Obtain a medical certificate confirming that the officer meets the 
standards laid out at para 2.7.2.2 is to be obtained.   
(b)  The medical certificate should be forwarded to the brigade SO2 
Cadets along with a statement by the Cadet Commandant explaining the 
reasons an extension is needed. 
(c)  If the extension is agreed by the Deputy Brigade Commander then it 
is to be forwarded to SO2 Pers1 at UK Regional Command HQ Cadets 
Branch. 
(d)  SO2 Pers will inform the Cadet Commandant if the extension has 
been approved and provide the date of extension if relevant. 
(2)  Those officers who have already gained UK Regional Command 
consent to serve over 65 (probably from dual service with CCF).  
Present 
evidence of consent to Cadet Commandant. 
 
                                                
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx 
2-35 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 363 link to page 363 link to page 220  
2.2.4.7. Training 
2.2.4.7.1. Applicants with Previous Commissioned Service. 
a. 
Before appointment as an ACF Officer.  Applicants who have previously held 
a commission are not to be permitted to receive training or give instruction, or attend 
annual camps, until they have received formal notification of appointment to an Army 
Reserve General List Sect B Commission. 
b. 
After appointment as an ACF Officer.  On appointment and thereafter, 
training that officers are obliged to undergo is specified at Part 4.3. 
2.2.4.7.2. Applicants without previous commissioned service. 
a. 
Before commissioning.  Potential ACF officers who have not previously held a 
commission, or obtained a pass at AOSB or equivalent, are required to: 
(1)  Join the ACF as an adult instructor. 
(2)  Complete AIC1. 
(3)  Complete five days continuous attendance at Annual Camp. 
b. 
After commissioning.  Training that officers are obliged to undergo is 
contained aPart 4.3. 
 
                                                
1 Or be exempt in accordance with par2.3.5.2.2 
2-36 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 158  
2.2.5 ACF Officer Commissioning Procedures 
2.2.5.1. Outline Procedure. 
2.2.5.1.1. Anyone wishing to apply for a commission in the ACF should apply to a Cadet 
Commandant in writing.  The Cadet Commandant should interview the applicant and 
declare the level of support they are willing to give the applicant and advise the applicant 
accordingly.  The ACF County HQ is to: 
a. 
Initiate and process the relevant documentation. 
b. 
Obtain security clearance for applicants other than those currently holding a 
Land Forces commission on the active list. 
c. 
Undergo an appropriate background check2. 
d. 
Arrange the appropriate medical examination for all applicants other than those 
currently holding a Land Forces commission on the active list. 
e. 
Arrange for applicants to attend a Cadet Forces Commissioning Board (CFCB) 
or to be considered by the Transfer Board as appropriate. 
f. 
Forward the relevant documentation as follows: 
(1)  CFCB Candidates.  To the Central Processing Cell (CPC), Recruiting 
Group (RG) Upavon  who then create a record on Tri-Service Recruit 
Harmonisation Application (TRHA) and forwards the documents to AOSB for 
CFCB.  CFCB allocates a Board vacancy and issues joining instructions to the 
ACF County or to the applicant directly. 
(2)  AOSB Transfer Board Candidates.  To the AOSB Westbury. 
2.2.5.2. Documentation 
2.2.5.2.1. The following documents are to be used: 
a. 
AF B6610A.  The Application Form is to be completed by all candidates for 
CFCB or for the AOSB Transfer Board. 
b. 
Security Clearance: 
(a)  National Security Vetting Online Form.  Clearance application 
forms, for clearance to SC level, required for all applicants except those 
currently holding a Land Forces commission on the active list or those 
currently serving in the ACF who are already cleared to SC level. 
(b)  MOD Form 134.  The Official Secrets Act Declaration on 
Appointment. 
                                                
2 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
2-37 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 192 link to page 192 link to page 192 link to page 158  
c. 
Medical Certificate.  Medical certification is required by all applicants, either by 
completion of Part 2 to the AF B6610A by a service medical officer, or by the 
completion of the medical certificate by a GP. 
d. 
Certificate of Agreement to Revert to Substantive Rank of Lieutenant.  
locally produced certificate signed by any applicant who holds a substantive rank 
higher than Lieutenant stating that they are willing to revert to the substantive rank of 
Lieutenant whilst serving on an Army Reserve General List Sect B Commission. 
e. 
Background check.  Evidence showing they have undergone an appropriate 
background check3. 
f. 
Cadet Commandant’s Recommendation.  To be completed for CFCB 
candidates personally by the sponsoring Cadet Commandant in the form required by 
the CFCB. 
2.2.5.3. Officers Currently Serving on a Land Forces Commission 
2.2.5.3.1. The applicant is to apply to the Cadet Commandant by completing: 
a. 
AF B6610APart 1, arranging for Part 2 to be completed by a service Medical 
Officer. 
b. 
Proof of having undergone an appropriate background check3. 
c. 
Reversion Certificate (if required as per Para 2.2.5.2.1.d). 
d. 
MOD Form 134. 
2.2.5.3.2. The ACF County is to: 
a. 
Apply to Regional Brigade HQ for the applicant’s commissioned service reports 
(five most recent Appraisal Reports). 
b. 
Apply through Chain of Command (CoC) to applicant’s unit for proof of security 
clearance to SC level. 
c. 
Apply for the applicant to undergo an appropriate background check3. 
d. 
Endorse the AF B6610A at Part 3 (Certificate No 2) and forward the following 
completed documents to AOSB for the Transfer Board: 
(1)  AF B6610A. 
(2)  The applicant’s commissioned service reports. 
2.2.5.3.3. The AOSB Transfer Board confirms or otherwise the applicant’s suitability for the 
grant of an Army Reserve General List Sect B commission. 
                                                
3 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
2-38 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 158  
2.2.5.3.4. The ACF County is, on receipt of confirmation of suitability from the Transfer 
Board, to process the AF B6610A (incorporating the Transfer Board’s recommendation) 
and to direct the PSS to make the appropriate entry on JPA. 
2.2.5.3.5. The ACF County notifies the applicant, in writing, of the appointment and terms 
of service.  A sample letter of notification and a summary of the Terms of Service are on 
the Cadet Force Resource Centre. 
2.2.5.4. Applicants with previous commissioned service 
2.2.5.4.1. Applicants Who Have Previously Held a Land Forces Commission (including 
ACF and CCF(A)), Who Currently Hold or Who Have Previously Held a Regular or 
Reserve Commission in the Royal Navy, Royal Marines or Royal Air Force or the Naval, 
Military, or Air Forces of the Commonwealth, or who have previously obtained a pass at 
AOSB or equivalent are to apply to the Cadet Commandant and: 
a. 
Complete AF B6610A, Part 1. 
b. 
Complete National Security Vetting Online Form. 
c. 
Provide evidence of having undergone an appropriate background check. 
d. 
Complete MOD Form 134. 
e. 
(Applicants who have not previously held a UK Land Forces Commission) 
Provide references from previous service employers covering the whole length of 
service or five years (whichever is shorter). 
f. 
Provide agreement in writing for any personal details and details of any 
previous service to be divulged to the MOD. 
2.2.5.4.2. The ACF County is to: 
a. 
(for applicants who have previously held a UK Land Forces commission) Apply 
to the Regional Brigade HQ for the applicant’s commissioned service reports (five 
most recent Appraisal Reports) or obtain the applicants service history from 
Westminster. 
b. 
Arrange for the candidate to be medically examined either by a service Medical 
Officer who is to complete Part 2 of the applicant’s AF B6610Aor by a GP who is to 
complete the medical certificate available on the Cadet Force Resource Centre. 
c. 
Endorse applicant’s National Security Vetting Online Form for security 
clearance to SC level unless Security Check certificate already held pertaining to the 
applicant. 
d. 
Obtain proof of having undergone an appropriate background check4. 
e. 
Endorse the AF B6610A at Part 3, Certificate No 2. 
                                                
4 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
2-39 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 158  
f. 
Forward the following documents to AOSB for the Transfer Board: 
(1)  AF B6610A. 
(2)  Medical certificate. 
g. 
Commissioned service reports/previous service employers’ reference as 
appropriate. 
2.2.5.4.3. The AOSB Transfer Board considers the application, makes a determination and 
confirms or otherwise the applicant’s suitability for the grant of an Army Reserve General 
List Sect B commission. 
2.2.5.4.4. The ACF County is, on receipt of confirmation of suitability from the Transfer 
Board, to: 
a. 
Process the AF B6610A and direct the PSS to make the appropriate 
appointment on JPA. 
b. 
Notify the applicant, in writing, of their appointment and terms of service.  A 
sample letter of notification and summary of terms of service can be found on the 
Cadet Force Resource Centre. 
2.2.5.5. Applicants without Previous Commissioned Service 
2.2.5.5.1. A suitably eligible candidate may apply to the Cadet Commandant in writing and 
is to: 
a. 
Complete Part 1 of the Application for a Commission Form (AF B6610A). 
b. 
Complete the Security Check to SC leveNational Security Vetting Online 
Form unless the ACF County already holds a current Security Clearance Certificate 
relating to the applicant. 
c. 
Obtain proof they have undergone an appropriate background check5. 
d. 
Provide the ACF County with details of any previous non-commissioned service 
in the Armed Forces and any training reports held as a result of attendance on CTT 
or CTC Frimley Park courses. 
e. 
Complete and return to CFCB the CV issued by CFCB when the applicant is 
allocated a place on CFCB. 
f. 
Complete MOD Form 134. 
 
 
                                                
5 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
2-40 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 158  
2.2.5.5.2. The ACF County is to: 
a. 
Prepare the applicant to attend CFCB in accordance with the guidance found in 
the CFCB section of the Cadet Force Resource Centre. 
b. 
Arrange for the candidate to be medically examined either by a service Medical 
Officer who is to complete Part 2 of the applicant’s AF B6610Aor by a GP who is to 
complete the medical certificate available on the Cadet Force Resource Centre. 
c. 
Forward the following documents to Central Processing Cell, Recruiting Group 
(CPC, RG) Upavon: 
(1)  CFCB Booking Application Form6 giving preferred dates for CFCB. 
(2)  AF B6610A. 
(3)  Medical certificate (unless AF B6610A has been completed by a Medical 
Officer at Part 2). 
(4)  Cadet Commandant’s recommendation in the form required by CFCB. 
(5)  Any CTT or CTC Frimley Park reports held on the applicant. 
d. 
Endorse applicant’s National Security Vetting Online Form for security 
clearance to SC level unless Security Check certificate already held pertaining to the 
applicant. 
e. 
Ensure the applicant has undergone an appropriate background check7. 
2.2.5.5.3. CPC RG creates a record in TRHA and forwards documents to AOSB for CFCB. 
2.2.5.5.4. CFCB assesses the applicant on a Board, confirms or otherwise the applicant’s 
suitability for the grant of an Army Reserve General List Sect B Commission, notifies the 
applicant of the result and returns the documentation to the ACF County. 
2.2.5.5.5. The ACF County is, on receipt of confirmation of suitability from the CFCB, to: 
a. 
Forward the AF B6610A (incorporating the CFCB recommendation) Process 
the AF B 6610A and direct the PSS to make the appropriate appointment on JPA. 
b. 
Notify the applicant, in writing, of their appointment and terms of service.  A 
sample letter of notification and summary of terms of service can be found on the 
Cadet Force Resource Centre. 
c. 
 
                                                
6 Available on the Cadet Resource Centre 
7 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland 
2-41 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2-42 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 363 link to page 199  
2.2.6 Rank 
2.2.6.1. Substantive Rank 
2.2.6.1.1. The highest substantive rank in the ACF is Lieutenant. 
2.2.6.1.2. Officers with previous commissioned service who are appointed directly to an 
Army Reserve General List Sect B commission after confirmation of suitability by the 
Transfer Board or through MS procedures are appointed in the substantive rank of 
Lieutenant. 
2.2.6.1.3. Officers with no previous commissioned service who are appointed to an Army 
Reserve General List Sect B commission on the recommendation of the CFCB Transfer 
Board are appointed as 2Lts on probation and are required to complete the following 
commissioned service in order to have their commission confirmed and to become eligible 
for promotion to Lieutenant: 
a. 
One Year.  Those who were previously substantive Warrant Officers in the 
Regular Army or Army Reserve or who have completed not less than one year as an 
RSMI in the ACF. 
b. 
Two Years.  All other officers commissioned via CFCB and those 
commissioned via AOSB Transfer Board who have not had any previous 
commissioned service. 
2.2.6.1.4. Promotion to Substantive Rank of Lieutenant for Officers on Probation.  
On the satisfactory completion of probationary service, officers on probation may be 
confirmed in their commission and promoted to the substantive rank of Lieutenant on the 
authority of their Cadet Commandant.  The Cadet Commandant is to notify the County 
PSS for JPA action and audit.  Notification of the occurrence is to be accompanied by a 
certificate signed by the Cadet Commandant showing completion of initial training as laid 
down in Part 4.3, the dates of attendance on the Adult Leadership and Management 
Course and the dates of attendance at annual camp.  If the Cadet Commandant considers 
that the probationary period has not been completed satisfactorily or if the officer on 
probation has not been able to fully meet the requirements of probation in that time, the 
Cadet Commandant may grant an extension of up to one year to the probationary period 
to give the officer the opportunity to meet fully the requirements of probation. 
2.2.6.1.5. Specialist Appointments.  Rank on appointment and subsequent promotion of 
ACF Chaplains is at para 2.2.6.3. 
2.2.6.1.6. Antedates. An officer directly commissioned in the rank of lieutenant may be 
given an antedate for previous reckonable service as calculated by MS [Reserves] APC. 
An officer commissioned as a second lieutenant may on promotion to lieutenant be given 
an antedate for seniority in that rank. This antedate will not precede the date of the 
probationary commission and will be calculated as follows: 
a. 
Commissioned service - to count in full. 
b. 
Full paid service as a Warrant Officer Class I or equivalent - to count in full up to 
a maximum of one year. 
2-43 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 198  
c. 
Full paid service below the rank of Warrant Officer Class I or equivalent - to 
count half up to a maximum of two years. 
2.2.6.2. Acting Rank 
2.2.6.2.1. 2Lt.  Acting rank may not be granted to a 2Lt. 
2.2.6.2.2. Lt to Maj.  Paid acting rank, up to and including the rank of Major, may be 
granted by the Cadet Commandant within the establishment of the ACF County.  
Notification of the grant of paid acting rank, signifying the recommendation of the Cadet 
Commandant, is to be made to the county PSS for JPA action and audit. 
a. 
Conditions.  ACF officers, except those at Paragraph b., are required to fulfil 
the following mandatory conditions in order to become eligible for promotion to the 
paid acting rank of: 
(1)  Capt: 
(a)  Complete four years reckonable commissioned service. 
(b)  Attend two annual camps. 
(c)  Pass the SA (M) (07) Cadet Course. 
(d)  Be recommended by the Cadet Commandant. 
(2)  Maj: 
(a)  Complete six years reckonable commissioned service. 
(b)  Attend three annual camps. 
(c)  Qualify on an ACF Area Commanders Course at CTC Frimley Park. 
(d)  Be recommended by the Cadet Commandant. 
b. 
Previous commissioned service.  Officers with previous commissioned 
service in the Regular Army or Army Reserve may be granted paid acting rank, on 
commissioning into the ACF, to fill a specified command or staff appointment within 
the ACF County establishment, provided they have held the same or higher 
substantive rank in their previous service as the acting rank they are granted in the 
ACF. 
2.2.6.2.3. Lt Col to Col.  Acting rank, up to and including the rank of Col, may be granted 
by the Brigade Commander or Deputy Commander Cadets within the establishment of an 
ACF County or the RAL or NAL.  Notification of the grant of paid acting rank, signifying the 
recommendation of the Cadet Commandant, is to be made to the county PSS (or CTC as 
appropriate) for JPA action and audit: 
2-44 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 199 link to page 203  
a. 
Lt Col.  Officers appointed as Cadet Commandants8, Deputy Cadet 
Commandants and those appointed to posts on the RAL or NAL with the established 
rank of Lt Col are eligible for grant of paid acting rank of Lt Col. 
b. 
Col.  Officers appointed as Cadet Commandants9 or to posts on the RAL or 
NAL with the established rank of Col are eligible for grant of unpaid acting rank of  
Col provided that they have served three years in the rank of Lt Col in the Regular, 
Reserve or Cadet Forces.  All acting Col in the ACF will be remunerated at the Lt Col 
rate. 
2.2.6.3. ACF Chaplains 
2.2.6.3.1. Officers appointed directly to RAChD (Reserve) General List Section B 
commissions are granted, on appointment, the paid rank of CF4. 
2.2.6.3.2. Promotion to the paid rank of CF3 may be made by the Chaplain General 
subject to: 
a. 
Completion of six year’s service as an ACF Chaplain. 
b. 
Attendance at five annual ACF camps. 
c. 
Completion of at least seventy days training. 
d. 
Recommendation by the DACG by the appropriate Brigade HQ and the County 
Commandant. 
2.2.6.3.3. Where there are two or more Chaplains of the rank of CF3 in one ACF County, 
the Cadet Commandant, having referred through RFCA to the DACG at the appropriate 
Brigade HQ, may nominate one to act as Senior Chaplain. 
2.2.6.4. Local Rank and Unpaid Acting Rank 
2.2.6.4.1. Colonels.  An application for the grant of the unpaid acting rank of Colonel is to 
be made for those individuals appointed as Colonels in accordance with para 2.2.6.2.3.b. 
2.2.6.4.2. Other Appointments.  The grant of local rank or unpaid acting rank is not 
authorised for other ACF officers. 
2.2.6.5. Relinquishment 
2.2.6.5.1. Acting rank is to be relinquished when the appointment for which it was granted 
is relinquished or lapses.  Notification of relinquishment is to be made to county PSS for 
JPA action and audit.  Individuals appointed to posts with a lower established rank are to 
revert to the rank appropriate to that appointment.  Where an individual has no appropriate 
post to move to they may be held in the Non-Effective Pool (see Para 2.2.8.1.4). 
 
 
                                                
8 Of ACF Counties whose establishment has a commandant in the rank of Col. 
9 Of ACF Counties whose establishment has a commandant in the rank of Col. 
2-45 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-46 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.2.7 Honorary Appointments 
2.2.7.1. Honorary Appointments 
2.2.7.1.1. An honorary colonel may be appointed: 
a. 
To an ACF county.   
b. 
In special cases as defined by RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
2.2.7.1.2. The principles outlined in AC 72030 The Reserve Land Forces Regulations 
paras 01.04.143 – 01.04.144 are to be followed. 
2.2.7.1.3. The recommendation is to be initiated by the Cadet Commandant on the form 
AF E 20033 and is then to be forwarded to the appropriate Brigade Commander for 
endorsement.  If endorsed by the Brigade Commander the form will then be forwarded to 
RC HQ Cadets Branch for endorsement by the GOC RC. 
2.2.7.1.4. An honorary colonel may receive a lord lieutenant’s commission if not already in 
possession of a commission from the Sovereign.  The grant of the commission is to be 
arranged by the RFCA with the lieutenancy concerned. 
2.2.7.1.5. An honorary colonel is to be appointed for five years. 
2.2.7.1.6. An honorary colonel may claim travel expenses from the ACF Operational Grant 
once a year in order to visit his unit’s annual camp. 
2.2.7.2. Honorary Chaplains 
2.2.7.2.1. In addition to the commissioned ACF Chaplains, Cadet Commandants may, on 
the advice of their senior ACF Chaplain and the Brigade DACG, invite local clergy to 
become Honorary ACF Chaplains.  These appointments are normally only for ceremonial 
and liturgical purposes, or to honour long-standing relationships.  A chaplain appointed 
must be in good standing with a church, or for other faiths an endorsing body which is 
recognised by the RAChD.  Honorary ACF Chaplains are to be treated as Civilian 
Assistants and are not eligible for remuneration and allowances.  They do not wear 
uniform except for those who are former members of RAChD who may do so on suitable 
occasions with prior permission from MOD.  ACF Counties are to submit a nominal roll of 
their Honorary Chaplains by 15 January each year to the Brigade HQ, RFCA and ACFA, 
giving the following information on each Honorary Chaplain: 
a. 
Rank (if any), name and initials. 
b. 
Date of birth, religion and home address. 
c. 
Date of appointment. 
 
 
2-47 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-48 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 203  
2.2.8 Transfer, reversion, resignation, retirement, relinquishment, 
termination, authorised absence and death 
2.2.8.1. Transfer 
2.2.8.1.1. Within an ACF County.  An officer holding an appointment within an ACF 
County may be transferred to another appointment in the ACF County on the authority of 
the Cadet Commandant. 
2.2.8.1.2. Between ACF Counties.  The voluntary transfer of an officer from one ACF 
County to another must be agreed between the two Counties concerned and notified to 
both the relinquishing and receiving PSS and the brigade G1 staff10 for JPA action and 
audit.  The officer is to assume the acting rank of the appointment to which they transfer. 
2.2.8.1.3. Between ACF and CCF (Army).  Officers being transferred are to assume the 
acting rank of the appointment to which they transfer.  Applications for transfer from CCF 
to ACF or from ACF to CCF are to be arranged as follows: 
a. 
From CCF to ACF.  The officer wishing to transfer from CCF to ACF and is 
eligible to do so, should apply to the appropriate Cadet Commandant and inform the 
Head Teacher of the CCF.  The Cadet Commandant, on agreeing the transfer, is to 
notify the PSS and the brigade G1 staff10 for JPA action and audit. 
b. 
From ACF to CCF.  When an ACF officer wishes to transfer to the CCF and is 
eligible to do so, the ACF County is to apply to the Brigade or District.  The Brigade 
HQ forwards the application to the relevant CCF Contingent for approval by the Head 
Teacher and takes the subsequent JPA action. 
2.2.8.1.4. To the Non-Effective Pool (NEP).  Where officers leave ACF Counties and 
cannot immediately gain a new Cadet Force post they may apply to transfer to the NEP for 
up to twelve months.  MOD will not provide any remuneration for officers in the NEP.  If at 
the end of this time officers cannot resume Cadet Force duty they will be obliged to 
relinquish their commission. 
2.2.8.1.5. To a Cadet Force of another service.  Officers must apply for a Commission / 
appointment in the other service and must resign their existing commission. 
2.2.8.2. Reversion to Lower or Substantive Rank 
2.2.8.2.1. An ACF officer may at any time apply to relinquish paid acting rank or revert to a 
lower rank.  They must revert to their substantive rank when they relinquish the 
appointment for which the acting rank was granted unless they are taking up another 
appointment for which the acting rank is permissible within the establishment of the ACF 
County. 
2.2.8.2.2. Paid acting rank may be withdrawn on authority of the Brigade if an officer: 
a. 
Is inefficient. 
                                                
10 JPA action can be made at brigade level if both units are in that brigade, if not theRC-Cdts-PolPlans-
xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx
 
 
2-49 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 203 link to page 204 link to page 204 link to page 204 link to page 204 link to page 182  
b. 
Is guilty of misconduct. 
c. 
Ceases to perform duty on being placed under arrest or on suspension from 
duty on disciplinary grounds. 
d. 
Is notified that steps are being taken to terminate their commission. 
2.2.8.2.3. In the case of sub-paragraph2.2.8.2.2.a and 2.2.8.2.2.b abovewithdrawal of 
acting rank will take effect from the date of the occurrence but, in the case of sub-
paragraph2.2.8.2.2.c and 2.2.8.2.2.dwithdrawal of acting rank will take place twenty 
one days after suspension from duty, being placed under arrest, or of the date of the 
intention to terminate their commission. 
2.2.8.2.4. All requests by individuals to relinquish acting rank or revert to a lower acting 
rank are to be notified to the PSS for JPA action and audit. 
2.2.8.3. Compulsory Resignation 
2.2.8.3.1. Apart from in the circumstances described in par2.2.8.3.2 no military authority 
other than the Defence Council may call upon an officer to resign their commission or 
exert any pressure upon them to do so. 
2.2.8.3.2. An ACF officer may be discharged from the ACF on the authority of the Cadet 
Commandant if: 
a. 
Their medical standard falls below that laid down for an officer of the ACF11. 
b. 
They cannot meet their training obligations with the cadet unit on whose 
strength they are borne because of a change of residence or employment. 
c. 
They intend to reside permanently overseas. 
2.2.8.3.3. The procedure for any other compulsory termination of service is contained in 
AGAI 67- Administrative Action. 
2.2.8.3.4. Cadet Commandants are to seek advice from their Brigade Commander or 
Deputy Commander on preparing a submission to the Defence Council. 
2.2.8.3.5. All discharges from the ACF are to be notified to the PSS for JPA action and 
audit. 
2.2.8.4. Voluntary Resignation or Retirement 
2.2.8.4.1. An ACF officer wishing to resign or to retire is to submit a written application to 
that effect to their Cadet Commandant. 
2.2.8.4.2. ACF officers with ten or more year’s commissioned service (including 
commissioned service in the Regular Army or Army Reserve) who wish to leave the ACF 
                                                
11 This decision may be made by the Cadet Commandant and the officer concerned.  If the officer disagrees 
with the commandant’s assessment they may volunteer to undergo a medical examination to see if they are 
fit for service with the ACF in accordance with para 2.2.3.4. 
 
2-50 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
voluntarily may apply to retire from the Service rather than to resign their commissions.  
Officers with less than ten year’s commissioned service, who wish to leave the ACF 
voluntarily, are required to resign their commission. 
2.2.8.4.3. Applications to resign or retire are to be submitted by ACF Counties as follows: 
a. 
ACF General List Officers
(1)  For Majors and below.  To the Cadet Commandant. 
(2)  For Colonels and Lieutenant Colonels.  To the Brigade Commander12. 
b. 
Medical and Nursing Officers.  To SO2 Med of the appropriate Brigade. 
c. 
Chaplains.  To the DACG of the appropriate Brigade. 
2.2.8.4.4. Procedure for Officers below the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.  The 
procedure for voluntary resignation or retirement, for officers below the rank of Lieutenant 
Colonel, is as follows: 
a. 
The officer’s application is to be forwarded to the Cadet Commandant. 
b. 
The application is to be accompanied by a certificate signed by the officer 
confirming that they are aware of any outstanding claims against them and that they 
will make arrangements to pay such refunds or other public claims before they leave 
the Service. 
c. 
When confirmation that retirement or voluntary resignation has been correctly 
processed, the Cadet Commandant should issue to the officer concerned, on behalf 
of the Brigade Commander, a letter of appreciation. 
2.2.8.4.5. Procedure for Lieutenant Colonels and Colonels.   
a. 
Applications to Retire/Letters of Resignation are to be received by the relevant 
Brigade HQ13. 
b. 
The application is to be accompanied by a certificate signed by the officer that 
they are aware of any outstanding claims against them and that they are to make 
arrangements to pay such refunds or other public claims before they leave the 
service. 
2.2.8.4.6. Once an officer’s discharge has been processed the Brigade Commander 
should write a suitable valedictory letter. 
2.2.8.5. Relinquishment of Commission 
2.2.8.5.1. An ACF Officer will normally relinquish their commission on completion of tenure 
of appointment, or any extension thereto, or on the lapsing of their appointment if they are 
not accepted for another appointment.  Notification of relinquishment is to be made to the 
                                                
12 ACOS Cdts for officers on the NAL. 
13 RC Cadets Branch  in the case of the NAL. 
2-51 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 204 link to page 203  
PSS by the Cadet Commandant.  The same procedures should be followed as for 
compulsory resignation and retirement found at Para 2.2.8.3. 
2.2.8.5.2. Where an ACF officer wishes to retain their commission with the intention of 
taking up another appointment, they may apply to the Cadet Commandant for a transfer 
the Brigade NEP (See Para 2.2.8.1.4).   
2.2.8.6. Termination of Commission 
2.2.8.6.1. Probationary commissions. 
a. 
If an officer serving on a probationary commission is, in the opinion of the Cadet 
Commandant, inefficient, unsuitable or fails to carry out their military duties 
satisfactorily and it is considered necessary to terminate their commission, the Cadet 
Commandant may submit a report to that effect to the Brigade.  The officer 
concerned must be informed in writing of the Cadet Commandant’s intention to 
terminate their commission and must be provided with a copy of the Cadet 
Commandant’s report to the Brigade HQ.  All reports must be recoded on the officer’s 
Westminster personal record with the permissions set to “CEO Only”. 
b. 
Authority to terminate an ACF probationary commission lies with the Brigade 
Commander who must satisfy themselves that the conduct of the officer warrants 
termination of their probationary commission.  Any decision to terminate an officer’s 
probationary commission is to be notified to the individual by the Brigade 
Commander in writing, including the reason for termination. 
2.2.8.6.2. All other commissions. 
a. 
When an ACF officer fails to carry out their duties in accordance with the role 
specification for their post, the Cadet Commandant is to make every effort to get in 
touch with them to discover the reason.  Where possible, as a first step, a suitable 
representative should visit the officer at their last recorded address. 
b. 
When a Cadet Commandant is satisfied that an officer cannot be traced or has 
no intention of resuming their duties they are to be placed in the NEP.  The officer is 
to be informed that this action has taken place by writing to their last known address. 
c. 
If, after twelve months, the officer has not applied to resume their duties their 
commission will be terminated. 
2.2.8.7. Authorised Absences 
2.2.8.7.1. An officer who wishes to be absent from their ACF duties for not more than three 
months may have this absence agreed by their Cadet Commandant. 
2.2.8.7.2. An officer who wishes to be absent from their ACF duties for more than three 
months is to be transferred to the NEP. 
2.2.8.8. Death 
2.2.8.8.1. In the event of the death of an ACF officer (even when not on ACF activities) the 
death is to be reported on an Incident Report Form (Annex A to LFSO 3202C). 
2-52 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 103  
2.2.9 Appointment of Cadet Commandants and Deputy Cadet 
Commandants 
2.2.9.1. Process 
2.2.9.1.1. Role Specification.  Brigade HQs maintain a Role Specification for each 
appointment based on the generic descriptions in Part 1.7 as tailored individually in 
consultation with Cadet Commandants.  The Role Specification is reviewed by the 
outgoing Cadet Commandant to ensure currency. 
2.2.9.1.2. Advertising.  All posts are to be widely advertised.  Brigade HQs should ensure 
that, where possible, posts are advertised at least nine months in advance of the required 
fill date.  The advertisement should be distributed as widely as possible and include, as a 
minimum, to the following: 
a. 
All Army Reserve units. 
b. 
RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
c. 
All Regional Brigade HQs. 
d. 
ACFA. 
e. 
Council of RFCAs. 
f. 
All RFCAs. 
g. 
Westminster and the Cadet Force Resource Centre. 
2.2.9.1.3. Applications for Appointments. 
a. 
All applicants must hold (or have previously held) a Land Forces commission. 
b. 
All applications for an appointment are to be made, in writing, to the appropriate 
Brigade HQ.  They should include a CV in the approved format14 and the names and 
addresses of at least two referees. 
2.2.9.2. Consideration of Applications 
2.2.9.2.1. Interviews.  All suitable applicants are interviewed by a Selection Board 
convened by Brigade HQ. 
 
 
                                                
14 Available on the Cadet Resource Centre 
2-53 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.2.9.2.2. Grading of Applicants. 
a. 
The Selection Board considers each applicant’s suitability based on the latter’s 
declared experience and expertise (taken from the individual’s CV) and references 
that may be available compared against the Role Specification for the appointment. 
b. 
The fairest method of selection is for each board member to score each 
applicant using the standard MS graded scoring method.  Even where there is only 
one runner for an appointment they are graded to ensure that they are above the 
quality line for that appointment. 
c. 
Following MS protocol, the Board declares the score of each applicant at the 
end of each interview before general discussion.  This subsequent discussion may 
highlight reasons why the highest scoring applicant is not considered the most 
suitable runner for an appointment. 
d. 
The Board’s grading scores are recorded on a Selection Board Summary of 
Scores.   
e. 
The quality line is to be set at an aggregate score of five points per board 
member.  Where a candidate’s score places them below the quality line no 
appointment is to be made even where this means the post remains unfulfilled. 
2.2.9.2.3. Declaration of Selected Applicant. 
a. 
Following the above, the Board declares its selection(s) and reserve(s) for the 
appointment(s) under consideration. 
b. 
Assurance of board.  Once the board has declared the selected applicant they 
are to send copies of the convening order, Army Form A2 and the Selection Board 
Summary of Scores to SO2 Cadet Pers15 and await a response before notifying the 
applicants16. 
2.2.9.2.4. Notification to Applicants.  Applicants are notified informally by the Board 
Secretary as soon as possible after the board has completed its business.  This is followed 
by formal notification in writing by the Board President.  A caveat to this formal notification 
may include the requirement for any successful applicant to complete the necessary 
processes for transferring to the ACF. 
2.2.9.2.5. Appeal Procedure.  There is no appeal procedure relating to this selection 
process but any applicant may submit a Formal Complaint if they feel that the correct 
process has not been followed. 
 
 
                                                
15 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx 
16 Amended by ACF RAN 1.1 (14 Mar 16) 
2-54 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 208  
2.2.9.2.6. Composition of the Board.  The Board is to consist of a minimum of four 
officers as follows: 
a. 
President.  Regional Brigade Comd/Dep Comd17. 
b. 
Members.  Three members from: 
(1)  Any substantive serving Col in the Regular or Reserve Forces. 
(2)  CE or DCE16 RFCA. 
(3)  Any Col on the NAL. 
(4)  Any Col on the RAL. 
(5)  ACF County Hon Col. 
(6)  Any retired officer having previously held the substantive rank of Col or 
above and deemed appropriate by the Brigade HQ. 
c. 
Secretary.  SO2 MS or SO2 Cadets, Regional Brigade HQ 
2.2.9.2.7. Board Proceedings.  The proceedings of the Board are recorded on an Army 
Form A2
 
accompanied by the Convening Order and the Selection Board Summary of 
Scores.  Whilst the format for each board results may differ, the following must be 
recorded: 
a. 
Composition of the Board.  To include details of: 
(1)  The membership of the Board. 
(2)  Those in attendance. 
(3)  All others present. 
b. 
Exclusions.  Details of any officer who was excluded from any part of the 
board, with the reason stated. 
c. 
Appointments.  The details of the appointment(s) to be considered, all the 
applicants and the name of the applicant(s) and reserve(s) Scores. 
d. 
Filtering.  The list of those applicants who are filtered out, with the reason.  
This list is presented to, and agreed by, the Board. 
2.2.9.2.8. Disclosure of Information.  To protect the privacy of applicants and maintain 
the integrity of Boards, matters arising at a Board are only discussed by members or those 
in attendance at the Board.  However, under the Freedom of Information Act, individuals 
have a right to request such information as relates to them. 
 
 
                                                
17 Must be a substantive Colonel. 
2-55 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 210 link to page 208 link to page 192  
2.2.9.2.9. Archiving Documentation.  Board Secretaries: 
a. 
Must destroy individual board members grading scores and hand written notes 
containing personal data at the conclusion of the board18. 
a. 
Retain individual Board member scores for 6 months from the date of 
promulgation of the Board results.  At the 6-month point, and having checked that no 
claim of discrimination has been raised to an Employment Tribunal, the individual 
Board member scores are destroyed. 
b. 
Retain aggregated Board member scores for 2 518 years from the date of 
promulgation of the Board results. 
2.2.9.2.10. Formal Notification of Appointment.  Following completion of the Board’s 
business, the Brigade MS Staff are to: 
a. 
Ensure notifications take place as per Para 2.2.9.2.3.a. 
b. 
Inform SO2 Pers19 at RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
c. 
Complete the relevant JPA data inputs. 
d. 
Issues a formal appointment order. 
e. 
Update appointment on Westminster. 
f. 
If the successful applicant is not currently serving on an Army Reserve General 
List Section B Commission carry out the procedures at Para 2.2.5.3. 
 
 
                                                
18 Amended by ACF RAN 1.1 (14 Mar 16) 
19 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx 
2-56 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 269 link to page 158  
Part 2.3  Adult Instructors and Civilian 
Assistants 

2.3.1.1. General 
2.3.1.1.1. The term Adult Instructor (AI) means any uniformed adult member of the ACF 
who is not a commissioned officer.  The term Civilian Assistant (CA) refers to a non-
uniformed civilian helper who assists the ACF, but is not a member of the ACF. 
2.3.1.1.2. AIs are voluntary youth workers appointed for service within the youth 
organisation that is the ACF.  They are not members of the Armed Forces and therefore 
are not subject to Service Law.  AI are however required to wear military uniform and rank 
while involved in ACF activities and are required to act in accordance with the Values and 
Standards of the British Army.  An AI carries out either general duties with the ACF or a 
specialist role by reason of possessing a special skill or qualification of use to the ACF. 
2.3.1.2. Eligibility for Appointment 
2.3.1.2.1. Before being appointed as an AI an individual must: 
a. 
Be at least 18 years of age (and not a cadet in any Cadet Force). 
b. 
Have the minimum medical standards shown in Part 2.7 and be in receipt of the 
appropriate medical certificate. 
c. 
Have the right of abode in the UK20. 
2.3.1.2.2. Applicants must be able to speak, read, write and comprehend instructions in 
English to a sufficient standard to perform all of the duties required of an ACF adult 
instructor and to ensure that Cadet welfare and safety is not put at risk. 
2.3.1.3. Security Checks. 
2.3.1.3.1. Applicants must also be able to meet the Baseline Personnel Security Standard 
(BPSS) in accordance with JSP 440 – The Defence Manual of Security21. 
2.3.1.4. Suitability checks. 
2.3.1.4.1. Applicants must also undergo an appropriate background check22.  As a result of 
a request for disclosure there may be instances when offences committed by individuals 
are identified and notified to the ACF. It is the responsibility of the Cadet Commandant to 
decide on whether to appoint the applicant. Should the Cadet Commandant decide not to 
appoint the applicant on the basis of disclosure, the applicant is to be informed and a 
record made. Should the Cadet Commandant wish to appoint the applicant despite an 
                                                
20 All British citizens automatically have right of abode in the UK.  For non-British citizens information can 
be found at the following:  https://www.gov.uk/right-of-abode/overview 
21 DII only 
22 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
2-57 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
adverse disclosure, consultation is to take place with the RFCA before the application is 
endorsed. The RFCA will record the decision and the ACF County will inform the applicant.  
Notwithstanding the above, it is disclosed that an applicant is on the Barred list for working 
with children and vulnerable adults, the applicant may not be permitted to join the ACF. 
2-58 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.3.2 Dual Appointments 
2.3.2.1. Dual Regular Army/ACF Appointments 
2.3.2.1.1. Members of the Regular Army may not hold a position in the ACF.  They may 
assist occasionally as “Service Helpers” with authority from their Commanding Officer and 
Cadet Commandant. 
2.3.2.2. Dual ACF/Army Reserve Commitment 
2.3.2.2.1. Soldiers serving in the Army Reserve may also serve as AI in the ACF with the 
agreement of the applicant’s Army Reserve Commanding Officer and the Cadet 
Commandant, but their duties in the Army Reserve are to take precedence.  Army Reserve 
Commanding Officers, in considering granting approval to a JNCO or Private Soldier to 
join the ACF, should bear in mind that the individual will wear the rank of SI in the ACF.  
Army Reserve applicants to join the ACF are to be subject to the same eligibility rules and 
appointment procedures as all other applicants.  Commissioned Officers of the Army 
Reserve may not serve as AI in the ACF and Commissioned Officers of the ACF may not 
serve as other ranks in the Army Reserve. 
2.3.2.3. Dual ACF/CCF Commitment 
2.3.2.3.1. An individual may be an AI in the ACF at the same time as being a non-
commissioned member of the CCF, with the agreement of the Cadet Commandant, and of 
the CCF Contingent Commander endorsed by the appropriate Brigade HQ.  All parties 
must be satisfied that the dual commitment will not create any conflict of duties and the 
approving authority is to be the Brigade HQ.  However, an individual may not be a 
commissioned officer in one Cadet Force and non-commissioned in another.  CCF 
applicants to join the ACF are to be subject to the same eligibility rules and appointment 
procedures as all other applicants. 
 
2-59 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.3.3 Adult Instructor application and enrolment process 
2.3.3.1. Initial Enquiry and Briefing 
2.3.3.1.1. When an individual expresses an interest in joining the ACF, they should be 
briefed on the organisation and complete their initial application.   
2.3.3.2. Initial Familiarisation and Application 
2.3.3.2.1. Where Counties have sufficient resources in place to guarantee the appropriate 
level of supervision of potential adult volunteers, those individuals may attend a period of 
informal familiarisation at the detachment. 
2.3.3.2.2. The initial familiarisation and application comprises: 
a. 
Initial Interview.  During the initial familiarisation phase, the OC should 
interview the applicant and where possible find opportunities to observe them during 
relevant activities.  The OC should complete the OC’s report.  This information will 
then be presented to the Board during the Familiarisation and Assessment Package.   
b. 
Appointment as a Civilian Assistant (CA).  Individuals found suitable by the 
OC, regardless of whether they wish to become uniformed adult instructors or non-
uniformed civilian helpers, may be approved by the Cadet Commandant as a CA 
during their period of informal familiarisation. 
c. 
Application Paperwork.  During this process the formal application paperwork 
is completed and submitted (medical, personal references, background check and 
security clearances).  If clearances fail at any stage of the application process, the 
individual is to be informed and any approval as a CA formally withdrawn.   
d. 
Familiarisation at Detachment.  Where possible, before attending the formal 
Familiarisation and Assessment package, individuals should, at the Cadet 
Commandant’s discretion, have the opportunity to become familiar with a range of 
Cadet activities at Detachment and ACF Area level.   
2.3.3.3. Familiarisation and Assessment Package 
2.3.3.3.1. Within six months of initial enquiry all potential volunteers should complete a 
formal Familiarisation and Assessment package, by the ACF County, with the exception of 
those civilian assistants (CA) who only assist in a specialist or administrative role who are 
to complete, as a minimum, the familiarisation periods (less the introduction to APC 
Syllabus subjects). 
2.3.3.3.2. If, at a later stage, a CA wishes to change role to that of a uniformed CFAV, they 
must subsequently apply and complete the full Familiarisation and Assessment package. 
2.3.3.3.3. The aim of the Familiarisation and Assessment package is to assess an 
individual’s suitability to serve as a youth leader in the ACF whilst at the same time 
providing potential adult volunteers with an insight into the organisation and the role of an 
ACF adult volunteer.  In order to assist those running the Familiarisation and Assessment, 
the following directions on how to manage the process are provided on the Cadet Force 
Resource Centre
;
 
2-60 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
a. 
Instructions for running the Familiarisation and Assessment package. 
b. 
Familiarisation materials, including Instructional Specifications (ISpecs), which 
form the basis of lesson plans. 
c. 
Assessment instructions and materials including Assessment Specifications 
(ASpecs), which describe how the assessments are run. 
d. 
Any supporting training and assessment materials for delivering this package. 
2.3.3.4. Assessment Board 
2.3.3.4.1. On completion of the package, the County Cadet Commandant selects, defers 
or rejects individuals, based on the evidence gathered during the assessment phase. 
2.3.3.4.2. The decision of the assessment board is final.  There is no right of appeal. 
2.3.3.4.3. The Assessment Board Instructions are on the Cadet Force Resource Centre. 
2.3.3.5. Enrolment 
2.3.3.5.1. The enrolment process is to be conducted by the Cadet Commandant in the 
presence of the applicant. 
2.3.3.5.2. After the new Adult Instructor has signed the Volunteer Agreement and the 
Cadet Commandant has countersigned it the promise shall be administered by the Cadet 
Commandant as follows: 
Speaker 
Suggested wording 
You are now required to demonstrate your understanding of the responsibilities of an 
Cadet 
Adult Instructor in the ACF to both Cadets and to me, your Cadet Commandant.  This 
Commandant 
is achieved by your making this promise to me. 
Sponsor 
Sir/Ma’am, this is [AI’S FULL NAME] who wishes to become a full member of the ACF. 
Cadet 
Sergeant [SURNAME] you have now been with us for [TIME SERVED].  Have you 
Commandant 
considered what it means to be an Adult Instructor in the ACF? 
Instructor 
I have Sir/Ma’am 
Do you understand that by joining [County] ACF you are voluntarily joining the Army 
Cadet 
Voluntary Youth Organisation and that while you are a member of it you will be 
Commandant 
expected to serve it loyally and carry out your obligations as a Youth Leader in the 
ACF, and conform to its values and standards? 
Instructor 
I do Sir/Ma’am 
Cadet 
Please now make your declaration 
Commandant 
I, Sergeant [AI’S FULL NAME] fully understand that as an Adult Instructor I have a 
special responsibility of care for other people’s children.  I promise to respect and 
observe the special duty of this responsibility and I promise to serve those in my care 
Instructor 
loyally and honourably to the best of my ability at all times through the (County) ACF, 
to which I now belong.  I will also ensure that I will keep up to date with changing 
regulations and initiatives regarding the development of the Cadets. 
Sergeant [SURNAME], you are now enrolled as an Adult Instructor.  I welcome you to 
the ACF and now require you to abide by the Army’s Values and Standards, uphold its 
Cadet 
traditions and understand the meaning and philosophy of the ACF Charter.  I will 
Commandant 
always be ready to help you to keep the promise you have just made. 
 
 
2-61 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.3.4 The Adult Volunteer Agreement 
2.3.4.1. Ministry of Defence (MOD) 
2.3.4.1.1. Upon joining the ACF an AI signs the same MOD Sponsored Volunteer 
Agreement that is signed by members of all of the MOD sponsored Cadet Forces. 
2.3.4.1.2. Specifically they agree to the following: 
a. 
Acceptance of Cadet Forces values, rules and regulations 
b. 
Understanding and accepting that the Cadet Forces are uniformed, MOD 
sponsored military youth organisations having strong and in some cases formal 
connections to the Armed Forces, and that they follow the customs and ethos of their 
single Services (sS) wherever possible. 
c. 
Accepting and agreeing to uphold the ethos, core values and standards of the 
Cadet Forces as currently published or future amended. 
d. 
To not promote any beliefs, behaviours or practices that are not compatible with 
the core values and standards of the Cadet Forces. 
e. 
To comply with the policies, rules and regulations of the Cadet Forces and 
voluntarily undertake to comply with any lawful instruction given to them. 
f. 
To receive guidance on Child Safeguarding during the induction process and to 
accept and understand that it is the primary responsibility of all adults involved with 
the Cadet Forces to safeguard the moral, psychological and physical welfare of 
cadets, regardless of their gender, religion, race, ability, disability, sexuality and 
social background by protecting them from any form of physical, emotional and 
sexual abuse or neglect. 
g. 
To accept that they are being enrolled for voluntary service with the Cadet 
Forces as a CFAV in a role and from a date that will be notified to them by the Cadet 
Forces. 
h. 
To voluntarily undertake, with the instructions and guidance of superior officers, 
to train cadets in accordance with a training programme authorised by the Cadet 
Forces and in accordance with the relevant regulations and instructions.  Also to 
undertake to carry out administrative or other duties as detailed and as necessary.  In 
particular that they fully understand their responsibilities for the safety and wellbeing 
of cadets. 
i. 
That in order for them to offer their services on a voluntary basis, they accept 
the requirement to undertake the appropriate learning and/or training within the 
timescale as laid down by the Cadet Forces; failure to complete the appropriate 
induction and initial training to a satisfactory standard may result in the termination of 
this agreement. 
j. 
To accept that their continued voluntary service with the Cadet Forces is 
conditional on remaining able to carry out their role with, and in support of, cadets.  In 
2-62 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
assessing their suitability for continued voluntary service, such factors as health, 
fitness, enthusiasm, attitude, qualification and competence will be taken into account. 
k. 
To understand that they are volunteering their services, there is no legal 
obligation on them to accept any voluntary activities.  Nor is there any legal obligation 
on the Cadet Forces to provide them with any voluntary activities.  However, they 
accept that in order for the Cadet Force to plan its activities, if they are subsequently 
unable to attend an activity that they have previously agreed to attend, they will 
contact the Cadet Force in advance, so that alternative arrangements can be made 
in their absence. 
l. 
To confirm that if they persistently fail to turn up for activities without contacting 
the Cadet Force in advance this agreement may be terminated in accordance with 
current or future amendments to the policies, rules and regulations of the Cadet 
Forces. 
m. 
To return any uniform and equipment loaned to them when their volunteering 
with the Cadet Forces ends. 
n. 
That if they have any concerns during their volunteering with the Cadet Forces, 
they will report these immediately using the appropriate procedure as detailed in the 
relevant Single Service cadet Force regulations. 
o. 
To understand and accept that they are a volunteer offering their services on a 
voluntary basis which can be terminated by the AI or the Cadet Forces at any time. 
p. 
To understand and accept that: 
(1)  There is no automatic entitlement to volunteer allowances or other 
payments. 
(2)  If they wish to claim such allowances they must apply for them. 
(3)  Such allowances may only be paid where funds are available and even 
then, are only payable at the absolute discretion of the Cadet Forces. 
q. 
That any allowances or other payments which are approved will be paid to them 
by bank account so they will ensure that any changes of bank account are notified to 
the Cadet Forces. 
r. 
That they will inform the Cadet Forces in writing, as soon as is practicably 
possible and no later than 14 calendar days, of any significant changes to their 
personal circumstances that affect their continued suitability for volunteering with the 
Cadet Forces, such as being placed on the barred list, changes to their medical 
fitness, as well as changes that are important for administrative purposes such as 
change of name, permanent civilian address and next of kin. 
s. 
To understand and accept that they are engaged as a volunteer and that there 
is no intention on the side of either party that this agreement should create an 
employment relationship or worker arrangement either now or at any time in the 
future. 
2-63 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 143 link to page 257  
2.3.4.1.3. Detailed Terms of the Agreement.  Detailed Terms of the agreement are found 
on the form signed by the volunteer and are available on the Cadet Force Resource 
Centre
.
 
2.3.4.2. Specific to Army Cadet Force 
2.3.4.2.1. Role on appointment.  Unless joining the ACF with a specific specialist skillset 
for a specific role AIs will be appointed as Detachment Instructors.  The Roll Specification 
for Detachment Instructors ion page 1-121. 
2.3.4.2.2. Uniform.  An AI is entitled to receive a free issue of certain items of uniform 
clothing and equipment, which may only be worn and used when on ACF duties and must 
be returned to the ACF when the AI leaves.  All members of the ACF must wear uniform in 
accordance with Army Dress Regulations (all ranks) – Part 8 – Dress regulations for 
Combined Cadet Force (Army Sections) and the ACF.
 
2.3.4.2.3. Remuneration and Allowances.  An AI is eligible to receive remuneration in 
the form of Volunteer Allowance (VA) as pePart 2.6 and allowances as peJSP 752 – 
Tri-Service Regulations for Allowances
.
 
 
 
2-64 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-65 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 363  
2.3.5 Management of AIs 
2.3.5.1. Rank on entry and probation 
2.3.5.1.1. All newly appointed AI are subject to the initial probationary appointment of 
Probationary Instructor (PI) for a period of up to twenty four months.  In this period, they 
are required to complete their Advanced Induction Course (AIC), on successful completion 
of which they may be confirmed in the rank of Sergeant Instructor (SI) by the Cadet 
Commandant.  However, if a PI is unable to complete the period of probation to the 
satisfaction of the Cadet Commandant, the Cadet Commandant may extend the period of 
probation for a maximum further period of one year or may terminate the service of the PI.  
PI do not wear badges of rank and are distinguished by wearing red epaulette loops in 
uniform until the successful completion of the Intermediate Induction Course (IIC) at which 
point they wear a rank slide with three chevrons (Sergeant) and the lettering “PI” on a 
yellow background23.  Notwithstanding their probationary status, the terms of service of PI 
are, in all other respects, those of SI. 
2.3.5.1.2. AI who join the ACF within five years of being discharged from the Regular 
Armed Forces or the Army Reserve in the rank of Sergeant or equivalent and above, may 
be accepted, subject to a vacancy existing within the authorised establishment, in the 
following ranks once their probationary period has been served: 
Rank in RN, RM, Army, RAF, 
RNR, RMR, Army Reserve, 
Rank on joining ACF 
RAuxAF 
WO or equivalent 
SMI 
SSgt/Sgt 
SSI 
2.3.5.2. Initial and Continuation Training 
2.3.5.2.1. All AIs, including those with previous military service, regardless of their previous 
rank, are required, as a rule, to undertake initial ACF training in accordance with the 
guidance given on page 4-11.  Normally, this will include Basic Induction Course (BIC) 
and Intermediate Induction Course (IIC) within the ACF County, an Advanced Induction 
Course (AIC) provided by a CTT within twenty four months of joining. 
2.3.5.2.2. Exceptionally, a Cadet Commandant may exempt an individual who has the 
appropriate military knowledge and experience from undertaking the AIC. 
2.3.5.3. Promotion 
2.3.5.3.1. Provided a vacancy exists within the ACF county establishment, the Cadet 
Commandant may promote AIs from SI to SSI and from SSI to SMI as follows: 
a. 
From SI to SSI providing the AI has successfully completed one of the following 
courses: 
(1)  Adult Leadership and Management Course. 
(2)  Target Rifle Coaching Course. 
                                                
23 Amended by ACF RAN 1.2 (1 Apr 16) 
2-66 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
(3)  Cadet Force Skill at Arms Instructor’s Course. 
(4)  Long Range Management Qualification. 
(5)  SA (M) (07) Cadet Course. 
(6)  Area First Aid Trainer. 
(7)  First Aid Teaching Certificate. 
(8)  Intermediate Signals Instructor. 
(9)  Advanced Signals Instructor. 
(10)  MTA Mountain Leader Summer (MLS). 
(11)  MTA Hill & Moorland Leader (H&ML). 
(12)  MTA Single Pitch Award (SPA). 
(13)  BCU UKCC Level 1 Coach. 
(14)  Army Reserve All Arms Drill Course. 
(15)  Certificate in DofE Leadership plus expedition supervisor. 
b. 
From SSI to SMI providing the AI has successfully completed the SA (M) (07) 
Cadet and is recommended by the Cadet Commandant.  
c. 
The grant of acting and/or local rank to AI is not permitted in the ACF. 
2.3.5.4. Appointment to Regimental Sergeant Major Instructor (RSMI) 
2.3.5.4.1. The appointment of one SMI to the position of RSMI is made by the Cadet 
Commandant for a period of three years.  RSMI tours may be extended by the Cadet 
Commandant for one year at a time to a maximum of six years, no individual may serve as 
an RSMI for more than six years in total.  At the termination of their tour RSMIs are to 
revert the rank appropriate to the appointment they take up in the establishment unless 
they are accepted for a commission through the Cadet Force Commissioning Board 
(CFCB) process. 
2.3.5.5. Adult Under Officers (AUO) 
2.3.5.5.1. An AI who is a candidate for a commission may be appointed as an AUO by the 
Cadet Commandant, pending commissioning.  AUO is an appointment; it does not alter an 
individual’s current terms of service and they shall continue to receive remuneration and 
allowances in their AI rank until appointed to a commission.  In the event of a commission 
not being conferred, the individual concerned is to revert to their current AI rank.  The 
appointment of AUO is limited to three years, within which time the AI will be expected to 
prepare for, and undertake, the CFCB process. 
2.3.5.5.2. An AI who is appointed as an AUO should have their rank entered as AUO on 
Westminster but this is not an option in the Paid Rank field which should remain at the AI 
rank they currently hold. 
2-67 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 162  
2.3.5.6. Application for a Commission 
2.3.5.6.1. An AI may apply to the Cadet Commandant to be considered for a commission 
at any time as long as they meet the eligibility requirements to be an ACF Officer and 
providing they have completed the initial training. 
2.3.5.7. Authorised absence 
2.3.5.7.1. An AI who wishes to be absent from ACF duty for not more than three months 
may be granted an authorised absence by the Cadet Commandant.  An individual wishing 
to be absent for more than three months should be placed in the non-effective pool.  They 
may return from absence at any time provided it is approved by the Cadet Commandant 
and there is a post available. 
2.3.5.8. Transfers 
2.3.5.8.1. Transfers within the ACF County may be made on the authority of the Cadet 
Commandant.  Transfers between ACF Counties may be made with the approval of both 
the releasing and receiving Counties having been audited by the RFCA through the AF E 
535 (ACF)
 
process.  Transfers to or from the CCF must have the agreement of the Cadet 
Commandant and CCF Contingent Commander concerned and the approval of the 
relevant Brigade HQ.  The Brigade HQ is the approving authority. 
2.3.5.9. Resignation 
2.3.5.9.1. An AI may resign before reaching retirement age by notifying the Cadet 
Commandant in writing, giving at least one month’s notice.  The Cadet Commandant may 
shorten the period between resignation and termination of service should they feel it is 
appropriate. 
2.3.5.9.2. Where an AI gives written notice of resignation during the investigation of any 
offence, during an investigation by Social Services or during any disciplinary proceedings, 
they will be allowed to resign one month from the date of receipt of that notice. 
2.3.5.9.3. The fact that an AI tenders their resignation, or ceases to attend must not 
prevent any allegation of a safeguarding nature being followed up on in accordance with 
the procedures on page 2-8.  It is important that every effort is made to reach a conclusion 
in all allegations bearing on the safety or welfare of children, including any in which the 
person concerned refuses to cooperate with the process.  Wherever possible, the person 
should be given a full opportunity to answer the allegation and make representations about 
it. 
2.3.5.10. Retirement and Extension of Service 
2.3.5.10.1. Extensions of volunteer service for AIs.  For all AIs, applications for 
extensions of tenure, provided they remains suitable in every respect for service with the 
ACF, may be approved by: 
a. 
Over the age of 60.  The Cadet Commandant annually from the age of 60 up to 
the age of 65. 
2-68 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 269  
b. 
Over the age of 65.  RC HQ Cadets Branch annually in exceptional 
circumstance beyond the age of 65.  The process to be followed is: 
(1)  The AI should informally approach the Cadet Commandant to see if the 
they are willing to endorse the application. 
(2)  If the Cadet Commandant agrees then a medical certificate confirming 
that the AI meets the standards laid out at para 2.7.2.2 is to be obtained. 
(3)  The medical certificate should be forwarded to the local RFCA along with 
a statement by the Cadet Commandant explaining the reasons an extension is 
needed. 
(4)  If the extension is agreed by the local RFCA then it is to be forwarded to 
the brigade SO2 Cadets. 
(5)  If the extension is agreed by the Deputy Brigade Commander then it is to 
be forwarded to SO2 Pers24 at RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
(6)  SO2 Pers will inform the Cadet Commandant if the extension has been 
approved and provide the date of extension if relevant. 
c. 
Notification.  All approvals of extensions of tenure are to be notified in writing 
to the AI being extended, including the date of expiry of their extension.  The planned 
end date should be added to their primary appointment on Westminster. 
d. 
Dual service. 
(1)  Any AI dual serving with the CCF must also follow the regulations laid 
down in JSP 313 if they are to carry on dual serving. 
(2)  If they are approved by one Cadet Force but not the other they are to 
cease dual serving and only carry on in that one cadet force. 
(3)  If approval to extend service over 65 in one cadet force has been 
approved by the brigade and RC HQ it does not need to be obtained again and 
the same end date can be used for both. 
2.3.5.11. Termination of volunteer service 
2.3.5.11.1. The service of an AI may be terminated by the Cadet Commandant at any time: 
a. 
By giving one month’s notice in writing to the AI: 
(1)  Where the AI’s personal circumstances (for instance their medical 
condition) cease to be suitable or tenable for service with the ACF. 
(2)  Where the AI is no longer able to discharge their obligations to the ACF at 
the Detachment on whose strength they are borne, or in the position to which 
they has been appointed, and they cannot be absorbed into another 
Detachment or position. 
                                                
24 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx 
2-69 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 230 link to page 232 link to page 234 link to page 230  
(3)  When the Detachment on whose strength they are borne is closed and 
they cannot be absorbed into another Detachment. 
(4)  With due warning on grounds of misconduct, indiscipline, persistent 
inefficiency or if the AI fails to conform to the values and standards required by 
the ACF, in circumstances which do not justify termination of service without 
notice.  The procedure to be followed is on page 2-76 Guidance on determining 
misconduct is on page 2-78. 
b. 
Without notice in any of the following circumstances: 
(1)  If the AI has been absent from ACF duties for 56 consecutive days without 
the permission of their Cadet Commandant. 
(2)  If an AI on probation fails to complete the period of probation to the 
satisfaction of the Cadet Commandant. 
(3)  If there are grounds under the common law justifying the termination of an 
AI’s service without notice. 
(4)  If the AI is convicted of a criminal offence. 
c. 
Before exercising their power to terminate the service of an AI without notice, 
the Cadet Commandant shall, where practicable, inform the AI concerned of the 
grounds for termination of service and shall give the AI a reasonable opportunity to 
make representations in the matter as the AI wishes.  Guidelines on procedures to be 
followed and on what may be construed as grounds justifying termination of service 
under the common law are on page 2-80. 
2.3.5.11.2. Notice of Termination.  Notice of termination in writing, including the reasons 
for it, are to be, where possible, served personally to the AI or, if that is not possible, sent 
by recorded delivery to the AI’s home address. 
2.3.5.12. Suspension and Disciplinary Procedures 
2.3.5.12.1. The Cadet Commandant may suspend an AI from ACF duties: 
a. 
When the AI is suspected of having committed a criminal offence, while the 
alleged offence is being investigated and, if legal proceedings are brought about as a 
result thereof, pending the final determination of the court thereon. 
b. 
In the event of a serious incident involving an AI or when an allegation of 
indiscipline or misconduct is made against an AI, while the matter is being 
investigated and until any disciplinary action that may result is determined. 
2.3.5.12.2. All such suspensions are without prejudice to the outcome of any investigation. 
2.3.5.12.3. Guidelines on disciplinary procedures are on page 2-76. 
2.3.5.13. Complaints and Grievances 
2.3.5.13.1. Where an AI wishes to make a complaint against another member of the ACF 
or has a grievance against the ACF, they should, in the first instance, take it up with their 
2-70 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 244 link to page 323 link to page 323 link to page 158  
Detachment or ACF Area Commander as appropriate.  Where that may not be appropriate 
or if the AI feels that the complaint or grievance is not being dealt with properly or fairly, 
they should request an interview with the Cadet Commandant.  If, after making the 
complaint or airing the grievance to the Cadet Commandant, the AI continues to feel 
dissatisfied with the outcome, they may request the Cadet Commandant to refer matter to 
the ACFA for arbitration.  Thereafter there is no further right of appeal.  Guidance on 
handling grievances is on page 2-90. 
2.3.5.14. Civilian Assistants (CA) 
2.3.5.14.1. Status.  Any person who, on the authority of the Cadet Commandant 
concerned, assists in the training or the administration of the ACF and who is not an officer 
or an AI, is defined as a Civilian Assistant (CA).  CA are not subject to Service Law.  CA 
can give valuable help in specialist subjects or in providing administrative assistance and 
their use is encouraged. 
2.3.5.14.2. Accreditation.  The appointment of a CA requires the approval of an ACF 
Area Commander or above and is to be notified on Part 1 Orders and recorded on 
Westminster.  The following accreditation will also be required: 
a. 
CA who are used to give instruction to Cadets or adults are to furnish written 
evidence of their qualification in the subject concerned. 
b. 
CA whose ACF usage requires them to have unsupervised access to cadets 
must also be able to meet the Baseline Personnel Security Standard (BPSS) 
undergo an appropriate background check25.  Otherwise they are not to be permitted 
to have unsupervised access to Cadets but are to be in the company of an ACF 
Officer or AI at all times when working with Cadets. 
2.3.5.14.3. Terms of Service.  CA are not entitled to wear uniform or to receive Volunteer 
Allowance or any other ACF allowances, but they may be paid expenses from the RFCA 
ACF Operational Grant. 
2.3.5.15. Indemnification, Insurance and Compensation 
2.3.5.15.1. Indemnification.  The MOD will normally indemnify all members of the ACF 
(including approved CA) involved in authorised cadet activities providing the activities are 
properly conducted and supervised, and no negligence is involved.  This does not absolve 
any adult member of the ACF, or CA, from meeting their own duty of care obligations. 
2.3.5.15.2. ACF Collective Insurance.  ACF Counties are to take up the insurance 
policies arranged by the ACFA to cover all their members, including CA, for public liability 
and personal accident.  Individuals are advised to provide their own insurance cover for 
personal possessions and issued items. 
2.3.5.15.3. Compensation.  Compensation, under certain circumstances, may be 
provided by the MOD to members of the ACF and approved CA for injury or disablement 
suffered as a result of ACF activities.  Details, including claims procedure, are on page 3-
49
.
 
                                                
25 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
2-71 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.3.5.16. Casualty Procedure 
2.3.5.16.1. ACF AI and CA are to be managed in accordance with Joint Services casualty 
procedure in the event that they become a serious casualty while undertaking activities 
authorised by the Cadet Commandant including: 
a. 
Training with Regular or Army Reserve units. 
b. 
Attending Cadet camps. 
c. 
Attending courses or other authorised ACF activities away from their normal 
place of parade. 
2.3.5.16.2. The procedure for casualty notification is in JSP 751 – Joint Casualty and 
Compassionate Policy and procedures
26
.  The Joint Casualty and Compassionate 
Centre (JCCC) will manage all such casualties and can be contacted at: 
Method 
Number 
Civ 
01452 519 951 
Telephone 
Mil 
95471 7325 
Civ 
01452 510 807 
Fax 
Mil 
95471 7363 
 
 
 
                                                
26 DII only. 
2-72 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-73 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 223 link to page 223  
2.3.6 Termination of appointment for misconduct, indiscipline or 
inefficiency 
2.3.6.1.1. When the service of an AI is to be terminated for inefficiency, unsuitability, 
persistent absence, failure to meet the required medical standard, failure to complete 
probation satisfactorily or failure to carry the duties or training expected under the AI 
Terms of Service, termination procedure may be carried out as described at Paragraph 
2.3.5.11.1.  When the service of an AI is to be terminated on grounds justifying dismissal 
under the common law or if convicted of a criminal offence, the Cadet Commandant may 
terminate their service without notice as described at Paragraph 2.3.5.11.1. 
2.3.6.1.2. When the Cadet Commandant or the AI’s ACF Area Commander believes that 
consideration should be given to the termination of the AI’s service on grounds of 
misconduct, indiscipline or persistent inefficiency but the circumstances do not justify 
termination without notice, the following procedure should apply: 
a. 
The AI should be interviewed by their ACF Area Commander or equivalent, 
have their faults explained and given an opportunity to discuss them.  The AI should 
be given a verbal warning, to include a time, which should not be less than three 
months, by when their conduct or performance must have improved satisfactorily.  A 
record of the interview, in note form and including the date, should be made and 
retained. 
b. 
If, on completion of the warning period, the AI’s conduct or performance has not 
improved satisfactorily, the AI should be interviewed by the Cadet Commandant and 
issued with a written warning to include a further period of not less than three months 
in which to improve to a satisfactory standard.  The AI is to be obliged to sign a 
certificate acknowledging receipt of the written warning and declaring that they 
understands the requirement.  A record of the interview, in note form and including 
the date, should be made and retained. 
c. 
If, after the further warning period, the AI’s conduct or performance has failed to 
reach a satisfactory standard, they may be issued by the Cadet Commandant with 
notice of termination of service. 
d. 
Throughout all warning periods, an AI under warning is to be given every 
opportunity to improve their conduct or performance and is to be accorded the 
access to their ACF Area Commander or the Cadet Commandant that they may need 
to discuss the circumstances, and to receive such advice and guidance as they may 
request. 
2.3.6.1.3. Copies of the records of interviews, letters of warning, and certificates of 
acknowledgement, notice of termination and any other relevant correspondence between 
the AI and their ACF Area Commander or Cadet Commandant should be retained with the 
AI’s personal records at County HQ. 
 
 
2-74 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-75 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.3.7 Disciplinary procedures for ACF Adult Instructors – Handling 
2.3.7.1. General 
2.3.7.1.1. The following procedures have been produced for guidance only.  Whilst every 
effort should be made to follow them, it is recognised that circumstances may occur in 
which it will be necessary to deviate from them.  The paramount consideration is the 
welfare of the Cadet.  There is also a duty of care for the Adult Instructor (AI). 
2.3.7.2. Adult Discipline and Personal Conduct 
2.3.7.2.1. CFAVs in the ACF must remember that their behaviour is under close scrutiny 
by Cadets who often model their own behaviour on that of their ACF adults.  The ACF is 
also observed regularly by members of the Army and by the public.  ACF adults therefore 
are obliged to observe the highest standards of personal conduct and discipline at all 
times. 
2.3.7.2.2. The Cadet Commandant is empowered to discharge any AI who is in breach of 
good discipline, good order, duty of care or safe conduct.  A breach of the law is liable to 
be considered a breach of good discipline. 
2.3.7.2.3. Adults are not to swear at or in the presence of Cadets, nor permit others to do 
so.  They are not to address others in terms that adversely reflect on that person’s sex, 
religion, race, or any disability, nor may they permit others to do so. 
2.3.7.2.4. Adults are not to behave towards a Cadet in a way that might be considered as 
a physical threat or assault, nor may they permit others to do so.  Any form of 
psychological, emotional or physical bullying or intimidation by an adult on a Cadet or 
another adult, even where it may not amount to a breach of the law, is liable to be 
considered a breach of good discipline and may result in disciplinary action being taken 
against the offender.  In situations where members of the public (adults or young people) 
act in a threatening manner towards cadets complaints should be logged with the local 
police on 101 (if it is a significant threat then 999). 
2.3.7.2.5. Adults are not to consume alcohol while on duty, other than in officers’ and 
adults’ messes, or in the presence of Cadets except on specific occasions authorised by 
the Cadet Commandant.  Alcoholic drinks are specifically forbidden on military training 
areas and ranges and are not to be consumed in vehicles carrying Cadets.  Adults are not 
to consume alcohol within the 8 hours preceding any activity with cadets (specifically 
driving duty whether or not passengers are to be carried).  Adults are not to undertake any 
duty with Cadets if they believe that their abilities are impaired by alcohol, nor may they be 
ordered to do so.  If the person in charge believes that an adult is under the influence of 
alcohol, they should order that individual to go home or, if they are unable to travel, to be 
removed from contact with Cadets, and should report the matter to the Cadet 
Commandant or CEO. 
2.3.7.2.6. Adults are not to smoke in the presence of cadets, in MOD and ACF buildings 
and in military and ACF vehicles.  
2.3.7.2.7. Adults who have been prescribed drugs that may inhibit their ability to carry out 
their duties properly, are to report the circumstances to the CEO.  They may not undertake 
ACF duties until cleared to do so by the CEO.  An adult found to be in possession of, or 
2-76 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 158  
suspected of using, a controlled drug is to be suspended pending investigation and 
reported to the Police.  If convicted of any drug related offence, an adult is to be 
discharged from the ACF and a referral made to the appropriate agency27. 
2.3.7.2.8. Adults in the ACF are to be made aware of the difficulties that can arise when 
they form close personal relationships with other adults, bearing in mind the influence they 
can have on Cadets.  It is appreciated that the ACF is, in part, a social activity and it is 
accepted that personal relationships between adults serving in the ACF do develop, or 
may already exist when they join.  However, the ACF is a uniformed and disciplined 
organisation as well as a youth organisation.  Behaviour between adults which may be 
unremarkable in a civilian workplace, may be unacceptable within the ACF.  Any such 
relationship between adults in the ACF should be conducted discreetly and, so far as is 
possible, away from the ACF. 
                                                
27 See para 2.1.1.3Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or Access 
Northern Ireland. 
2-77 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 158  
2.3.8 Allegations of misconduct - Preliminary Assessment 
2.3.8.1.1. Where an allegation of misconduct is identified by the MOD, ACF (officer, adult, 
parent, Cadet), the Civil Police, Social Services or others, it should be reported to the CEO 
as the County Principal Staff Officer. 
2.3.8.1.2. The CEO will make an assessment whether the allegations are genuine or 
merely vexatious (i.e.  whether there is a reasonable expectation that the allegations will 
be investigated).  It is not the function of the CEO to forma view as to whether or not the 
allegations have any foundation.  The CEO will inform the Cadet Commandant. 
a. 
If the CEO determines that the allegation is vexatious, a written record of that 
determination, together with the reasons, is to be placed on the Adult Instructor (AI)’s 
“P” file and Brigade are to be informed of the circumstances.  The Cadet 
Commandant may nevertheless direct that the allegation is to be investigated. 
b. 
If the CEO determines that the allegation is genuine, they will categorise the 
allegation and proceed accordingly.  The categories are: 
(1)  Allegations of misconduct of a criminal nature.  This covers allegations 
that a crime has been committed. 
(2)  Allegations of misconduct justifying termination of service under the 
common law.  
The common law recognises that there may be a number of 
circumstances justifying termination of service without notice.  These may range 
from ceasing to have the necessary qualifications for the appointment, to 
conduct likely to bring the County, ACF or Army into disrepute.  High standards 
are expected of any youth organisation.  Examples of misconduct justifying 
summary termination of service without notice are given below.  The list is not 
exhaustive.  Misconduct justifying termination of service under the common law 
may also give rise to termination of service without notice for failure to meet the 
Army’s values and standards of discipline or efficiency. 
(a)  Conduct affecting their background check28. 
(b)  False declarations in the appointment process. 
(c)  Failure to complete a probationary period satisfactorily. 
(d)  Serious negligence which causes or might cause unacceptable loss, 
damage or injury. 
(e)  Conviction for a criminal offence by a court of law (except for minor 
road traffic offences). 
(f) 
Conduct, whether or not in the course of ACF duties, likely to bring 
the ACF or the British Army into disrepute (this would include incidents 
arising whilst under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs, or the 
possession of any illegal drugs or substances). 
                                                
28 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
2-78 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
(g)  Theft or unauthorised appropriation of MOD property. 
(h)  Fraud, including fraudulent expense claims. 
(i) 
Falsification of records. 
(j) 
Serious breach of confidentiality. 
(k)  Serious misuse of the MOD’s computer hardware, software and 
information technology systems. 
(l) 
Harassment, unlawful discrimination or bullying. 
(m)  Refusal to comply with a reasonable instruction from a superior 
officer in the ACF. 
(n)  Serious insubordination. 
(o)  Serious breach of health and safety policies and procedures, or 
endangering the health and safety of a fellow member of the ACF or third 
party. 
(3)  Allegations of conduct contrary to the Army’s values and standards 
of discipline or efficiency.  
This covers three types of misconduct: conduct 
contrary to the Army’s values and standards; conduct contrary to the Army’s 
standards of discipline; and conduct contrary to the ACF’s standards of 
efficiency.  Absence from ACF duties for 56 consecutive days without the 
recorded permission of the Cadet Commandant is an example of the latter type. 
(4)  Allegations of misconduct giving rise to concerns that a minor may 
be a risk
.  This covers allegations which would normally be reported to Social 
Services. 
2-79 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.3.9 Handling procedures for allegations of misconduct of a criminal 
nature 
2.3.9.1. Initial action 
2.3.9.1.1. The CEO is to report the matter to the Civil Police, if not already involved, and 
inform the Cadet Commandant.  The Civil Police will then control any investigation with 
assistance from the County. 
2.3.9.1.2. The CEO is to inform Brigade in accordance with LANDSO 3202 Cadets. 
2.3.9.1.3. Dependant on the seriousness of the allegations, the CEO will assist in the 
preparation of a defensive media brief with the Chain of Command, Media Ops and the 
RFCA. 
2.3.9.2. Suspension of the AI 
2.3.9.2.1. The AI will normally be suspended without prejudice pending investigation of the 
alleged offence and / or pending the outcome of criminal proceedings.  Where the alleged 
offence is of a minor nature which is unlikely to impact on the duties of the AI, the Cadet 
Commandant has the discretion not to suspend the AI. 
2.3.9.2.2. Notice of Suspension will be given in writing by the Cadet Commandant and will 
normally be served personally to the AI, or if that is not practicable, by recorded delivery 
letter to the AI’s last known home address.  The notice of suspension will inform the AI 
that: 
a. 
An allegation of criminal misconduct has been made which has been passed to 
the Civil Police for investigation. 
b. 
The AI is suspended from all ACF activity and locations and, if appropriate, from 
communicating with Cadets, pending investigation of the alleged offence and / or 
pending the outcome of criminal proceedings; 
c. 
Suspension withdraws the right of access to ACF training, activities and 
property.  Depending on the allegations, the Notice of Suspension may also: 
(1)  Require the return of keys to ACF / MOD premises; 
(2)  Inform the AI that access to MIS, including Westminster, has been 
withdrawn. 
2.3.9.2.3. If appropriate, the Cadet Commandant may direct the CEO to inform any other 
Cadet and youth organisation of the suspension. 
2.3.9.2.4. The CEO will make a plan to contact any AI under suspension weekly, as a duty 
of care, until the investigation and aftermath are complete. 
2.3.9.2.5. Where the Cadet Commandant has decided against suspension, the AI is to be 
informed by recorded delivery letter sent to their last known address that an allegation of 
criminal misconduct has been made which has been reported to the Civil Police for 
2-80 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 238 link to page 242 link to page 238 link to page 242 link to page 235 link to page 235 link to page 235 link to page 235 link to page 158  
investigation.  If circumstances allow, the Cadet Commandant should also give that 
information verbally. 
2.3.9.3. Investigation 
2.3.9.3.1. The alleged offence will be investigated by Civil Police and/or Social Services.  
(AIs are not subject to Service Law therefore investigation or questioning by the Military 
Police, MOD Police or SIB will not normally be appropriate). The CEO will assist any 
investigation where required and will, if permitted by Civil Police / Social Services, attend 
case conferences. 
2.3.9.3.2. ACF personnel must not interview Cadets concerning the alleged offence.  They 
may, if permitted by Civil Police / Social Services, be present when interviews are 
conducted by those agencies. 
2.3.9.4. Subsequent action 
2.3.9.4.1. Subsequent action will depend on the circumstances 
a. 
Criminal charges not proffered and certificate of suitability to work with children 
at enhanced level29 unaffected. 
(1)  The Cadet Commandant will decide whether the facts disclosed amount to 
an allegation of misconduct giving rise to disciplinary procedures in paragraph 
2.3.10 o2.3.11 and proceed accordingly. 
(2)  The AI is to be informed that they are no longer suspended from duty.  
Where the facts disclosed amount to an allegation of misconduct giving rise to 
disciplinary procedures in categorie2.3.10 or 2.3.11above the AI is to be 
informed and notified that disciplinary proceedings will be commenced as 
appropriate. 
b. 
Criminal charges proffered, but not proceeded with, and clearance of suitability 
to work with children at enhanced level29 unaffected.  The matter is to be dealt with 
as under Paragraph a above. 
c. 
AI prosecuted and found “not guilty” and clearance of suitability to work with 
children at enhanced level29 unaffected.  The matter is to be dealt with as under 
Paragraph a above. 
d. 
Background check29 affected and /or AI prosecuted and found guilty.  The 
service of the AI will normally be terminated without notice.  Before exercising their 
power to dismiss without notice the Cadet Commandant shall, where practicable, 
inform the AI of the grounds of termination of service without notice and shall give the 
AI a reasonable opportunity to make representations in the matter as they thinks fit.  
If, after receiving those representations, the Cadet Commandant is minded to 
terminate the service of the AI, the CEO is to send a letter to the AI by recorded 
delivery to their last known home stating the fact of termination of service without 
notice.  Brigade and the RFCA are to be informed in accordance with LANDSO 3202 
                                                
29 See para 2.1.1.3By the Disclosure and Barring Service in England and Wales, Disclosure Scotland or 
Access Northern Ireland. 
2-81 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Cadets.  The ACFA is also to be informed.  In Scotland, where appropriate, the 
name of the AI is to be passed to the Scottish Government for inclusion in The List. 
 
 
2-82 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-83 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.3.10 Handling procedures for allegations of misconduct justifying 
termination of service without notice under common law and/or 
allegations of conduct contrary to the Army’s Values and Standards of 
discipline or efficiency 
2.3.10.1. Initial action 
2.3.10.1.1. Without expressing a view as to whether or not the allegations have any 
foundation, the CEO will record the allegations and report them to the Cadet Commandant 
or the AI’s ACF Area Commander, as appropriate.  The CEO should then ascertain from 
the Cadet Commandant or ACF Area Commander whether they believe that, if the 
allegations are proved, the circumstances are such as to require either: 
a. 
Counselling. 
b. 
Termination of service after due warning. 
c. 
Termination of service without notice. 
2.3.10.1.2. In accordance with LANDSO 3202 Cadetsthe CEO will inform the Brigade of 
the allegations.  Where it is proposed to proceed by counselling or due warning, Brigade or 
the RFCA may direct otherwise. 
2.3.10.1.3. Dependant on the seriousness of the allegations, the CEO will assist in the 
preparation of a defensive media brief with Chain of Command, Media Ops and the RFCA. 
2.3.10.2. Investigation 
2.3.10.2.1. The CEO will organise an investigation into the allegations, with advice from 
RFCA as appropriate.  The Cadet Commandant, Chief Executive of the RFCA and 
Chairman of the RFCA are not to be involved in the investigation as they may be required 
to chair and decide upon any subsequent disciplinary hearing or appeal. 
2.3.10.2.2. ACF personnel must not interview cadets unless the cadet is accompanied by 
a parent, guardian or Social Services. 
2.3.10.2.3. If the CEO is satisfied, after investigation, that there is a case to answer, 
disciplinary proceedings will be commenced. 
2.3.10.3. Disciplinary proceedings 
2.3.10.3.1. Counselling.  Where it has been determined that counselling is an appropriate 
remedy, the AI is to be interviewed by an ACF member of more senior rank who is to 
explain the AI’s failings and the steps necessary to remedy them.  A brief note of 
counselling will be made and retained on the AI’s Westminster30 file together with a record 
of the CEO’s investigations.  If the required improvement occurs, the note and record of 
investigation will be removed from the AI’s file one year after the counselling session. 
 
                                                
30 With permissions set to “CEO Only” 
2-84 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 226 link to page 239  
 
2.3.10.3.2. Termination of Service after Due Warning 
a. 
The procedure to be followed is set out on page 2-74 Prior to commencing this 
procedure, the CEO is to provide the ACF Area Commander or equivalent with a 
written record of their investigations.  This is to be recorded on their Westminster file 
at HQ Admin level. 
b. 
If, following the initial interview with the AI, the ACF Area Commander is not 
satisfied that the allegations are founded, they may instruct further investigations or 
dismiss the matter.  In the latter event, Brigade and RFCA are to be informed in 
accordance with LANDSO 3202 Cadets. 
c. 
If at the end of the procedure the Cadet Commandant decides to terminate the 
service of the AI, they may do so with or without further notice.  If further notice is not 
given, the AI must be given a reasonable opportunity to appeal to the Chief Executive 
of the RFCA. 
2.3.10.3.3. Termination of Service without notice.  Except in the circumstances 
envisaged in paragraph 2.3.10.3.2.cthe Cadet Commandant will normally only decide to 
terminate service without notice after convening a disciplinary hearing. 
2.3.10.4. Procedures for Disciplinary Hearings 
2.3.10.4.1. These procedures have been produced for guidance only.  It is recognised that 
every investigation is likely to be different and the Chairman of the Hearing has the 
flexibility to deviate from these guidelines should they deem it appropriate. 
2.3.10.4.2. In the event of a disciplinary hearing being convened, the AI against whom 
allegations have been made is to receive a letter at least 48 hours in advance of the 
hearing, specifying the allegations and giving an indication of possible outcomes (which 
may include disciplinary action up to and including termination of service without notice) 
should the allegations be found proven. 
2.3.10.4.3. Disciplinary Hearings will normally be chaired by the Cadet Commandant.  The 
person who carried out the preceding investigation should not chair any related disciplinary 
hearing. 
2.3.10.4.4. Disciplinary Hearings will normally be held in a neutral area (eg meeting room 
rather than the Cadet Commandant’s Office). 
2.3.10.4.5. The CEO will draw up a list of those likely to be required to give evidence or 
make statements during the Hearing (the AI having provided the CEO with a list of the 
witnesses they wish to call) and write to them giving outline details of the Hearing, 
including dates, times and venue.  The AI and witnesses will normally be given at least 48 
hours to prepare for the Hearing, although witnesses may be called at shorter notice as 
evidence becomes available during the Hearing. 
2.3.10.4.6. The Chairman of the Hearing should appoint an assistant to record the 
Hearing, act as a witness to the proceedings and to generally assist.  The assistant will not 
form part of the decision-making process. 
2-85 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.3.10.4.7. The Chairman of the Hearing should explain the procedures to the AI at the 
outset, confirm the allegations being made against him/her if necessary, and the possible 
range of sanctions should the charges be found proven. 
2.3.10.4.8. The AI should be invited to comment on the allegations and if they do not 
contest the allegations, the Chairman of the Hearing, if satisfied with the AI’s statement, 
may decide not to call further witnesses.  In these circumstances, and before the 
Chairman of the Hearing considers the case, the AI should be allowed to make a plea in 
mitigation. 
2.3.10.4.9. All relevant evidence following investigation will be considered. 
2.3.10.4.10. The AI, and their representative, should be in attendance throughout the 
Hearing.  The AI (not the representative) will be allowed to direct questions, through the 
Chairman of the Hearing, to those submitting or giving evidence. 
2.3.10.4.11. The Chairman of the Hearing may adjourn and re-convene at any time 
throughout the Hearing to consider the evidence, seek advice or to allow other witnesses 
to be called. 
2.3.10.4.12. The Chairman of the Hearing, when satisfied that all the relevant evidence 
has been presented, should adjourn to consider the evidence. 
2.3.10.4.13. After considering the evidence the Chairman of the Hearing re-convene and 
state whether and to what extent they considers the allegations to be substantiated.  If the 
allegations are found to be established in whole or in part they shall invite the AI to submit 
a plea in mitigation before deciding the appropriate penalty. 
2.3.10.4.14. The Chairman of the Hearing should explain the appeal procedures to the AI 
before concluding the Hearing. 
2.3.10.4.15. The Chairman of the Hearing should formally write to the AI within 48 hours 
confirming the outcome of the Hearing and the appeal procedures. 
2.3.10.4.16. On completion of disciplinary proceedings (or if there is an appeal, on 
conclusion of the appeal), the Cadet Commandant will direct the CEO to take such action 
as may be necessary to implement the decision reached in the Hearing / Appeal.  The 
CEO will inform Brigade and the RFCA in accordance with LANDSO 3202 Cadets and a 
written report and all supporting documentation should be attached to the AIs file on 
Westminster with the permissions set to “CEO only”. 
2.3.10.5. Appeal procedures 
2.3.10.5.1. If the AI wishes to appeal, notification outlining the grounds for appeal is to be 
made in writing to the Chief Executive of the RFCA within 10 days. 
2.3.10.5.2. On receipt of notification of an intended Appeal, the Chief Executive will direct 
the Deputy Chief Executive to review the written report of the Hearing and the disciplinary 
procedures followed, with particular regard to the principles of natural justice, Freedom of 
Information and Data Protection.  In the event of any adverse findings, a written report 
should be prepared and passed to the Chief Executive along with the written record of the 
Hearing. 
2-86 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.3.10.5.3. The Chief Executive or Chairman of the RFCA will convene a meeting with the 
AI to hear the Appeal.  They will consider the written record of the Hearing and the Deputy 
Chief Executive’s report, and then arrive at decision.  The decision may uphold the appeal, 
dismiss the appeal, or vary any penalty imposed.  The decision shall have regard to the 
needs of the county, including whether the Cadet Commandant has lost confidence in the 
AI. 
2.3.10.5.4. The Chief Executive or Chairman of the RFCA should formally write to the 
Brigade and the AI within 48 hours of the decision confirming the outcome of the Appeal. 
2.3.10.6. Disciplinary Penalties 
2.3.10.6.1. The disciplinary penalties available following investigation and a disciplinary 
hearing, include: 
a. 
Formal warning issued in front of a witness and recorded on the AI’s 
Westminster file at “CEO Only” Level. 
b. 
Demotion. 
c. 
Movement to another detachment / Area. 
d. 
Termination of service without notice with due warning. 
e. 
Summary termination of service without notice. 
2.3.10.7. Legal Representation or Accompaniment 
2.3.10.7.1. During Civil Police and Social Services investigations the AI must decide 
whether or not they require legal representation.  The MOD does not provide such 
representation.  Advice may be available through ACFA arranged insurance. 
2.3.10.7.2. An AI may be accompanied by a person of their choice during any County 
disciplinary proceedings other than counselling. 
2-87 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 234 link to page 234  
2.3.11 Handling procedures for allegations of misconduct giving rise to 
concerns that a minor may be at risk 
2.3.11.1.1. Where the allegations concern conduct which may be of a criminal nature, the 
matter is to be dealt with in accordance with the procedure on page 2-80 The Civil Police 
should be informed of any concerns that a minor may be at risk, and should be asked to 
advise whether Social Services are to be involved. 
2.3.11.1.2. Where the allegations do not concern conduct which may be of a criminal 
nature, a report should be made to Social Services and their advice requested.  The CEO 
will assist any investigation where required and will, if permitted by Social Services, attend 
case conferences. 
2.3.11.1.3. ACF personnel must not interview Cadets concerning the alleged misconduct 
but may, if permitted by Civil Police / Social Services, be present when interviews are 
conducted by those agencies. 
2.3.11.1.4. If there is concern that disciplinary proceedings might prejudice enquiries by 
Social Services, the commencement of disciplinary proceedings should be delayed.  
Should it be necessary to suspend the AI from contact with minors during this period, the 
Cadet Commandant may suspend the AI without notice, citing this paragraph.  The 
procedure in para 2.3.9.2 should be followed in respect of any suspension. 
 
 
2-88 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-89 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.3.12 Grievances 
2.3.12.1. Right to be accompanied 
2.3.12.1.1. At any interview arising from the operation of this grievance procedure an AI 
has the right to be accompanied by a member of the ACF of their choosing.  The 
companion may address the hearing and confer with the AI during the hearing but cannot 
answer questions on the AI’s behalf. 
2.3.12.2. Informal Action 
2.3.12.2.1. Grievances should in the first instance be raised informally with the AI’s 
Detachment / ACF Area Commander.  It is hoped that most grievances will be handled in 
this way.  However, should this informal approach fail to resolve the problem, the AI may 
proceed to take formal action. 
2.3.12.3. Formal Action 
2.3.12.3.1. Grievances should be submitted in writing to Cadet Commandant in the first 
instance, unless the Cadet Commandant is the subject of the complaint or there is some 
other good reason why it would be inappropriate for the Cadet Commandant to hear the 
grievance.  In the latter circumstances the grievance should be presented to the Deputy 
Chief Executive of the RFCA. 
2.3.12.3.2. The Cadet Commandant, or Deputy Chief Executive of the RFCA, will then 
interview the AI and make a written record of the interview.  A decision will normally be 
given within 10 working days of the grievance being submitted in writing.  Whilst every 
endeavour will be made to resolve more complex grievances in this time frame, the Cadet 
Commandant / Deputy Chief Executive of the RFCA may where necessary take longer to 
gather evidence or interview witnesses.  The reasons for delaying a decision should the 
procedures last longer than ten days will be communicated to the aggrieved party. 
2.3.12.4. Appeals 
2.3.12.4.1. Where, after following the formal grievance procedure, an AI is not satisfied 
with the decision, they may appeal in writing to the Chief Executive of the RFCA.  Without 
prejudice to the foregoing, the RFCA shall, at its sole discretion, determine who the 
appropriate person to chair the appeal hearing is. 
2.3.12.4.2. Appeals will only be considered if presented within five days of the grievance 
decision.  Appeals should state the grounds upon which the appeal is based. 
2.3.12.4.3. The CEO will assist in the preparation of the appeal and carry out any 
necessary investigations.  ACF personnel must not interview Cadets unless the Cadet is 
accompanied by a parent, guardian or Social Services. 
2.3.12.4.4. The AI will be informed of the decision of the appeal hearing in writing, as soon 
as possible following the conclusion of the appeal hearing.  The decision of the appeal will 
be binding. 
 
 
2-90 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
2-91 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 252 link to page 367  
Part 2.4  Cadets 
2.4.1.1. Eligibility 
2.4.1.1.1. To be eligible to be a cadet in the ACF a young person must : 
a. 
Be at least 12 years old. 
b. 
Not yet be 18 years old31. 
c. 
Be in at least school Year 8 for England and Wales and the equivalent in 
Scotland and Northern Ireland. 
d. 
Not be a member of the Services (Regular or Reserve). 
e. 
Not be a CFAV in any MOD Sponsored Cadet Force. 
2.4.1.2. Joining Procedure 
2.4.1.2.1. The administrative procedure cannot be initiated until the potential Cadet fulfils 
the eligibility criteria above, The ACF Enrolment Form (Army Form E529) then needs to 
be completed; this includes obtaining the written consent of the parent or guardian. 
2.4.1.2.2. Once the form has been completed the Cadets details are to be entered onto 
Westminster as soon as possible. 
2.4.1.2.3. Cadets and their guardians are to be made aware that any changes in personal 
circumstances including for example change of name, change of contact numbers or being 
suspected of a criminal offence must be reported to the Detachment Commander as soon 
as possible. 
2.4.1.3. Enrolment Procedure 
2.4.1.3.1. A recruit is to be enrolled as an ACF Cadet after passing the ACF Basic Training 
Test, normally within 3 months of joining.  Instructions for the ACF Enrolment Ceremony 
are given on page 2-98.  Enrolment in the ACF conveys no commitment to join HM 
Forces. 
2.4.1.4. Training Progression 
2.4.1.4.1. The APC (ACF) Training Syllabus is designed to be progressive and challenging 
for all cadets; details are provided in 4.3.5.1.1. 
2.4.1.4.2. An ACF recruit must have passed the recruit’s ACF Basic Training Test and 
have successfully spent at least one training weekend away from home, before they can 
be permitted to attend Annual Camp. 
                                                
31 Where a Cadet is required to be a member of the ACF as part of their education they may stay until they 
complete their education. 
2-92 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 246  
2.4.1.5. Wearing of Uniform 
2.4.1.5.1. As a result of the early stages of recruit training a Detachment Commander will 
know whether a recruit is sufficiently interested and suitable to stay in the ACF.  At this 
time their uniform may be issued to them.  At that time, they will be issued with it officially 
and will sign Army Form E617.  They may then wear uniform when travelling to and from 
their Detachment, on duty or on ACF activities, at the discretion of the Cadet 
Commandant. 
2.4.1.6. Ranks 
2.4.1.6.1. Below are the ranks that may be held by a Cadet.  Promotion depends entirely 
on merit.  Cadets will not normally be promoted to the ranks or equivalent shown below 
unless they have qualified for the appropriate ACF APC Stars. 
2.4.1.6.2. The table shows the promoting authority for each rank.  Although there is no limit 
to the number of cadets in each rank, counties should ensure that the rank is appropriate. 
Promoting 
Rank 
APC Star Held 
Authority 
Cadet (Cdt) 
Nil 
NA 
Detachment 
Cadet Lance Corporal (Cdt LCpl) 
1-Star 
Commander 
Cadet Corporal (Cdt Cpl) 
2-Star 
Area 
Cadet Sergeant (Cdt Sgt) 
3-Star 
Commander 
Cadet Staff Sergeant (Cdt SSgt) 
4-Star 
Cadet 
Cadet Company Sergeant Major (Cdt CSM) 
Commandant 
Cadet Regimental Sergeant Major (Cdt RSM) 
Master Cadet 
2.4.1.7. Transfer 
2.4.1.7.1. A cadet changing their residence or school is permitted to transfer to another 
ACF Detachment in a more convenient locality.  They will be permitted to retain their rank 
and the receiving ACF County HQ is to arrange transfer on Westminster. 
2.4.1.7.2. If the cadet is transferring out of the ACF County; the County HQ is to contact 
the Westminster helpdesk. 
2.4.1.8. Resignation and Dismissal 
2.4.1.8.1. A cadet may leave at any time.  They must resign if they no longer meet the 
eligibility criteria at Para 2.4.1.1.1. 
2.4.1.8.2. A cadet may be dismissed for misconduct or failure to attend parades, with the 
agreement of the Cadet Commandant. 
2.4.1.8.3. In accordance with LFSO 6102 – Territorial Army and ACF Clothing and 
Equipment Losses
 
every effort should be made to recover MOD items where practicable. 
2-93 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.4.1.9. Award and Presentation of Certificates 
2.4.1.9.1. As a general rule ACF Counties should arrange for Star Qualification Certificates 
and the Certificates for the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award and BTEC diplomas to be 
presented to serving recipients during a formal parade. 
2.4.1.9.2. The presenters of the certificates should if possible be in one of the appropriate 
categories indicated below: 
Certificate 
Presenter 
Master Cadet 
Lord-Lieutenant, Brigade Commander or 
4 Star 
similar 
Gold DofE 
BTEC Diploma 
3 Star 
Cadet Commandant or Visiting VIP 
Silver DofE 
2 Star 
1 Star 
Deputy Cadet Commandant, CTO or Area 
Bronze DofE 
Commander 
First Aid 
Basic Training 
Detachment Commander or visiting VIP 
2.4.1.10. Achievements and experience in the ACF 
2.4.1.10.1. AF E7580 is a record of achievements and experiences that can be used when 
applying for work/education.   
2.4.1.10.2. It is produced by Westminster automatically. 
2.4.1.10.3. All cadets are entitled to ask for their AF E7580while they are serving 
members of the ACF, regardless of their training achievement and possible future careers.  
This document is particularly suitable for cadets contemplating a career in the Armed 
Forces or other public services and also for older cadets in search of employment; it is of 
great value to potential employers.  Furthermore, it should help the cadet to discuss and 
inform any interviewer on their past achievements in the ACF and thus sell himself.  The 
chief merit of the APC 4-Star Certificate (AF E7551) or equivalent lower Star grading, if 
produced at a job interview, would be to impress the potential employer with the 
applicant’s achievement.  The benefit to a cadet of holding a BTEC Diploma gained 
through ACF training or a Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, both being nationally recognised 
achievements, is self-evident. 
2.4.1.10.4. The AF E7580 and the Star Qualification Certificate complement each other 
but it must be remembered that each serves its own separate purpose, as do a BTEC 
Diploma and a Duke of Edinburgh’s Award. 
2.4.1.11. Cadet discipline 
2.4.1.11.1. The maintenance of good discipline in the ACF is the responsibility of all adults 
and senior cadets under adult supervision.  Adults must therefore rely almost entirely on 
leadership and personal example to maintain good discipline.  There is, therefore, a heavy 
responsibility placed on adults to set a good example at all times and, when necessary, to 
behave in a better manner than would be expected outside the ACF. 
2-94 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.4.1.11.2. There are no sanctions or punishments available to adults to enforce discipline 
on cadets other than suspension or dismissal, or, in the case of Cadet NCOs, reduction in 
rank. 
2.4.1.11.3. Breaches of criminal law by cadets whilst with the ACF are not to be tolerated.  
Any Cadet suspected or found to be in breach of the criminal law is to be suspended 
immediately pending investigation by the civilian police. 
2-95 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.4.2 Senior Cadet Appointments 
2.4.2.1. Master Cadet. 
2.4.2.1.1. To qualify for consideration for appointment as Master Cadet, a Cadet must: 
a. 
Have qualified at APC 4-Star. 
b. 
Hold the minimum rank of Cadet Sergeant. 
c. 
Be at least sixteen years of age. 
d. 
Have passed the Senior Cadet Instructor’s Cadre. 
e. 
Have passed 4-Star Fieldcraft. 
f. 
Be recommended by their Detachment Commander. 
g. 
Be recommended by their Area Commander. 
h. 
Be recommended by CTC Frimley Park by passing the Master Cadet Course. 
2.4.2.1.2. The appointment of a Master Cadet is solely at the discretion of the Cadet 
Commandant.  Once appointed a Master Cadet may wear the Master Cadet Badge. 
2.4.2.1.3. On appointment a Master Cadet Certificate should be presented by a notable 
dignitary as soon as possible under ACF County arrangements.  Master Cadet certificates 
are to be obtained by writing to CTC Frimley Park. 
2.4.2.2. HM Lord Lieutenant’s Cadet 
2.4.2.2.1. The purpose of the appointment of HM Lord Lieutenant’s Cadets is to reward 
outstanding Cadets.  Candidates are to be nominated by Cadet Commandants and 
submitted annually in accordance with instructions issued by RFCA. 
2.4.2.2.2. The appointment is for one year and the duties involved are decided by 
individual Lord Lieutenants in agreement with the Cadet Commandant. 
2.4.2.2.3. Lord Lieutenant’s Cadets are to be issued with No 2 Dress for the duration of 
their appointment. 
2.4.2.3. Other Cadet Appointments32 
2.4.2.3.1. From time to time, ACF Counties may be approached by other civic dignitaries 
or civil organisations to appoint cadets to representational positions (i.e. Mayoral cadets).  
Authority to approve these appointments is with brigade HQ, and they should take into 
account the views of the regional HM Lord-Lieutenants before approving any appointment. 
2.4.2.2.4.2.4.2.3.2. Cadets may also be allowed to provide an ad-hoc representational 
function for specific or high-profile civic events, especially where cadets and their staff may 
                                                
32 Amended by ACF RAN 1.12 (6 Feb 17) 
2-96 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
be present.  For example, one or more cadets at Remembrance or Armed Forces Day 
parades could be detailed to assist the mayor or other civic dignitary on a one-off basis.  
These must be agreed on a case-by-case basis by the Cadet Commandant. 
 
2-97 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 253  
2.4.3 The ACF Cadet Enrolment Ceremony 
2.4.3.1. The Procedure 
2.4.3.1.1. It is desirable that the important step of taking the “cadet promise” (at para 
2.4.3.3
) should be made as memorable as possible for the new cadet.  This may best be 
done by a short ceremony that must be simple, dignified and sincere. 
2.4.3.1.2. Circumstances will vary and units may wish to develop a procedure especially 
suitable to their own ideas and tradition.  The following are the basic essentials of the 
ceremony: 
a. 
The ceremony should always be carried out by the cadet’s own Detachment 
Commander. 
b. 
The minimum number required for the Ceremony, in addition to the new cadet 
himself, will normally be a senior Cadet NCO who will act as sponsor.  The sponsor 
should preferably be a Cadet NCO who has been responsible for giving the cadet 
their recruit training. 
c. 
Before making their Promise, the Cadet should have completed their Recruits 
Test and the officer responsible should be satisfied that the new cadet understands 
the purpose and meaning of the Promise and their obligations as a cadet. 
d. 
The ceremony should take place at the Detachment, on a normal parade 
evening.  It should not be held in conjunction with any display or public event.  On the 
other hand, it should not take place in the Detachment office. 
2.4.3.2. The Ceremony 
2.4.3.2.1. When possible and appropriate: 
a. 
The remainder of the Detachment should be paraded in a hollow square or 
similar formation.  Before the entrance of the recruit the officer should remind all 
present of the nature of the Enrolment Ceremony and ask them to remember the 
time when they themselves took the Promise. 
b. 
The parents of the new cadet should be invited to be present. 
2.4.3.2.2. While it is important that the ceremony should not become boring or routine by 
too frequent repetition, too long intervals between ceremonies are not desirable.  It is a 
matter of striking a balance depending on the flow of recruits into the detachment. 
 
 
2-98 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.4.3.3. The Promise 
2.4.3.3.1. The wording for the Cadet Enrolment Ceremony is below and cannot be altered: 
Speaker 
Suggested wording 
Sir/Ma’am, this is [CADET’S FULL NAME] who wishes to become a member of 
Sponsor 
[COUNTY NAME] ACF. 
Detachment 
Cadet [CADET’S SURNAME] you have now been with us for [TIME SERVED].  Have 
Commander 
you considered what it means to be an Army Cadet? 
Cadet 
I have Sir/Ma’am 
Do you understand that by joining this Detachment you are voluntarily joining the 
Detachment 
Army’s Youth Organisation and that while you are a member of it you wil  be expected 
Commander 
to serve it loyal y, uphold it’s values and carry out your obligations as an Army Cadet? 
Cadet 
Yes Sir/Ma’am 
Detachment 
It is now time to make your promise? 
Commander 
I, Cadet [CADET’S FULL NAME] promise to serve my Queen and Country loyally and 
honourably.  I will uphold the values of the Army Cadet Force and will respect my 
Cadet 
fellow cadets of [COUNTY NAME] ACF, to which I now belong. 
2-99 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 255  
This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.8 (19 Aug 16) 
Part 2.5  Honours and Awards 
2.5.1.1. Non-Operational Gallantry Awards. 
2.5.1.1.1. Awards made in recognition of the various degrees of gallantry.  The following 
awards may be made in this category: GC, GM, QGM and QCBC.  Any of these awards 
may be recommended, when appropriate, to CFAVs or cadets; for further details see 
JSP 761. 
2.5.1.2. Awards in the Half Year Lists (New Year and at the Sovereign’s 
Birthday). 

2.5.1.2.1. ACF CFAVs and cadets are eligible for consideration for Non- Gallantry Honours 
and Awards in the half-yearly Honours List.  It should be noted that: 
a. 
ACF Officers are eligible for Military Division awards and recommendations 
should be forwarded through the Army Chain of Command on JPA S004. 
b. 
ACF Adult Instructors and cadets are only eligible for Civil Division awards.  
Recommendations are to be forwarded on MOD Form 408 through the Chain of 
Command to the Civilian Honours Unit. 
2.5.1.3. The Cadet Forces Medal 
2.5.1.3.1. ACF CFAVs may receive the Cadet Forces Medal as long as they meet all of the 
criteria.  All information about and regulations regarding the Cadet Force Medal are found 
in JSP 814. 
2.5.1.4. HM Lord-Lieutenant’s Certificate of Meritorious Service. 
2.5.1.4.1. The Lord-Lieutenant’s Certificate of Meritorious Service may be awarded by 
Lord-Lieutenants to CFAVs for meritorious service to the community; this award is 
administered by the RFCA. 
2.5.1.5. The ACF Certificate of Good Service 
2.5.1.5.1. General 
a. 
The ACF Certificate of Good Service is awarded to both CFAVs and cadets 
twice yearly.  Cadet Commandants will be invited to forward recommendations to RC 
HQ Cadets Branch in accordance with sub para 2.5.1.5.3. 
b. 
The Certificate is awarded for either: 
(1)  Continuous exemplary commitment to the ACF over a long period; or 
(2)  Outstanding effort delivered in support of a specific ACF project or activity. 
2-100 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.8 (19 Aug 16) 
 
c. 
The maximum number of certificates available to be awarded to each ACF unit 
in each calendar year will be based on the numbers of cadets and CFAVs on 
strength on 31 Mar the previous year.  The number will be calculated as follows: 
(1)  Cadet certificates.  One per 450 cadets (or part thereof). 
(2)  CFAV certificates.  One per 150 CFAVs (or part thereof). 
2.5.1.5.2. Eligibility 
a. 
To be eligible for the award of an ACF Certificate of Good Service: 
(1)  A cadet should have been a member of the ACF for at least three years on 
the date of recommendation. 
(2)  An adult instructor should have been a member of the ACF for at least five 
years on the date of recommendation. 
(3)  An officer shall be below the rank of Major. 
b. 
ACF Certificates of Good Service can also be awarded to those individuals who 
have left the ACF since the closing date of the previous application period providing 
they also satisfy the eligibility criteria in (2)(a). 
2.5.1.5.3. Application process 
a. 
RC HQ Cadets Branch will invite applications for the award of an ACF 
Certificate of Good Service twice yearly.  This will clearly state the closing date by 
which applications must be received so as to be considered for that award period.   
b. 
Recommendations should be made by the individual’s ACF Area or Detachment 
Commander and must be endorsed by the Cadet Commandant.  Applications are to 
be made using the Recommendation Form posted to the Cadet Force Resource 
Centre
.
 
c. 
Once the Cadet Commandant has endorsed the application they are to forward 
it to the appropriate brigade cadet branch for them to obtain the Brigade 
Commander’s endorsement.  If the Brigade Commander endorses the application 
they are to forward the application to SO2 Cadet Pers at UK RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
2.5.1.6. ACFA Awards 
2.5.1.6.1. ACFA President’s Award.  This Award consolidates and replaces the ACFA 
President’s and Chairman’s Certificates of Gallantry, Letters and Certificates of 
Commendation.  The President’s Award is for conspicuous acts or exceptional service by 
CFAVs, cadets, or persons who are not members of the ACF, especially in activities 
managed through ACFA eg sport, music, D of E and first aid.  Recommendations are to be 
submitted by Cadet Commandants to the ACFA axxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx. 
2.5.1.6.2. Praiseworthy first aid by cadets and CFAVs.  ACFA have experience of a 
wide range of awards related to praiseworthy first aid or the application of first aid training 
and work with awarding bodies to promote recognition for ACF cadets and CFAVs.  These 
include St John Ambulance, British Red Cross and Royal Humane Society.  The ACFA will 
2-101 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.8 (19 Aug 16) 
 
ensure that nominations are submitted for the most appropriate award(s) that fully meet 
the criteria of the relevant awarding body.  The advice of the ACFA should be sought 
before considering local or military commendations, as some awards may be restricted 
where recognition has already been given.  Awards through or contact with national 
awarding bodies must be only via the ACFA.  Awards may comprise: 
a. 
Certificates that are sent to Commandants for presentation locally. 
b. 
Annual events such as St John Ambulance Everyday Heroes and British Red 
Cross Humanitarian Awards. 
c. 
The life saving medals of the Order of St John or the Royal Humane Society. 
Nominations are to be sent to xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx using the following forms 
Praiseworthy Adult Nomination FormPraiseworthy Cadet Nomination Form. 
2.5.1.6.3. Other awards.  ACFA also have experience of a wide range of awards that may 
be appropriate, including those of the Humane Societies, and will advise and assist in 
submitting nominations, especially for Cadets.  The advice of the ACFA should be sought 
before considering local commendations, as some awards may be restricted where 
recognition has already been given. 
 
2-102 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.7 (25 May 16) 
 
Part 2.6  Remuneration of CFAVs 
2.6.1.1. General 
2.6.1.1.1. Some duty with the ACF can be remunerated; this part sets out the conditions 
that must be met before a CFAV is eligible to receive remuneration.  Meeting the eligibility 
requirement in no way entitles the CFAV to receive remuneration.  In line with the MOD 
sponsored Volunteer Agreement
 
the ACF is a voluntary organisation and CFAVs should 
not expect remuneration for their time, however the Army does provide funding for the 
ACF to ensure that the charter of the ACF can be met.  The budget for remuneration is 
allocated in the Cadet Resource Allocation Directive and is managed in accordance 
with these regulations and JSP 754 – Tri-Service Regulations for Pay and Charges. 
2.6.1.1.2. Members of the Regular Army Reserve of Officers (RARO) attached for service 
with the ACF will be eligible for remuneration and allowances appropriate to the ACF and 
the rank to which appointed and their remuneration is handled exactly the same as ACF 
Officers. 
2.6.1.1.3. Army Reserve officers on loan to the ACF will draw remuneration and 
allowances or training expenses allowances, as appropriate, in accordance with AC 72030 
The Reserve Land Forces Regulations
.
  All accounting is to be carried out by the parent 
Army Reserve unit.  Days of out-of-camp training for which pay is issued are to count 
against the allotment of Man Training Days (MTDs) of the officers’ Army Reserve units. 
2.6.1.2. Rates of remuneration 
2.6.1.2.1. CFAVs receive remuneration at special daily rates which are published annually 
by the MOD in a directed letter.  This remuneration will be in the form of a Volunteer 
Allowance (VA). 
2.6.1.2.2. CFAVs will receive remuneration in the following ranks: 
a. 
Officers. 
(1)  Colonels.  Remunerated in the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 
(2)  Officers commissioned who previously held the rank of SSI-RSMI.  At 
the rate detailed in JSP 754. 
(3)  Other Officers.  Remunerated in their acting rank (if held) or their 
substantive rank. 
b. 
Adult Instructors. 
(1)  Probationary Instructors.  Remunerated in the rank of Sergeant 
Instructor. 
(2)  Other Adult Instructors.  Remunerated in the rank held33. 
                                                
33 There is no acting rank for Adult Instructors. 
2-103 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.7 (25 May 16) 
 
c. 
Civilian Assistants.  Civilian Assistants may not be remunerated using this 
system; remuneration of Civilian Assistants (if any) must be awarded from the ACF 
Operational Grant or Non-Public Funds. 
2-104 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 259 link to page 259 link to page 259 link to page 260 link to page 261 link to page 259 link to page 259 This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.7 (25 May 16) 
 
2.6.2 Limits on remuneration 
2.6.2.1. General 
2.6.2.1.1. Each individual who receives units of VA is limited as to how many they may 
receive in a Financial Year (FY).   The limit placed upon that individual depends upon their 
type of engagement with the ACF and the different engagements are detailed in the paras; 
2.6.2.22.6.2.3, 2.6.2.4 and 2.6.2.5. 
2.6.2.1.2. The FY runs from April to March and the FY which a unit of VA is counted 
against is determined by when it is authorised by the Pay Administrator (not when the 
activity took place). 
2.6.2.1.3. Westminster can be used at any time by the individual or their CoC to view all 
remuneration claimed and the status of any claims. 
2.6.2.2. ACF CFAVs 
2.6.2.2.1. Each unit of VA must be approved by the authorising authority before it can be 
allocated to a CFAV.  The authorising authority depends on the total number of units of VA 
that have been authorised for an individual CFAV in the current FY.  The authorising 
authorities for each level are listed below: 
Ser 
Units of VA 
Authorising authority 
Remarks 

<36 
Cadet Commandant 
 
Normally only allowed for those CFAVs who have 
supported regional and national activity 
Deputy Brigade Commander or 
 

37-50 
Deputy Assistant Commander 
If a CFAV dual serves in a CCF in a different 
brigade than their ACF County then approval is 
required from both brigades 
2.6.2.3. RFCA employees 
2.6.2.3.1. RFCA employees may claim up to 28 units of VA for conducting CFAV activity in 
the course of their employment.  This may include Annual Camp (during which time the 
RFCA will grant special paid leave) and attendance at weekend training.  Units of VA for 
weekend training may only be claimed once the employee has exhausted the working 
hours available as part of their ‘all hours worked contract.’  However, the conditions for 
hours worked in para 2.6.3.3 must be satisfied. 
2.6.2.3.2. Additionally, an RFCA employee who is also a CFAV in an established role may 
receive units of VA if engaged in authorised training.  These units of VA will be allocated in 
the same way as for any other member of the ACF.  The limiting factors in para 2.6.2.2.1 
include all units of VA received as both an RFCA employee and as an ACF CFAV (ie the 
units of VA authorised in para 2.6.2.2 is counted towards the limits and is not a separate 
allocation). 
2-105 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 259 link to page 260 link to page 259 This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.7 (25 May 16) 
 
2.6.2.4. CCF CFAVs 
2.6.2.4.1. CCF CFAVs are allocated units of VA in accordance with JSP 313. 
2.6.2.4.2. The limiting factors in para 2.6.2.2.1 include all units of VA received as a both 
CCF CFAV and as an ACF CFAV (ie the units of VA authorised in para 2.6.2.4.1 is 
counted towards the limits and is not a separate allocation). 
2.6.2.5. CCF School Staff Instructors 
2.6.2.5.1. CCF School Staff Instructors are allocated a number of units of VA in 
accordance with JSP 313. 
2.6.2.5.2. These units of VA are counted separately to the ACF units of VA and are not 
counted towards the totals in para 2.6.2.2.1. 
2-106 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 261 This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.7 (25 May 16) 
 
2.6.3 Eligibility for remuneration 
2.6.3.1. Annual Camp 
2.6.3.1.1. An individual is entitled to a full day’s VA, without conditions as to hours of work, 
for all calendar days of actual attendance at annual camp, including days of arrival and 
departure, and days spent with advance and rear parties. 
2.6.3.2. Authorised courses 
2.6.3.2.1. An individual is entitled to remuneration for the recognised duration of courses 
authorised by RC HQ Cadets Branch.  This duration will be published in the Joining 
Instructions for the course and on Westminster. 
2.6.3.3. Other duty and training periods 
2.6.3.3.1. CFAVs are eligible for remuneration for: 
a. 
Attendance at courses of instruction. 
b. 
Periods of service of authorised training. 
c. 
Attendance at voluntary additional training. 
d. 
Attendance at commissioning or selection boards. 
e. 
Supervising cadets during travel. 
f. 
Activities when otherwise deemed to be on duty by the Cadet Commandant. 
2.6.3.3.2. CFAVs are NOT eligible for remuneration for: 
a. 
Parade nights. 
b. 
Charity events34. 
c. 
Social events34. 
2.6.3.3.3. A maximum of one unit of VA may be issued for a period of 24 hours.  Length of 
attendance is counted, not the calendar day(s).  VA may be issued in quarter units (¼, ½, 
and ¾). 
                                                
34 Unless supervising cadets taking part. 
2-107 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 262 link to page 261 This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.7 (25 May 16) 
 
2.6.3.3.4. Eligibility is based on the total hours attended in each 24 hour period and the 
amount of time spent actively engaged in activities.  The table below shows the minimum 
hours required in each 24 hour period to be eligible for VA: 
Minimum time 
Minimum time spent on 
Ser 
VA eligible 
attended (hours) 
activity (hours) 



¼ 



½ 



¾ 




2.6.3.3.5. In all cases: 
a. 
Attendance is from the time of assembly to the time of dismissal and may 
therefore include travelling time from the normal place of duty to the training location 
and vice versa.  Attendance may include the periods between leaving home and 
arrival at place of duty and vice-versa, providing that: 
(1)  They are spent wholly on travelling to and from the location of the activity 
(or necessary overnight accommodation when travel is impossible). 
(2)  The travelling time of any single journey exceeds 2 hours. 
(3)  The minimum period of actual cadet activity must not include travelling 
time. 
b. 
The travelling time of personnel who are required to travel direct to an activity 
location which is not their normal duty location is admissable for remuneration as 
long as the conditions of sub para a are met.  Examples of such travel are for the 
purpose of carrying out a reconnaissance for future activities, attendance at 
conferences, meetings, presentations or seminars, or staff visits to other units or 
headquarters. 
c. 
When a quarter, a half or three-quarter of a day’s VA is issued for a day 
preceding or succeeding a full day’s duty, training, weekend or camp, care is to be 
taken to ensure that the conditions of 2.6.3.3.3 are observed, so that, for example, 
continuous attendance from 1200 hours on a Saturday to 1200 hours on the Sunday 
can make an individual eligible for a maximum of one unit of VA. 
2-108 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.7 (25 May 16) 
2.6.4 Accounting for remuneration 
2.6.4.1. Remuneration Budgets 
2.6.4.1.1. At the start of each FY units will be allocated a budget for remuneration in the 
Cadet Resource Allocation Directive This budget will be input into the remuneration 
section of Westminster. 
2.6.4.1.2. When a CFAV assists another unit, the assisted unit can have the appropriate 
amount of its remuneration budget transferred to the unit of the assisting CFAV.  The 
budget can only be transferred by a pay administrator in a unit that is superior to both of 
the units concerned, therefore transfer of budgets should be managed by: 
a. 
Between units in the same RPOC Brigade.  The RPOC Brigade Cadets 
Branch. 
b. 
Between units in different RPOC Brigades.  UK RC HQ Cadets Branch SO2 
Pers35
c. 
From CTC Frimley Park to units.  CTC Office Manager36
2.6.4.2. Remuneration Accounts and Records 
2.6.4.2.1. On receipt of a Commissioning Letter for an officer, or a Notification of 
Appointment for an AI, and a completed JPA E 016ARFCA will open a JPA account. 
2.6.4.2.2. The AO is to ensure that the information from the JPA E 016A is promptly input 
into JPA. 
2.6.4.2.3. Any changes in bank details are to be notified on JPA E 016A. 
2.6.4.3. Payments and Notification 
2.6.4.3.1. An individual remuneration statement (JPA E017) will be produced each month.  
It will provide details of the amount that has been paid to the individual’s bank account. 
2.6.4.3.2. At the end of each FY a P60 will be sent to County HQ for forwarding to each 
CFAV showing their total remuneration and the amounts of tax and Earnings Related 
National Insurance Contribution (ERNIC) paid. 
2.6.4.3.3. An individual CFAV may view their historic JPA E017 and P60s on the Defence 
Gateway
 
at any time in the “My Admin” area. 
                                                
35 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx 
36 xxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
2-109 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.7 (25 May 16) 
 
2.6.4.4. Income Tax 
2.6.4.4.1. Income tax is deducted at source by AFPAA(G), and is payable at the basic rate 
by all adults, except in the following circumstances: 
a. 
Students - Inland Revenue Form P38(S) (Statement of Projected Earnings) will 
be sent out by AFPAA(G) on request for completion and return.  This declaration 
should be renewed annually. 
b. 
Certain individuals, ie unemployed and retired personnel, may be entitled to tax 
exemption.  In such circumstances they should contact their local Inspector of Taxes 
who will issue AFPAA(G) with a Form P6 “No Tax” coding.  This form is renewable 
annually. 
2.6.4.5. National Insurance 
2.6.4.5.1. ERNIC is payable by all adults on pay claims submitted to AFPAA(G) for one 
calendar month which exceed the minimum authorised by Department for Social Security 
(DSS).  CFAVs over 65 (men) or 60 (women) may be exempt from paying but they are 
required to obtain Inland Revenue Form CA4140 (Certificate of Age Exemption) from the 
Inland Revenue to be forwarded to AFPAA (G).  This is a form is a “Continuous Authority”. 
2-110 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 261 link to page 261 link to page 261 This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.7 (25 May 16) 
 
2.6.5 Allocation of remuneration 
2.6.5.1. General 
2.6.5.1.1. All claims for remuneration must be made on Westminster and need to be 
authorised at several different levels before a unit of VA will be allocated to an individual.  
The different methods by which remuneration may be claimed in are detailed below. 
2.6.5.2. Standard claims 
2.6.5.2.1. General.  Most claims made by CFAVs will be linked to an activity that is 
recorded as a Course or Event in Westminster these are referred to as “Standard 
Claims”. 
2.6.5.2.2. Process. 
Action 
Section of 
Stage 
Remarks 
Activity Director 
CFAV Claiming 
Westminster 
Must select “VA Claimable” and 
Create activity 
enter the appropriate units of VA 

 
Activities 
and invite CFAV 
claimable as per para 2.6.3.1
2.6.3.2 or 2.6.3.3 as appropriate 
Accept Invitation 

 
Activities 
 
and attend activity 
In multiples of ¼ days up to a 
Record activity 
maximum of the number 

 
Activities 
attendance 
selected in stage 1 plus 2 days 
for advance and rear parties 
Select number of 

 
VA to claim and 
Remuneration 
 
submit claim 
 
2-111 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 261 link to page 261 link to page 265 link to page 266 link to page 259 link to page 259 link to page 259 link to page 261 link to page 261 link to page 261 link to page 263 This section was amended by ACF RAN 1.7 (25 May 16) 
 
2.6.5.3. Non-standard claims 
2.6.5.3.1. General.  There will be times when claims are made that are not associated with 
an activity that has been created on Westminster This will normally be for administrative 
tasks such as recces or collecting transport.  These claims must be verified by an officer 
with the minimum rank of Captain. 
2.6.5.3.2. Process. 
Action 
Section of 
Stage 
Verifying 
Remarks 
CFAV Claiming 
Westminster 
officer 
Select the number of units of VA that you 
wish to claim up to the maximum 
Create a non-
specified in para 2.6.3.3 

 
standard claim in 
Remuneration 
 
Westminster 
Evidence of attendance can be added to 
the claim (this must be done unless the 
verifying officer was present) 
Verify the 
Having satisfied themselves that the 

claim on 
 
Remuneration 
conditions in par2.6.3.3 have been 
Westminster  
satisfied 
2.6.5.4. Authorisation of claims 
2.6.5.4.1. Once a claim is made it must be authorised before it will be paid.  Unit pay 
administrators will be able to view all claims that have been made once either of the 
processes detailed in paras 2.6.5.2.2 o2.6.5.3.2 have been completed. 
2.6.5.4.2. The decision on whether the claim is approved or rejected by the pay 
administrator will depend upon guidance given to them by the Cadet Commandant.  This 
guidance should be based upon: 
a. 
The limit imposed on the individual of how many VAs they can claim as detailed 
at para 2.6.2.2 (and taking into account para 2.6.2.3 for RFCA employees and 
2.6.2.4 for CCF CFAVs). 
b. 
If the activity carried out makes the CFAV eligible for remuneration in 
accordance with para 2.6.3.12.6.3.2 o2.6.3.3. 
c. 
The capability to remunerate the CFAV from the unit budget (see para 2.6.4.1). 
2.6.5.5. Payment of claims 
2.6.5.5.1. All claims are paid through JPA and all approved claims must be input into JPA 
for this to happen. 
2.6.5.5.2. Unit pay administrators can view all authorised claims in the remuneration 
section of Westminster and have the option to press the button “create pay run” this will 
produce a spread sheet of all claims that have been approved since the last pay run but 
have not yet been paid. 
 
2-112 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
2-113 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
2-114 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 2.7  Medical 
2.7.1.1. General 
2.7.1.1.1. This part is concerned with the medical aspects of authorised training in 
accordance with, and in addition to, the APC (ACF) training syllabus. 
2.7.2 CFAVs 
2.7.2.1. Introduction 
2.7.2.1.1. Duty with Cadet Forces differs considerably from service in the Regular Forces 
or Army Reserve and there are a number of appointments which can be filled by ACF 
CFAVs of lower medical categories; these categories are now expressed as “3 – Fit”, “2 – 
Fit with some limitations”, “1 – Fit for sedentary or routine work” and “0 – unfit for ACF 
service”, and carry with them certain limitations as to the individuals eligibility to be 
appointed as an Officer or AI.  If the medical standards required are achieved then both 
Officers and AI are appointed as CFAVs in the ACF. 
2.7.2.2. Medical Standards for Officers under the PULHHEEMS System 
2.7.2.2.1. Applicants who are examined by Service Medical Officers or Medical Boards will 
be assessed under the PULHHEEMS system.  In making the assessments maximum use 
of the discretionary powers in PULHHEEMS Administrative Pamphlet 2010 (PAP 10) will 
be made, bearing in mind the nature of the duties of officers serving with the Cadet 
Forces. 
2.7.2.2.2. There are to be four employment categories and the minimum acceptable 
PULHHEEMS assessment for each is: 
Category 
Description 









Satisfies minimum Standard 3. 






8/5 
8/3 


Fit for all ACF duties 
Satisfies minimum standard 2. 

Fit for all ACF duties with minor 





8/5 
8/5 


exceptions37. 
Satisfies minimum standard 1. 






8/5 
8/5 


Marked as restricted on employment38. 
Below minimum standard 1. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Unfit for ACF service 
2.7.2.3. Medical Standards for Adult Instructors for use by Civilian 
Practitioners 

2.7.2.3.1. The same four categories of fitness will apply to AI, but in order to assist the 
civilian practitioner in reaching an assessment a formula has been designed which roughly 
conforms to the PULHHEEMS standards for ACF officers.  The practitioner should 
examine each candidate and indicate their fitness category and any limitations.  It will be 
                                                
37 Examining doctor to specify. 
38 Such as “not to be exposed to weapon or other noise” 
2-115 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
the responsibility of the Cadet Commandant to see that the AI is not asked to exceed their 
limitations. 
2.7.2.3.2. Doctors are invited to certify that each applicant belongs to one of the following 
four categories: 
a. 
Category 3.  Fit to take part in outdoor activities of an Adventurous nature 
compatible with the supervision of children and young people.  Has the stamina to 
endure strain and fatigue related to such activities.  Able to hear sufficiently well to 
perform such duties.  Able to see to handle and shoot weapons and drive a motor 
vehicle.  Is emotionally stable. 
b. 
Category 2.  Fit to take part in outdoor activities as stated in Category 3 but 
with some limitation(s).  The degree of limitation(s) should be stated by the doctor.  Is 
emotionally stable. 
c. 
Category 1.  Fit for sedentary and routine work.  Able to walk at least 2 miles a 
day, can stand for moderate but not prolonged periods.  Able to hear sufficiently well 
to perform such duties.  Able to see to drive.  Is emotionally stable. 
d. 
Category 0.  Below minimum Category 1 standard.  Unfit for ACF service. 
2.7.2.4. Disability 
2.7.2.4.1. CFAVs must be classed as fit to serve in the ACF and any disability or special 
need of a CFAV must not impact upon the safety or wellbeing of cadets.  There are a wide 
range of roles in the ACF and it is up to Cadet Commandants to decide on an individual 
basis the roles that may be fulfilled by a CFAV if they have been classed as fit to serve in 
the ACF in accordance with this part. 
2.7.2.4.2. If special circumstances exist for an individual to be employed in the ACF who 
does not fit any of the 3 categories for employment, eg paraplegia, a case should be 
submitted to RC HQ Cadets Branch for special exemption. 
2.7.2.4.3. Referral for specialist advice will be required for a declared history of pulmonary 
tuberculosis and in all other cases as considered necessary by the examining medical 
officer.  Chest radiography may be required. 
2.7.2.5. Payment of Fees 
2.7.2.5.1. Where practicable medical examinations will be performed without incurring any 
extra charge against public funds.  Fees may be paid, subject to the approval of the 
appropriate Brigade HQs, where this is not possible. 
2-116 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.7.3 Cadets 
2.7.3.1. Enrolment 
2.7.3.1.1. The majority of Cadets in the ACF are able to undertake the activities included in 
the APC (ACF) training syllabus.  However, there may be some who are not able to 
undertake all the activities because of physical disabilities.  There is no intention of 
preventing them from joining the ACF provided that the parents or guardians concerned, 
and head teachers in the case of Restricted Detachments wish them to do so and Cadet 
Commandants are prepared to accept them and are able to put any necessary safeguards 
in place, it is necessary to impose certain rules and restrictions to ensure the safety of 
such Cadets and those with whom they will train.  The ACF is unable to provide specialist 
carers.  To this end: 
a. 
It is strongly advised that the parents or guardians of a potential recruit should 
declare to the Detachment commander concerned any illness or disability from which 
they may be suffering at the time of joining.  In particular it is important that the 
effects of the medical condition on the individual are clearly stated so that the ACF 
can determine how this may affect their ability to take part in ACF activities and 
whether any reasonable adjustments will need to be made to help the individual take 
part.  Details of medical conditions will be asked for on AF E 529 when the cadet 
joins and parents/guardians must inform the DC if there is any change to the 
condition. 
b. 
Parents and guardians are responsible for the provision of a medical warning 
tag or bracelet for a Cadet whose illness or disability requires one and which is to be 
worn whenever the Cadet is involved in ACF activities.  Tags/bracelets will not be 
supplied by MOD. 
2.7.3.2. Training 
2.7.3.2.1. It is necessary to impose certain rules and restrictions to ensure the safety of 
cadets with certain medical conditions or disabilities and cadets with whom they may be 
training.  They are as follows: 
a. 
In any case of doubt, the decision whether a physically disabled cadet should 
undergo ACF training lies with the parents or guardians and Cadet Commandant 
concerned. 
b. 
The commanding officer of any Service establishment or ship to which a cadet 
may be attached for training retains the responsibility to decide that any cadet is unfit 
to undertake the form of training planned, even if previously considered fit by the 
parents and Cadet Commandant concerned. 
c. 
The OIC party will be responsible for carrying out a careful local Risk 
Assessment which will consider medical conditions unsuited to the activities 
proposed. 
d. 
Cadets suffering from enuresis (bed wetting) or motion sickness may only take 
part in sea or air training or attend training at a Naval or RAF establishment when a 
medical officer is borne on the strength of that ship or establishment. 
2-117 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.7.3.3. Training of a Strenuous Nature 
2.7.3.3.1. Cadet Commandants in consultation with medical staff and instructors should 
prepare a full list of activities of a strenuous nature which are likely to be carried out during 
any training period.  This list should be supplied with the Activity Consent Form. 
2.7.3.3.2. Prior to cadets being required to undertake strenuous training, a copy of the 
Activity Consent Form should be given to every cadet with the instruction that it is to be 
given to their parent, guardian and returned to the Detachment, duly completed and 
signed, before the relevant activity starts. 
2.7.3.3.3. Cadets suffering from serious disabilities may be limited in which activities they 
can take part in (or to what extent they can take part). The MoD has a duty to ensure that 
cadets are not placed at risk because of a medical condition they may have which would 
require a level of supervision or care that is not available through the ACF.    The Cadet 
Commandant has the final say on whether a cadet can take part in any activity, most 
activities can be modified39 in such a way to allow the majority of cadets to take part. 
2.7.3.4. Asthma/Respiratory Disorders 
2.7.3.4.1. Cadets who suffer or who have suffered from asthma or other significant 
respiratory / breathing problem may take part in selected activities as long aActivity 
Consent Form
 
is completed and the following factors are taken into account: 
a. 
The severity of the asthmatic condition. 
b. 
The physical demands of the training activity. 
c. 
The degree of environmental protection. 
d. 
The level of appropriate medical supervision. 
2.7.3.4.2. Should any doubt exist on whether a cadet is fit to undertake all the activities, a 
doctor should be consulted before the Activity Consent Form is signed.  When Cadets 
with asthma are considered for an adventurous training activity the OIC party will be 
responsible for carrying out a local Risk Assessment, bearing in mind that both exertion 
and cold are independent risk factors which may trigger acute attacks.   
2.7.3.4.3. Should consent be given, the adult supervisor  must be aware of the case and 
agree to the cadet’s participation.  Any appropriate medication must be carried by the 
cadet at all times and taken in accordance with prescription instructions.  These must also 
be known by the accompanying adult, who must also carry an additional 
inhaler/medication, clearly labelled with the cadet’s name and be aware of any necessary 
emergency treatment which may vary from individual to individual.  Details are to be 
obtained on the Activity Consent Form. 
2.7.3.4.4. If at any stage, it is the view of the adult supervisor that despite the medical 
consent the cadet should not take part in the training activity, the supervisor is to take all 
steps to effect this. 
                                                
39 This can include modification to the syllabus requirements as long as they are reasonable and do not 
detract from the level of effort and achievement required. 
2-118 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 206 link to page 222  
2.7.4 Pregnancy and maternity 
2.7.4.1. General 
2.7.4.1.1. It is the responsibility of the Cadet Commandant, to assess any health and 
safety risks to CFAVs and cadets. 
2.7.4.1.2. Any female member of the ACF must inform her Cadet Commandant  that she is 
pregnant as soon as possible so that they, can fulfil their Duty of Care as well as Health 
and Safety responsibilities properly. 
2.7.4.1.3. Cadet Commandants are to: 
a. 
Remind members of their ACF County of the requirement for them to give 
notice of their pregnancy to their Cadet Commandant. 
b. 
On receipt of this written notification make a Risk Assessment. 
c. 
Ensure that no officer or AI is discharged or requested to resign from the ACF 
on grounds of pregnancy. 
2.7.4.2. CFAVs 
2.7.4.2.1. CFAVs that become pregnant are to inform their Cadet Commandant at the 
earliest opportunity. They are also encouraged to support the Cadet Commandant in 
completing a risk assessment for the activities they are likely to undertake with the ACF 
during the pregnancy. 
2.7.4.2.2. Whilst there is no entitlement to OML and AMP or SMP and VA, CFAVs who are 
pregnant are to inform their commandant when they wish to cease attending cadet 
activities and for what length of time they wish to take a break from the ACF40. 
2.7.4.2.3. Female Adult Volunteers are to be reassured by their commandant that when 
they wish to return to the ACF to participate in Cadet Activities there will be a post on the 
establishment for them. 
2.7.4.2.4. The Cadet Commandant should explain that their return to cadet force activities 
would require them to complete any mandatory training that has lapsed (or been 
introduced) during their absence. 
2.7.4.2.5. The Cadet Commandant should explain to the CFAV that the ACF have no child 
care provision whilst they are attending activities with the ACF. 
2.7.4.3. Cadets 
2.7.4.3.1. Female cadets who become pregnant are to inform their Detachment 
Commander when they feel it appropriate to do so. They are encouraged to collaborate 
with the detachment commander to construct a risk assessment for the activities they wish 
to participate in during their pregnancy. 
                                                
40 Similarly there is no allowance for paternity leave but an authorised absence may be taken in accordance 
with par2.2.8.7 (Officers) or para 2.3.5.7 (AIs). 
2-119 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
2.7.4.3.2. If the cadet feels comfortable doing so they are encouraged to let their 
detachment commander know if and when they will be taking a break from cadet activities 
and for how long.  
2.7.4.3.3. The detachment commander should explain to the cadet that the ACF have no 
child care provision whilst the cadet is attending activities with the ACF. 
2.7.4.3.4. The detachment Commander is to ensure the Cadet Commandant is kept 
informed of the situation with the Female Cadet. 
2.7.4.3.5. Pregnant Cadets are not to be permitted to continue participating in ACF 
activities where there is any risk to either their own or their unborn child’s health.  A female 
cadet must notify her Cadet Commandant, of her pregnancy, so that the necessary Risk 
Assessments can be carried out.  She may resume her cadet membership after the birth of 
her child if she wishes, subject to the approval of her Cadet Commandant. 
 
 
 
2-120 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
SECTION 3 - LOGISTICS, FINANCE AND 
MEDICAL 
 
 
 
3-1 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
3-2 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 3.1  General 
3.1.1.1.1. The purpose of this section is to ensure that the general principles of 
responsibility for the provision, maintenance and disposal of MOD stores are known by all 
members of the ACF, especially by the users of the stores at Detachment level.   
3.1.1.1.2. In the ACF the term “stores” is used as a generic term for all items used by the 
ACF for training and administration.  Stores may be referred to under various headings in 
their day-to-day use, examples of which are: 
a. 
Clothing and Personal Equipment.  Clothing and equipment issued to 
members of the ACF and signed for by an individual on AF E617B. 
b. 
Training Stores.  Stores used for ACF training other than at a. above. 
c. 
Arms and Ammunition.  All types of weapons, their connected equipment 
such as blank firing attachments, along with ammunition and pyrotechnics. 
d. 
Accommodation Stores.  Stores for use in official buildings and camps such 
as chairs, tables and cooking equipment. 
e. 
Army Books, Forms and Publications.  Stationery and instructional 
publications used for training and administration. 
3.1.1.1.3. Those who deal with accounting for these stores must use the accurate 
definitions as used in The Defence Logistics Framework. 
3.1.1.1.4. Unit Identity Numbers (UINs). 
a. 
Westminster contains a list of ACF & RFCA UIN. 
b. 
UIN are to be quoted on all vouchers and correspondence affecting stores. 
c. 
Should the details held against an RFCA or ACF County UIN need amendment 
as a result of a change of title or postal address, the RFCA is to complete and 
dispatch a Change of Location Report in accordance with AGAI Volume 1, Chapter 2.  
The Unit details on Westminster must also be updated. 
3.1.1.2. Health and Safety – Policy 
3.1.1.2.1. In the management of the ACF above County level, there is a distinction 
between Training Safety (TS), which is directed and implemented by the military chain of 
command, and health and safety, which is directed and implemented on behalf of the 
Army by Regional Command through the regional Brigades and the RFCA. 
a. 
Training Safety.  The Cadet Commandant is advised by the TSA. 
b. 
Health and Safety.  The Cadet Commandant is advised by the CEO. 
3.1.1.2.2. Within the ACF County, the Cadet Commandant has the overall responsibility for 
the safety and welfare of the adult leaders and Cadets, while Area Commanders, 
Detachment Commanders and the adult leaders in charge of activities are responsible to 
3-3 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
the Cadet Commandant for the wellbeing of the CFAVs and cadets in their charge.  The 
TSA is the Cadet Commandant’s adviser on training safety and the CEO is the Cadet 
Commandant’s adviser on all aspects of health and safety including environmental 
protection  which, collectively, is referred to as SHE. 
3.1.1.2.3. The ACF is equally subject to SHE legislation as are all other workplaces, 
organisations, institutions and establishments, particularly to the Health and Safety at 
Work Act 1974.  There are many sources of regulation relating to health and safety but the 
principal document that applies to the ACF is JSP 375 – The MOD Health and Safety 
Handbook
 
and this is to form the basis of SHE management within the County. 
3.1.1.2.4. Health and Safety Policies.  Two Health and Safety Policies are to be 
displayed in each building used by the ACF: 
a. 
The Secretary of State’s SHE Policy. 
b. 
The Cadet Commandant’s SHE Policy.  The Cadet Commandant is to issue a 
SHE statement, which is to be reviewed annually.  It is to be displayed in every 
Detachment and training facility within the County, alongside the Secretary of State 
for Defence SHE Policy Statement.  The Cadet Commandant is also to issue an 
annual SHE action plan, which is to be implemented through regular meetings of 
their SHE Committee.  The SHE Committee should include the County Training 
Officer, the Area Commanders, the CEO and CQM.  The CEO should manage the 
annual SHE audit as part of the standard reporting system. 
3.1.1.3. Accidents and Incidents 
3.1.1.3.1. The unpleasant effects of any accident or incident can be significantly 
aggravated by failure to carry out the necessary remedial action properly and, conversely, 
can be ameliorated by prompt and effective action including timely and accurate reporting.  
All adult leaders in the ACF are to be made aware of the action to be taken in the event of 
an accident or incident and the reporting procedure. 
3.1.1.3.2. All incidents no matter how minor should be recorded in the copy of MOD Form 
315 – Occurrence Book
 
that must be kept at that location. 
3.1.1.3.3. In the event of an accident the incident management procedure detailed in 
AC72008 Cadet Training Safety Precautions should be carried out followed by the 
reporting procedure in LFSO 3202 C. 
3.1.1.4. Safety, Health and Environmental Protection (SHE) 
3.1.1.4.1. It is essential that each individual member of the ACF is clear as to the SHE 
arrangements that apply to them with regard to Accommodation and the necessary Site 
Risk Assessments.  These are detailed in the RC HQ Cadets Branch instruction – The 
Management of Safety, Health, Environmental Protection and Fire (SHE) and Training 
Safety (TS) in the ACF and the Army Sections of the Combined Cadet Force, and in 
AC72008 Cadet Training Safety Precautions. 
3-4 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.1.1.5. Accounting and stocktaking 
3.1.1.5.1. All accounting and stocktaking within the ACF should be done on the 
Westminster G4 package and in accordance with The Defence Logistics Framework – 
The Defence Supply Manual which should be consulted when undertaking these activities. 
3.1.1.6. Scales 
3.1.1.6.1. The scales or lists of stores authorised for the ACF are given in the following 
references: 
a. 
Clothing and personal equipment – Army Dress Regulations (all ranks) – 
Part 8 – Dress regulations for Combined Cadet Force (Army Sections) and the 
Army Cadet Force
.
 
b. 
Training stores (including arms) – The Cadet Forces Master Equipment List. 
3.1.1.7. Clothing and equipment losses 
3.1.1.7.1. LFSO 6102 – Territorial Army and ACF Clothing and Equipment Losses 
directs units in the safeguarding of MOD assets, prevention of further losses and 
management of loaned clothing and equipment.  It states the procedure to be followed in 
the event of non-return of loaned clothing and/or equipment. 
3.1.1.7.2. RFCA will obtain guidance from RC HQ Cadets Branch before legal action is 
taken to repossess stores including clothing and personal equipment from ex- members of 
the ACF. 
 
 
3-5 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
 
3-6 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 3.2  Dress 
3.2.1.1. General 
3.2.1.1.1. The authoritative publication on the subject of dress in the ACF is Army Dress 
Regulations (all ranks) – Part 8 – Dress regulations for Combined Cadet Force 
(Army Sections) and the Army Cadet Force
.  
This publication gives not only the scales 
of clothing and personal equipment authorised for the ACF but also detailed instructions 
on the wearing of uniform and embellishments.  The process for proposing changes is 
contained in that document. 
3.2.1.2. Accounting 
3.2.1.2.1. ACF units are to account for stores using the Westminster G4 package. 
3.2.1.2.2. Items listed on The Cadet Forces Master Equipment List (less weapons and 
ammunition) are to be maintained on the miscellaneous account and categorised under 
sub headings, eg: 
a. 
General. 
b. 
Clothing. 
3.2.1.3. Mandatory requirement to wear ACF/Cadet insignia 
3.2.1.3.1. When in uniform ACF personnel must indicate that they are members of the 
Cadet Forces by wearing the following text on their rank slide or shoulder titles as 
appropriate: 
a. 
CFAVs.  “ACF”. 
b. 
Cadets.  “Cadet”. 
3.2.1.4. Laundry and Dry Cleaning 
3.2.1.4.1. All ACF Counties are registered by UIN with the Army HQ and RC SFM 
branches to permit them to utilise the Laundry and Dry Cleaning Services in place in each 
Brigade AOR.  The costs for this service will be borne by Cadets Branch RC. 
3.2.1.4.2. The items for laundry and dry cleaning include: 
a. 
Uniform (MTP and No2 Dress). 
b. 
Sleeping systems. 
c. 
Bed linen. 
d. 
Table linen. 
3-7 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.2.1.5. MOD FORM 7767 Clothing – Control of Demands (Clothing 
Maintenance Limits) 

3.2.1.5.1. To effect economic management of clothing as required by The Defence 
Logistics Framework
the maintenance limits are to be applied to the official strengths 
established annually at 30 Sep. 
3.2.1.5.2. The control recording requirements using AF H 8500 as detailed in The Defence 
Logistics Framework
are not to be allowed for the ACF.  Instead, these records are 
maintained on Westminster. 
3-8 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 3.3  Equipment 
3.3.1.1. Responsibility 
3.3.1.1.1. The County Commandant is responsible for publishing an Equipment Care 
Policy. 
3.3.1.1.2. Accounting for all stores issued to the ACF from Army sources or purchased 
from public funds is the responsibility of the CQM as directed by the Cadet Commandant. 
3.3.1.1.3. All such stores remain public property. 
3.3.1.1.4. Except when personal clothing and equipment accompanies a member of the 
ACF on transfer to another County, public stores will not be transferred from one ACF 
County to another unless written authority is given by RC HQ Cadets Branch or the 
appropriate Brigade HQ, when the vouchers authorising the transfers will quote the 
authority. 
3.3.1.1.5. CAAs, using RC HQ Cadets Branch Logistic Support Inspection methodology, 
are to visit Detachments and HQ holding stores at suitable intervals to: 
a. 
Advise on stores accountancy and administration. 
b. 
Check that the appropriate stores accounts and records are correct and up to 
date, and to note balances for comparison with the Westminster G4 records. 
c. 
Carry out spot checks in the stores and verify the correctness of holdings 
against ledger balances. 
3.3.1.1.6. They are to pay particular attention to: 
a. 
General.  Layout of stores and tidiness. 
b. 
Clothing and Equipment.  Personal clothing and equipment records, 
recoveries of clothing and equipment from Cadets who have left the ACF and return 
of clothing and equipment no longer required. 
c. 
Arms and Ammunition.  The condition of weapons and the security of 
weapons and ammunition (see LFSO 2901)
d. 
Composite Rations.  If rations are held, that they are within warranty life. 
3.3.1.2. Security of Stores 
3.3.1.2.1. The security of stores is dependent on: 
a. 
Satisfactory storage arrangements to ensure that stores, particularly attractive 
items, are not stolen. 
b. 
Good accountancy and checking systems, to ensure that stores are not lost in 
any other way. 
3-9 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.3.1.2.2. Public property, or property bought with funds provided by RC HQ Cadets 
Branch and issued for use by the ACF, is held on charge by the CQM.  Where appropriate 
it is distributed to ACF County HQ, Areas, Detachments or individuals.  The CQM on 
whose charge property is held is to take practical measures to prevent loss of property for 
which they are responsible.  The CQM must ensure that administration is sound and that, 
where necessary, responsibility for the custody and use of MOD property is clearly 
delegated to those concerned. 
3.3.1.3. Accountability 
3.3.1.3.1. All stores accounting is to be conducted in accordance with The Defence 
Logistics Framework
.
 
3.3.1.4. Distribution Records 
3.3.1.4.1. All of the ACF County’s stores are held on Westminster G4, this system is also 
used to account for the distribution of stores to sub-units. 
3.3.1.4.2. Cadet clothing record AF E 617 Bdetailing (as part of the management system) 
the level of clothing and personal equipment loaned to individual CFAVs and cadets, is to 
be held at the point most convenient to management. 
3.3.1.4.3. Where accountable stores are temporarily loaned to individuals, other than items 
which are recorded on AF E 617 Ba signature is to be obtained from the individual either 
in a “loan book” or on a temporary receipt (i.e.  MOD FORM 7767).  These loans are to be 
reviewed frequently and signatures are to be renewed, where necessary, at 3 monthly 
intervals. 
3.3.1.4.4. Distribution records generally are only to be amended when a transaction 
permanently alters the stores holding. 
3.3.1.5. Internal Demands and Issues 
3.3.1.5.1. Replacement of stores by Detachments/Areas is to be by an informal combined 
indent/delivery note (“shopping list”) system.  Supply is to be made from Area/County 
level, according to availability, or the indent passed to SO2 Log and Eqpt, Cadets Branch 
RC.  Management control is to be exercised during the process and the unserviceable 
items are to accompany the indents where practicable to the County CQM. 
3.3.1.5.2. “Shopping lists” for items or quantities additional to those already held should be 
prepared separately from normal replacement lists and indicate that they are a new 
requirement.  Each new request will require a justification to the County CQM as to why, 
what, when you need the new items. 
3.3.1.5.3. Normally stores replenishment by counties will be from Stores System 3 
sources.  All receipts and issues and G4 accounting is to be completed on Westminster 
G4 accounts. 
3.3.1.5.4. Internal distribution of new receipts, or redistribution of existing stocks, is to be 
controlled under managerial arrangements and, if appropriate, distribution records and 
inventories amended accordingly. 
3-10 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.3.1.6. Stocktaking and Examination of Account 
3.3.1.6.1. All stocktaking is to be coordinated and monitored by the CQM in accordance 
with The Defence Logistics Framework This includes the stocktaking carried out upon 
change of Cadet Commandant or Cadet Quarter Master. 
3.3.1.7. MOD clothing and equipment that may be made available to the 
ACF 

3.3.1.7.1. Following the closure, disbandment or amalgamation of a regular or Army 
Reserve unit there may be certain items of clothing and equipment that are surplus to 
requirement and thus available for ACF units to bid for to enhance training. 
3.3.1.7.2. In the first instance, the CQM should establish a rapport with the Brigade 
Ordnance Warrant Officer (BOWO) so that they are in a position to be notified by the 
BOWO should such items become available. 
3.3.1.7.3. Alternatively, the ACF CQM should approach the CQM of the disposing unit 
direct if they hear of a change that may result in surplus equipment being made available 
within their County boundaries. 
3.3.1.7.4. These items – e.g.  Waterproofs, PLCE, Water Jerry Cans and Norwegian 
Containers - will be a one off issue with no entitlement to supply maintenance through the 
Defence Supply Chain. 
3.3.1.7.5. CQM will be expected to collect these items using County resources, unless 
notified otherwise by the Brigade HQ. 
3.3.1.7.6. CQM are not to take on charge any items of clothing or equipment that have 
been condemned for further use, regardless of the perceived condition of the items. 
3.3.1.8. Complete Equipment Schedule (CES) 
3.3.1.8.1. Items for which a CES has been issued are to be accounted for as complete 
equipment.  Where component parts are in themselves accountable under the ACF 
definition, they are to be annotated “A” in the schedule. 
3.3.1.8.2. Where a CES has not been issued, but the item is regarded as a complete 
equipment, a list of component parts held is to be prepared in lieu of the schedule.  These 
components are to be classified as to accountability and the list annotated as for a CES. 
3.3.1.8.3. A Local Equipment Schedule is to be generated by the CQM where an item has 
several components and does not have a CES, eg a camera, case and memory card.   
3.3.1.8.4. Separate entry in the account of the accountable components of complete 
equipment is not necessary.  Vouchers should be cross-referenced. 
3.3.1.9. Conditioning/Disposal 
3.3.1.9.1. Stores will not be examined for condition by Board of Survey. 
3-11 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.3.1.9.2. Type L items and Consumable items which become unserviceable are to be 
examined by the County CQM or Cadet Stores Assistant.  If the County CQM is satisfied 
that the item cannot be repaired cost effectively and that there has been no neglect or 
misuse, he will authorise the item for replacement. 
3.3.1.9.3. Type P items are to be examined by the appropriate Service authority under 
arrangements made by the County CQM through the appropriate Brigade HQ G4 Log and 
or ES Staff. 
3.3.1.9.4. Detailed instructions for the examination of Type P items, their repair or, if found 
to be unserviceable, their disposal are to be stated in The Defence Logistics 
Framework
.
 
3.3.1.10. Losses and Damages 
3.3.1.10.1. RC HQ Cadets Branch will accept responsibility for the financial costs arising 
from loss or damage in the following circumstances and counties should not affect any 
form of insurance against these risks: 
a. 
Loss of, or damage by fire or storm to, buildings which have been placed on the 
Army Reserve property list or the approved Cadet property list, together with any 
MOD property stored therein. 
b. 
Loss of, or damage by fire or storm to, MOD property stored in other 
accommodation provided that all reasonable precautions have been taken to prevent 
such loss or damage. 
c. 
Loss of, or damage to, MOD property arising from fire, storm, transit handling 
and accidental damage to, or in connection with, annual camp in so far as recovery 
cannot be made from the contractors.  The term “MOD property” as used in this 
paragraph includes both property issued in kind by RC HQ Cadets Branch and 
property bought with funds provided by RC HQ Cadets Branch. 
3.3.1.10.2. RC HQ Cadets Branch will not accept responsibility for loss or damage in the 
following circumstances: 
a. 
Loss of, or damage to, buildings by fire or storm when the buildings have not 
been placed on the Army Reserve property list or the approved Cadet Property list. 
b. 
Loss of, or damage to, private property for any reason.  CQMs should affect 
such form of insurance as is considered necessary to meet these risks, the cost of 
any premiums being met from non-public funds. 
c. 
In all other cases of loss or damage ACF units will be governed by the same 
rules as apply to inquiries in Army Reserve units.  A board of inquiry will be held if 
required. 
3.3.1.10.3. Each case will be considered on its merits by a board of enquiry and the RFCA 
will be invited to contribute in whole or in part towards the cost of the loss or damage if it is 
considered that there has been a failure on its part to introduce and maintain effective 
systems of administration or to exercise all reasonable supervision and control. 
3-12 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 287 link to page 287  
3.3.1.10.4. Deficient articles will be summarised on AF O1680A or B as appropriate by the 
RFCA.  The priced AF O1680 in duplicate, together with remittance, will be forwarded to 
the Command Pay Office or relevant DLO IPT who will endorse and return one copy to the 
RFCA to support the ledger entry striking the articles off charge. 
3.3.1.10.5. Should it be necessary to replace the articles struck off charge, an indent will 
be submitted in the normal manner.  The indent will show clearly the reason for the 
demand and bear a cross reference to a receipted AF O1680 with which the lost articles 
were struck off charge.  Articles drawn to replace losses will be brought on charge. 
3.3.1.10.6. When the stores have to be valued, the amount chargeable will be assessed in 
accordance with The Defence Logistics Framework. 
3.3.1.10.7. Any appeal made against a request to pay for the lost stores will be forwarded 
to the RFCA for onward transmission to the appropriate Brigade HQ, who will arrange for it 
to be sent to the authority empowered to deal with the case. 
3.3.1.10.8. If the loss is not considered to be the responsibility of any individual or group of 
individuals, MOD FORM 2260 will be prepared and application made for write-off. 
3.3.1.11. Delegated Powers of Write-off 
3.3.1.11.1. Delegated powers of write-off and basic losses instructions are published in 
JSP 462 (Part 1 and Part 2) 1.  Delegation of powers should be obtained from the 
appropriate Regional1 Brigade HQ. 
3.3.1.11.2. The broad definitions of the categories relevant to losses are as follows: 
a. 
Cash Losses. 
(1)  Category A1 – Losses of stores due to culpable causes, that is by proven 
fraud, proven or suspected theft, arson, sabotage or malicious damage and by 
culpable negligence. 
(2)  Category A2 – Cash losses due to other causes, except military and 
civilian pay, allowances and superannuation. 
(3)  Category C – Fruitless payments. 
(4)  Category D – Claims abandoned. 
b. 
Stores Losses. 
(1)  Category B1 – Fraud, theft, arson and sabotage. 
(2)  Category B2 – All other losses not covered by Category B11. 
3.3.1.11.3. Category D is related only to claims abandoned, which are defined as cases in 
which valid claims (bills) are or could have been presented in respect of stores losses, but 
which for valid reasons are not proceeded with to finality.  These should be reported in 
                                                
1 Amended by RAN 1.3 (14 Mar 16) 
3-13 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 287 link to page 288  
accordance with LFSO 6102 – Territorial Army and ACF Clothing and Equipment 
Losses
1
. 
3.3.1.11.4. The responsibility for write-off lies with: 
a. 
Issued items.  The military chain of command. 
b. 
RFCA funded items.  The RFCA Chief Executive. 
c. 
Non-Publically funded items.  No powers of write off.  These losses should be 
claimed against insurance policies for items bought from non-public funds2. 
3.3.1.12. Procedure for Repairing Damaged Stores and Equipment 
3.3.1.12.1. A workshop indent (DSG 8800) will be prepared in quintuplicate, and submitted 
to the Comd Equipment Support (ES) at the appropriate Brigade HQ, who is to give 
instructions for the equipment to be handed into the workshops.  The article will not be 
struck off ledger charge.  When the work is finished the RFCA will be notified of the 
arrangements for collecting the equipment. 
3.3.1.12.2. Comd ES at the appropriate Brigade HQ is to raise debit vouchers for sums 
due under Para 3.3.1.11.4. 
3.3.1.12.3. When articles are condemned as unserviceable and beyond local or 
economical repair, a condemnation certificate (AF G1043) will be issued by the workshop 
to which the article was sent for repair and forwarded to the RFCA, together with a copy of 
the relevant DSG 8800.  The RFCA will then apply to the Comd Log Sp at the appropriate 
Brigade HQ for disposal instructions for the condemned article.  In accordance with these 
instructions the RFCA is to voucher the condemned article on MOD FORM 7767 which is 
to be prepared in quadruplicate.  Three copies will be sent to the workshop which will then 
despatch the articles to the appropriate depot in accordance with normal procedure. 
3.3.1.12.4. AF G1043 will be attached to the relevanMOD FORM 7767. 
3.3.1.12.5. Indents for articles in replacement will bear a cross reference to AF G1043 on 
which the original items were condemned. 
3.3.1.13. Fuels, Lubricants and Associated Products 
3.3.1.13.1. Fuels, lubricants and associated products for use in static engines supplied for 
technical instruction are to be obtained by local purchase.  The fuel is to be brought to 
charge and accounted for on the plant card of the static engine.  The cost will be borne by 
the RFCA. 
                                                
2 Amended by RAN 1.3 (14 Mar 16) 
3-14 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 3.4  Arms and Ammunition 
3.4.1.1. General 
3.4.1.1.1. The authoritative instruction on security of arms and ammunition in the ACF is 
JSP 440 – The Defence Manual of Security3.  LFSO 2901 draws on JSP 440 – The 
Defence Manual of Security4
 and is designed as a stand-alone document held at 
detachment level.  JSP 482 – MOD Explosive Regulations, Chapter 29 – Storage 
Regulations for Cadet Units holding SAA only should also be consulted. 
3.4.1.1.2. Holdings.  Holdings at Detachments, or on behalf of Detachments by another 
unit, are to be kept to a minimum.  As a guide holdings should be restricted to the 
estimated requirement for the next three months.  This requirement may be modified by 
local instructions from ARMY HQ. 
3.4.1.1.3. Demands.  Requests for ammunition are to be made to the County HQ on AF G 
8227
 County HQ are to check that the demand is in order and that the Detachment has 
an entitlement.  Issues to Detachments are to be made from County HQ stock holdings.  
Demands made by the County HQ are to be in accordance with LANDSO 4414 and The 
Defence Logistics Framework
.
 
3.4.1.1.4. Receipts.  The detachment ammunition storekeeper who receives the 
ammunition is to examine the ammunition received and confirm that the quantity agrees 
with that stated on the accompanying voucher.  Depot or factory sealed boxes are not to 
be opened to check the contents.  A copy of the AF G 8227 accompanying the ammunition 
is to be signed and endorsed as received and sent to the County HQ. 
a. 
Where the ammunition has been put in the storage location by County HQ 
stores staff in the absence of the detachment ammunition storekeeper the AF G 
8227
 
is to be left with the ammunition.  The detachment ammunition storekeeper is to 
check, at the earliest opportunity, the ammunition received against the issue voucher 
and send a receipted copy to the County HQ. 
b. 
If there is a discrepancy between the AF G 8227 and the ammunition received, 
a description of the discrepancy is to be immediately communicated to the County 
HQ followed up by a short report in writing. 
c. 
The County HQ is to account for the ammunition received in accordance with 
The Defence Logistics Framework5. 
d. 
The Detachment is to record the ammunition received on a Detachment 
Ammunition Record Card.   
3.4.1.2. Control 
3.4.1.2.1. Issues of ammunition for firing will be made either from the Detachment 
ammunition store, or collected from another unit, depending on the storage arrangements 
                                                
3 DII only 
4 DII only 
5 Available on the Cadet Forces Resource Centre 
3-15 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
agreed by Army Brigade HQ.  No ammunition is to be issued on repayment and no cash 
refund for fired cases will be given on return of the empties. 
3.4.1.2.2. Issues from Detachment Ammunition Stores.  Issues from the Detachment 
ammunition store are to be made to the Range Conducting Officer (RCO), who is to check 
carefully the quantity issued, and sign in the appropriate space on the Detachment 
Ammunition Record Card.  The stock balance is to be entered on the Detachment 
Ammunition Record Card after each issue. 
a. 
CAAs are to balance the Cadet Unit Ammunition Record Cards with their 
ammunition account during each visit by recording in the account the net transactions 
on the Detachment Ammunition Record Card since the last visit.  The CAA is to 
make a stock check entry on the Cadet Unit Ammunition Record Card. 
b. 
Detachment Ammunition Record Cards that have been filled up or where the 
stock balance has been reduced to zero are to be retained by County HQ stores staff 
to support the ammunition account.  The Detachment ammunition storekeeper is to 
sign the cards before they are taken away by the CAA. 
3.4.1.2.3. Issues from another Unit’s Store.  Where ammunition is collected from 
another unit (holding unit), the quantity issued is to be carefully checked and a receipt 
given by the RCO to the ammunition storekeeper of the holding unit. 
a. 
Where the holding unit is a cadet detachment, ammunition is to be accounted 
for on a Detachment Ammunition Record Card.  Where the holding unit is not a 
Cadet detachmentThe Defence Logistics Framework Ammunition accounting 
procedures are to be used. 
b. 
County HQ stores staff are to make an entry in their ammunition account for 
each quantity issued against the signature of the RCO.  The County HQ stores staff 
are to reconcile the ammunition records of the holding unit against their account 
during each visit to the holding unit, or at a frequency directed by Brigade HQ. 
3.4.1.2.4. Return after Firing.  After firing has ceased the RCO is to ensure that all unfired 
rounds are kept separate from the empty cases, counted and subtracted from the quantity 
issued.  The balance should agree with the empty cases collected. 
a. 
On return to the Detachment ammunition store the fired and unfired rounds are 
to be recounted, verified against the previous count taken, and entered as a receipt 
on the Detachment Ammunition Record Card.  The Officer in Charge of firing will sign 
the Detachment Ammunition Record Card to certify the expenditure and the 
storekeeper will sign for the returned ammunition.  An entry is required on the card to 
certify expenditure even when no rounds have been returned to the store.   
b. 
Fired cartridge cases are to be accounted for, by quantity, on their own 
Detachment Ammunition Record Card; there is to be a separate card for each calibre 
of fired ammunition.  Misfires and damaged rounds are to be counted as expended 
on the card for the serviceable ammunition; they are then to be recorded on their own 
Detachment Ammunition Record Card.   
c. 
It is emphasized that the signature of the person returning the unfired rounds 
and empty cases is certifying that all unfired rounds and empty cases have been 
3-16 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
returned and that no live rounds or fired cases have been retained by Cadets or 
others.   
d. 
As required by AC 71855-C: Regulations for Cadets Training with Cadet 
Weapon Systems and Pyrotechnicsan AF B 159 A is to be completed for each 
firing period.  AF B 159 A are to be serially numbered by Detachments and recorded 
on the Cadet Unit Ammunition Record Card.  Copies of each AF B 159 A are to be 
retained by the Detachment and passed on to the County HQ on request.   
e. 
County HQ stores staff are to arrange for the disposal of misfires, damaged 
rounds, fired cartridges and packaging in accordance with The Defence Logistics 
Framework
 
after reconciliation with Detachment records.   
f. 
Misfired and damaged rounds are to be stored in a separate metal box within 
the ammunition store.  Fired cartridge cases are to be stored in a secure location 
other than the ammunition store.   
3.4.1.2.5. Use in Rifle Competitions.  Detachments may take part in rifle competitions 
using ammunition supplied from Service sources.  However, the Detachment’s total 
entitlement to ammunition is not to be exceeded.   
3.4.1.3. Ammunition 
3.4.1.3.1. Supervision of detachment ammunition.  A Detachment’s ammunition store is 
to be placed under the charge of an individual who is to be responsible for the storage, 
issue, receipt and accounting of ammunition.  As a minimum this individual must have 
passed the Cadet SA Ammunition Storeman Course and have SC clearance6.  Where a 
detachment wishes to use SA ammunition but does not have an appropriately qualifies 
person on their strength the guidance below should allow them to carry on training: 
a. 
A qualified individual on the strength of another detachment, the area or the 
county may be in charge of the detachments ammunition account as long as they are 
willing and able to commit to the extra time to carry out the required checks and be 
present when ammunition is issued or returned. 
b. 
If there is no qualified individual able to take charge of a detachments 
ammunition account then no ammunition may be stored in that location.  Ammunition 
may still be transported to that location to be used and then returned to the store it 
was issued from as long as the guidance in LFSO 2901 is followed. 
3.4.1.3.2. CQM Staff.  Personnel responsible for storage, issue, receipt and accounting of 
ammunition other than SAA whether in unit lines, on exercise or camp must have 
completed and passed the Unit Ammunition Storeman course delivered by the Defence 
School of Ammunition at Kineton.  County HQ stores staff responsible for ammunition 
must also have completed and passed the relevant safety and transport courses for 
hazardous products.   
                                                
6 Officers will already be SC cleared.  As a default AIs will only be BPSS cleared but must have full SC 
clearance before being placed in charge of arms or ammunition. 
3-17 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.4.1.3.3. Security.  All Detachments are to comply with the security regulations for 
ammunition in LFSO 2901.  This LANDSO is based on and amplifies the regulations in 
JSP 440 – The Defence Manual of Security78.   
3.4.1.3.4. Ammunition Storage Regulations.  All Detachments are to comply with the 
ammunition storage regulation in LFSO 2901. 
3.4.1.4. Packing Materials 
3.4.1.4.1. Cartons, packing cases, wrappers and the like will be reported by ACF Counties 
to SS3 who will arrange for disposal instructions to be issued.  Packing cases will not be 
used for any purposes other than that for which they are supplied. 
3.4.1.5. Salvage 
3.4.1.5.1. All types of fired cases, ammunition components and packages will be returned 
to SS3 who will dispose of them in accordance with instructions, but where convenient 
fired cases may be returned to Regular Army or Army Reserve units. 
                                                
7 DII only 
8 DII only 
3-18 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 3.5  Messing 
3.5.1.1. Introduction 
3.5.1.1.1. Policy and guidance on all Cadet Messing are contained in JSP 456, Volume 2, 
Chapter 14, Cadet Forces
which should be studied before planning any Cadet Camp. 
3.5.1.1.2.  A brief guide follows to assist in messing procedures for cadet camps. 
3.5.2 A guide to messing procedures with particular reference to annual 
camp 
3.5.2.1. Aim 
3.5.2.1.1. To assist ACF counties with their catering arrangements for Annual Camp and 
other training. 
3.5.2.2. General 
3.5.2.2.1. References throughout this section are to Brigade HQ and, within Brigade HQ, 
to the following staff branches: 
a. 
Log Sp Svcs Food Svcs Branch, Brigade HQ which is the advisory branch 
responsible for contracts, tenders, supply, interpretation of regulations, etc. 
b. 
Log Sp Svcs Food Svcs, RC HQ Cadets Branch which is the advisory branch 
on all messing matters. 
3.5.2.3. Entitlement to Rations or Cash 
3.5.2.3.1. It is necessary first to establish the entitlement to rations or money in 
accordance with JSP 456, Volume 2, Chapter 14, Cadet Forces. 
3.5.2.4. Types of Catering 
3.5.2.4.1. The type of catering support must be established: 
a. 
Contract.  Most permanent training camps have a full catering contract in 
operation or available for activation.  Arrangements should be confirmed with the 
Camp Cadet Commandant, DIO help desk or Brigade HQ Log Sp Svcs Food Svcs. 
b. 
Self-Help.  In this case, the numbers attending Camp must be accurately 
established so as to ensure that sufficient staff of the proper standard can be made 
available.  Guidance can be obtained from Log Sp Svcs Food Svcs. 
3.5.2.5. Camp Reconnaissance 
3.5.2.5.1. Permanent contractors manage the majority of UK DIO camps and instructions 
are obtainable from the DIO help desk.  The notes below do not apply. 
3-19 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.5.2.5.2. Where the camp is not run by an DIO contractor you should check the following 
points: 
a. 
Kitchen. 
(1)  Note available static equipment, hot plates, grills, deep fryers, etc. 
(2)  Note whether heating is electric or gas, and also sources of supply or 
replenishment. 
(3)  Note capacity of fryers and quantity of fat/oil required. 
(4)  Note plate-washing facilities. 
b. 
Dining Rooms.  Note seating capacity, size of hot plate, split levels, kitchen to 
dining room.  Consider means of dispersing queues.  (500 for one service is not 
satisfactory.  Cold buffet, curry bar, beverage service, sweet containers, etc all help 
with dispersal). 
c. 
Ration Store/Butcher Shop.  Confirm sufficient racking, storage 
bins/containers, etc and that there is ample cool/cold storage. 
d. 
Messes.  Establish the number of messes to be used. 
e. 
Locally Employed Civilians.  If possible ensure that there will be a sufficient 
number of cooks and other catering staff to meet known commitments and to allow 
for reasonable hours of duty and free-time. 
f. 
Stores and Cleaning Aids.  Confirm who supplies/demands all cleaning 
materials, towels, rags, etc.  Any requirement for pesticides, first aid box and 
contents. 
g. 
Laundry.  Check with camp staff that they have a central pool for chef’s whites.  
If not, ensure that sufficient cooks whites are taken to camp to maintain personal 
standards of hygiene (enough for a daily change) and protection and conform to the 
programme for laundry. 
h. 
Canteen.  Consider any canteen requirements.  Confirm existing camp facilities 
and that the service is adequate and flexible.  If no canteen services are provided, it 
will be necessary to note building facility, equipment and annotate staff to cover such 
commitments.  Shopping lists for goods etc should be forwarded to the appropriate 
agency as early as possible. 
i. 
Maintenance, including Emergencies.  Liaise with camp staff for all the 
relevant information about support for breakdown in equipment or services, and 
establish the reliability of the support.  There is normally a need for a 24 hour service, 
7 days a week. 
3.5.2.5.3. Log Sp Svcs.  Liaise with Log Sp Svcs of the host Brigade HQ.  Confirm the 
availability of GCWO/BCWO cover for visits to camp, particularly during the settling-in 
period.  Log Sp Svcs will provide general and helpful advice based on local knowledge.  
Menu planning can be discussed prior to camp. 
3-20 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.5.2.5.4. Other Units.  Check the camp programme to see if a unit is still in camp when 
you arrive (rear party) and if a unit will arrive in your location before you depart (advance 
party).  Accordingly, liaise with unit(s) in question and confirm messing requirements and 
agree on ration accounting responsibilities.  Also attempt to establish any additional 
feeding commitments, ie camp staff, CTT and units who may share your camp facilities. 
3.5.2.5.5. Supplies.  Camps with full catering support will normally have MOD Contractor 
supplied food in which case the contractor will require an indication of feeding strengths for 
the period.  Camps that require rations to be organised by the unit will receive food from 
either the MOD Food Supply Contract or purchased locally from retail sources having been 
granted “Cash in Lieu of Rations” (CILOR).  Consultation with Log Sp Svcs Food Svcs at 
Brigade HQ and the Army Liaison Team (ALT) is strongly advised to enable the best 
method of food supply to be established.  Further advice on the methods of obtaining food 
through the Food Supply Contract will be given at this stage. 
3.5.2.5.6. Army Liaison Teams (ALT).  ALT are situated at the contractor’s main depots 
and form a valuable link between the Armed Forces Food Supply Contract and receiving 
units.  ALT can provide valuable advice and assistance regarding any aspects of service 
supplied food to Cadet Camps.  A contact phone number and address can be obtained 
from Log Sp Svcs Food Svcs at Brigade HQ. 
3.5.2.5.7. Waste Disposal.  Camp Standing Orders should confirm the service of swill and 
refuse collection.  Unit representatives are advised to read the contract and confirm the 
responsibility for the provision of containers and their cleaning.  Ensure that adequate 
containers exist for all messes and are particularly available during the period of handover/ 
takeover. 
3.5.2.5.8. Water Supply.  Check the existence of a high pressure water point and location 
for filling bowsers, cans, etc. 
3.5.2.5.9. Contracts.  If contract catering is to be adopted, it is essential that a pre-Camp 
meeting takes place with the contractor; ideally this should be an on-site meeting during 
the recce.  Any advice on the content of the tenders should be sought from Log Sp Svcs.  
The following points should be discussed with the contractor and recorded: 
a. 
Numbers to be fed. 
b. 
Establish the lines of communication between the unit and the contractor. 
c. 
Dates and times of first meals and last meals. 
d. 
Any special commitments, including the requirement for packed meals. 
e. 
Examine the availability and state of equipment to ensure that it has the 
capability to cope with the anticipated requirement. 
f. 
The level of extra messing is agreed and the contractor confirms by item, what 
they are to produce for the money. 
g. 
That both the unit and contractor are clear what the contractor’s responsibilities 
are. 
h. 
The accommodation for the contractor’s staff is adequate. 
3-21 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
i. 
The contractor is clear regarding the standard required. 
3-22 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 3.6  Medical 
3.6.1.1. First aid support for ACFs 
3.6.1.1.1. The Care Quality Commission (Registration) Regulations 2009 and the Health 
and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2010 require all organisations 
providing Medical and Nursing Care to register as a Healthcare Provider and to meet all of 
the requirements of the associated legislation.  Failure to comply with the legislation can 
result in severe financial penalties for an organisation and in some cases criminal 
prosecutions. 
3.6.1.1.2. The implication for the Cadet Forces of this legislation is that while they may 
have professionally qualified nurses as part of their organisation, or may have nurses 
employed by an agency in attendance at their activities, these professionally qualified 
personnel are severely limited in what they can actually do. 
3.6.1.1.3. When engaged on Cadet Force activities, nurses, no matter how skilled or 
experienced, can only provide First Aid or emergency aid until the arrival of an NHS 
ambulance in accordance with guidance given by Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC).  
Provision of anything above this is classed as Regulated Activity and should not be 
provided. 
3.6.1.1.4. Examples of Regulated Activity that cannot be provided by nurses while they are 
engaged in Cadet activities are: 
a. 
Provision of sick parades/medicine parades.  Provisions are to be made for 
Cadets that are unwell to be seen as temporary patients in local NHS primary care 
facilities.  Cadets requiring regular medication that has been brought from home are 
to receive this from the CFAVs named on the Activity Consent Form completed 
prior to the activity. 
b. 
Provision of bedding down facility.  If a Cadet is too unwell to participate in 
activities and requires bedding down, then the Cadet’s own unit is to arrange to have 
that Cadet returned home.  Any escort is to be provided by an Officer/CFAV from the 
Cadet’s own unit. 
c. 
Dispensing of medicines within Cadet medical modules.  These modules 
are not to be used.  Any modules held by Cadet Force units are to be back loaded 
and replaced with enhanced First Aid kits.  Nurses, even those nurses who have 
undertaken Patient Group Direction (PGD) Training in their normal employment, are 
not permitted to dispense medication while involved in Cadet Activities. 
d. 
Provision of anything other than immediate First Aid or emergency care.  
Nurses engaged in Cadet activities are not permitted to provide anything more than 
immediate First Aid or emergency care.  If any further treatment is required, this must 
be provided by local NHS facilities.  In the case of emergencies, transportation to the 
emergency facility must be via the local NHS ambulance service. 
3.6.1.1.5. The prime duty of care for a Cadet remains with the Cadet Force unit and if a 
Cadet requires emergency care an adult representative of their Cadet Force unit is to 
accompany them to the local Emergency Department.  Should hospital admission be 
3-23 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
required, an adult representative of their Cadet Force unit is to visit the Cadet regularly.  
The Cadet County HQ will also remain responsible for the management of the Cadet. 
3.6.1.1.6. Pastoral care is not a First Aid issue and remains the responsibility of the Cadet 
Force unit, not of the agency nurse that has been employed to provide First Aid. 
3.6.1.1.7. Any agency nurses that are employed are only to assist the Cadet Force unit’s 
own Officers or CFAVs in the provision of First Aid to injured Cadets. 
3.6.1.2. Medical Risk Assessments 
3.6.1.2.1. When preparing for Annual Camp and or adventure training it is incumbent on 
the organisers to undertake a suitable and sufficient Risk Assessment.  The Risk 
Assessment should consider all Cadets taking part in the proposed activities.  It is 
especially important to look at the medical aspects and undertake specific Risk 
Assessments for individuals who may have disabilities or medical problems which may 
expose them to greater potential for harm or injury.  The following checklist (which is not 
exhaustive) may be used as a guide to assessing the suitability of Cadets for training (see 
also AC72008 Cadet Training Safety Precautions). 
3.6.1.2.2. Assess the activities to be undertaken (hazards) which should take account of; 
a. 
The training environment, including specific activities. 
b. 
The distance involved in conducting strenuous activity. 
c. 
The length of time away from home base. 
d. 
The season and climate variability.  The meteorological conditions (i.e.  
Temperature, wind, precipitation and forecast). 
e. 
The potential effects on the individual and team. 
3.6.1.2.3. Assess the general health of the individual with appropriate advice from the 
medical officer and parent or guardian. 
3.6.1.2.4. Evaluate the risks and decide whether existing precautions are adequate or 
more should be done, paying reference to: 
a. 
The emergency procedures/nearest hospital/transport. 
b. 
Means of emergency communication/local rescue services’ contacts.  (If mobile 
telephones are to be used, area of coverage should be established). 
c. 
Whether more than one adult instructor is available so that adequate 
supervision of the remaining Cadets can be maintained in the event of an 
emergency. 
d. 
Other factors to mitigate the risks. 
3.6.1.2.5. Risk Assessment findings are to be recorded.  Assessments involving 
individuals (including medical information) is to be handled sensitively and in accordance 
with medical in confidence criteria. 
3-24 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.6.1.2.6. Assessments should be reviewed and revised when necessary (ie following 
significant changes). 
3.6.1.3. Medical Equipment 
3.6.1.3.1. In order that a supply of medical equipment may be available in case of 
emergency, an emergency first aid pack for general purposes is authorised for issued 
through the stationery budget and catalogue via the County CQM.  These first aid kits are 
for firm base locations within the building where the cadet may parade and train.   
3.6.1.3.2. A standard First Aid Kit is to be provided at all detachments.  County RFCA staff 
are to ensure that periodic checks are carried out to confirm they are in date. 
 
 
3-25 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
3-26 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 3.7  Transport and travel 
3.7.1.1. General 
3.7.1.1.1. JSP 800 is the authority on all information relating to travel and transport within 
the MOD. 
3.7.1.1.2. Travel by Members of the ACF 
a. 
As a general principle all journeys in the UK will be completed by the cheapest 
method except when this would contravene the rules of Duty of Care or entail serious 
delay or other marked inconvenience. 
b. 
Bookings for commercial air, rail and sea travel are to be made using the DT 
Electronic Booking Interface System (EBIS) and the associated Travel Service 
Provider (TSP), currently Hogg Robinson Group (HRG).  Bookings are to be made by 
Admin Officers, on behalf of CFAVs, using the online tool. 
c. 
Journeys by members of the ACF located in Northern Ireland, the Isle of Man, 
the Shetland and Orkney Islands and the Outer Hebrides, are the subject of special 
arrangements.  When required, details of these should be obtained from the 
transport/ movement office at the appropriate Brigade HQ. 
3.7.1.1.3. Travel costs for members of the ACF may be paid: 
a. 
Direct from public funds. 
b. 
From public funds out of grants allotted to RFCA referred to as the “ACF 
Operational Grant”. 
c. 
From non-public funds where appropriate. 
3.7.1.1.4. Cadet Commandants are entitled to authorise CFAVs and cadets to travel using 
public funds for any of the MOD indemnified cadet activities carried out within the UK.  The 
costs to participate in these recognised activities must be met from within the allocated 
budget detailed in the Cadet Resource Calculator. 
3.7.1.1.5. Although it is not guaranteed, CFAVs and cadets may be authorised to travel 
using public funds outside of the UK when taking part in an activity approved by RC HQ 
Cadets Branch.  During the approval process RC HQ Cadets Branch will confirm whether 
there is an entitlement to travel using public funds.  Units bidding for permission to use 
White Fleet or hired transport must state the predicted cost (i.e.  White Fleet fuel cost, or 
coach hire and certify that they can resource this from within the allocated budget detailed 
in the Cadet Resource Calculator). 
3.7.1.1.6. Travel to the National Inter Services Cadet Rifle Meeting is paid from a special 
grant or from non-public funds, but a contribution from RC HQ Cadets Branch may be 
provided.  Travel to ACFA sponsored sports events may be met by a grant from ACFA 
arranged on a central or regional basis. 
3-27 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.7.1.2. Conveyance of Stores 
3.7.1.2.1. The cost of conveyance of stores for the following purposes will be met from 
public funds: 
a. 
Equipment, stores and rations to and from Annual Camp. 
b. 
Initial and replacement issues of clothing, stores and equipment from RLC or 
other MOD sources to County HQs. 
c. 
Return of stores from County HQs to RLC and other depots. 
3.7.1.2.2. The cost of conveyance of stores for other purposes will be paid for from the 
ACF Operational Grant.  Military transport should be utilised, if available. 
3.7.1.3. Discipline and Safety 
3.7.1.3.1. Supervision of parties of Cadets in transit is the responsibility of the CFAV 
nominated to be in charge.  Parties travelling by rail or in public or hired road transport are 
to be accompanied by an appropriate number of CFAV. 
3.7.1.3.2. Rules for the maintenance of discipline and safety when travelling by road are 
given in AC72008 Cadet Training Safety Precautions. 
3.7.1.4. Vehicle Insurance 
3.7.1.4.1. MOD Vehicles.  JSP 800Volume 5, Part 1, Chapter 2 is the definitive guidance 
for claims and insurance issues relating to the use of MOD vehicles.  MOD vehicle 
insurance cover includes all MOD vehicles including vehicles issued to the ACF by RFCA.  
It covers only the MODs legal liability to pay compensation to third parties.  ACF occupants 
of the vehicle who may be injured are in the same position regarding compensation as 
they would be if injured in the course of any other ACF activity.  MOD insurance cover 
does not apply: 
a. 
If an MOD vehicle is used for private purposes or purposes not associated with 
the ACF activity.  It is incumbent on CO’s or line managers to ensure the MOD 
vehicles are only driven on authorised journeys. 
b. 
Where drivers are not authorised by the Cadet Commandant to use a motor 
vehicle or do not hold a full DVLA licence valid for the category of vehicle being 
driven. 
c. 
In the event of carriage of passengers who are not travelling in the performance 
of an official ACF activity.  The carriage of unauthorised passengers in MOD vehicles 
is absolutely forbidden. 
d. 
Where drivers are injured through their own negligence they are not entitled to 
common law compensation from the MOD. 
e. 
Where an MOD employee claims against third parties it is the individual’s own 
responsibility to pursue a claim for compensation if they suffer injury or damage to 
property caused by acts of negligence by a third party. 
3-28 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
f. 
MOD will not compensate for personal possessions or ACF owned equipment 
lost or stolen from an MOD vehicle or damaged as the result of a vehicle accident. 
3.7.1.4.2. Hired Vehicles.  When hiring self-drive vehicles for ACF activities, ACF 
Counties are to ensure that adequate third party vehicle insurance cover is included in the 
terms of hire.  ACF occupants of hired vehicles being used in support of authorised Cadet 
Activities are in the same position with regard to compensation for injury as they would be 
in an MOD owned vehicle. 
3.7.1.4.3. Vehicles Owned Privately by the ACF.  It is the responsibility of the ACF 
County to insure any vehicle owned privately by the ACF.  Such vehicles are not covered 
by the MOD vehicle insurance policy.  The ACFA has arranged for the provision of 
comprehensive insurance cover for ACF owned multi-seat vehicles at competitive rates by 
Heath Lambert Insurance Services Ltd, 60 St Faiths Lane, Norwich, NR1 1JT (Tel: 01603 
626197).  ACF Counties considering using this facility should apply direct to Heath 
Lambert Insurance Services Ltd for a quote. 
3.7.1.4.4. Private Vehicles Used for ACF Activities.  Vehicles owned personally by 
individual members of the ACF and used for ACF activities or to transport other members 
of the ACF are not covered by any form of MOD or ACF insurance, and nor are the 
occupants.  It is the responsibility of the owner of the vehicle to ensure that the vehicle, 
driver and all passengers are adequately covered by insurance.  Members of the ACF 
should be made aware by their unit that some insurance companies consider journeys 
made on ACF activities to be of a business nature and are not covered therefore by an 
insurance policy taken out for domestic and pleasure purposes.  ACF members should 
check with their insurance company before using their vehicle for ACF activities or for 
transporting other members of the ACF to and from ACF activities. 
 
 
3-29 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
3-30 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.7.2 Vehicles for ACF use 
3.7.2.1. Vehicles Purchased from RFCA ACF Vehicle Grant 
3.7.2.1.1. RFCA may purchase vehicles for use by the ACF on authorised cadet activities.  
The vehicles may be obtained from local sources at the most competitive price available.  
When considering requests to purchase an additional vehicle or to replace an existing one, 
an RFCA should take into account the requirements for the vehicle, current funds 
available, and its ability to run the vehicle from within the annual ACF Operational Grant. 
3.7.2.1.2. When an ACF vehicle is no longer considered economical to run, the RFCA may 
sell the vehicle on the open market and credit the proceeds towards the cost of the 
replacement vehicle. 
3.7.2.1.3. Details of all disposals are to be fully recorded showing: 
a. 
Disposal price (including part exchange value). 
b. 
Cost of new vehicle. 
c. 
Details of old and new vehicles. 
3.7.2.2. Insurance of Vehicles 
3.7.2.2.1. MoD Spot Hire and Project Phoenix Vehicles.  A motor insurance policy to 
cover these vehicles, as commercial vehicles, in respect of third party liability including 
theft has been arranged in the same way as service vehicles.  Subject to certain provisos, 
authorised passengers and drivers are included in the cover and this extends to both 
personal injury and damage to property.  The policy excludes loss of, or damage to, the 
vehicle itself, and this risk is borne by the MOD. 
3.7.2.2.2. RFCA Vehicles.  The RFCA are to ensure that their vehicles are included in a 
policy and are to pay the necessary premium from the annual ACF Operational Grant.  
They are to ensure that if any accident or occurrence arises from the use of the vehicle 
whereby it seems likely that a third party claim of any sort may be made, notice in writing is 
given to the company immediately that there is no admission of liability or any other 
concession which could prejudice the company’s action, and that any third party claim 
received is immediately sent to the company.   
3.7.2.3. Vehicles Obtained from Non-public Funds 
3.7.2.3.1. The maintenance and running expenses of a vehicle owned by an ACF County 
may be paid from the ACF Operational Grant on the following conditions: 
a. 
Brigade has recognised the vehicle.  Recognition will only be granted if it can be 
demonstrated that the vehicle in question is necessary for the efficient operation of 
the ACF County in question. 
b. 
The vehicle is used solely for authorised Cadet training, activities and 
administration on the same basis as a General Reserve Vehicle. 
c. 
The vehicle is covered by a current MOT certificate of roadworthiness. 
3-31 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.7.2.3.2. The maintenance and running costs of all other vehicles privately purchased by, 
or donated to, an ACF County HQ, Area HQ or an individual Detachment must be met 
from non-public funds, as must the cost of insurance. 
3.7.2.3.3. Payments in respect of claims for the Additional Allowance are made at the 
discretion of Brigade HQ and may vary from the claims. 
3.7.2.3.4. Additional Allowances are not payable for journeys carried out in privately owned 
cars or vans and are limited to vehicles: 
a. 
Which are licensed, taxed and insured in the name of the Detachment/School/ 
LEA. 
b. 
The insurance policies of which cover legal liability to third parties in respect of 
personal injury and damage to property and under which both the owners and the 
drivers of the vehicle are indemnified. 
c. 
The insurance policies of which cover legal liability to the full number of 
passengers conveyed. 
d. 
In respect of which, if the insurance policy does not cover use for hire or reward, 
written confirmation has been obtained from the insurers that the payment of the 
allowance will not invalidate the policy. 
3.7.2.3.5. ACF Counties are required to produce written confirmation and the relevant 
insurance policy and premium receipts either before payment of a claim is approved or 
subsequently.  A copy of the written confirmation is to be attached to the first claim in 
respect of such a vehicle. 
3.7.2.3.6. The receipt of a cash refund in the circumstances described above does not 
involve use of the vehicle for hire or reward within the meaning of that term in the licensing 
provisions of Part III and Part IV of the Road Traffic Act 1960, and does not, therefore, 
make the obtaining of a PSV or Carriers ʻBʼ licence necessary.  However, unless the 
insurance policy already covers use for hire or reward, insurers might contend that the 
vehicle is used for reward (resulting from the ability to claim the allowance), thus 
invalidating the policy.  Consultation with insurance companies is, therefore, essential. 
3.7.2.3.7. Where a school owns/operates a vehicle for the purpose of fulfilling elements of 
the school curriculum, it may be advisable, where appropriate, to include Cadet Activities 
in the application for exemption.  Where, however, a Detachment though essentially 
school- oriented is, nevertheless, open to persons not attending the school for educational 
purposes, then a separate certificate should be obtained. 
3.7.2.4. Issue of Fuels, Lubricants and Associated Products 
3.7.2.4.1. Fuel for operation of vehicles purchased from the RFCA ACF vehicle grant and 
officially recognised vehicles, for use outside the Annual Camp period, may be provided 
free from Army sources provided that the vehicle is using the FMT 1001 - Vehicle 
Utilisation Record
.
 
3.7.2.4.2. Provision is to be limited to issue from military POL points that are situated 
within a reasonable distance of the location of the vehicle or by use of officially issued 
Agency Cards. 
3-32 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.7.2.5. Tachographs 
3.7.2.5.1. Under Regulations EC 3820/85 and 3821/85, tachographs are required to be 
fitted to all vehicles less those which are used by the Armed Forces, where: 
a. 
In the UK the seating capacity, including the driver, exceeds 18. 
b. 
In EC countries the seating capacity, including the driver, exceeds 9. 
3.7.2.5.2. Tachographs which need to be fitted to ACF owned vehicles must be bought 
and fitted at private expense. 
 
 
3-33 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
3-34 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.7.3 Travel by road 
3.7.3.1. General 
3.7.3.1.1. All road movement by the ACF is subject to the provisions of JSP 800.  Only 
those parts of the Regulations to which ACF units will need to make frequent reference are 
outlined in the following paragraphs. 
3.7.3.1.2. The activity which carries most risk of death or injury to ACF personnel is 
driving.  It is essential - and legally necessary - that there is a clear policy for the 
authorisation of personnel to drive covering experience, competence and safety record.  
This policy is contained in JSP 800. 
3.7.3.2. Authorisation Criteria 
3.7.3.2.1. Authority to drive military and/or RFCA/ACF vehicles will be granted by the 
Cadet Commandant only to personnel who fulfil the criteria laid down in JSP 800. 
3.7.3.3. Passenger Safety 
3.7.3.3.1. Service pattern vehicles should be so marked as to make clear they are carrying 
Cadets.  Escorts are to be provided to supervise Cadets while travelling in TCV.  Escorts 
are to be seated in the rear of the vehicle with the Cadets.  A Risk Assessment is to be 
carried out prior to use to consider the use of escorts in any PCV.  Escorts are to: 
a. 
Ensure that Cadets embark and disembark in a controlled manner; that they 
remain seated for the duration of the journey and that they do not distract the driver 
or other road users. 
b. 
Ensure that, where seat belts are provided, these are worn at all times, and that 
baggage is securely stowed. 
c. 
Control Cadets when they leave the vehicle both during planned and unplanned 
halts. 
3.7.3.4. Vehicle Documentation and Administrative Procedures 
3.7.3.4.1. All of the procedures in JSP 800 must be followed. 
3.7.3.5. Public Service Vehicles (PSV) 
3.7.3.5.1. General.  The operation of PSV is governed by the Public Passenger Vehicles 
Act 1981, Section 1.  In outline: 
a. 
A PSV is defined as a motor vehicle other than a tramcar which is used to carry 
passengers as part of a commercial activity or for hire or reward either by collecting 
individual fares or using a collective charge.  There are 2 categories: 
(1)  Small Buses.  Vehicles adapted to carry between 8 and 16 passengers 
(eg minibuses). 
3-35 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
(2)  Large Buses.  Vehicles adapted to carry 17 or more passengers.  ACF 
Counties are to register and operate small buses only. 
b. 
Cadets Use of Section 19 Permits.  MOD vehicles, including hire when paid 
for by MOD funds, are not to be operated on Section 19 permits. 
3.7.3.6. Large Goods Vehicles (LGV) 
3.7.3.6.1. A large goods vehicle (LGV) is defined as any goods vehicle, inclusive of trailer 
if towed, the maximum permitted weight of which exceeds 3.5 tonnes, and any articulated 
vehicle of any weight.  The minimum age for driving a LGV is 21 years. 
3.7.3.6.2. Restrictions: 
a. 
County Commandants are responsible for ensuring that all such vehicles are 
driven only by qualified drivers holding a vocational LGV licence. 
b. 
ACF CFAVs may be trained and tested to qualify for LGV licences under 
Service arrangements, provided that they have a valid licence for Category B and a 
valid provisional LGV licence.  The cost of LGV licences may be born at public 
expense. 
3.7.3.7. Seat Belts 
3.7.3.7.1. All members of the ACF are required to wear seat belts, where fitted, when 
travelling in vehicles. 
3.7.3.8. Seating Capacities 
3.7.3.8.1. The maximum seating capacities of vehicles are not to be exceeded. 
3.7.3.8.2. When equipment or baggage is carried or when personnel are in marching 
order, proportionate reductions will be made.  If, for example, half the body is taken up with 
light baggage/equipment, only half the permitted number of passengers may be carried.  If 
the baggage/equipment is heavy for its bulk then the permissible weight, allowing 180 lb 
for each person, is not to be exceeded. 
3.7.3.8.3. Passengers are not to be carried in trailers. 
3.7.3.9. Speed Limits 
3.7.3.9.1. The drivers of all types of vehicles being driven on ACF duties are required to 
comply with the speed limits imposed by the civil law.  Although the driver remains 
responsible, under the law, for their actions, the member of the ACF most senior in rank 
travelling in the vehicle is to ensure that the driver remains within the law. 
3.7.3.9.2. For certain vehicles, because of their construction and design, lower speed limits 
are imposed by the Services on technical grounds.  Where lower limits are imposed they 
will be shown in the Service-produced user handbooks. 
3-36 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.7.4 Travel by air, rail and sea 
3.7.4.1. Entitlement to travel 
3.7.4.1.1. Entitlement.  Entitlement for members of the ACF to travel as passengers by 
air, rail and sea is detailed in JSP 800Vol 2.  Passenger Travel Instructions. 
3.7.4.1.2. Class of Travel.  Members of the ACF are to travel by rail and sea within the UK 
in standard class. 
3.7.4.2. Booking Procedures 
3.7.4.2.1. Bookings for commercial air, rail and sea travel are to be made using the DT 
Electronic Booking Interface System (EBIS) and the associated Travel Service Provider (TSP), 
currently Hogg Robinson Group (HRG).  Bookings are to be made by Admin Officers, on 
behalf of CFAVs, using the online tool. 
3.7.4.2.2. Alternatively contact details for the TSP are as follows: 
a. 
0844 848 4422 (for callers from overseas: 0116 263 3450). 
b. 
24 hr emergency: 01483 793 355. 
3.7.4.2.3. Responsibilities.  Before submitting any application for a passage, the 
applicant or traveller is to be satisfied that: 
a. 
The journey is being undertaken for valid reasons and by the most economical 
means available. 
b. 
The necessary approval has been obtained, including financial approval for 
temporary duty visits and / or travel by commercial means where applicable. 
c. 
Authority has been obtained for excess baggage where required (in accordance 
with Chapter 6 of JSP 800, Vol 2). 
d. 
Action has been or will be taken to recover any costs due to be paid by the 
passenger(s), or the organisation responsible for the passenger(s). 
3.7.4.2.4. Responsibility for checking the propriety of bookings rests with budget 
managers/holders and sponsors/authorisers and not with the MOD booking agencies.  
Budget holders must satisfy themselves that air travel is properly. 
3.7.4.3. Travel to and from Annual Camp 
3.7.4.3.1. Brigade HQ (Log Sp) Transport and Movement branch is responsible for 
arranging rail movement as follows: 
a. 
Movement of ACF counties in formed bodies to and from camp by the Brigade 
HQ (Log Sp) Transport and Movements branch in which the County HQ is located. 
b. 
Movements from camp of ACF County’s dispersing to separate destinations by 
the Brigade HQ (Log Sp) Transport and Movements branch in which the camp is 
located.  Movement by individuals is arranged by the ACF County HQ. 
3-37 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 312  
3.7.4.3.2. In arranging ACF travel to and from Annual Camp, the Brigade HQ is to consider 
whether travel by rail or road would be the less expensive and less inconvenient method 
and plan accordingly.  Journeys by members of the ACF located in Northern Ireland, the 
Isle of Man, the Shetland Islands, Orkney Islands and the Outer Hebrides are the subject 
of special arrangements. 
3.7.4.3.3. A Cadet travelling independently, may travel at public funds expense from the 
normal place of parade of their Detachment to Annual Camp and back to their normal 
place of parade, except as in Para 3.7.4.3.4. 
3.7.4.3.4. If a Cadet is a member of a Category (R) Detachment at a boarding school, the 
cost of their travel from camp to home, but not to any other place, may be borne by public 
funds when their home is in the UK or the Irish Republic.  If their home is outside the UK or 
the Irish Republic, travel at public expense will be permitted only for movement within the 
UK and the Republic of Ireland. 
3.7.4.3.5. The cost of private car transportation between Great Britain, Northern Ireland 
and islands off the coast of Britain will not be chargeable to public funds. 
3.7.4.4. Provision of Packed Meals/Refreshments 
3.7.4.4.1. Packed meals and refreshments on air, rail and sea journeys are not provided 
from public funds.  If required they should be arranged with catering services of the train 
operating company.  They may be paid for from non-public funds and the retail messing 
rate may be claimed. 
3.7.4.5. Use of Sleepers 
3.7.4.5.1. Provided that the use of a sleeper train is the most economical method of travel, 
taking into account the nightly rate of subsistence allowance, an ACF Officer or AI may 
use a sleeper on a rail journey.  The cheapest berth available appropriate to the entitled 
class of travel must be used. 
3-38 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Part 3.8  Finances 
3.8.1 The Cadet Resource Allocation Calculator 
3.8.1.1.1. The Cadet Resource Allocation Calculator directs the level of resources that 
are allowable for each brigade, ACF County. 
3.8.1.1.2. These calculations are based on ensuring that cadet units receive the correct 
resources to train their cadets.  Therefore units will receive different allocations depending 
on the average strength of the unit throughout the year; the star grades of the cadets are 
also taken into account as different resources are required for each level of the syllabus. 
3.8.1.1.3. The resources that are allocated using the Calculator are: 
a. 
Volunteer Allowance (VA). 
b. 
Ammunition. 
c. 
Operational Ration Packs (ORP). 
d. 
Transport funding. 
e. 
Travel allowances. 
 
 
3-39 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
3-40 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 315  
3.8.2 Annual grants 
3.8.2.1. General 
3.8.2.1.1. Each county will receive a grant from the Cadet Resource Allocation Calculator 
(CRAC) based on the amount of active personnel they have.  This is called the ACF 
Operational Grant. 
3.8.2.1.2. Hard and soft infrastructure changes other than those a3.8.2.2.1 below are 
met from other RFCA funding sources. 
3.8.2.2. The ACF Operational Grant 
3.8.2.2.1. The ACF Operational Grant can be used to fund the items in the table below 
(within the funds available): 
Symphony Level 5 Code 
Item 
Cons General Administration 
Postage, Stationary, Printing and office consumables 
Cons Office Equipment 
Maintenance and hire 
Cons Telephone 
Land and mobile 
Provision of Broadband at CTCs, support to pre-existing IT suites 
Cons IT 
and specialist help to fix IT issues if necessary. County IT 
equipment (non PH2) consumables 
Televisions, DVD players, overhead projectors, toilet rolls, cutlery, 
kitchen utensils and equipment, cleaning materials, hot/cold boxes 
and burco boilers.   Maintenance of accommodation stores - various 
Cons CTC Expenses 
small items including:  lock repairs, key cutting, touch up paint and 
the use of a glazier.   The provision of bedding, mattresses and 
sleeping bags 
Uniform tailoring. Provision of uniform accoutrements not provided 
Cons Uniform 
through the G4 system such as officers' caps. Badges (such as Lord 
Lieutenants badges) – Chevrons 
Cons Laundry 
Laundry costs (bedding, uniforms, sleeping bags, liners) 
Expenses of unit training (excluding the cost of travelling) such as 
the provision of Projectors and First Aid training equipment not 
available through the system. Payment of entry fees (Sport and 
Activity/Competition). Payment of activity related affiliation fees 
Cons Fees & Training 
(such as NGB registration). County competitions medals, trophies 
and engraving. Maintenance, inspection and repair of shotguns, 
traps and air rifles. Shotgun and air rifle consumables. Maintenance, 
inspection, repair and insurance (public liability) costs for mobile 
climbing tower and inflatable obstacle course. 
Payment to civilians for expenses incurred with the training and 
administration of adults and cadets (to include the provision of AT 
instructors where necessary). Buffet refreshments for 
Cons Subsistence 
parents/visitors days/open evenings/LL presentations. Payments to 
ACF PSS for travel and subsistence related to attendance at 
courses, conferences etc 
Performing rights fees, provision of sheet music, repairs and 
Cons ACF Band 
maintenance to instruments. Repairs and tailoring of band uniforms 
 
Replacement, maintenance and repairs to AT equipment holdings 
(to include mountain bikes, paint ball and archery provision). 
Cons AT Equipment 
Purchase of minor items of equipment 
 
 
3-41 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
Symphony Level 5 Code 
Item 
The establishment of Officers' and Sergeants' Messes. 
Supply of cleaning materials and toilet rolls not supplied by DIO. 
Sun block/cream and after sun. 
Cons Annual Camp 
Dongle access to the internet where no provision has been made by 
DIO. 
Office equipment hire and support. 
 
Occasional skip hire (in excess of waste disposal for written off 
items). 
Cons Non DIO DAS 
Non DIO supplied cleaning equipment and consumables. 
Furniture and accommodation stores (until provision through DAS is 
secured) 
MOT, Repairs, Servicing etc. There should be no insurance or road 
Trv Vehicle Fleet Maintenance 
tax costs or costs related to ACF Non-Public vehicles 
Trv Fees 
Miscellaneous payments such as toll bridge fees etc 
Trv Additional Coach Hire 
This should be minimised where possible 
Trv Fuel 
Fuel for the ACF vehicle fleet 
Trv Breakdown Cover 
Only where provision already exists 
Trv Trailer Costs 
All trailer maintenance/repair costs etc 
3-42 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.8.3 Non-public funds 
3.8.3.1. General 
3.8.3.1.1. Non-public funds must be used for the many activities which members of the 
ACF undertake other than APC (ACF) Syllabus training and attachments to, or attendance 
at courses organised by, the Regular Army and Army Reserve, which the MOD finances. 
3.8.3.1.2. Non-public funds are operated at national, county, area and detachment levels.  
At national level they are the concern of ACFA.  At County, Area and Detachment level 
they are the responsibility of Cadet Commandants in accordance with policies which are 
formulated by RFCA. 
3.8.3.1.3. An account of the receipt and expenditure of money received from private 
sources, either for general or specific purposes is to be kept in a suitable form and duly 
audited in accordance with the policy laid down by RFCA. 
3.8.3.1.4. Premiums paid to the ACFA Collective Insurance Scheme may not be charged 
to public funds.  Basic premiums, at rates published from time to time, are to be paid 
annually as at 1 Apr with supplementary extensions paid at the time that the cover is 
arranged. 
 
 
3-43 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
3-44 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.8.4 Travel allowances 
3.8.4.1. General 
3.8.4.1.1. Officers and AI of the ACF when travelling on authorised duty, may claim travel 
allowances as undeJSP 752 – Tri-Service Regulations for Allowances. 
3.8.4.2. Collective Subsistence Arrangements for Cadet Travel 
3.8.4.2.1. The following instructions will apply to collective travel arrangements: 
a. 
Cadets (and any accompanying adults) travelling in a party of 4 or more on a 
single journey in excess of 5 hours on which food has to be purchased, are 
authorised a refund of costs which should be made to the leader of the party against 
receipted bills.  The refund will be limited to multiples of the 5-10 hours Daily Rate of 
Subsistence Allowance (DRSA) (for Majors and below) which may be claimed for 
each member of the party in accordance with the following: 
(1)  The time spent on a journey covers one or more of the 3 recognised meal 
times, ie breakfast, lunch, tea/supper, and the claim is limited to DRSA for each 
meal time. 
(2)  The meal(s) is/are actually taken during the period of travel and could not 
reasonably have been taken before the start or after the finish of the journey. 
(3)  The time spent travelling qualifies for DRSA (as defined above) in the 
following way: a journey of 5 hours but less than 10 hours, DRSA at over 5 
hours; a journey of 10 hours but less than 15 hours, DRSA at over 10 hours; 
etc. 
b. 
No payment can be made for a journey lasting less than 5 hours. 
c. 
Accompanying Officers who do not hold appointments in the ACF are to claim 
Subsistence Allowance through their parent units. 
3.8.4.2.2. These arrangements apply equally to Cadets travelling from Northern Ireland 
and the Scottish Islands to the mainland.  Travel to and from Annual Camp and Bisley 
meetings are covered by this instruction. 
3.8.4.2.3. The rules set out above also apply to parties of less than 4 or those travelling 
singly, except that they may claim individually instead of through the leader of the party. 
3.8.4.3. Insurance 
3.8.4.3.1. Terms of Insurance Policies. 
a. 
When private motor vehicles, other than solo motorcycles are used on official 
journeys at the  of MMA, the owner must have a valid comprehensive insurance 
policy covering all risks normally incurred (for which the MOD will accept no liability) 
including the following: 
(1)  Bodily injury to or death of third parties. 
3-45 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 319 link to page 320 link to page 319 link to page 320 link to page 319 link to page 320 link to page 320 link to page 319 link to page 320  
(2)  Bodily injury to or death of any passenger. 
(3)  Damage to the property of third parties. 
(4)  Damage to or loss of the vehicle. 
When private solo motorcycles are used on official journeys the policy need cover 
only third party risks, ie sub-para(1) and (3) above. 
b. 
The insurance cover in respect of sub-paraa(1) to a(3) must be without 
financial limit. 
c. 
When private motor vehicles are used on official journeys at PCR or residence 
to place of duty is being claimed, insurance cover is essential only for sub-paras a(1) 
to a(3)to which the provisions of sub-Para b apply. 
d. 
Policies which contain an excess clause requiring the owner to bear the first 
part of any claim are acceptable provided the liability of the owner does not exceed 
£200 except where the insurance company has specified an excess of more than this 
figure due to no fault of the claimant eg a newly qualified driver or due to age. 
3.8.4.3.2. The individual’s responsibility under Para 3.8.4.3.1 extends to satisfy themselves 
that: 
a. 
His insurers have undertaken to indemnify the Crown, in the event of a claim 
being made against the Crown as the insured’s employer, to the same extent as they 
are insured under the policy. 
b. 
The policy covers the use of the vehicle on official business by the officer or AI, 
and that their receiving mileage allowance (and, if carrying passengers on duty, a 
supplement for each) is not to be deemed to constitute use for hire or reward. 
3.8.4.3.3. The insurers listed in RAAC Ch.  3 have given a general undertaking as 
described in Para 3.8.4.3.2.a above and no action to obtain a special endorsement or 
written undertaking is necessary. 
3.8.4.3.4. Where an insurer is not listed in RAAC Ch.  3, the officer or AI must personally 
obtain the undertaking by means of an endorsement to the policy or by letter.  A 
satisfactory form of words is: 
Personnel, whether Service or civilian, employed by or in any Government 
Department using their private motor vehicles on official business may receive a 
mileage allowance for the journey and if carrying other officers or servants of the 
Crown travelling on duty, a small additional allowance in respect of each passenger.  
When the vehicle is being so used we undertake that subject otherwise to its terms 
and conditions the policy covering the vehicle shall be deemed to include such use 
and the receipt of the said allowance shall not be deemed to constitute use for hiring 
or for the carriage of passengers for hire or reward. 
We also undertake to indemnify the Crown in the event of a claim being made 
against the Crown to the same extent as the policy holder is insured under the policy, 
on the understanding that the insurers are allowed to retain control of the claim. 
3-46 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
3.8.4.3.5. Alternative Drivers.  When an officer or AI permits another person to drive the 
motor vehicle in which they are travelling on official duty, it is necessary for them to ensure 
that the insurance policy is specially endorsed to provide cover on such journeys and that 
the Ministry of Defence is indemnified to the same extent as they would themselves be 
covered by the policy.   
3.8.4.4. Method of Claim – Travel Allowances 
3.8.4.4.1. Claims for the Reimbursement of Travelling Expenses covered in JSP 752 – Tri-
Service Regulations for Allowances
 
 other than Home to Duty Travel (HDT)  Claims are 
to be submitted on JPA F016. 
3.8.4.4.2. HDT.  Claims are made through Westminster by unit admin staff.  All that is 
required is the dates on which journeys are made by the individual from his registered 
place of residence to his registered place of duty.  Local procedures are to be used to 
provide this information. 
3.8.4.4.3. ACF Operational Grant.  Claims for allowances and refunds of expenses from 
the ACF Operational Grant authorised journeys are made to RFCA under the local 
procedures specified.   
 
 
3-47 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

 
 
3-48 
AC 14233 V1.12 (Feb 17) 

link to page 323  
3.8.5 Indemnification, compensation and insurance for the ACF 
3.8.5.1. General 
3.8.5.1.1. Indemnification, compensation and/or insurance cover for the ACF is provided in 
one or other of the following ways: 
a. 
By MOD where training activities authorised by ACDS (RF&C) are involved. 
b. 
By the ACFA collective insurance scheme for training and activities that may not 
be authorised by ACDS (RF&C) but are approved by a Cadet Commandant. 
c. 
By the MOD insurance policy for third party liability in respect of MOD vehicles 
used by the ACF and vehicles provided by RFCA for the use of the ACF. 
d. 
Insurance cover arranged privately by ACF Counties for overseas travel and for 
vehicles, property and equipment privately owned by the ACF. 
3.8.5.2. Indemnification 
3.8.5.2.1. MOD will normally indemnify all members of the ACF involved in authorised 
Cadet Force activities, including those abroad, provided that the following conditions are 
met: 
a. 
The activity is authorised and recorded on Westminster and approved by a 
Cadet Commandant as part of the syllabus or ethos of the Cadet Forces. 
b. 
The activity is overseen and tutored by qualified instructors and carried out 
using best practice guidelines laid down by the appropriate national body in the 
relevant publications. 
c. 
Appropriate risk assessments are carried out. 
d. 
The appropriate protective clothing is worn for the activity being undertaken. 
3.8.5.2.2. A guide as to what activities will be covered by MOD indemnity, as authorised by 
ACDS (RF&C), published as a DIN annually on the Cadet Forces Resource Centre The 
list is not exhaustive and other activities may be indemnified, when approved by a Cadet 
Commandant.  However, if an activity does not meet the conditions given at Paragraph 
3.8.5.2.1MOD may repudiate liability for any claim resulting from an incident, in which 
case the individual responsible for the activit