Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Information about Haringey Borough Council & Sevacare Haringey'.



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Safeguarding Adults 
 
Joint Establishment Concerns 
Procedure and Guidance 
 
 
 
 
July 2015 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
www.haringey.gov.uk 
 
Page 1 of 26 







 
 
Document Control 
 
Version 
Status 
Authors 
1.0 
Final April 2013  
Lorraine Stanforth   Safeguarding Adults 
Project Lead, Haringey Clinical 
Commissioning Group 
 
Helen Constantine   Head of Business 
Management & Improvement Service, 
Haringey Adult and Housing Services 
 
Farzad Fazilat - Commissioning Manager, 
QA and Safeguarding, 
 
Version 
Status 
Authors 
2.0 
Final July 2015 
 
Helen Constantine   Head of Joint 
Governance & Business Improvement , 
Haringey Council 
 
Farzad Fazilat - Commissioning Manager, 
QA and Safeguarding, Haringey Council 
 
Karen Baggaley, AD for Safeguarding 
Haringey Clinical Commissioning Group 
 
Document Objectives: This joint health and social care strategy has been developed as a means for 
managing large scale investigations of Care Providers.   
  
Intended Recipients: The procedure applies to all Haringey residents who receive a service from an 
establishment. 
 
Monitoring Arrangements: Haringey council and the Clinical Commissioning Group is committed to 
working in partnership with statutory partners, in particular the Regulator who retains the overall 
responsibility for the registration and monitoring of compliance of Fundamental Standards 
 
Approving Body and Date Approved: 
July 2015 
Safeguarding Adults Board (SAB) 
Date of Issue 
July 2015 
 
Scheduled Review Date 
July 2018 
 
Lead Officers 
Karen Baggaley, AD for Safeguarding Haringey 
Clinical Commissioning Group 
 
Charlotte Pomery   Head of Joint 
Commissioning, Haringey Council 
 
Helen Constantine   Head of Joint 
Commissioning  & Business Improvement 
Service, Haringey Council 
 
Sue Southgate    Head of Service, Haringey 
Council  
 
 
 
 
 
Page of 26 

 
Contents 
 
Page: 
 
1. 
Principles and values 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4 
 
1.1 
Definition of Establishment  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

1.2 
Who does this document apply to? 
 
 
 
 
 
 

1.3 
Safeguarding Adults Reviews 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

1.4 
Large scale Investigations 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

1.5 
Organisations working with adults at risk 
 
 
 
 
 

1.6 
Organisations working together in Safeguarding Adults –    
 
 

1.7 
Working with Providers 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
2. 

Procedure   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10 
 
2.1 
Introduction  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10 
2.2 
Mental Capacity 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11 
2.3 
Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) 
 
 
 
 
 
11 
2.4 
Ill treatment and wilful neglect 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11 
2.5 
Categories of abuse – Institutional abuse 
 
 
 
 
 
11 
2.6 
Adults at risk who cause harm   
 
 
 
 
 
 
12 
2.7 
Abuse of trust 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13 
2.8 
Public interest 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13 
 
 
3. 

Roles and responsibilities   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14 
 
3.1 
Establishment Concern Strategy Meeting Group 
 
 
 
 
14 
3.2 
Other professionals  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14 
3.3 
Service Users  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17 
3.4 
Family/friends/visitors  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18 
3.5 
Advocates    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18 
3.6 
Document Control   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18 
 
 
4. 
Establishment Concern Procedure    
 
 
 
 
 
19 
 
4.1 
Stage 1: Decision to invoke the Establishment Concern Procedure 
 
19 
4.2 
Stage 2: Initial Strategy Meeting  
 
 
 
 
 
 
19 
4.3 
Stage 3: Establishment Concern Reconvened Strategy meeting 
 
 
21 
4.4 
Stage 4: Implementing Improvement Plan and Monitoring   
 
 
22 
4.5 
Stage 5: Completion and Closing of Establishment Concern Procedure   
23 
 
 
Appendix 
1. 
Establishment Concern Organisational Risk Assessment Template   
24 
 
 
 
Page of 26 

 
 
1. 
Principles and values 
 
This joint health and social care procedure and guidance has been developed as a 
means for managing large scale investigations of Care Providers.  It is a response 
to the concerns raised in Safeguarding Adults Reviews (SAR) about the quality of 
care  and  safety  of  people,  most  recently  the  South  Gloucestershire  report  on 
Winterbourne View Private Hospital1 and the Francis Report on the failings found 
at  Mid-Staffordshire  NHS  Foundation  Trust.2    It  is  not  however  exclusive  to  the 
findings  and  recommendations  of  these  reports,  it  has  also  taken  forward  the 
organisational 
learning 
from 
other 
SARs, 
management 
investigations, 
commissioning accreditation findings and safeguarding investigations managed by 
the lead agency for safeguarding  - Haringey council.  
 
The Care Act 2014 sets out the statutory framework for adult  safeguarding and is 
binding on local authorities, the police and the NHS but it also has relevance and 
messages  for  a  much  broader  range  of  organisations  and  individuals.    The 
statutory  guidance  makes  safeguarding  a  personalised  experience:  aiming  to 
achieve the outcomes identified by adults at risk of harm and abuse. 
 
This procedure is intended to reflect the Safeguarding Principles of: 
 
 
Empowerment  -  People  are  encouraged  to  make  their  own  decisions 
and are provided with support and information. 
 
Prevention  -  Strategies  are  developed  to  prevent  abuse  and  neglect 
that promotes resilience and self determination. 
 
Proportionate  –  A proportionate  and  least  intrusive  response  is made 
with people appropriate to the level of risk.  
 
Protection - People are offered ways to protect themselves, and there 
is a co-ordinated response to safeguarding concerns.  
 
Partnership  -  Local  solutions  through  services  working  with  their 
communities.  
 
Accountability  -  Accountability  and  transparency  in  delivering 
safeguarding. 
 
1.1 
Definition of Establishment 
 
An  Establishment  for  the  purposes  of  this  procedure  is  any  care  provider  who 
delivers  support  and  care  to  a  group  of  individuals. This  would  include but  is  not 
exclusive to the following: 
 
 
Domiciliary Care Providers 
 
Residential Care Homes 
 
Nursing Homes 
 
Supported Living  
 
Private hospitals 
                                                 
1South Gloucestershire Safeguarding Adults Board Winterbourne View Hospital Serious Case Review by Margaret Flynn 
(2012) 
2 Final Report Of The Independent Inquiry Into Care Provided By Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Published – 
Robert Francis QC 
 
Page of 26 

 
 
NHS hospitals including mental health provision 
 
Day Care/Opportunities Providers 
 
Rehabilitation Units for people who misuse drugs or alcohol 
 
1.2 
Who does this document apply to? 
 
1.2.1  Any resident who is deemed vulnerable by virtue of their need for a service is 
entitled to be safeguarded from abuse. This procedure applies equally to all 
Haringey residents who receive a service from an Establishment, regardless 
of any funding stream. People who fund their own care are equally entitled to 
be safeguarded and should be treated the same as other residents who are 
funded by the local authority or health services.  
 
1.2.2  The in house provision of any of these services is subject to the same level 
of scrutiny through safeguarding as those commissioned by the council or by 
individuals through Personal Budgets. 
 
1.3 
Safeguarding Adults Reviews  
 
The  Care Act  2014 introduces Safeguarding Adults Reviews  (previously known as 
Serious  Case  Reviews)  and  gives  SABs  flexibility  to  choose  a  proportionate 
methodology.    The  purpose  of  the  SAR  must  be  to  learn  lessons  and  improve 
practice and inter-agency working.  In Haringey the procedure is to follow that of the 
Care  Act  2014  regulations  and  guidance,  to  arrange,  where  appropriate,  for  an 
independent  advocate  to  represent  and  support  an  adult  who  is  subject  of  a 
safeguarding  enquiry  or  SAR  where  the  adult  has  ‘substantial  difficulty’  in  being 
involved in the process and where there is no other appropriate adult to help them 
learning  from  near  misses  and  situations  where  the  arrangements  worked 
especially  well.    It  expects  agencies  to  cooperate  with  the  review  but  also  gives 
Boards the power to require information from relevant agencies.  The SAB may also 
commission  a  SAR  in  other  circumstances  where  it  feels  it  would  be  useful, 
including  learning  from  “near  misses”  and  situations  where  the  arrangements 
worked especially well. The SAB decides when a SAR is necessary, arranges for its 
conduct and if it so decides, implements the findings. 
 
 
1.4 
Large scale Investigations 
 
1.4.1  Safeguarding  concerns  that  are  to  be  managed  through  large  scale 
investigations  are  predominantly  about  Providers  and  concerns  which  go 
beyond  quality  and  contractual  issues.  A  large-scale  Safeguarding  Adults 
investigation would be indicated when a number  of adults at risk have been 
allegedly abused, or patterns or trends are emerging from data that suggest 
concerns about poor quality of care:  
 
  in a particular resource/establishment; 
  where the same person is suspected of causing the abuse or neglect; 
and 
  where a group of individuals are alleged to be causing the harm. 
 
1.4.2  In  drawing  up  this  procedure,  Haringey  Council  and  Haringey  Clinical 
Commissioning Group are committed to working in partnership with statutory 
partners, in particular the Regulator who retains the overall responsibility for 
the registration and monitoring of care providers’ compliance of fundamental 
Page of 26 

 
standards.  Other  key  partners  and  stakeholders  are  police  colleagues, 
voluntary organisations and people who use services and those who support 
people who use services as family, friends and local residents.  
 
1.4.3  Additionally there are services that are in a unique position to work collegially 
-  safeguarding,  commissioning,  complaints  teams,  front  line  social  care 
teams, Continuing Health Care teams, and community safety unit and health 
and safety teams.   
 
1.4.4  Integral  to  the  effectiveness  of  managing  an  Establishment  Concern  is  the 
need  to  work  in  a  transparent  and  open  way  with  Providers.  It  is  not  the 
intention of this procedure to be punitive in its dealings with Providers but to 
implement  the  Safeguarding  Principles  by  supporting  and  giving  a  helpful 
steer  when  concerns  arise,  to  assist  Providers  in  getting  back  on  track.  A 
shared  goal  should  always  be  that  people  can  expect  and  receive  a  safe, 
quality standard of care. 
 
1.4.5  Where  there  are  issues  for  safeguarding  open  dialogue  and  agreed  actions 
for improvements can only be achieved where there is trust and a willingness 
on  all  parties  to  work  together.  Haringey’s  policy  and  procedures  adopt  the 
Pan London guidance regarding organisations as detailed below. 
 
1.5 
Organisations working with adults at risk 
 
  Staff have a duty to report in a timely way any concerns or suspicions 
that an adult at risk is being or is at risk of being abused. 
  Actions  to  protect  the  adult  from  abuse  should  always  be  given  high 
priority by all organisations involved. Concerns or allegations should be     
reported without delay and given high priority. 
  Organisations  working  to  safeguard  adults  at  risk  should  make  the 
dignity, safety and well-being of the individual a priority in their actions. 
  As  far as  possible  organisations  must  respect  the  rights  of  the  person 
causing  harm.  If  that  person  is  also  an  adult  at  risk  they  must  receive 
support and their needs must be addressed. 
  Staff  will  understand  their  role  and  responsibilities  in  regard  to  this 
procedure. 
  Every  effort  should  be  made  to  ensure  that  adults  at  risk  are  afforded 
appropriate protection under the law. 
  Organisations will have their own internal operational procedures which 
relate  to  these  multi-agency  Safeguarding  Adults  policy  and 
procedures, including complaints, and in respect of support to staff that 
raise  concerns  (‘whistleblowing’)  to  comply  with  the  Public  Interest 
Disclosure Act 1998. 
  Organisations  will  ensure  that  all  staff  and  volunteers  are  familiar  with 
policies  relating  to Safeguarding Adults,  know how to recognise  abuse 
and how to report and respond to it. 
  Organisations  will  ensure  that  staff  and  volunteers will have  access  to 
training that is appropriate to their level of responsibility and will receive 
clinical  and/or  management  supervision  that  affords  them  the 
opportunity to reflect on their practice and the impact of their actions on 
others 
 
 
 
Page of 26 

 
1.6 
 Organisations working together in Safeguarding Adults 
 
  Partner  organisations  will  contribute  to  effective  inter-agency  working 
and  effective  multi-disciplinary  assessments  and  joint  working 
partnerships  in  order  to  provide  the  most  effective  means  of 
safeguarding adults. 
  Action taken under these procedures does not affect the obligations on 
partner organisations to comply with their statutory responsibilities such 
as  notification  to  regulatory  authorities  under  the  Health  and  Social 
Care  Act  2008,  the  Housing  and  Regeneration  Act  2008,  or  to  comply 
with employment legislation. 
  Organisations  continue  to have  a duty  of  care  to adults  who  purchase 
their  own  care  through  personal  budgets  and  are  required  to  ensure 
that  reasonable  care is taken to avoid  acts or omissions that  are likely 
to cause harm to the adult at risk. 
  Partner  organisations  will  have  information  about  individuals  who  may 
be  at  risk  from  abuse  and  may  be  asked  to  share  this  where 
appropriate, with due regard to confidentiality. 
 
1.7 
Working with Providers 
 
1.7.1  Health and Social Care need to be transparent in its dealings with Providers.  
Providers  are  accountable  for  their  actions  and  need  to  be  informed  of 
concerns  that  arise  from  safeguarding,  quality  checks  and  individual  care 
management reviews. In some instances Providers are able to take the lead 
in  safeguarding  planning  for  example,  suspending  a  member  of  staff  whilst 
an investigation takes place either through disciplinary procedures (overseen 
by  the  local  authority)  or  through  other  investigations  including  criminal 
investigations.  
 
1.7.2  Providers  need  to  be  part  of  empowering  adults  at  risk  to  take  the  lead  in 
safeguarding  by  creating  a  culture  of  being  listened  to  with  respect.  Not  all 
concerns  will  involve  safeguarding  but  Providers  can  enable  people  to  talk 
freely, for example publicising an open and transparent complaint procedure 
that assures people that there will be no retribution and offering other ways of 
gaining  customer  feedback  which  can  be  anonymous  if  people  wish.  
Providers  who  facilitate  independent  advocacy  and  hold  regular  service 
user/carer  led  meetings  are  able  to  demonstrate  more  effectively  their 
commitment to empowering adults at risk. 
 
1.7.3  In  turn  Health  and  Social  Care  will  work  together  to  empower  Providers  by 
offering support and guidance where it is asked for or needed as identified by 
concerns. 
 
1.7.4  Providers have a duty of care to protect adults at risk and meet the standards 
either  set  out  by  the  Regulator  if  they  are  subject  to  registration  or  by  the 
council  in  ensuring  that  there  is  a  clear  commitment  to  protection  in  their 
policy and procedures that is evidenced in their practice.  
 
1.7.5  Haringey Council and Haringey Clinical Commissioning Group are committed 
to  working  with  Providers  to  protect  people  who  are  unable  to  protect 
themselves  or  at  risk  of  abuse  and  will  take  proactive  steps  in  early 
intervention. 
 
Page of 26 

 
1.7.6  Providers  are  expected  to  have  a  robust  quality  assurance  framework  in 
place.  This  should  evidence  their  commitment  to  prevention.  Early 
prevention  is  about  recognising  potential  abuse  and  learning  from  past 
situations  to  inform  better  practice.  Prevention  strategies  evidencing  that 
Providers  undertake  regular  staff  training,  supervision  and  appraisals 
together with customer feedback under a robust quality assurance framework 
is welcomed. 
 
1.7.7  In  partnership  with  key  stakeholders  the  council  and  clinical  commissioning 
group  will  regularly  review  intelligence  about  Provider  activity  as  part  of  its 
own prevention strategy and monitoring arrangements. It will take necessary 
and appropriate action in consultation with partners, communicating with the 
Provider any concerns in a timely manner. 
 
1.7.8  Action  taken  in  response  to  safeguarding  will  be  proportionate.  Providers 
will  be  expected  and  encouraged  to  be  able  to  discern  what  poor  practice 
amongst  their staff is, what  a complaint is and what  should be raised under 
safeguarding.    The  council  and  clinical  commissioning  group  will  strive  to 
assure  Providers  that  a  proportionate  and  the  least  intrusive  response  is 
made  to  any  concerns  through  the  scrutiny  of  the  Safeguarding  Information 
Panel3. Safeguarding and quality concerns will be risk assessed to consider 
the most appropriate action to take by the council or its partners. 
 
1.7.9  Partnership working on the management of Establishment Concerns is key 
to the effectiveness of quality outcomes.  There will be a local response and 
solution  through  considered  information  sharing  using  the  principles  of 
Haringey council’s Information Sharing protocol.4 This procedure is inclusive 
to the needs of all residents and its implementation will include commitment 
from  residents,  staff,  management,  providers,  partners,  Elected  Members 
and local services and organisations.  
 
1.7.10 The procedure will be governed by a commitment to equality, embracing the 
diverse communities of Haringey acknowledging and recognising the need to 
seek a response that matches the specific needs of people who use services 
and their support networks.  
 
1.7.11 Accountability  of  the  safeguarding  and  quality  work  that  the  council  holds 
management  responsibility  for  will  be  reported  through  the  mechanisms 
already  in  place.  This  includes  the  joint  Health  and  Adult  Social  Care 
commissioning  Group.  Specific  concerns  about  providers  that  affect  one 
particular  client  group  for  example  learning  disability  will  be  shared  at  the 
Learning  Disability  Partnership  Board  if  appropriate  to  do  so.  A  summary  of 
the  work  under  Establishment  Concerns  will  be  prepared  and  presented  at 
the  Safeguarding  Adults  Board  and  The  Governing  Body  of  the  Clinical 
Commissioning Group, bearing in mind the need for confidentiality.  
 
1.7.12 Providers are accountable to service users and commissioners for providing 
the  standard  of  care  which  is  expected  and  agreed  in  individual  care  plans 
and contracts and commissions. Providers are also accountable to the Care 
Quality  Commission  to  meet  the  standards  set  in  their  registration 
compliance and legislation. 
                                                 
3 Six weekly meeting held between Safeguarding, Commissioning, Clinical Commissioning Group and the Care Quality 
Commission 
4 Haringey Safeguarding Adults Multi Agency Information Sharing Protocol 2014 
Page of 26 

 
 
 
 


Procedure 
 
2.1 
Introduction 
 
2.1.1  In  drawing  up  this  joint  procedure  there  is  reference  throughout  to  the  Pan 
London policy and procedures.5 
 
2.1.2  The procedure does not exempt services from managing safeguarding adults 
at  risk  who  are  supported  by  Establishments  who  are  subject  to  single 
safeguarding alerts from the usual practice. In all cases single  alerts should 
ensure  that  there  is  an  outcome  to  determine  whether  or  not  the 
safeguarding  alert  was  substantiated  through  robust  investigation  and  an 
effective protection plan is in place; it is not sufficient to state that the matter 
will be dealt with through an Establishment Concerns process.  
 
2.1.3  Organisations  should  be  assured  that  individuals  are  protected  and  specific 
issues  relating  to  individuals  are  addressed.  Attention  to  the  needs  of  other 
people  who  are  supported  by  the  same  Establishment  should  be  made  to 
ensure that the concerns raised on an individual do not affect the quality and 
safety of other people.  
 
2.1.4  Where  an  Establishment  Concerns  process  is  already  taking  place,  the  two 
processes  should  run  in  parallel  with  a  possible  outcome  that  the  issues  in 
the single alert are being addressed appropriately through the Establishment 
Concerns  process  and  there  is  no  need  for  additional  action.    At  the  very 
least  the  single  alert  should  be  taken  through  both  stage  2  –  Referral  and 
stage 3 – Safeguarding strategy discussion meeting and a decision recorded. 
 
2.1.5  Establishment  Concern  Investigations  will  involve  a  wide  range  of 
organisations and a number of individual Safeguarding Adults processes and 
investigations.  There  will  be  an  overarching  strategy  meeting  or  discussion 
and case conference for the Establishment Concern.  
 
2.1.6  Pan  London  states  that,  “Where  the  need  for  a  large-scale  investigation 
becomes  apparent,  senior  managers  in  the  local  authority  should  identify  a 
senior manager to take responsibility for coordinating the overall investigation 
with  all  other  relevant  organisations.  If  a  crime  is  thought  to  have  been 
committed,  the  usual  principles  and  responsibilities  for  reporting  to  police 
apply.  If  the  concern  is  within  a  health  setting,  the  concerned  party  will 
contact the executive lead for Safeguarding Adults in that organisation, who 
will alert the CQC and NHS England (London). Together they will determine 
the next steps. The Safeguarding Lead for Adults in the local authority should 
also  be  informed  as  the  local  authority  remains  the  lead  organisation  for  all 
safeguarding matters within its jurisdiction. 
 
2.1.7  Haringey council has adopted the principles set out in Pan London by setting 
up the Safeguarding Information Panel (SIP) so that it can make a proactive 
response  to  concerns  and  take  the  proportionate  action  as  outlined  in  its 
procedure.  
 
                                                 
5 Protecting adults at risk: London multi-agency policy and procedures to safeguard adults from abuse (Updated 2015) 
Page of 26 

 
2.2 
Mental Capacity  
 
2.2.1  All decisions taken in the Safeguarding Adults process must comply with the 
Mental Capacity Act 2005. 
 
2.2.2  All adults at risk should be assumed to have capacity and to make informed 
choices  about  their  own  safety.  The  principles  of  the  Mental  Capacity  Act 
2005 is significant in the process of managing large scale investigations as it 
is  likely  that  some  people  have  capacity  and  others  may  lack  capacity  to 
make decisions. An equal access to services and interventions is required.  
 
2.2.3  For those people who lack capacity decisions should be made on the basis 
of  Best  Interest.  The  Haringey  Mental  Capacity  Tool  and  Best  Interest 
Decision tool should be used for anyone who lacks capacity and where there 
are no other legal procedures in place. 
 
2.2.4  The  Independent  Mental  Capacity  Advocate  (IMCA)  service  in  London 
Borough  of  Haringey  is  delivered  by  an  independent  advocacy  service, 
VoiceAbility6.   
 
2.2.5  Where  there  is  no-one  appropriate  to  consult,  other  than  those  in  a 
professional capacity.  The Managing Authority must inform the Supervisory 
Body,  in  the  application  for  authorisation,  who  will  refer  at  once  to 
VoiceAbility. 
 
2.2.6  Where  the  person  or  representative  (if  not  a  paid  representative)  requests 
that an IMCA is instructed to help them.  This is to provide them with support 
and  information,  to  represent  the  relevant  person,  and  to  help  them  make 
use of the review process or access the Court of Protection, if appropriate. It 
could happen more than once in an authorisation. 
 
2.2.7  If  the  Supervisory  Body  believes  that  the  person  or  representative  may  not 
use their rights to access a review or the Court of Protection.  For example, 
occasionally,  the  representative  may  feel  uncertain  about  making  this 
request  however  much  the  Managing  Authority  or  others  gives  them  the 
relevant  information  and  support  to  do  so.    The  Supervisory  Body  must  be 
informed of any concerns as decisions for this criterion would  be on a case 
by case basis.  
 
IMCAs  have  a  statutory  right  of  access  to  and  copying  of  records  that  the 
record  holder  believes  to  be  relevant  to  the  decision.    Clinicians  and 
practitioners should be prepared to give access to files and notes but only to 
relevant  information  to  the  decision.    Those  responsible  for  patient  /  user 
records  should  ensure  that  third  party  information  and  other  sensitive 
information not relevant to the decision at hand remains confidential. 
 
2.3 
Deprivation  of  Liberty  Safeguards  (DoLS)7  apply  to  people  who  have  a  mental 
disorder and who do not have mental capacity to decide whether or not they should 
be  accommodated  in  the  relevant  care  home  or  hospital  to  be  given  care  or 
                                                 
6 http://www.voiceability.org/in_your_area/london/barnet_enfield_and_harringey 
7 The Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS)Where the service user is over 18 and is resident in a care home or a 
hospital the deprivation can be authorised using the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DOLS); a detailed procedure 
prescribed by the Mental Capacity Act 2005. This involves the care home or hospital applying to the local authority who 
may grant an authorisation if certain criteria are met. The authorisation must be monitored and kept under review. 
Page 10 of 26 

 
treatment.  These  safeguards  provide  protection  to  people  in  hospitals  and  care 
homes.  Care  homes  and  hospitals  must  make  requests  to  a  local  authority  for 
authorisation  to  deprive  someone  of  their  liberty  if  they  believe  it  is  in  their  best 
interest.  All decisions on care and treatment must comply with the Mental Capacity 
Act  and  the  Mental  Capacity  Act  Code.    DoLS  requests  and  authorisations  are 
particularly  relevant  for  this  procedure  as  there  may  be  issues  relating  to  the 
number of inappropriate and unauthorised restrictions on people; the Provider may 
have failed in its duty to identify and request the statutory assessments. This in itself 
may  be  an  indicator  that  care  homes  and  hospitals  may  not  be  providing  safe, 
quality care and support to people who lack capacity. 
 
2.4 
Ill  treatment  and  wilful  neglect  -  Pan  London  recommends  that,  “An  allegation  of 
abuse  or  neglect  of  an  adult  at  risk  who  does  not  have  capacity  to  consent  on 
issues about their own safety will always give rise to action under the Safeguarding 
Adults process.” Section 44 of the Act makes it a specific criminal offence to wilfully 
ill treat or neglect a person who lacks capacity. 
 
2.5 
Categories of abuse – Institutional abuse 
 
2.5.1  The  types  of  abuse  noted  in  single  investigations  are  the  same  as  those 
relating  to  Establishments.  In  particular  for  Establishments,  “institutional 
abuse is the mistreatment or abuse or neglect of an adult at risk by a regime 
or  individual’s  within  settings  and  services  that  adults  at  risk  live  in  or  use, 
that violate the person’s dignity,  resulting in  lack of  respect for their human 
rights.” 
 
2.5.2  Institutional  abuse  occurs  when  the  routines,  systems  and  regimes  of  an 
institution  result  in  poor  or  inadequate  standards  of  care  and  poor  practice 
which  affects  the  whole  setting  and  denies,  restricts  or  curtails  the  dignity, 
privacy, choice, independence or fulfilment of adults at risk. 
 
2.5.3  Institutional abuse can occur in any setting providing health and social care. 
A  number  of  inquiries  into  care  in  residential  settings  have  highlighted  that 
institutional abuse is most likely to occur when staff: 
 
  receive little support from management; 
  are inadequately trained; 
  are poorly supervised and poorly supported in their work; and 
  receive inadequate guidance. 
 
2.5.4  The risk of abuse is also greater in institutions: 
 
  with poor management 
  with too few staff 
  which use rigid routines and inflexible practices 
  which do not use person-centred care plans 
  where there is a closed culture 
 
2.5.5  A full Multi-Agency Risk Matrix 8 will be made on Establishments where there 
are concerns. The Risk Matrix will map out the concerns and level of risk and 
be the basis upon which Service Improvement Plans are made.  
 
 
 
                                                 
8  See appendix 
Page 11 of 26 

 
2.6 
Adults at risk who cause harm 
 
2.6.1  Where the person causing the harm is also an adult at risk, the safety of the 
person  who  may  have  been  abused  is  paramount.  Organisations  may  also 
have responsibilities towards the person causing the harm, and certainly will 
have  if  they  are  both  in  a  care  setting  or  have  contact  because they  attend 
the  same  place  (for  example,  a  day  centre).  The  person  causing  the  harm 
may  themselves  be  eligible  to  receive  an  assessment.  In  this  situation  it  is 
important  that  the  needs  of  the  adult  at  risk  who  is  the  alleged  victim  are 
addressed separately from the needs of the person causing the harm. It will 
be  necessary  to  reassess  the  adult  allegedly  causing  the  harm.  This  could 
involve a network meeting where the following could be addressed: 
  the extent to which the person causing the harm is able to understand 
his/her actions; 
  the  extent  to  which  the  abuse  or  neglect  reflects  the  needs  of  the 
person causing the harm; and 
  the  likelihood  that  the  person  causing  the  harm  will  further  abuse  the 
victim or others. 
 
2.6.2  The  same  principles  and  responsibilities  to  report  a  crime  apply.  The 
appropriate community mental health team (CMHT) would be involved if the 
person alleged to have caused the abuse appears to have a mental illness or 
is showing signs of mental disturbance. 
 
2.7 
Abuse of trust 
 
2.7.1  A relationship of trust is one in which one person is in a position of  power or 
influence  over  the  other  person  because  of  their  work  or  the  nature  of  their 
activity. There is a particular concern when abuse is caused by the actions or 
omissions  of  someone  who  is  in  a  position  of  power  or  authority  and  who 
uses their position to the detriment of the health and well-being of a person at 
risk, who in many cases could be dependent on their care. There is always a 
power imbalance in a relationship of trust. 
 
2.7.2   Where  the  person  who  is  alleged  to  have  caused  harm  is  in  a  position  of 
trust with the adult at risk, they may be deterred from making a complaint or 
taking  action  out  of  a  sense  of  loyalty,  fear,  of  abandonment  or  other 
repercussions. 
 
2.7.3  Where the person who is alleged to have caused the abuse or neglect has a 
relationship of trust with the adult at risk because they are a member of staff, 
a paid employee, a paid carer, a volunteer or a manager or proprietor of an 
establishment, the organisation will invoke its disciplinary procedures as well 
as taking action under the Safeguarding Adults policy and procedures. 
 
2.7.4  If  a  crime  is  suspected  a  report  must  always  be  made  to  the  police,  and 
referral  must  be  made  to  the  Disclosure  and  Barring  Service  (DBS)  if  they 
have been found to have harmed or put at risk of harm an adult at risk. If the 
person  who  is  alleged  to  have  caused  the  abuse  is  a  member  of  a 
recognised  professional  group  the  organisation  will  act  under  the  relevant 
code  of  conduct  for  the  profession  as  well  as  taking  action  under  this 
procedure. 
 
 
 
Page 12 of 26 

 
2.8 
Public interest 
 
2.8.1  If the adult at risk has the mental capacity to make informed decisions about 
maintaining  their  safety  and  they  do  not  want  any  action  to  be  taken, 
practitioners have a duty to share the information with relevant professionals 
to prevent harm to others. This is particularly relevant for people who are in 
shared  living  arrangements.  The  fear  of  retribution  for  service  users  and 
families may be high and it is incumbent upon the professionals involved to 
provide assurances through rigorous and robust safeguarding plans. 
 
2.8.2  In those instances where people  are adamant  that  they do not  wish to take 
matters  further,  action  should  still  be  undertaken  by  the  council  and  its 
partners to consider options for monitoring the Establishment either through 
Safeguarding or other procedures. 
 
 

Roles and responsibilities  
 
3.1 
Establishment Concern Strategy Group 
 
This  is  the body  that  will  approve  and  steer  actions. This  will  be  multi-agency  and 
rest  on  partnership,  collegial,  collaborative  working  to  recommend  and  reach 
decisions.  Representation  on  this  group  will  be  from  Health,  Metropolitan  Police, 
Care  Quality  Commission,  Commissioners,  and  Senior  Operational  Service 
Manager as appropriate. If it is known who the other funding authorities are they will 
be invited to become a member of the group.  
 
3.1.1  The members of the Establishment Concerns Strategy Group (ECSG) should 
be  of  sufficient  seniority  to  assess  the  capacity  of  staff  and  authorise 
releasing  staff  to  undertake  work.  In  the  event  that  the  ECSG  member  is 
unable or has no resource to undertake specific actions within  their service, 
they will be responsible for undertaking the work either by commissioning or 
negotiation  with  colleagues.  The  strategies  that  are  put  in  place  cannot  be 
effective without commitment to ensuring delivery within specified timescales. 
 
3.1.2  The  Head  of  Safeguarding  (local  authority)  in  consultation  with  the  Head  of 
Commissioning  (local  authority)  has  a  responsibility  to  appoint  a  chair  to 
manage the work as soon as reasonable to do so.  
 
3.1.3  In instances where the local authority does not commission services from the 
Provider,  it  remains  the  lead  agency  responsible  for  the  safeguarding  and 
may request that, an appropriate chair from health is delegated the role. 
 
3.1.4  The Chair of the ECSG will delegate work through identifying the knowledge, 
skills and experience needed to complete specific actions that will be carried 
out by professionals and co-ordinated by the chair of the ECSG. 
 
3.2 
Other professionals  
 
3.2.1  Adult Social Care and Health professional staff.  Throughout the life of the 
process  a  number  of  tasks  and  actions  will  be  identified.  This  may  include 
undertaking  specific  investigation  of  an  issue,  collating  resident  reviews, 
interviewing personnel undertaking announced and unannounced inspection 
visits, file audits,  review of policy and procedures. This is not  an exhaustive 
list  but  an  indication  of  the  kind  of  activity  that  professionals  might  be 
Page 13 of 26 

 
required  to  do.  Occupational  Therapy  has  a  key  role  to  play  in  large  scale 
investigations  in  nursing  and  residential  care  and  their  particular  skills  in 
assessing manual handling techniques for example is essential. 
 
3.2.2  Health  Managers.   The  government White Paper,  Liberating  the NHS  (DH, 
2010a), makes clear that patients must be at the heart of the NHS. Services 
will be accountable to patients for the quality of care, shared decision making 
will  become  the  norm  and  patient  safety  is  put  above  all  else.    Health 
colleagues play an equal role  in  the implementation of this procedure. They 
hold  expertise  and  knowledge  of  health  provision  and  in  particular  clinical 
practice. Providers delivering nursing provision will find it helpful to consider 
improvements with the support of clinical experts with experience in the field 
that  the  Establishment  specialises  in.  A  system  whereby  health  managers 
compliment  adult social care managers is the most  effective way to support 
Providers and safeguard adults at risk.  
 
3.2.3  GPs’ have a significant role in Safeguarding Adults and are often attached to 
particular residential and nursing provision.  Where there are specific clinical 
concerns,  the  role  of  the  GP  in  monitoring  the  health  needs  of  people  is 
essential  to  the  safeguarding  process.  GP’s,  are  in  a  unique  position  to 
assess how well people’s health needs are met by establishments, especially 
those in a residential or nursing provision. Their role includes: 
 
  making  a  referral  to  a  Safeguarding  Adults  referral  point  should  they 
suspect or know of abuse, in line with these procedures 
  playing  an  active  role  in  strategy  discussions  or  meetings,  case 
conferences and protection planning. 
 
GP  Collaboratives  should  make  sure  that  effective  training  and  reporting 
systems are in place to support GPs and GP practices in this work. The CCG 
is keen to support GP’s in their changing role and work is being carried out to 
continue to consolidate knowledge of safeguarding processes. 
 
3.2.4  The  Care  Quality  Commission  regulates  and  inspects  health  and  social 
care services including domiciliary services and protects the rights of people 
detained  under  the  Mental  Health  Act  1983.  It  has  a  role  in  identifying 
situations that give rise to concern that a person using a regulated service is 
or  has  been  at  risk  of  harm,  or  may  receive  an  allegation  or  a  complaint 
about  a  service  that  could  indicate  potential  risk  of  harm  to  an  individual  or 
individuals.  Where  the  CQC  receives  information  about  a  possible 
Safeguarding  Adults  situation  or  issue,  then  that  information  must  be 
immediately  brought  to  the  attention  of  the  lead  regulatory  inspector  for  the 
service,  or  the  duty  inspector.  If,  on  a  review  of  the  information,  there 
appears  to  be  a  Safeguarding  Adults  concern,  the  CQC  should  pass  the 
information to the local authority through the locally determined referral point. 
As  a  key  stakeholder  in  the  Safeguarding  Information  Panel,  there  is 
opportunity  to  work  closely  on  managing  concerns  prior  to  invoking  this 
procedure.    
 
All  health  and  adult  social  care  providers  registered  with  CQC  will  have  to 
meet  the  fundamental  standards.    These  are  the  basic  requirements  that 
providers  should  always  meet,  and  the  standard  of  care  and  service  that 
patients  or  care-users  should  expect.    They  will  be  legal  requirements  and 
Page 14 of 26 

 
CQC  will  be  able  to  take  enforcement  action,  including  prosecution,  when 
they find breaches.   
 
The fundamental standards have been developed in response to the Francis 
Inquiry report, to ensure that standards in the health and care sector will not 
be allowed to fall below what people expect.  The Report recommended the 
introduction  of  new  fundamental  standards  as  legal  requirements,  which 
should  be  easy  for  all  to  understand  and  give  CQC  the  power  to  take  swift 
action where they are not being met. 
 
Care providers will be required to meet the fundamental standards as part of 
the  requirements  for  registering  with  CQC,  and  on  an  ongoing  basis.  The 
standards  are  intended  to  be  common-sense  statements  that  describe  the 
basic requirements that providers should always meet, and set the outcomes 
that patients or care-users should always expect.  In summary, these are: 
a)  care and treatment must be appropriate and reflect service users' needs 
and preferences. 
b)  service users must be treated with dignity and respect. 
c)  care and treatment must only be provided with consent. 
d)  care and treatment must be provided in a safe way. 
e)  service users must be protected from abuse and improper treatment. 
f)  service users' nutritional and hydration needs must be met. 
g)  all  premises  and  equipment  used  must  be  clean,  secure,  suitable  and 
used properly. 
h)  complaints  must  be  appropriately  investigated  and  appropriate  action 
taken in response. 
i) 
systems  and  processes  must  be  established  to  ensure  compliance  with 
the fundamental standards. 
j) 
sufficient  numbers  of  suitably  qualified,  competent,  skilled  and 
experienced staff must be deployed. 
k)  persons  employed  must  be  of  good  character,  have  the  necessary 
qualifications, skills and experience, and be able to perform the work for 
which they are employed (fit and proper persons requirement). 
l) 
registered  persons  must  be  open  and  transparent  with  service  users 
about their care and treatment (the duty of candour). 
 
Each  outcome  is  supported  by  a  small  number  of  other  conditions  –  these 
provide  CQC  with  a  means  of  taking  appropriate  enforcement  action  where 
providers  are  found  to  be  slipping,  but  have  not  yet  breached  the 
requirement.    This  supports  CQC’s  new  approach  to  inspection  and 
enforcement  which  is  based  less  around  checking  compliance  with  detailed 
regulations, and instead focuses on five key questions about care: 
  Is it safe? 
  Is it effective? 
  Is it responsive? 
  Is it caring? 
  Is it well-led? 
 
The  role  of  the  CQC  through  its  Compliance  Manager  and  Inspectors  is 
central to all actions. The CQC in their role as Regulator acts independently, 
and is a valued partner in the process of information sharing and working to 
tackle areas of common concern. It is acknowledged that there will be some 
decision  making  that  the  Regulator  would  need  to  abstain  from,  namely 
whether or not commissioners choose to suspend or terminate business with 
Page 15 of 26 

 
the  Provider. Their  expertise  in  working  with  Providers  and  standard  setting 
will  be  considered  in  the  Service  Improvement  Plans  and  quality  assurance 
strategy.   
 
Neither  the  council  nor  the  CCG  is  responsible  for  Enforcement  Action  as 
that  is  the  prerogative  of  the  CQC.  Where  there  are  issues  relating  to 
compliance  and  safeguarding  the  ECSG  will  agree  with  the  Provider,  a 
means by which improvements are managed that will meet both compliance 
and the safeguarding standards. 
 
3.2.5  Metropolitan  Police/Community  Safety  Unit.    The  investigation  of  crimes 
against adults at risk is managed in accordance with the Safeguarding Adults 
at Risk Standard Operating Procedures. These give clear guidance to police 
officers  and  staff  to  ensure  the  safety  and  protection  of  adults  at  risk  by 
providing  a  quality  service  to  service  users  whether  as  employees, 
colleagues, victims, witnesses or strategic partners, and so on. Their role in 
this  procedure  is  to  lead  on  any  criminal  investigation  and  in  particular 
Section 44 of the Mental Capacity Act, where there is consideration to wilful 
neglect.  Expertise  on  fact  finding  and  investigative  practice  will  be  utilised 
within  the  strategy  groups.  Community  Safety  Units  can  make  valuable 
contribution  to  protection  plans,  for  example  targeting  resources  in  specific 
areas where there are known concerns. 
 
3.2.6  Health  and  Safety  Inspection  Unit.    Colleagues  in  health  and  safety  units 
will  support  safeguarding  plans  by  making  both  announced  and 
unannounced inspections. Residential units are legally obliged to ensure that 
their premises are compliant with health and safety legislation. Where there 
are specific concerns around environmental issues, infection control and staff 
welfare the expertise and advice from health and safety will play an important 
part in both the fact finding and quality assurance processes. 
 
3.2.7  Commissioners.  Commissioning  colleagues  should  set  out  clear 
expectations  of  provider  agencies  and  monitor  compliance.  Commissioners 
have a responsibility to: 
 
  ensure that commissioned services know about and adhere to relevant 
registration requirements and guidance 
  meet the standards set out in Haringey Quality Standards 
  ensure that all documents such as service specifications, invitations to 
tender,  service  contracts  and  service-level  agreements  adhere  to  the 
multi-agency Safeguarding Adults policy and procedures 
 
Commissioners  will  work  closely  with  the  Safeguarding  Adults  Team,  both 
Heads  of  Service  assuring  that  the  Safeguarding  Information  Panel  takes 
place  on  a  regular  basis.  Where  the  commissioned  service  is  solely  from 
NHS  commissioners,  the  local  authority  team  will  take  a  step  back  in  the 
process but  be  available  for  consultation  on  safeguarding  practice  and  the 
standards  of  the  local  authority.  Where  there  are  concerns  around  block 
contracts the commissioning service will play a lead role in the safeguarding 
process.  
 
3.2.8  Legal  Services  will  provide  advice  in  instances  where  Providers  instruct 
solicitors  and  mount  a  challenge  to  safeguarding  matters.  The  ECSG  will 
take precautionary steps in its dealings with solicitors, but will always aim to 
Page 16 of 26 

 
work and have open dialogue with Providers  without  recourse through legal 
channels.  In  the  event  that  legal  advice  is  required,  the  case  will  in  the first 
instance  be  discussed  with  the  Director  of  Adult  Social  Services  in 
consultation with the Assistant Director of Commissioning. 
 
Lawyers  are  required  to  provide  a  timely  response  to  casework  involving 
safeguarding. Legal services will be consulted in the rare case that a decision 
has  been  reached  to  decommission  a  service,  and  how  this  information  is 
presented to relatives, residents and other funding authorities.  
 
3.2.9  Performance  Team/Mosaic.    The  statistical  information  required  by  the 
Department  of  Health  AVA  returns  and  information  for  the  Safeguarding 
Adults Board, will be collated from Mosaic (social care database), by the local 
authority Performance team. 
 
The  fields  in  the  safeguarding  adults  episodes  will  identify  whether  the 
concern relates to an Establishment and be a mandatory field determined by 
Framework  i.  This  information  will  be  presented  to  the  SIP  and  to the  SAB. 
From  recording  accurate  details,  patterns  and  themes  of  concerns  can  be 
identified at an early stage and flagged up to the Head of Safeguarding in the 
monthly performance data. 
 
3.3 
People who use services - People who use services  are responsible for protecting 
themselves as far as is possible. Speaking out is not easy for people who are reliant 
upon care services and have limited access to the wider community. Service users 
need to be encouraged and supported to raise complaints,  concerns and question 
when  care  is  not  provided  according  to  care  plans;  or  care  is  not  delivered  when 
expected;  or  care  is  not  provided  with  dignity  and  respect.  For  people  in  shared 
living  arrangements,  a  culture  of  feeling  safe  to  raise  issues  without  fear  of 
retribution needs to be in place. Professionals have a duty to meet people on their 
own to enable them to talk freely and to be supported to challenge poor quality. 
 
3.4 
Family/friends/visitors  -  Informal  support  to  service  users  provides  additional 
safeguards  that  issues  are  raised  in  a  timely  way.  They  may  also  be  concerned 
about retribution and reluctant to raise matters, but should equally be considered as 
potential partners in safeguarding plans. 
 
3.5 
Advocates - The use of advocates in safeguarding is essential for people who lack 
capacity  and  have  no  relatives  to  support  them.  Referrals  to  Independent  Mental 
Capacity Advocacy are to be made to Voiceability who is currently commissioned to 
provide this service. This should be addressed by the ECSG, with a mind to equal 
opportunities for all adults at risk. 
 
Other advocates may be considered. Where there is no Family and friends to act in 
the  role  of  advocates;  assurance  regarding  conflict  of  interest  and  that  they  are 
acting according to the wishes and preferences of the adult at risk should always be 
made. 
 
3.6 
Document  Control  -  Throughout  the  life  of  the  process  all  documents  are  to  be 
uploaded centrally onto Framework-i and clearly kept  within  the Document  section 
of the Establishment. The Document Controller is responsible for ensuring that the 
agreed minutes are uploaded. Copies of action plans are updated and that there is 
one version in use at a time that is accessible to all relevant parties. In some cases 
there may be a nominated Document Controller. The CCG will retain documents of 
Page 17 of 26 


 
Establishment  Concerns  through  its  Safeguarding  Adults  Lead.  Access  to  these 
documents will be on a strictly need to know basis. 
 
 

Establishment Concern Procedure  
 
The Establishment Concern Procedure (ECP) will follow a 5 stage process detailed 
below:  
 
 
 
4.1 
Stage 1: Decision to invoke the Establishment Concerns Process (ECP) 
 
4.1.1  The  decision  to  invoke  the  ECP  will  be  jointly  proposed  by  the  Head  of 
Safeguarding and Assistant Director Commissioning giving reasons to invoke 
ECP to the Director of Adult Social Services. 
 
4.1.2  The  decision  to  Invoke  ECP  will  be  taken  by  the  Director  of  Adult  Social 
Services. 
 
4.1.3  In  instances  where  the  concern  is  in  a  health  setting  the  Director  of  Adults 
Social  Services  will  consult  with  the  senior  manager  of  that  health  setting. 
The  safeguarding  process  may  run  concurrent  with  a  Serious  Incident 
procedure but the safeguarding adults’ process will take precedence. 
 
4.2 
Stage 2: Initial Strategy Meeting  
 
4.2.1  Once  it  has  been  agreed  to  invoke  the  ECP,  a  senior  manager  will  be 
appointed as Chair. 
 
4.2.2  The  Chair  will  call  a  meeting  with  all  the  relevant  parties  supported  by  the 
administrative support in the Safeguarding Adults and DOLS team.  
 
Page 18 of 26 

 
4.2.3  The Chair will confirm with the CQC that the ECP has been invoked; and the 
establishment  about  which  the  concern  has  been  raised  will  be  notified  in 
writing  that  the  ECP  has  been  invoked.  They  will  be  informed  of  the 
allegations/concerns at the earliest possible opportunity if it is safe to do so. 
 
4.2.4  If there is a Police investigation, the provider will be informed in accordance 
with Police advice.  
 
4.2.5  The  initial  strategy  meeting  will  clarify  roles  and  responsibilities, 
particularly: 
 
  The  Chair  (who  will  be  responsible  for  coordinating  all  pieces  of  work 
within the process).  
  The link worker for user/carer/relatives  
 
4.2.6  Actions from the initial strategy meeting 
 
  The initial strategy meeting will assess the level of risk and put in place 
a Protection Plan whilst investigations are being made. 
  The  meeting  will  consider  the  actions  and  tasks  that  need  to  be 
completed  to  determine  whether  abuse  has  taken  place  or  is  likely  to 
take place. 
  An Action Plan will be drawn up with named leads and a  timescale for 
completing  each  action  to  be  brought  back  to  a  reconvened  strategy 
meeting. 
  Organisational Risk Assessment (See Appendix 1) will be undertaken at 
this stage.  
 
The  initial  strategy  meeting  will  agree  a  communication  strategy  which 
addresses both internal and external communications.  
 
Check list for information: 
 
  Senior Management - Need to Know  
  Strategy decision on when to discuss matters direct with the Provider 
  If a suspension on admissions is considered how this is communicated 
to front line staff 
  Alerting other local authorities who have made placements 
  Alerting Health colleagues on any Continuing Care placements 
  Information to the Provider 
  Press release discussion to Communications Team 
  Briefing paper for Chief Executive and or Elected Members 
  Consider how to consult with any other stakeholders, e.g. residents and 
relatives without raising anxiety 
  Agree as part of strategy how to include self-funders. 
  Agree date of next and any subsequent meeting. 
 
 
 
Page 19 of 26 

 
4.3 
Stage 3 Establishment Concern Reconvened Strategy meeting 
 
4.3.1  The  meeting  would  be  informed  of  the  outcome  of  the  individual 
investigations  which  will  be  the  basis  of  the  discussion  to  agree  an  action 
plan  unless  there  are  exceptional  reasons  for  further  investigation  to  be 
undertaken. This is to minimise the repeated questioning of the adults at risk 
and witnesses.  
 
4.3.2  The meeting will consider the Organisational Risk Assessment and  consider 
risk which will addresses the probability of risk and the likely impact of risk on 
the  safety  of  people  who  use  services.  The  meeting  will  consider  if  is  it 
unsafe  for  people  to  continue  to  receive  a  service  from  an  establishment 
furthermore  the  meeting  will  also  consider  the  risks  of  moving  people  to  an 
alternative provision.  
 
4.3.3  In cases where it has been assessed that  the risk of continuing placements 
or  allowing  residents  to  stay  in  a  placement  are  too  high,  consideration 
should be made as to suspension of placement and / or removal of residents. 
 
4.3.4  A suspension of commissioning can be imposed while more information is 
gathered  on  the  issues  of  concern,  or  other  action  is  taken  in  accordance 
with  agreed  plans  to  reduce  risk.    A  termination  of  commissioning  will 
include  changing  services  or  placements.  This  action  will  only  be  taken  if  it 
has  not  been  possible  to  improve  standards  of  care  to  an  acceptable  level 
within  a reasonable timeframe or if the risks to service  users are immediate 
and unacceptable. 
 
4.3.5  Suspension  should  be  considered  in  the  following  instances  as  part  of  the 
risk strategy discussion:  
 
  If  at  any  stage  there  are  strong  indicators  that  there  is  a  risk  of 
significant harm to other  people  using services receiving services  from 
the same Provider and that this risk is continuing; and/or;  
  If  a  serious  criminal  investigation  is  underway  where  it  would  place 
service  users  at  risk,  for  example  an  unacceptable  low  level  of  staff; 
and/or;  
  If  any  other  relevant  and  serious  incident/  concern/situation  warrants 
such action.  
  If the Care Quality Commission reports significant regulatory issues. 
 
4.3.6  Consideration to decommission services in the following circumstances:  
 
  If  at  any  stage  there  are  strong  indicators  that  there  is  a  risk  of 
significant harm to other  people  using services receiving services  from 
the  same  Provider  and  that  this  risk  is  continuing  and  it  has  not  been 
possible  to  improve  standards  of  care  and  support  to  an  acceptable 
level  within  a  reasonable  timeframe  or  the  risks  to  service  users  are 
immediate and unacceptable or   
  If any other relevant and serious situation warrants such action.  
  In all cases legal advice should be sought and such decisions ratified by 
the Director of Adult Social Services. 
 
4.3.7  If the Provider operates more than one service consideration should be given 
to  whether  the  suspension  or  termination  should  apply  to  those  other 
Page 20 of 26 

 
services  also.  This  will  depend  on  the  nature  of  the  concerns  and  the 
circumstances. 
 
4.3.8  Where it is considered that a suspension is necessary this recommendation 
should be escalated to the relevant person. For the local authority this will be 
the Assistant Director of Commissioning, other Heads of Services, always in 
consultation with the Director of Adult Social Services.  For the CCG this will 
be the Chief Officer 
 
4.3.9  Full  details  of  the  concerns  and  actions  together  with  the  identified  risk 
should be provided by the Chair. 
 
4.3.10 In  the  exceptional  case  that  there  is  a  recommendation  to  decommission  a 
service, reference should be made to placement contracts.  
 
4.3.11 The  agreed  Service  Improvement  Plan  will  be  the  High  Level  plan  for  all 
subsequent  safeguarding to ensure safety,  governance,  compliance,  clinical 
effectiveness  referencing  throughout  the  experience  of  the  adult  at  risk  and 
their informal network.  
 
4.4 
Stage 4 Implementing Service Improvement Plan and Monitoring 
 
4.4.1  A  Service  Improvement  Plan  will  be  formalised  into  the  overall  Protection 
Plan  for  the  immediate  safety  of  people  at  risk  of  abuse  when  there  is  an 
agreed  mandate  to  manage  an  establishment  when  institutional  abuse  is 
suspected. It will be the key document that is drawn up with the Provider to 
address the concern. 
 
4.4.2  The Service Improvement Plan will be risk assessed for priority, timescale for 
improvement and updated in agreement with the ECSG. 
 
4.4.3  Underneath  this  high  level  plan  there  may  be  a  number  of  individual 
protection plans for people whom a safeguarding alert has been raised.  
 
4.4.4  An  officer  would  be  appointed  to  monitor  the  progress  of  improvement  plan 
and report back to future reconvened strategy meetings. 
 
4.4.5  Monitoring: 
  Quality services are excellent services with dignity and respect at their 
heart of service provision. The Quality Assurance strategy will focus on 
meeting  business  expectations  as  set  out  in  the  Department  of  Health 
Dignity  Standards  and  the  council’s  Quality  Standards.  Quality 
assurance  is  about  independently  checking  that  for  each  concern  or 
issue  identified  as  poor  or  not  meeting  the  needs  of  people  using 
services, the action taken will deliver the quality of care and standards 
expected.  
 
The  purpose  of  quality  planning  is  to  provide  a  secure  basis  for  the 
ECSG  to  agree  on  the  overall  quality  expectations  and  the  associated 
quality  criteria,  the  means  by  which  quality  will  be  achieved  and 
assessed, and ultimately the acceptance criteria by which the evidence 
will  be  judged.  The  specific  treatment  for  quality  will  focus  on  the 
outcome for people who use services. The definition of quality for each 
area will include criteria considered good practice.  
Page 21 of 26 

 
  People who use services, relatives, carers will play a major role in the 
quality  assurance  strategy  which  will  ensure  that  people  who  use 
services remain at the heart of the safeguarding process. 
  The  ECSG  will  assign  staff  with  the  right  kind  of  experience,  skill  and 
knowledge  to  assess  whether  the  provider  has  implemented  a 
sustainable change; and that there is assurance that the improvements 
are embedded in practice. 
 
4.5 
Stage 5: Completion and Closing of ECP 
 
4.5.1  The final meeting would consider the current level of risk, the sustainability of 
changes  and  customer  feedback  from  people  who  use  services  and  their 
relatives/friends.  
 
4.5.2  Where the risk continues and there is cause for further concern the meeting 
would  review  the  current  protection  plan  against  the  level  of  risk  to  assess 
the  viability  of  working  with  the  provider  to  improve  services  or  consider 
alternative options for example decommissioning the service. 
 
4.5.3  The  tolerances  on  time  for  making  any  improvements  would  be  dependent 
upon the level of risk to people who use the service. 
 
4.5.4  Upon  an  agreed  ECSG  decision  that  satisfactory  improvements  that  are 
sustainable has been achieved, the process will formally come to an end and 
the  relevant  parties  including  the  provider  and  the  CQC  will  be  notified 
formally by the chair.  
 
4.5.5  A Lessons Learnt exercise may be considered by the group as a whole and 
in some instances with Provider participation. Any lessons learnt can be fed 
into  the  commissioning  cycle,  improve  the  safeguarding  adults  function  and 
raise awareness with other staff members. Any changes made to practice to 
improve  the  quality  and  safety  for  people  who  use  services  can  be 
disseminated  within  organisations  bearing  in  mind  the  need  for 
confidentiality. 
 
 
 
Page 22 of 26 

 
Appendix 1 
 
SAFEGUARDING ADULTS 
Establishment Concerns  
ORGANISATIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT 
  
Concerns Meeting Chair –   
Time and Date    
Professionals involved in the risk assessment and management plan. 
 
Establishment:  
Lead CQC inspector  
 
Address: 
 
 
 
 
 
Postcode: 
 
 

 
RISK INDICATORS/FACTORS 
LEVEL OF 
YES  NO  N/A   CONCERN 
 
INDICATED 
 
High, medium, low 
 
Is the Establishment CQC registered 
 
 
 
 
 
Are there any improvements /enforcements in place 
 
 
 
 
 
Is the responsible person working in partnership with 
 
 
 
 
the authority 
 
Does the Establishment have a registered manager in 
 
 
 
 
place 
 
Does the Establishment have a stable and experienced 
 
 
 
 
staff team 
 
Does the Establishment have a robust on call system  
 
 
 
 
 
Does the Establishment have a clear 
 
 
 
 
managerial/Clinical Lead 
 
Does the Establishment have a history of safeguarding 
 
 
 
 
alerts relating to neglect and or institutional abuse? 
 
Does the Establishment have a history of complaints 
 
 
 
 
about quality and safety? 
 
Does the Establishment have a history of poor care 
 
 
 
 
management? 
Is the Establishment  likely to work with people that 
 
 
 
 
Page 23 of 26 

 
may have  diminished or lack of capacity on issues of 
care and personal safety (eg caters for people with 
cognitive impairment, dementia, learning difficulties) 
Does the Establishment have adequate arrangements 
 
 
 
 
for assessment of capacity and/or best interest decision 
making? 
 
Does the Establishment respect people’s privacy and 
 
 
 
 
dignity? 
 
Does the Establishment have a Safeguarding policy 
 
 
 
 
which includes a zero tolerance on all forms of abuse 
which staff are aware of through up to date training  
which is embedded in practice 
 
Does Establishment work with people that have serious   
 
 
 
and complex health problems 
 
Does the Establishment work with people that have 
 
 
 
 
communication difficulties including English as a 
second language. 
 
Are the wishes and views of people using services 
 
 
 
 
central to the care planning process  
 
Have concerns been raised regarding the quality of 
 
 
 
 
care plans 
 
Have concerns been raised regarding the quality of risk 
 
 
 
 
assessments 
 
Have concerns been raised regarding the storage, 
 
 
 
 
recording and distribution of medication. 
 
Are people’s health care needs properly identified, 
 
 
 
 
planned for and reviewed. 
 
Do people living in the Establishment have access to 
 
 
 
 
NHS services 
 
Is the staff team appropriately qualified, trained and 
 
 
 
 
supported 
 
Does the Establishment have appropriate methods to 
 
 
 
 
quality assure staff training 
 
Does the Establishment  work with people that are 
 
 
 
 
isolated and have no or few visitors 
 
Does the Establishment act to alleviate loneliness and 
 
 
 
 
isolation 
People who use services have access to carers and 
 
 
 
 
professionals to put forward their views and listen to 
their needs and wants.   
 
Is there evidence from customer feedback that there is 
 
 
 
 
dissatisfaction with the service and no action has been 
taken 
Page 24 of 26 

 
 
Does the Establishment work with high risk service 
 
 
 
 
users that may pose a risk to other residents, staff or 
members of the public. 
 
Does the Establishment have a policy and 
 
 
 
 
understanding of deprivation of liberty standards 
 
Does the Establishment have a cordless or mobile 
 
 
 
 
phone available for calls to other parts of the home and 
for use when calling emergency services. (e.g. in CPR 
situations) 
 
Are the proprietors of the Establishment fully involved 
 
 
 
 
and working towards compliance with the improvement 
plan 
 
Are there health and safety concerns within the 
 
 
 
 
Establishment 
 
 
Additional risks not listed in the matrix 
 
 
 
Are all of the risks addressed within the improvement plan, if not please list actions to 
address these risks in the management plan, which can then be incorporated into the 
improvement plan. 

Page 25 of 26 

 
Management plan 
Risk 

Actions 
Date these 
Outcome for 
Who will  Review – when and 
will start 
Provider and 
do this 
whom 
adults at risk 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Risk Assessment at  
Date:  
 
 
END 
 
Page 26 of 26