Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'LFB New Personal Protective Equipment'.


 
 
 
Report title 
Agreement to enter a Call off Contract for the supply of  
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 
 
Meeting 
Date 
Resources Committee 
21 July 2017 
Report by 
Document Number 
Head of Procurement and Technical & Service Support 
FEP 2761 
 Public 
 
Summary 
Members agreed in January 2015 that the Authority participates in a col aborative procurement 
project with Kent Fire and Rescue Service (KFRS) for the provision of Personal Protective Equipment 
(FEP 2381).  
The procurement has now concluded and Bristol Uniforms have been selected as the new 
Framework supplier  
The Framework Agreement between Kent Fire and Bristol Uniforms was entered into on 13th June 
2017 and is now available to all fire and rescue services..  
This report details the outcome of this project and asks members approval for LFEPA to enter into 
contract with Bristol Uniforms for a fully managed service of structural PPE and USAR PPE beginning 
October 2018 and for a period of 8 years.. 
Recommendations 
That the Authority authorises the Head of Procurement and Technical Service Support to enter into a 
Call-Off Contract under the Framework Agreement between Kent Fire and Bristol Uniforms for the 
provision of Firefighter  Personal Protective Equipment and Urban Search and Rescue Personal 
Protective Equipment and authorises the Head of Legal and Democratic Services to execute the Cal -
Off Contract together with al  ancil ary or additional documentation. 
Background 
1.  As detailed in FEP2381, Kent FRS led the col aborative project for the provision of Personal 
Protective Equipment and established a col aborative project board for this purpose. The Brigade 
had representation on the Joint Procurement Project Board, and on the Technical and 
Commercial Teams  to ensure that London’s interests and requirements were fulfilled. 
2.  Internal y, the project was run in accordance with the corporate project management framework 
and a London specific project board was set up to monitor the progress of the col aborative 
 
 

  
procurement and to take decisions pertinent to London’s specific requirements of the 
col aboration. 
3.  The advantages to the Brigade joining up with this col aborative procurement included, the ability 
to access shared resources to undertake the market research and procurement activities. The 
Brigade influenced the procurement strategy and the user specification to ensure our 
requirements were incorporated into the new contract. Further detailed advantages are set out in 
paragraphs 16 – 21 below. 
Scope 
4.  The scope of the project was to provide a framework which al ows FRSs to establish cal -off 
contracts for the supply of suitable PPE ensembles for operational staff to complete a range of 
activities, such as (but not exclusively): Structural firefighting, outdoor firefighting (including 
fields, woods, forests etc.), technical rescue (including USAR, road traffic col isions, non-fire 
related rescues etc.) and other activities that a Fire and Rescue operational member of staff would 
attend as part of their day-to-day activity. The project looked at innovation in PPE design, fabrics 
and methods to achieve the best possible solution. 
The procurement process 
5.  Paragraphs 6 to 12 below provide members with a summary of the procurement and evaluation 
process but the full detail is attached as Appendix 1 to this report. This is the official report on the 
full tender, evaluation and trialling and testing process as recorded by Kent FRS acting as lead 
procurement authority for this procurement..  
6.  Following a series of market days with potential suppliers staring in March 2015 the framework 
for the provision of Personal Protective Equipment for Fire Fighters was advertised in the Official 
Journal of the European Union (OJEU) in line with the Public Contract Regulations 2015 on 4th 
April 2016. The Competitive with Negotiation Process was used for this procurement and bidders 
were required to submit a Pre-Qualification Questionnaire (PQQ) prior to submitting a tender. 
7.  The requirement was for a single supplier framework agreement with the successful tenderer 
being able to provide both firefighters PPE and Urban Search and Rescue PPE. Six bidders 
submitted PQQ’s and fol owing the evaluation process and approval by the Project Board, three 
bidders were invited to tender.  
8.  The three bidders Agility Logistics, Ballyclare Ltd and Bristol Uniforms Ltd. were invited to tender 
on 31st May 2016.   
9.   On receipt of tenders, an initial desktop evaluation was carried out by representatives from the 
Commercial and Technical Teams and the Project Board. This was fol owed by initial discussions 
in terms of the proposed Ful y Managed Service, Pricing Models and Terms and Conditions. 
 
10. Following the desktop evaluations, there was a 3 stage  evaluation of the proposed ensembles. 
This included  various wearer trials, laundry , ergonomic and performance tests to determine the 
best  overal  performing ensemble . LFB provided 8 out of the 30 firefighters for the trials for PPE 
and 6 for the Urban Search and Rescue Trials from an overal  total of 12 firefighters. The trialling 
process was al  completed in the presence of official recorders who were responsible for 
observing and noting any comments made by the trialist during the trials. The official recorders 
represented 11 FRS and these were London, West Sussex, Hertfordshire, Suffolk, Kent, Essex, 
Tyne & Wear, Durham & Darlington, East Sussex, Bedfordshire and West Midlands. 
 
 

  
11. Bidders  were then required to re-submit their tenders with their best and final offer. 
12. Each of the bids were scored against the relevant quality and cost criteria. The full breakdown of 
scores awarded is provided in the Part Two report (Commercial y Sensitive). Bristol Uniforms Ltd  
were the successful tenderer 
Length of Framework Agreement 
13. The length of the Framework Agreement is as fol ows: 
  Framework Agreement –  the overarching framework agreement between Kent FRS and 
Bristol Uniforms  will be in place for 4 years from the date of signing the Framework 
Agreement ending 12th June 2021. 
  Call Off Contracts – Independent cal  off contracts between single FRS and Bristol can be 
placed anytime within the 4 year call off period and will be for a period of 8 years.  
14. The current LFB PPE contract with Bristol Uniforms ends on 14th October 2018 and therefore 
immediately fol owing Resources Committee approval, officers will begin discussion with Bristol 
uniforms to ensure a new contract is agreed and al  the pre-contract start up work such as 
measuring and manufacture can be completed to allow a seamless transition on that day. 
15. LFB would also be using the Fully Managed Service for the provision of USAR PPE as per our 
existing arrangement.. 
Benefits to this Collaborative Procurement Exercise: 
 
16. Following the award of the contract, officers were keen to review the col aborative process and 
determine what the benefits of such a col aboration were to the Brigade. It is clear that the 
officers who were involved in the process determined that these were several and in both the 
commercial and technical areas. 
 
17. The col aboration provided for a cost model which enables volume discounts, thereby optimising 
the col ective buying power of the FRS and generating cashable savings, in addition to the cost 
avoidance savings that FRS’s will benefit from in terms of reduction in time and resource to place 
a cal -off via this framework. The saving to LFB is £158K in year 1 and £343K in subsequent years 
as the temporary budget reduction as a consequence of the 2 year extension to the current 
contract (FEP2381) 16 January 2015, is ended and the budget is returned to the original sum from 
October 2018. 
18. A significant benefit of running a national col aboration was the opportunity to involve a wide 
range of technical experts from around the UK. These officers not only offered a wealth of 
knowledge and understanding of the subject but had years of operational experience 
encompassing large metropolitan brigades to smaller services employing a sizable retained/on 
cal  response. The suppliers to be successful were required to deliver a high performing PPE that 
could meet a diverse demographic need. 
19. The specification for the fire tunic and trouser looked for enhanced performance in both heat and 
flame protection and breathability (water vapour resistance).  Bristol Uniforms successful fire 
tunic and trouser exceeded the requirements of the specification and offers (for LFB) enhanced 
heat and flame protection, whilst delivering excel ent levels of breathability. 
 
 

  
20. This process has benefited hugely from the participation of officials from National and LFB Fire 
Brigades Union (FBU). The FBU provided advice on H&S matters pertaining to their members 
and contributed operationally giving technical feedback as current serving firefighters and 
officers. 
21. From the start of the col aboration project, LFB was committed to ensuring staff side 
representation as standing members on the Technical Group. Corporately, it is acknowledged 
that early inclusion of RBs on projects such as this proves invaluable in identifying potential issues 
early and resolving them quickly; avoiding delays later on. 
Lessons learnt: 
 
22. The main lesson learnt from this col aboration is that any Brigade specific requirement that 
deviates from the agreed generic specification runs the risk of being voted down as a result of 
sheer numbers of opposing views due to the volume of participating authorities in the 
col aboration. This is the case with London’s requirement to have the word FIRE on the reverse of 
the tunic. This requirement would seem to be particular to London and is standard on our current 
PPE and remains a prerequisite for our final ensemble. No other participating Authority agreed 
with the need for this addition and as a result this does not feature on the tunic offered under the 
framework. 
 
23. Officers approached the legal advisor to the col aborative procurement and his advice is that 
there is nothing in the framework agreement to prevent authorities modifying the PPE to meet 
their own requirements, provided this is permitted by the terms of the cal -off agreements. The 
draft terms of this contract form a schedule to the framework agreement. They contain a clause 
allowing the authority entering into the cal -off contract to make variations to the terms of the 
contract. The Authority can serve a “Variation Notice” on the contractor. Once they have done so 
the contractor must prepare an estimate setting out the cost of implementing the variation. The 
authority then has the opportunity of deciding whether or not to accept this additional cost. It was 
the legal view that this clause al ows authorities to make changes to the specification of the PPE as 
wel  as to the services to be provided under the contract.  
24. This requirement will now be agreed between officers and Bristol Uniforms. The additional cost 
of this variation is not yet known however this cost should be minimal and will be met  from the 
savings figures detailed in paragraph 17. 
 
Head of Legal and Democratic Services comments 
25. Lawyers from the Brigade have been working closely with Kent and the external legal adviser 
throughout  the project. The procurement has been undertaken strictly in accordance with the 
provisions of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015. The OJEU Notice stated that al  UK fire and 
rescue services are entitled to call off under the Framework agreement. 
 
Director of Finance and Contractual Services comments  
26. This report presents the outcome of the col aborative procurement for the provision of PPE with 
Kent Fire and Rescue Services. The report notes that by running a col aborative procurement 
there have been savings in terms of time and cost to LFEPA, which would have been significant if 
LFEPA needed to run a separate procurement. The potential cost of entering this cal  off contract 
 
 

  
for LFEPA has been calculated and could generate a saving of £158k in the first contract year and 
£343k in al  subsequent years. These figures reflect both the unit costs for PPE agreed in the 
contract and a reduction in the establishment since the contract was previously tendered. Any 
potential savings will be included as part of the 2018/19 budget setting process, once they are 
confirmed. 
Sustainable development implications 
27.  Requirements in support of the GLA Group’s Responsible Procurement policy were incorporated 
into tender documents and the Brigade’s Head of Sustainable Development supported the 
evaluation of those elements of the bid, including apprenticeships and ethical sourcing. 
Staff Side consultations undertaken 
28. As part of the evaluation process a London FBU representative was a member of the technical 
team who developed the specification and as an official recorder who observed them on the fire 
ground during trials.  
Equalities implications 
29. As part of the selection of trialists, LFB ensured that out of 30 firefighters involved with PPE that 
12 of these were female firefighters. LFB also provided two female firefighters for the USAR trials.  
Bristol will also produce an extra item of special measure PPE held in stock at the appropriate 
Service Centre for increased resilience. This includes bespoke items, such as gloves and boots, 
for individuals with special fit requirements. 
 
List of Appendices to this report: 
1.  Kent Fire and Rescue Service – Award recommendation report Part 1. 
 
LOCAL GOVERNMENT (ACCESS TO INFORMATION) ACT 1985 
List of background documents 
1.  Kent Award Recommendation Report Part 1, Framework Agreement for the Provision of 
Personal Protective Equipment for Firefighters . Reference C15041 
Proper officer 
Head of Procurement and Technical Service Support. 
Contact officer  Nicol Thornton 
Telephone 
020 8555 1200 Ext. 31151 
Email 
xxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
 
 
 



  
Appendix 1 
Award Recommendation Report 
Part 1  
 
Framework Agreement for the Provision of Personal 
Protective Equipment for Firefighters 
 
Reference: C15041 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Hannah Parfitt 
Procurement Department 
5th May 2017  
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

link to page 25 link to page 24 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 21 link to page 21 link to page 20 link to page 20 link to page 20 link to page 19 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 10  
Contents 
 
Section 1 – Executive Summary ............................................................................................................... 4 
Section 2 – General ...................................................................................................................................... 5 
2.1 Background Information ...................................................................................................................... 5 
2.2 Owner/Sponsor ..................................................................................................................................... 6 
2.3 Indicative Value of the Framework Agreement ............................................................................... 6 
2.4 Key Procurement Personnel ............................................................................................................... 6 
Section 3 – Objectives, Justification and Scope .................................................................................. 7 
3.1 Recommended Scope of the Framework Agreement .................................................................... 7 
3.2 Procurement Scope – Single Supplier Framework ......................................................................... 8 
3.3 Procurement Scope – Competitve with Negotiation Procedure .................................................... 8 
Section 4 – Supplier Engagement, Tender Process and Evaluation Summary ......................... 10 
4.1 Supplier Engagement ........................................................................................................................ 10 
4.2 Approach to the Market ..................................................................................................................... 10 
4.3 PQQ Submissions and Evaluations ................................................................................................ 10 
4.4 Evaluation Process and Results .............................................................................................. 12 
4.4.1 Stage 1 – Desktop Evaluations: ............................................................................................... 12 
4.4.2 Stage 2 – Product Selection:..................................................................................................... 12 
4.4.3 Stage 3 – Final Ensemble Evaluations: ................................................................................... 13 
4.5 Framework Award Recommendation .............................................................................................. 14 
4.6 Final Ensemble Selected .................................................................................................................. 14 
4.6.1 Fire Fighters PPE ........................................................................................................................ 14 
4.6.2 USAR PPE ................................................................................................................................... 15 
4.7 Length of Framework Agreement .................................................................................................... 15 
Section 5 – Risks and Benefits ............................................................................................................... 16 
5.1 Risks ..................................................................................................................................................... 16 
5.2 Benefits ................................................................................................................................................ 16 
Section 6 – Implementation Timescales ............................................................................................... 18 
Section 7 – Approval .................................................................................................................................. 19 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
Section 1 – Executive Summary 
 
In 2014, Kent Fire and Rescue Service (KFRS) began work on the renewal of the South East and 
Eastern Regional Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Framework which was being accessed by 
13 Fire and Rescue Services (FRS) and expired in June of that year. The new Framework would 
be open to FRS, Police Forces, NHS bodies, Scottish NHS bodies, Ministry of Defence and 
Northern Ireland DHSSPS within the UK. It includes the options of full structural firefighting PPE, a 
layered jacket, rescue jacket and also the provision of Urban Search & Rescue kit. It would also 
include both ‘fully managed’ and ‘purchase only’ options.  
In line with the steer from Government to collaborate, a total of 20 FRS initially joined the project 
with a total buying power of approximately £70,000,000 with approximately 20,500 wearers. 
Ongoing marketing with the aim of enticing more FRS’s to join continued throughout the project 
with facilities being made to allow new entrants at any stage of the process.  
There was a requirement for the Collaborative PPE framework to be ready for the summer of 2017 
for FRS to have their chosen option available for January 2018.   
This report sets out the results of the tender process undertaken. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
Section 2 – General 
2.1 Background Information 
In 2010, Kent led a procurement project to establish a framework for the supply and maintenance 
of structural firefighting PPE.  The framework lasted for a period of four years and expired in June 
2014.  By that time 13 FRSs had agreed call off contracts with the supplier.   
 
The length of the call off contracts was for a period of eight years (life expectancy of the garments) 
and therefore the first FRSs who used call off contracts would need a new framework in place by 
2017 so that a seamless transition could occur from existing to new. 
Drawing on previous experience, as well as working collaboratively with other FRSs, there was an 
opportunity for this project to identify resource efficiencies and financial savings moving forward.It 
was anticipated that savings could be made through the new framework as a result of collaboration 
with other services, enabling economies of scale and reduced duplication of resource commitment 
for the provision of firefighting PPE.  
Under the previous framework there were 13 FRS and approximately 8,500 Fire Fighters. Those 
services that expressed an interest in the new Collaborative PPE framework, prior to the issue of 
the Invitation to Tender (ITT) were asked to sign an Inter Authority Agreement to state that they 
intended to place call off contracts from the framework once it was awarded. 20 FRS signed the 
agreement which totals approximately 20,600 firefighters.  
The project team carried out an options appraisal to determine the scope of the project and it was 
agreed that a framework would be set up that looks to provide an ensemble that caters for most 
types of incidents and considers a layered approach. 
The scope of this project was to provide a framework which allows FRSs to establish call off 
contracts for the supply of suitable PPE ensembles for operational staff to complete a range of 
activities, such as (but not exclusively): Structural firefighting, outdoor firefighting (including fields, 
woods, forests etc.), technical rescue (including USAR, road traffic collisions, non-fire related 
rescues etc.) and other activities that a Fire and Rescue operational member of staff would attend 
as part of their day to day activity. The project looked to explore innovation in PPE design, fabrics 
and methods to achieve the best possible solution. 
The framework caters for purchase only and for a fully managed service option.  The fully 
managed service option has been designed and specified to offset risk of non-compliance to the 
PPE at Work Regulations 1992, in particular :  - 
Regulation 4:  Provision of PPE  
Regulation 5:  Compatibility of PPE 
Regulation 6:  Assessment of PPE 
Regulation 7:  Maintenance and Replacement of PPE 
Regulation 9:  Information, Instruction and Training 
Regulation 11:  Reporting loss or defect 
Fire and Rescue Services electing to Purchase only would only be able to demonstrate compliance 
with regulations 4, 5 and 6 if they were to purchase and issue the full ensemble, as the complete 
ensemble is an outcome of the risk assessment, specification and evaluation processes used;  a 

 

 
mix and match with other items of PPE purchased separate to this contract may not demonstrate 
compliance.  Compliance to regulations 7, 9 and 11 are an integral part of the fully managed 
service only. 
The Project Board comprised of senior representatives from KFRS, West Midlands FRS, London 
Fire Brigade and Northumberland FRS (representing the North East Region). Reporting into the 
Project Board were two working groups, Commercial and Technical. These groups looked at 
various different aspects of the project which included profile building, data gathering and analysis, 
market research and development, review and consultation of risk assessment, specification 
writing, route to market, preparation of tender documents, evaluation of tender including 
evaluations of ensembles, awarding the framework and developing a delivery plan with the 
successful contractor.  
The Project Board decided to utilise the competitive with negotiation tendering process and this 
report sets out the results of that exercise.   
2.2 Owner/Sponsor 
KFRS are the National Lead for the Clothing Category and is responsible for the procurement 
process, award and shall be the legal entity named on the contract on behalf of all UK FRS. KFRS 
shall therefore also be responsible for the ongoing management of this Framework Agreement. 
 
Call-Off Contracts awarded via the Framework Agreement shall be the responsibility of the relevant 
Contracting Authority. 
Hannah Parfitt, Senior Procurement Officer, is the owner/sponsor for KFRS Call-Off Contracts 
awarded via the Framework Agreement. 
2.3 Indicative Value of the Framework Agreement  
As published within the Contract Notices (the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU) and 
the Contracts Finder website) to alert the market of the opportunity to tender, the Framework 
Agreement has an indicative value range of £70,000,000 to £180,000,000. 
The lower figure represents the value of all of the FRS that signed an Inter Authority Agreement at 
the start of the process . The maximum figure allows for all UK FRS to access the Framework.  
 
2.4 Key Procurement Personnel  
Tina Butler, Head of Procurement at KFRS is the Category Lead for the Clothing Category in line 
with the National Procurement Category Management Strategy.  
Hannah  Parfittt,  Senior  Procurement  Officer  at  KFRS  was  the  Commercial  Lead  for  the 
Procurement  Process  and  will  act  as  the  first  point  of  contact  for  the  management  of  the 
Framework Agreement. 

 

 
Section 3 – Objectives, Justification and Scope 
 
3.1 Recommended Scope of the Framework Agreement 
The  scope  of  this  project  is  to  provide  a  framework  which  allows  FRSs  to  establish  call  off 
contracts  for  the  supply  of  suitable  PPE  ensembles  for  operational  staff  to  complete  a  range  of 
activities, such as (but not exclusively): Structural firefighting, outdoor firefighting (including fields, 
woods,  forests  etc.),  technical  rescue  (including  USAR,  road  traffic  collisions,  non-fire  related 
rescues etc.) and other activities that a Fire and Rescue operational member of staff would attend 
as part of their day to day activity. The project will look to explore innovation in PPE design, fabrics 
and methods to achieve the best possible solution. 
In  addition,  a  fully  managed  service  and  purchase  only  options  will  be  provided  to  ensure 
compliance with PPE regulations.  
The Project Management Plan captures the following objectives and benefits.  
Benefit Name 
How & when will this be measured?  Success is…. 
New PPE Framework 
A new framework needs to be in place  A new framework is in 
that all LA FRSs can 
so FRA’s can call off contracts from 
place by May 2017 
access  
June 2017 
‘Fit for purpose’ 
New PPE is in place to provide a 
PPE is available to front 
firefighting PPE is 
smooth transition from the current to 
line operational crews 
available for participating  the new arrangements  for March 
from March 2018 
FRSs beyond their 
2018 
current contracts 
FRSs will be able To 
Through Risk assessments, 
A Service provision that 
ensure compliance with 
Evaluations and wearer trials carried 
complies with PPE 
PPE at Work 
out between July 2016 and February 
Regulations 1992. 
Regulations 1992 
2017.  
Both financial and 
Savings will be made through 
Reduced annual 
resource savings are 
collaboration, not only through 
expenditure and 
realised by participating 
economies of scale once the 
resource commitment for 
FRSs  
framework has been awarded but also  PPE that meets the 
because of reduced duplication of 
standards of 
work conducted by individual services 
performance currently 
by not having to go out to market for 
available as a minimum 
the provision of firefighting PPE.. The 
project will explore the potential 
collaboration with a university to 
conduct research on current costs for 
individual fire and rescue services 
across the country.  
 
 
 

 

 
3.2 Procurement Scope – Single Supplier Framework  
The Commercial Group produced a matrix outling the advantage and disadvantages to determine 
whether the award could be made to one or multiple suppliers.  
A lot of the components to an ensemble are sourced through third parties and suppliers were 
encouraged to work together in order to provide the best ensemble.   
The Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) at Work Regulations states the responsibility placed on 
an employer for where the risk cannot be removed in any other way. This project specifically looks 
to transfer certain aspects of this risk onto the supplier.  
  Regulation 4: Requires PPE to be provided where the risk cannot be eliminated and then 
stipulates the conditions which must be met in order for PPE to be deemed suitable 
  Regulation 5: Requires compatibility between different elements of PPE 
  Regulation 7: Requires PPE to be maintained in an efficient state and in good repair 
The risk would be too high for an FRS to maintain these regulations, particularly if multiple 
suppliers were used; therefore, based on the level of risk of transferring the responsibility onto an 
FRS to compile an ensemble, the recommendation was to have a single supplier.  
The use of Lots were also considered according to Regulation 46 of the Public Contracts 
Regulations 2015. It was agreed that the use of lots would not be suitable for this project for the 
following reasons: 
  Technically difficult as compatibility between the different elements of PPE needs to be 
executed. This would be difficult to implement if there were different suppliers awarded 
different lots. 
  The use of lots does not allow for the management of PPE under a  fully managed service 
option.   
  Due to the volume of wearers that this project may be providing for, true economies of 
scale will only be achievable with one supplier and this would not be possible if lots were 
attributed to the project. One supplier would only be able to win a limited number of lots and 
the risk would fall back onto the FRS to manage.  
  Co-ordination of different lots would be costly to the FRS 
The recommendation from the Commercial Group, following discussions with the Technical lead 
was to have a single supplier, who will be required to provide all components of the PPE and have 
the option for a fully managed service. This was agreed by the Project Board.   
3.3 Procurement Scope – Competitve with Negotiation Procedure 
The Commercial Group discussed the possibility of using the competitive with negotiation 
procedure as well as the restricted process and discussed the advantages and disadvantages for 
both procedures. The discussions included input from the Technical lead and legal representatives. 
It was agreed that the complexities of the pricing schedule would determine whether competitive 
negotiation would be used. The specification would be output based and conversations regarding 
the requirements were determined through the market days which followed the process set out in 
the supplier engagement strategy.   
 

 

 
Legal advice was sought from Sharpe Pritchard which confirmed that it would be possible to go 
through the Competitive with Negotiation Route. This was detailed within the tender 
documentation. 
The Commercial and Technical groups both agreed that there would be a need to negotiate but 
only on specific parameters of the tender submissions. These were the Fully Managed Service, 
Pricing Models and Terms and Conditions. The Project Board agreed with the recommendation for 
the use of the Competitive with Negotiation Route. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
Section 4 – Supplier Engagement, Tender Process and Evaluation Summary  
4.1 Supplier Engagement  
A series of market days were held with potential suppliers from March 2015 through to January 
2016. Within this time there were 3 market days as well as representation from the project at the 
Emergency Services Show. This enabled officers to seek advice and opinions from the 
marketplace prior to beginning the formal tender process and update suppliers on the progress of 
the project.  
To ensure fairness and transparency, all of the presentations delivered were made available to 
suppliers on the project website as well as video recordings of the presentations.  
The website also included information on the timescales of the project and the strategy outlining 
how suppliers will be communicated with at various points in the process.  
4.2 Approach to the Market 
Following the market engagement, the framework for the provision of Personal Protective 
Equipment for Fire Fighters was advertised in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU) in 
line with the Public Contract Regulations 2015 on 4th April 2016. The Competitive with Negotiation 
Process was used for this procurement and suppiers were required to subumit a Pre-Qualification 
Questionnaire (PQQ) prior to submitting a tender.   
 
The market was informed of the opportunity via three ways: 
1.  A Contract Notice advertised in OJEU (reference: 2016/S 066-115718) 
2.  A Contract/Opportunity Notice advertised on the Contracts Finder website 
3.  An advert on the Kent Business Portal 
All suppliers  were notified at the market  days of how the advert will be published and the project 
website was updated, providing links to the opportunity when it was available.  
The Framework Agreement is accessible to all UK FRS, Ministry of Defence, Police Forces in the 
UK, NHS Bodies in England, Scottish NHS Bodies, NHS Wales and Northern Ireland DHSSPS.   
4.3 PQQ Submissions and Evaluations 
The requirement was for a single supplier framework agreement with the successful tenderer being 
able to provide both fire fighters PPE and Urban Search and Rescue PPE. Six companies 
submitted PQQ’s and following the evaluation process and approval by the Project Board, three 
companies were invited to tender.  
Al  PQQ’s received were subject to a ‘two stage’ evaluation process. The PQQ stated that The 
Authority reserves the right to exclude a supplier or consortia who does not achieve a score of 300 
through the evaluation process. All suppliers that were not successful either failed at Stage 1 or did 
not meet the scoring requirement.  
 
 
 
 
 
10 
 

 
Stage 1 – Pass/Fail 
Criteria 
Section 1 - Supplier Information 
Section 2 - Grounds for Mandatory Exclusion 
Section 3 - Grounds for Discretionary Exclusion Part 1  
Section 4 - Grounds for Discretionary Exclusion Part 2  
Section 5 - Economic and Financial Standing 
Section 7A Question 7 - Article 11B 
Section 7B - Insurance  
Section 7C - Compliance with Equality Legislation 
Section 7D - Environmental Management 
Section 7E - Health and Safety 
 
Stage 2 – Scored Evaluation 
Assessment Criteria 
% Weighting 
1.  Please  provide  details  of  your  experience  of  providing  a  fully 
managed  service  in  an  essential  services  environment  for  a 
18% 
contract/combination  of  contracts  that  equate  to  over  5,000 
wearers/users 
2. Please provide details of the processes that are in place to ensure 
18% 
tracking and tracing of items through the supply chain 
3.  Please  provide  details  of  the  Company's  experience  of  managing 
18% 
sub-contractors within a fully managed service 
4.  Please  provide  experience  of  managing  suppliers  through  the 
10% 
supply chain. 
5.  Please  provide  experience  of  maintaining  quality  standards  within 
18% 
an essential services environment 
6.  Please  provide  evidence  of  implementing  the  delivery  of  a  fully 
18% 
managed service. 
 
 
11 
 

 
The following three suppliers were invited to tender on 31st May 2016.   
a.  Agility Logistics  
b.  Ballyclare Ltd 
c.  Bristol Uniforms Ltd  
4.4 Evaluation Process and Results  
As part of the process suppliers were required to attend sizing days in June 2016 to measure those 
wearers that were taking part in the product evaluations. This took place at Oldbury Fire Station, 
West Midlands. At the beginning of the process there were 30 wearers that were sized from FRS 
across the country involved in the project.  
 
All three suppliers responded to the ITT and met the closing date of 5th August 2016.  
The evaluation process was split into 3 stages.  
4.4.1 Stage 1 – Desktop Evaluations:  
On receipt of tenders, an initial desktop evaluation was carried out. This included the technical 
specifications. Representatives from the Commercial Team, Technical Team and Project Board 
carried out the evaluations. There were 10 representatives from 7 different FRS involved in the 
tender evaluation.  
 
Negotiations with suppliers also took place during this stage.  Each supplier had 2 days of 
negotiations with representation from Sharpe Pritchard Legal advisors and members from each of 
the working groups.  
The agenda items for each of the negotiation days for each supplier were the same and the topics 
discussed were; Fully Managed Service, Pricing Models and Terms and Conditions. 
Any pass/fail elements were evaluated at this stage and then main tender responses reviewed to 
enable negotiations to take place, specifically relating to the initial pricing, managed service and 
technical specifications.  
During this stage, the aim was to only eliminate products from the process, rather than looking to 
eliminate tenderers completely.   
4.4.2 Stage 2 – Product Selection:  
Following Stage 1 desktop evaluations, the products supplied by each tenderer were evaluated to 
determine the best performing elements of an ensemble. The tunic and trousers were required to 
have had 5 washes prior to being provided for the trials.These scores did not form part of the main 
evaluation Matrix and they were only used for product selection based on the highest scoring 
product.  
 
Through the product selection process, 5 wearers were unable to complete the process and their 
scores were not included in the product selection evaluation as they were unable to evaluate all 
products from all suppliers.  
The product evaluations were carried out using methodology based upon BS 8469: 2007 ‘Personal 
Protective equipment for firefighters – Assessment of ergonomic performance and capability – 
Requirements and test methods’.  
12 
 

 
Following negotiations, the final tender documentation was issued to suppliers on 16th January 
2017. All three suppliers responded to the final ITT and met the closing date of 17th February 
2017. 
4.4.3 Stage 3 – Final Ensemble Evaluations:  
Following Stage 2 product evaluations, the best performing products from the evaluations were 
collated to make a final ensemble, for each supplier. The tunic, trousers, gloves and fire hoods for 
each wearer, were required to be laundered and the same kit returned ready for Stage 3 
evaluations.The final 23 wearers that took part in this stage of the Evaluation Process represented 
11 FRS and these were Gloucestershire, East Sussex, London, Cleveland, Durham and 
Darlington, Suffolk, Royal Berkshire, Northumberland, Tyne & Wear, Buckinghamshire and the 
West Midlands. Each pair of wearers was allocated an official recorder who observed them on the 
fire ground and noted any comments the wearers made whilst they were trialling the ensembles. 
The official recorders represented 11 FRS and these were  London, West Sussex, Hertfordshire, 
Suffolk, Kent, Essex, Tyne & Wear, Durham & Darlington, East Sussex, Bedfordshire and the West 
Midlands. 
 
Suppliers were required to re-submit their tenders with their best and final offer based on the final 
ensemble selected through Stage 2 and resubmit elements of their tender from discussions held at 
the negotiation sessions.  
Each of the Contractor’s final ensembles were evaluated by the wearers using methodology based 
upon BS 8469: 2007 ‘Personal Protective equipment for firefighters – Assessment of ergonomic 
performance and capability – Requirements and test methods’. The scores were then inputted in 
the final evaluation matrix.  
The tenders were evaluated on the basis of the criteria published in the tender document which 
was the most economically advantageous tender (MEAT) in terms of cost (40%) and quality (60%) 
using the model set out in Tables 1 and 2 below.  
Table 1: Quality Evaluation Criteria for Framework Award (60%)  
 
Quality Criteria  
Weighting 

Service Specification 
40% 

User wearer and compatability trials 
50% 

Processes 
10% 
 
TOTAL 
100% 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13 
 

 
Table 2: Cost Evaluation Criteria for Framework Award (40%) 
Within the table below, when adding the total percentage weighting it shows that the total score 
does not add up to 100%. This is due to the full decimal places not being visible within the tables 
below. The weightings have been rounded to the nearest figure which is the reason for the slight 
difference in the total weighting.  
 
 
Cost Criteria  
Weighting 

Structural Fully Managed Service 
74% 

Layered Jacket Fully Managed Service 
4% 

Rescue Jacket Fully Managed Service  
4% 

USAR Fully Managed Service 
4% 

Discount 
10% 

Adjustment under 5% 
2.5% 
  TOTAL 
100% 
 
Each suppliers bids were scored against the relevant quality and cost criteria. The full breakdown 
of scores awarded is provided in the Part Two report (Commercially Sensitive). 
 
4.5 Framework Award Recommendation 
That the Project Board recommends that the Authority agrees that; 
The Commercial Lead, in consultation with the Project Board, be authorised to award the 
framework to Bristol Unifroms for the provision of Personal Protective Equipment for Fire Fighters 
for a period of four years (with an option for 8 year call off contracts to be raised allowing for an 
additional 1 year implementation period) in accordance with the terms and costs set out in the Part 
2 report. 
4.6 Final Ensemble Selected 
4.6.1 Fire Fighters PPE 
Item 
Description 
Helmet 
Rosenbauer HEROS Titan 
Hood 
Bristol 28510 
Tunic/Trouser Ensemble 
Bristol 28493B & 28493BF 
Bristol 28493A & 28493AF 
Layered Jacket 
Bristol 28494C & 28494CF 
Rescue Jacket 
Bristol 28493E & 28493EF 
Fire Glove 
Seiz XFS 
14 
 

 
Rescue Glove 
Vimpex EX1/RSQ 
Leather Boot 
Jolly 9306CA 
Rubber Boot 
Skellerup Extreme 
 
4.6.2 USAR PPE 
Item 
Option & Description 
Helmet 
MSA F2 X-TREM 
Rescue Glove 
Seiz X-Rescue 
USAR Boot 
Jolly 9300GA 
Chainsaw Boot 
Jolly 9065GA 
Trouser 
28495A/AF 
W/W Trouser 
A112 
Jacket 
28495B/BF 
W/W Jacket 
FK25 
 
4.7 Length of Framework Agreement 
As per the adverts for this procurement and the information provided with the Invitation to Tender, 
the length of the Framework Agreement is as follows: 
  Framework Agreement – 4 years from the date of signing the Framework Agreement 
  Call Off Contracts – Can be put in place within the 4 year call off period and will be for a 
period of 8 years.  
The Public Contract Regulations 2015 stipulate the following in relation to the term of a Framework 
Agreement – ‘The term of a framework agreement shal  not exceed four years, save in exceptional 
cases duly justified, in particular by the subject-matter of the framework agreement’.  
There will not be the option to extend the Framework Agreement beyond four years.  
 
 
 
 
 
15 
 

 
Section 5 – Risks and Benefits 
5.1 Risks 
A risk assessment took place throughout the Procurement Process. The risk that has been 
identified following the Framework Award is: 
Risk Description 
Control 
Commerical challenge under the Public 
  Legal advice has been sought on all 
Contract Regulations 2015, which may delay 
elements of the process 
the award of the Framework Agreement or even 
  A fair, transparent and compliant 
require the procurement to be aborted and 
procurement process has been carried 
started again. 
out with a full audit trail available 
  The evaluation was carried out as 
defined within the Invitation to Tender 
and full debrief information is available to 
each Supplier.  
  Full debrief information will also be 
supplied upon notification of the 
outcome for the tender, thereby ensuring 
that the process remains fully 
transparent.  
  There shall be a ten day standstill period 
between notification of the results and 
award of the Framework Agreement for 
unsuccessful suppliers to raise 
objections or directly challenge the 
decision, prior to filing a claim for a legal 
challenge.  
 
It should be noted that there is no commitment given to the successful supplier upon the award of 
the Framework Agreement. Commitment is only formed upon the placement of a Call-Off Contract 
between the individual Contracting Authority and the successful supplier.  
It is anticipated that the 20 FRS that signed an Inter Authority Agreement will report to their 
Authorities on award of the Framework Agreement, recommending to take the Framework.  
5.2 Benefits  
The following benefits of this Framework Agreement have been identified:  
  Robust procurement process which is fair and transparent  
  Audit/review by an external company of the process 
  One centrally managed framework  
  One comprehensive Risk Assessment  
  Ensures compliance with Health and Safety requirement (PPE at Work Regs 1992)  
  The items have been fully evaluated by wearers from across the country so removes the 
need for further trials to be completed 
  Independent research and development of the selection methodology was carried out by 
the University of Portsmouth 
  Bespoke and robust terms and conditions specific to the requirement 
  A cost model which enables volume discounts, thereby optimising the collective buying 
power of the FRS and generating cashable savings, in addition to the cost avoidance 
16 
 

 
savings that FRS’s wil  benefit from in terms of reduction in time and resource to place a 
call-off via this framework.  
  No requirement for mini competitions or additional charges for FRS wishing to access the 
framework  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17 
 

 
Section 6 – Implementation Timescales 
 
Milestones 
Target Date 
Owner 
Issue Intention to Award Letters 
By 8th May 2017 
Hannah Parfitt (KFRS) 
10 day mandatory standstill 
9th to 19th May 2017 
Hannah Parfitt (KFRS) 
period and respond to supplier 
communications 
Award of the Framework 
By 22nd May 2017 
Hannah Parfitt (KFRS) 
Agreement ((assuming no review 
(legal) process is initiated to 
challenge the award)) 
Signing of the Framework 
8th June 2017 
Hannah Parfitt (KFRS) 
Agreeement  
Framework Agreement Go Live 
8th June 2017 
N/A 
Commencement of Call-Off 
From 8th June 2017 
Contracting Authority 
Contracts 
Communication with Contracting 
From 8th June 2017 
Hannah Parfitt and Brett 
Authorities and ongoing 
Egan (KFRS)  
management of the Framework 
Agreement 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18 
 

 
Section 7 – Approval 
Project Board Approval  
Role 
Print Name 
Signature 
Date 
Project Sponsor (KFRS) 
Ann Millington 
 
 
 
Project Manager (KFRS) 
Chris Colgan 
 
 
 
Commercial Lead (KFRS) 
Hannah Parfitt 
 
 
 
Technical Lead (KFRS) 
Brett Egan 
 
 
 
Commercial Advisor (LFB)  Nicol Thornton 
 
 
 
Commercial Advisor 
Mandy Beasley 
 
 
(WMFRS) 
 
North East Representative  Robin Clow 
 
 
 
Legal Advisor (LFB) 
Dara Vexter/Valerie 
 
 
Boomla 
 
 
Clothing Category Lead 
Role 
Print Name 
Signature 
Date 
Head of Procurement 
Tina Butler 
 
 
KFRS 
 
 
Legal  
Role 
Print Name 
Signature 
Date 
Independent Legal Advisor  John Sharland 
 
 
 
 
19 
 


Document Outline