This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Physics, Economics, English, PPE, Maths, Law Selection for interview criteria'.


UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD
Ref. FOI/2017/July
11 August 2017
Reply to request for information under Freedom of Information of Act
Your Ref
Email dated 14 July 2017
Address
What do they know.com
_
Request
Please could you send me copy of spreadsheets, forms, assessment tools and/or
criteria that are used to select which applicants are chosen for interview for Chemistry,
Physics, Maths, PPE, Economics, Law and English. Also the same documents/criteria
used when assessing interviewees for an offer.
Dear Mr Pattison,
I write in reply to your email of 14 July 2017, requesting the information shown above.
The selection criteria for each subject are available on the University website here.
I attach additional information, where available, on the criteria used to shortlist applications and assess
interviewees. Information that falls outside the scope of your request has been redacted.
Yours sincerely
(Max Todd)
FOI OXFORD
General Enquiries Tel: +44 (0)1865 270000
Fax: +44 (0)1865 270222 Email: xxx@xxxxx.xx.xx.xx Web: www.ox.ac.uk

Chemistry UCAS form grading
Each candidate will be given a mark 1-5 on their UCAS form (5 = high) by tutors in the C1 college
Guidance for grading:
Grading will be based on the following 4 criteria
(i)
A level grades or equivalent (obtained or predicted)
(ii)
AS grades (if applicable)
(iii) GCSE grades or equivalent
(iv) Reference
Contextual data should not influence the grade given, but must be considered carefully if a
recommendation is made not to interview. University policy is that if a candidate is predicted grades
consistent with our standard offer, and has both a prior school flag and a postcode flag, then there is a
strong recommendation that they should be interviewed. There is a similar recommendation for
candidates with a care flag.
ADSS provides a statistic which analyses the GCSE score in comparison to other applicants in all subjects
from Schools with comparable GCSE performance. This may pick out students who do not look stunning
but have performed much better than expected, and the converse.
A* grades at A level correlate reasonably well with our interview assessments, although we reject a
large number of candidates who ultimately gain 3 or more A* grades. The number of A*s gained is also
a reasonable predictor of success at Prelims and Part IA – better than any other measure we have at
present.
Since the standard offer is now A*A*A candidates who are predicted A*AA are unlikely to be
competitive; occasionally schools will not predict A* grades as a matter of policy: if this is the case then
they should say so in their reference. An additional complication this year is that this is the first cohort
taking the new linear A levels, and Schools are finding prediction more difficult. Such candidates
should not be ruled out automatically, as predictions are not always accurate but should be considered
carefully. It is also worth pointing out that the proportions of candidates gaining A* grades varies with
A level subject – in 2016 it was Chemistry 8%, Maths 18%, Further maths 29%, biology 8%, physics
9% (candidates selecting further maths are a self-selecting set).
You can only grade on the basis of the information provided. Some overseas students will not have
equivalents to GCSE or AS and this should not be a reason to exclude them from the shortlist. The
criteria below are typical rather than restrictive.
5/5 candidate would typically have: predicted or achieved grades of 3 or more A*s in chemistry,
maths and one other A level or equivalent; all AS levels at A grade (if applicable); a large majority of
GCSE at A* including all important subjects and a reference recommending them as an outstanding
candidate.
4.5/5 candidate would typically have at least 3 A* grades predicted or gained, including chemistry
and maths, no obvious weakness at AS, a majority of GCSEs at A*, including the important subjects, but
with lower grades in non-scientific subjects.
4/5 candidate would typically have most of the attributes of the 5/5 candidate, but might fall down
in one area only: there must be a confident prediction of A*A*A at A level, or equivalent, with the A*’s
in science or maths, but the GCSE results might be good but not outstanding (still with A* in the
important subjects). Such a candidate would be expected to have a strong rather than an outstanding
reference.
3/5 candidate would typically be predicted at least A*AA at A level or equivalent, but there may be a
good reason to suspect that the candidate has the potential to be better than this. Such candidates may

or may not be invited for interview, but should be considered carefully before excluding them from the
shortlist. Last year we made 5 offers to candidates predicted A*AA, 4 of these were successful, two
outperforming the prediction, and indeed one gaining A*A*A*.
2/5 candidate would be expected to have: at least A in Chemistry/Science double subject and maths
GCSE; predicted or achieved grades of at least A*AA in A level or equivalent. Experience shows that
candidates graded this low are extremely unlikely to be successful and we would not normally
shortlist them unless there is a good reason to consider them.
1/5 candidate would typically have predictions of AAA or lower at A level or equivalent, or be offering
insufficient science. We would not normally invite these candidates for interview.
Any comments or suggestions for improvement would be gratefully received.

 
Economics and Management Admissions 
 
Candidates are shortlisted for interview according to the factors in the following table with 
weights – High/Medium/Low – as indicated.  For those shortlisted, performance at interview 
is an additional assessment factor considered alongside those shown which remain important. 
 
Factor 
High 
Med 
Low 
Thinking Skills Assessment (TSA) Test  
 
 
 
GCSE (or similar) profile 
 
 
 
Predicted performance at A-level (or similar) 
 
 
 
UCAS reference 
 
 
 
AS level module grades 
 
 
 
UCAS personal statement 
 
 
 
 
 

ENGLISH
 
 
ELAT scores 
ELAT marks will be uploaded to the system by 5pm on Monday 21 November 
(MT Week 7).  
 
Candidates will sit the ELAT at test centres round the world on 2 November 2016. 
The test consists of a single writing exercise and is marked out of 30. Each test is 
at least double marked and the candidate will receive a final score out of 60, on 
the basis of which candidates will be banded into 4 bands.   
 
ELAT marks will be uploaded to the system by 5pm on Monday 7th week, and the 
banding meeting will take place 11am-1pm that day. The score (out of 60) is used 
in  pre-interview  ranking  and  allows  fine  discrimination  between  candidates.  The 
banding (1-4, where 1 is high) is a broad categorization which makes comparison 
 


between different years’ cohorts possible (because the actual spread of scores on 
ELAT differs from year to year depending on difficulty).  
 
The 4 bands will indicate the following: 
The  top  Band  will  identify  those  candidates  who  should  definitely  be  called  for 
interview (unless other indicators strongly suggest otherwise) 
The  second  Band  will  indicate  candidates  who  should  be  invited,  provided  other 
information supports this 
The third Band will contain candidates who may not be called unless there is other 
convincing evidence to suggest they ought to be interviewed.  
The  fourth  Band  identifies  those  students  who  are  unlikely  to  be  invited,  though 
other factors may outweigh the evidence of the test. 
 
 
Tutors will be able to view a scanned image (PDF) of the ELAT script by clicking 
on the link associated with the candidate’s first name on the ELAT  page.  
 
 
 


Pre-interview Ranking and Banding 
All marks are standardized against the applicant cohort. Unified rankings are 
created using each standardized mark in different proportions (as in 2015):  
  40% ELAT mark out of 60 
  25% Written Work mark out of 10 
  17.5% UCAS score out of 10 
  17.5% Contextualized GCSE score.  
English is for the second year trialing a new model for contextalised GCSE (rather 
than GCSE A*) in 2015. Where the Contextualized GCSE score is unavailable, 
imputation is used (a ‘best guess’ at what the candidate’s GCSE score would have 
been, based on their other scores). There is no need to perform the same 
upranking where there is no ELAT or WW score, as failure to sit/submit these is 
grounds for deselection. However, tutors are free manually to rescue any 
candidate who has a genuinely good reason for having failed to take the ELAT 
(please alert the Admission Co-ordinator to this).) 
 
Once ranked, applicants will be placed into one of ten bands, where 1 is high. 
These bands serve as the tutors’ guide to shortlisting. 
 
Shortlisting and deselecting candidates 
Decisions on reserving and deselecting candidates must be made by the 
deadline of 6pm on Wednesday Week 7.
 
 
Pre-interview banding will be done by Tuesday morning 7th week. Colleges then 
have until 6pm on Wednesday to make shortlisting/reserving/deselection 
decisions.  
 
Guidelines are as follows: 
 
  Shortlist bands 1-5 inclusive. 
  Shortlist or deselect band 6 (unflagged) at tutors’ discretion; shortlist all 
Access-flagged candidates in band 6. 
  Shortlist Access-flagged candidates in lower bands unless strong negative 
indicators suggest otherwise
  Please contact the Admissions Co-ordinator if you are concerned about 
selecting/deselecting any particular candidate. 
Strong negative indicators which mean that candidates may not be selected for 
interview include: missing ELAT (although tutors may summon such candidates if 
they consider there were very strong mitigating circumstances; ELAT band 4; 
written work marked below 5; not predicted at least AAA or equivalent at A2. Such 
conditions only come into play with WP flagged candidates, as non-flagged 
candidates in the lower bands need not be considered for selection unless tutors 
wish to ‘rescue’ them. 
 
 


The Faculty goal is that all colleges should shortlist to the same standard across 
the university; once Access flags have been taken into account, no college should 
shortlist any applicant they would not wish to interview themselves (within the 
parameters of automatic shortlisting for bands 1-5). 

 


 
Interview Week Arrangements 
Some colleges may call candidates earlier than the dates given in the prospectus. 
Colleges with higher quotas, who find the number of interviews very strenuous, are 
recommended to explore the possibility of beginning interviewing on Sunday 
afternoon. 
 
The alphabetical principle is entirely discretionary – colleges should prioritize filling 
up Sunday/Monday, so that exporters have as clear a picture as possible by 
Monday evening, and importers can keep second interview slots free on Tuesday. 
 
It is strongly recommended that all importing colleges preserve slots on 
Tuesday for second interviews
; the situation whereby the assigned second 
college can only see a Monday applicant on Wednesday, leaving other colleges 
wondering whether to risk seeing them on Tuesday (and thus not seeing other 
applicants), is as far as possible to be avoided. 
 
EML and CLENG candidates will also sit tests during the interview period.  
Interview  performance  should  be  judged  according  to  the  published  interview 
criteria  (see  Appendix  1:  English  admissions  criteria,  p.12).  Colleges  should 
enter their interview scores onto ADSS using a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the 
highest  score.  The  sooner  interview  scores  are  entered  into  ADSS,  the  more 
helpful  this  information  will  be  to  colleges  looking  to  arrange  second-choice 
interviews.  College tutors should enter interview scores by 7.00pm each day 
for the candidates seen that day.
 
 
10 

Appendix 1: English admissions criteria 
The English Faculty seeks: 
•   To  provide  challenging  undergraduate  courses  that  engage  the  critical 
intelligence,  imagination  and  creativity  of  the  students;  that  develop  their 
independent thinking by drawing on technical skills in literary analysis; and that 
increase their sensitivity to the critical and linguistic issues that lie at the heart of 
English literature.  
•   To  promote  in  all  its  students  skills  and  aptitudes  which  are  transferable  to  a 
wide range of employment contexts and life experiences. 
Our  admissions  procedures  are  designed  to  select  those  students  best  fitted  by 
ability and potential to benefit from the intensive, tutorially-based learning methods 
employed  by  the  Faculty  to  achieve  those  goals.  While  academic  staff  will  be 
guided  in  their  decision-making  by  the  criteria  that  follow,  it  is  important  to 
remember  that  selection  involves  complex  professional  judgements  and  that 
selection for places at Oxford takes place in a highly competitive environment. On 
both counts, mere possession of the qualities indicated below does not guarantee 
a candidate the offer of a place. 
The  following  criteria  are  to  be  applied  in  the  assessment  of  candidates  for 
English. In the case of candidates for the Joint Schools with English, these criteria 
are to be applied in assessment for the English side of each school. 
Written Work Criteria 
•        Literary sensibility 
•        Sensitivity to the creative use of language 
•        Evidence of careful and critical reading 
•        An analytical approach 
•        Coherence of argument and articulacy of expression 
•        Precision, in the handling of concepts and in the evidence presented to 
support points 
•        Relevance to the question 
•        Originality. 
Interview Criteria 
•        Evidence of independent reading 
•        Capacity to exchange and build on ideas 
•        Clarity of thought and expression 
•        Analytical ability 
•        Flexibility of thought 
•        Evidence of independent thinking about literature 
•        Readiness and commitment to read widely with discrimination 
 
 
13 

Candidates will be assessed on the basis of information derived from the following 
sources:  
•  UCAS forms, including, in particular, personal statements, school reports, 
qualifications achieved and qualifications predicted 
•  Performance in the ELAT 
•  Written work submitted by candidates  
•  Performance in interviews  
•  Comparison, in all these areas, with other candidates 
Every  effort  will  be  made  to  take  into  account  the  special  needs  or  particular 
circumstances of candidates in making judgements on these matters.  
 
14 

LAW
 
(j) Selection for Interview 
 
1. Criteria for Selection for interview 
 
The required standard in school leaving qualifications is as follows: 
 
 
 

A-level  
 
 
AAA in any subject except for General Studies.  
 
Internat. Baccalaureate  38 + inc. Bonus points
(with at least 6,6,6 in higher level papers) 
 
European Baccalaureate An  average  of  85%  or  above,  with  scores  of  between  
and 9 in specified subjects. 
 
Scottish Candidates 
AA  in  Advanced  Highers  plus  either  a  B  in  a  third 
Advanced Higher or an A in a Standard Higher (where that 
Standard Higher is in a different subject from each of the 
Advanced Highers) 
 
Required  achieved  or  predicted  grades  in  respect  of  other  qualifications  can  be 
obtained online: 
www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate_courses/international_applicants/internatio
nal_qualifications/index.html 
 
If a candidate has not achieved, or is not predicted to achieve, the required standard 
in  A-Level  or  equivalent  examinations  (or,  where  relevant,  in  a  first  undergraduate 
degree), then, in the absence of exceptional circumstances, that candidate will not be 
invited  for  interview.  It  is  often  the  practice  of  colleges  to  contact  candidates  with 
missing predictions and ask for such predictions to be provided by a relevant person.  
 
If this occurs, and such evidence is received, colleges should be aware of the 
need to pass such information on to the Faculty Selection Committee (via the 
Student Administration Officer: xxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx) if the candidate in 
question is not pre-selected. 
 
Applications  for  standard  (ie  not  Senior  Status)  undergraduate  courses  should  be 
assessed in a single gathered field, irrespective of whether the application is for a first 
or a second degree. This means that 2nd BA applications no longer exist as a separate 
category and hence that, if a college offers undergraduate places in a subject, it must 
also consider applications from those who already have a degree. 
 
Candidates will normally be invited for interview if they meet the following criteria: 
 
(a)  Results  in  official  examinations  to  date,  especially  GCSE/A-
levels/examinations in the first degree, are at the highest level (Appendix 
A); 
(b)  The school report/reference is entirely positive and contains no negative 
aspects relevant to the admission criteria (above, p.10); 
(c)  Results in the Law National Admissions Test are at the highest level. 
 
Candidates may still be invited for interview if their applications do not display 
all  of  these  factors  if  the  paper  application  reveals  a  clear  and  objective 
justification  for  the  shortcoming(s)  and  strong  and  convincing  alternative 
evidence of the candidate’s future promise. In particular, outstanding strength 
in one field may compensate for weakness in another.  
 
These criteria are modified as necessary to apply with similar effect to candidates who 
are  not  in  UK  secondary,  further  or  higher  education.  There  will  be  no  overseas 
 
 

interviews  this  year,  therefore  no  overseas  interview  scores  will  be  available.  All 
overseas candidates will be assessed based on the same criteria as above.  
 
Some  non-UK  candidates  may  not  have  completed  any  formal  assessments  at  the 
point of application. In the absence of existing academic qualifications, colleges are 
free to adopt their own policies with regard to these candidates. Colleges should be 
aware that the Faculty Selection Committee, when considering such applications, will 
necessarily place particular weight on the candidate’s LNAT performance. Candidates 
are encouraged to include all relevant existing academic qualifications when making 
their  application.  If  colleges  receive  evidence  of  existing  academic  qualifications 
beyond those mentioned in a candidate’s UCAS form, colleges should be aware of the 
need to pass such information on to the Faculty Selection Committee (via the Student 
Administration Officer: xxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.xx) if the candidate in question is not 
pre-selected. 
 

 
 
2. Criteria for assessing interviews 
 
Interview  questions  may  include  legally-related  questions  as  well  as  more  general 
intellectual  puzzles  calling  for  analysis  of a  type  similar  to  legal  analysis.  Many  law 
tutors will present candidates with a short extract from a judgment or newspaper article 
(two or three sides of A4) and discuss this with them during the interview (having given 
them half an hour to read the extract beforehand). Knowledge of the law, other than 
such knowledge as can be learned from such an extract, if any) is not being assessed 
and is irrelevant to the assessment of the interview). Interviewers will be looking for 
 
21 

evidence relevant to each of the general admissions criteria. Reflecting these criteria 
in turn, high scoring interviews will normally exhibit: 
 
(1) Application: a high degree of concentration on the matter under discussion, 
free  of  distraction  and  digression,  and  a  clear  enthusiasm  for  pursuing  a 
problem to its solution; 
 
(2) Reasoning ability: thoughtful reactions to novel problems or novel versions 
of a problem posed by the interviewers, an ability to maintain a line of argument 
free  of  contradiction  or  equivocation  (evidence  of  which  may  include  quick 
detection  by  the  candidate  of  contradictions  or  equivocations  in  what  the 
interviewer or the candidate has said), and an ability to break free from a line 
of thinking which is proving unproductive;  
 
(3) Communication: clear responses carefully articulated. 
 
Interviewers may ask questions about the candidate’s interests and enthusiasms in 
order  to  ease  the  candidate  into  the  interview  proper,  or  in  order  to  assess  the 
candidate’s motivation. The candidate’s general accomplishments, tastes and virtues 
are irrelevant except insofar as they bear on one or more of the general admissions 
criteria. 

Appendix B(a): Example of Admissions assessment form 
 
LAW ADMISSIONS 
Candidate Evaluation Notes1 
 

UCAS Form 
 
 
GCSE results 
 
 
 
 
A – Level predictions  
 
 
Reference 
 
 
Personal Statement 
 
 
Disability 
 
 
 
LNAT/Law 
Faculty  Score  
Written Test 
 
Multiple Choice  
 
 
 
 
Essay Part  
 
 
 
 
Pre-Interview 
Decision  
Justification 
Decision 
Invite 
for   
 
Interview/pass  on  to 
 
Faculty 
Selection 
 
Committee 
(please 
 
specify) 
 
 
 
 
 
                                            
1 This form is provided for use in conjunction with the Faculty of Law Criteria for Admission to the BA programme 
in Jurisprudence (including Law with Law Studies in Europe)
.  
 
43 

Appendix B(b): Example of Interview assessment form 
 
Candidate Name:           Assessor Name:      
 
Interview 
Additional Comments  
Evaluation 
Score 1 - 102 

Application:  
 
 
Concentration 
and   
enthusiasm 
 
 
 
 
Reasoning: 
 
 
Ability  to  make  a   
sustained and cogent   
argument 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ability  to  distinguish   
relevant 
from   
irrelevant 
 
 
 
 
 
Ability  to  identify  and   
explain  weaknesses   
in argument  
 
 
 
 
 
Creativity, flexibility of   
 
thought, 
lateral   
thinking 
 
 
Communication:  
 
 
Ability  to  give  clear   
and 
carefully   
articulated responses   
 
 
Overall 
evaluation   
 
of interview3 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                            
2 Evaluation Scores: 1-2 Very poor; 3-4 Poor; 5 – 6 Average; 7-8 Good; 9-10 Very Good.  
3 Please give general evaluation of interview with reference to the Faculty of Law Criteria for Admission. 
 
44 

Post-interview report form for candidates applying to
MATHEMATICS, COMPUTER SCIENCE, and JOINT SCHOOLS
Interviewing college:
Candidate's name
Interviewers
Date
Time
Course
Year
"X" and
3 yr
A-level
School name
"Y"
GCSE summary
record
predictions
statistics
---
Test
Rank &
Questions
Total
PSI
Notes
Subrank
REPORT ON INTERVIEW (for each criterion circle score in range 1 low to 9 high)
Technical (ability to manipulate mathematics, independently apply known techniques)
[ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ]
Reasoning (clarity of logical argument, ability to argue independently)
[ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ]
Capacity to generate new ideas and adapt known techniques
[ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ]
Capacity to absorb new ideas and techniques
[ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ]
Motivation and enthusiasm
[ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ]
INTERVIEW COMMENTS
OTHER INFORMATION AFFECTING OVERALL GRADE (e.g. written submission)
Interview grade
[1 2 3 4 5 6 6+ 7– 7 7+ 8 9]
(First college only)
PROVISIONAL OVERALL GRADE
[1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]
An evaluation of all the information available on the candidate, including UCAS form, test and all interviews.
Numerical grades: 9: exceptional accept, 8: accept, 7: borderline, 6: below borderline, 5: probably reject, 4: reject, <4: clear reject.

Candidate Name:                             
 
 
 College: 
 
 
 
Physics Admissions Interview Assessment Form 
 
(a)  Motivation: a real interest and strong desire to learn physics 
 
      1              2              3             4              5 
 
(b)  Ability to express physical ideas using mathematics; mathematical ability 
 
      1              2              3             4              5 
 
(c)  Reasoning ability: ability to analyse and solve problems using logical and 
      critical approaches 
 
      1              2              3             4              5 
 
(d)  Physical intuition: an ability to see how one part of a physical system connects 
      with others, and to predict what will happen in a given physical situation 
 
      1              2              3             4              5 
  
(e)  Communication: ability to give precise explanations both orally and 
numerically 
      1              2              3             4              5 
 
Comments 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
        Interview number                  Overall Interview Grade 
 

  1         2        3          4          5       6         7          8           9          10 
   Unacceptable      Problematic  Acceptable         Good        Excellent 
  D       C       BC       B
       B       B+      B++     AB       A       A 
 
   Maths       Physics    Total 

 
  
 
 

Candidate Name:                             
 
 
 College: 
 
Physics Admissions Interview Assessment Form 
 
(a)  Motivation: 
 
   1 




 
(b)  Mathematical 
ability: 
    1 2 3 4 5 
 
(c)  Reasoning 
ability: 
    1 2 3 4 5 
 
(d)  Physical 
intuition: 
    1 2 3 4 5 
 
(e)  Communication:     1 2 3 4 5 
 
Comments 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
        Interview number                  Overall Interview Grade 
 

  1         2        3          4          5       6         7          8           9          10 
   Unacceptable      Problematic  Acceptable         Good        Excellent 
  D       C       BC       B
       B       B+      B++     AB       A       A 
 
   Maths test       Physics test     Total
 

PPE
4.1 Shortlisting criteria 
The  criteria  for  shortlisting  for  interview  are  specified  on  the  university 
webpage as follows: 
“We  only  interview  those  who  have  a  realistic  chance  of  getting  in, 
when  judged  by  past  and  predicted  exam  results,  school  reports, 
personal  statements  and  the  pre-interview  test.  Candidates  from 
overseas may be considered without interview.” 
 
The TSA results (and the banding of candidates according to TSA) are only a 
component part of making the decision to interview a candidate. Research by 
Cambridge Assessment on the correlation of the TSA with prelims has shown 
a correlation between the TSA and economics and philosophy prelims but not 
with politics. Therefore, it is important that the TSA informs our picture of the 
candidate rather than determining it. The weighting given to the information on 
a candidate should be as follows:  
 
Factor 
High 
Med 
Low 
Pre-interview Admissions Test  
 
 
 
GCSE (or similar) profile 
 
 
 
Predicted performance at A-level (or similar) 
 
 
 
UCAS reference 
 
 
 
AS level module grades 
 
 
 
UCAS personal statement 
 
 
 
 
To  achieve  consistency  of  short-listing  decisions  across  colleges,  all 
applicants will be allocated to bands according to their TSA overall score, as 
follows:  
 
Band    

Almost certainly shortlist 

Probably shortlist 

Marginal – use other information. 

Probably Deselect 

TSA score currently Unavailable;  
use other information. 
 
                                                 
1 This is the ratio of interviews per place agreed for PPE under the Common Framework. 
 
 

The band for each candidate will be displayed on the  ‘PPE Reserve Shortlist 
and Deselect’ screen in ADSS.  
In addition to the band for each candidate, each college will be given a target 
number  of  applicants  to  deselect.  The  cut-off  scores  for  each  band  will  be 
chosen so that, if colleges follow this shortlisting guidance, the target of  2.75 
interviews  per  place  for  PPE  as  a  whole  will  be  achieved.  The  college’s 
individual target will be calculated according to the number of applicants it has 
in  each  band.  Each  college  must  meet  its  Deselection  target  by 
deselecting the indicated number of candidates
. This is a requirement for 
the automatic  reallocation procedure of  candidates  to first  interviews  to  work 
(see section 4.4). 
Colleges that wish to interview candidates above their quota may do so
by  rescuing  the  candidates  after  the  reallocation  has  taken  place  (section 
4.5). 

“Pending”.  You  should  be  able  to  change  the  status  of  a  candidate  from 
“Pending”  to  “Reserved”,  “Shortlisted”  or  “Deselected”  by  clicking  on  the 
appropriate blue button. 
In  general,  a  college  that  has  more  than  2.75  candidates  for  interview  per 
place after deselection should expect to  reallocate (export) candidates, while 
a  college  with  fewer  than  2.75  should  expect  to  receive  (import)  candidates. 
The expected number of imports or exports will also be displayed. 
A college that expects to export candidates may Reserve some candidates as 
unavailable for reallocation. Following consultation with the College Groups in 
December  2007,  the  PPE  Committee  has  agreed  that  number  reserved 
should be no more than 1.5 X the number of places at the college

De-selection  and  Reservation  decisions  must  be 
entered on ADSS by 3pm Tuesday of 7th week. 

The deadline for final Rescue decisions to be entered 
on ADSS is 1pm on Wednesday of 7th week. 
 
5. Interviews and decisions 
Interviews at  the first-choice  college are held between  Monday and Tuesday 
of  9th  week.  Candidates  are  required  to  remain  in  Oxford  until  the 
morning of Wednesday of 9th week
, in case they are required for interviews 
at other colleges. 
5.1 Criteria for the conduct and content of interviews 
Under the Common Framework it has been agreed that for PPE: 
  applicants will normally have at least two interviews at their first choice 
college, although some colleges may have a single longer interview 
  most  colleges  will  have  a  minimum  of  two  interviewers  per  interview, 
and require interviewers to have received basic interview training 
  colleges  normally  wish  to  involve  tutors  from  all  three  subjects,  but 
since there are no specific subject requirements, and the content of the 
interviews is not subject-specific, it is not necessary to ensure this. 
What  is  expected  to  happen  at  interview  is  described  on  the  university 
webpage (http://www.ppe.ox.ac.uk/index.php/interviews), as follows: 
“The interview is aimed primarily at assessing the candidate's potential 
for  future  development.  Interviewers  will  be  looking  for  evidence  of 
genuine interests and enthusiasms, and the motivation to work hard at 
them.  The  candidates  should  listen  effectively,  absorbing  facts  and 
ideas  presented  to  them  and  assessing  their  relevance.  They  should 
be  ready  to  respond  to  problems  and  criticisms  put  to  them.  They 
should  present  arguments  and  reasoning  in  a  clear  and  carefully 
articulated manner. 
The  interview  is  not  primarily  a  test  of  existing  knowledge,  and  in 
particular,  is  not  a  test  of  philosophy,  politics  or  economics,  unless 
these  subjects  have  been  followed  at  school.  The  candidates  are 
expected  to  show  reasons  for  their  expressed  interests  in  PPE. 
Candidates'  general  accomplishments  are  not  relevant  except  insofar 
as they bear on one or more of the general admissions criteria.” 
5.2 Interview scores 
Up  to  three  interview  scores  can  be  entered  on  ADSS.  These  may  be 
separate grades for the politics, economics, and philosophy aspects, or non-
subject-specific grades for different interviews.  
Enter first interview scores for all candidates by 5pm 
on Tuesday of 9th week. 
 

Mark scheme for interviews 
Interviews  are  marked  on  a  scale  of  1-100,  and  marks  are  interpreted  as 
follows: 
70-100 
Excellent 
A mark above 70 is a strong indicator for admission 
65-69 
Positive  
Most candidates admitted will have interview scores above 65.  
60-64 
Neutral 
 
A candidate with interview and test marks consistently below 60 
50-59  
Weak 
is in a weak position 
49 or 
Very poor 
Interview strongly suggests that the candidate is not suitable 
less 
 
Standardization of scores 
In order to improve the comparability of interview scores across colleges,  the 
PPE  committee  has  agreed  to  standardize  the  individual  college’s  scores. 
This is mainly to help with the allocation of Second Interviews as some tutors 
had  previously  noted  that  some  Colleges  (or  subjects)  marks  deviated 
significantly  from  the  pattern  elsewhere.  To  this  effect,  a  new  column 
‘Interview  Stand.  Average’  has  been  added  next  to  the  previous  ‘Interview 
Average’ in the relevant ADSS views (see section 5.4). 
The  standardized  score  is  a  reworking  of  the  z-score  of  the  raw  average  of 
interview scores. A z-score is simply: 
𝑅𝑎𝑤 𝑎𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑎𝑔𝑒 − 𝜇
𝑧
𝑐
𝑐 =
𝜎
 
𝑐
where 𝜇𝑐 is the mean of the raw interview average marks within each college 
and 𝜎𝑐 the corresponding standard deviation. This score is dimensionless, so 
ADSS reports a  re-scaled interview mark by using the mean 𝜇 and standard 
deviation 𝜎 of the population of applicants (all colleges): 
𝑧 = 𝑧𝑐 × 𝜎 + 𝜇 
This effectively forces the standardized scores within each college to have the 
same  average  and  standard  deviation  as  in  the  whole  population  of 
applicants. 
 

APPENDIX B: Admissions Criteria for PPE5 
PPE tutors are looking for evidence of the following qualities in applicants: 
Application  and  interest:  capacity  for  sustained  study,  motivation  and 
interest, an independent and reflective approach to learning; 
Reasoning  ability:  ability  to  analyse  and  solve  problems  using  logical  and 
critical  approaches,  ability  to  assess  relevance,  capacity  to  construct  and 
critically  assess  arguments,  flexibility  and  willingness  to  consider  alternative 
views; 
Communication:  willingness  and  ability  to  express  ideas  clearly  and 
effectively  on  paper  and  orally;  ability  to  listen;  ability  to  give  considered 
responses. 
Throughout  the  admissions  process,  tutors  will  be  seeking  to  detect  the 
candidate's  future  potential  as  a  PPE  student.  Existing  achievement  (as 
revealed  in  official  examinations,  predicted  examination  results,  and  school 
reports),  as  well  as  performance  in  the  written  test  and  interview,  is  relied 
upon mainly as evidence of future potential. 
Candidates  are  not  expected  to  have  studied  any  philosophy,  politics  or 
economics  at  school,  but  should  be  interested  and  be  prepared  to  put  their 
minds to problems of philosophy, politics and economics presented to them. 
In the case of candidates whose first language is not English, competence in 
the English language is also a criterion of admission. 
Final  decisions  about  offers  of  places  will  use  the  full  range  of  evidence 
available,  including  past  and  predicted  exam  results,  the  school  report,  the 
personal  statement,  the  pre-interview  test  and  the  interviews.  Entry  is 
competitive,  which  means  that  not  all  candidates  who  satisfy  the  admissions 
criteria will receive offers.  
                                                 
5 The Admissions Criteria are publicly available on the PPE website (www.ppe.ox.ac.uk) 
 
 

Document Outline