Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'CFS/ME Guidelines for the Disability Analyst:Version 8'.




 
 
 
 
 
 
Chronic Fatigue 
 
Syndrome / Myalgic 
 
Encephalomyelitis 
 
(CFS/ME) – Guidelines 
 
for the Disability 
 Analyst 
 
 
  (Module 6) 
 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
 
Date:  9th September 2015 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
Foreword  
 
This  training  has  been  produced  as  part  of  a  training  programme  for  Healthcare 
Professionals  (HCPs)  who  conduct  assessments  for  The  Centre  for  Health  and 
Disability Assessments on behalf of the DWP.  
All HCPs undertaking assessments must be registered practitioners who in addition, 
have  undergone  training  in  disability  assessment  medicine  and  specific  training  in 
the  relevant  benefit  areas.  The  training  includes  theory  training  in  a  classroom 
setting,  supervised  practical  training,  and  a  demonstration  of  understanding  as 
assessed by quality audit. 
This training must be read with the understanding that, as experienced practitioners, 
the  HCPs  will  have  detailed  knowledge  of  the  principles  and  practice  of  relevant 
diagnostic techniques and therefore such information is not contained in this training 
module. 
In addition, the training module is not a stand-alone document, and forms only a part 
of  the  training  and  written  documentation  that  the  HCP  receives.  As  disability 
assessment  is  a  practical  occupation,  much  of  the  guidance  also  involves  verbal 
information and coaching. 
Thus,  although  the  training  module  may  be  of  interest  to  non-medical  readers,  it 
must  be  remembered  that  some  of  the  information  may  not  be  readily  understood 
without  background  medical  knowledge  and  an  awareness  of  the  other  training 
given to HCPs. 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 2 of 49 
 

 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
 
Document control 
Superseded documents  
Version history 
Version 
Date 
Comments 
8 Final 
9th September 2015 
Signed off by SH & S 
8a Draft 
October 2014 
Updated by Consultant Physician 
Deputy Medical Director Joint Royal College 
of Physicians Training Board 
7 Final 
28th May 2014 
Signed off by HWD and CMMS 
7e draft 
29th April 2014 
Further external QA comments incorporated 
7d draft 
29th November 2013 
External QA comments from HWD 
7c draft 
15th October 2013 
Document rewritten 
7b draft 
27th August 2013 
External Review   
7a draft 
12th August 2013 
Schedule 28 Review 
6 Final 
27 July 2012 
Signed off by CMMS 
Changes since last version 
Foreword updated 
Document rewritten using current research information 
Section 2 All questions changed  
Section 3 Case study and questions rewritten 
Section 4 rewritten 
Section 5 updated with current disability analysis information 
Section  6  rewritten  with  current  Revised  WCA  information  and  new  case  study 
added 
Section 7 rewritten and new case study added 
Section 8 added (guidance for case studies) 
References updated 
All MCQ questions changed 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 3 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
 
Outstanding issues and omissions 
Issue control 
Author: 
Medical Training & Development 
Owner and approver: 
 Clinical Director 
Signature: 
Date: 
Distribution:   All units 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 4 of 49 
 
 

link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 16 link to page 19 link to page 19 link to page 24 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 27 link to page 27 link to page 27 link to page 29 link to page 30 link to page 35 link to page 35 link to page 35 link to page 35 link to page 37 link to page 37 link to page 38
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
 
 
Contents 
Section 
Page 
1. 
Introduction 
6 
1.1 
Objectives 

1.2 
How to use these Guidelines 

2. 
Current knowledge of CFS/ME 
8 
3. 
CFS/ME Case Study 
9 
4. 
Overview of CFS/ME 
11 
4.1 
Epidemiology 
11 
4.2 
Aetiology 
11 
4.3 
Differential Diagnosis 
12 
4.4 
Diagnosis 
13 
4.5 
Functional Impairment and Levels of Severity 
16 
4.6 
Management 
16 
4.7 
Prognosis 
21 
5. 
Face-to-Face Assessment in the Disability Analysis Setting 
23 
5.1 
Before the Assessment 
23 
5.2 
Setting the Scene at the Beginning of the Assessment 
23 
5.3 
History 
23 
5.4 
Examination 
24 
5.5 
Observed Behaviour 
24 
5.6 
Logical Reasoning and Justification of Advice 
24 
6. 
CFS/ME and the Revised Work Capability Assessment 
26 
6.1 
Revised Work Capability Assessment Case Study 
27 
7. 
CFS/ME and Disability Living Allowance 
32 
7.1 
Higher Rate Mobility Component 
32 
7.2 
Care Component 
32 
7.3 
Disability Living Allowance Case Study 
32 
8. 
Self Assessment and Case Study Guidance 
34 
8.1 
Knowledge Self Assessment Quiz 
34 
8.2 
Revised WCA Case Study Suggested Guidance 
41 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 5 of 49 
 
 

link to page 38 link to page 39 link to page 41 link to page 42 link to page 43 link to page 45
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
 
8.3 
Disability Living Allowance Suggested Case Example Guidance 
41 
9. 
Further Reading 
42 
10. 
Conclusion 
44 
11. 
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome MCQ 
46 
Appendix A -  Oxford and Canadian Case Definitions 
47 
Observation Form 
49 
  
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 6 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
1. 
Introduction  
These guidelines form part of Atos Healthcare’s programme for continuing medical 
education for Health Care Professionals (HCPs).  They are designed to encourage 
consistency  in  our  approach  to  complex  conditions;  provoke  reflection  on  our  own 
perceptions with regard to them; and foster awareness of current medical thinking.   
Chronic  fatigue  syndrome  /  Myalgic  Encephalomyelitis  (CFS/ME)  is  a  disorder,  or 
group  of  disorders,  which  continues  to  cause  considerable  difficulties  for  clinician 
and disability analyst alike, due to the absence of clear causative factors, the lack of 
precise  case  definition  and  the  variable  and  uncertain  natural  history.    Since  the 
terms  “myalgic  encephalomyelitis”  and  “post-viral  fatigue  syndrome”  both  carry 
implications relating to causation, the generic term CFS/ME is preferred. 
The  purpose  of this  module  is  to  encourage  HCPs  working  in  disability  analysis  to 
adopt a common approach to this difficult and complex condition.   
The  disability  analyst’s  particular  focus  in  CFS/ME  is  the  assessment  and 
measurement of overall functional disablement.  It is hoped that this training module 
will encourage HCPs to approach these cases in a way that is objective, thoughtful 
and structured. 
The  Decision  Maker  (DM)  who  receives  the  report  and  advice  will  have  similar 
difficulty in interpreting the issues, and one of the HCP’s central tasks is to evaluate 
the history, clinical findings and disability in any given case and present them in an 
impartial, objective way. 
1.1  Objectives 
By the end of this module HCPs should have:- 
  An  overview  of  CFS/ME  including  aetiology,  diagnosis,  management  and 
prognosis 
  Considered  the  assessment  of  CFS/ME  in  disability  analysis,  developing  a 
consistent and focused approach 
  Considered the assessment of CFS/ME in Revised WCA and DLA cases 
1.2  How to use these Guidelines 
After the introduction, there is a short questionnaire to complete. This is followed by 
a  short  case  study  to  help  HCPs  to  begin  to  think  about  some  of  the  principles  of 
assessment of claimants with CFS/ME.   
The  document  contains  an  overview  of  the  condition  including  diagnosis  and 
management.  
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 6 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
This  is  followed  by  a  review  of  the  principles  of  disability  analysis  when  assessing 
claimants  with  CFS/ME,  with  specific  sections  about  Revised  Work  Capability 
assessments  and  Disability  Living  Allowance  assessments  (with  case  studies  to 
complete).  HCPs  should  read  the  whole  document,  however  they  need  only 
complete the cases studies for the relevant benefit strand for which they are trained. 
There is a reading list with further sources of information about CFS/ME. 
At  the  end  of  the  document  there  is  a  MCQ  to  be  completed  and  returned  to  the 
local training support manager. 
 
 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 7 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
2. 
Current knowledge of CFS/ME 
Before  proceeding  with  the  rest  of  the  module,  it  would  be  helpful  to  complete  the 
following short exercise.  First read the question, and then tick the most appropriate 
box. 
Don’t 
 
Yes 
No 
Know 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 8 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
3. 
CFS/ME Case Study 
XXXXXXXXX
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 9 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
Thinking about the information provided: 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 10 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
4. 
Overview of CFS/ME 
In 2002 the CMO CFS/ME Working Group reported “In recent years, CFS has been 
the preferred medical term for this disorder, or group of disorders, although the large 
majority of patients’ support organisations use the term ME. The Working Group is 
conscious that some patients, especially those who are severely affected, consider 
the  use  of  the  name  CFS  to  be  unrepresentative  of  their  il ness  experience.”1  It 
recommended  the  composite  term  CFS/ME  be  used  until  a  consensus  on 
terminology is developed. 
4.1  Epidemiology 
Reported  prevalence  rates  vary  because  of  the  use  of  different  diagnostic  criteria 
(due to the fact that diagnostic criteria are not standardised). 
1
It has been estimated that the overall population prevalence is 0.2–0.4% .  
A  review  of  CFS/ME  in  the  Lancet  in  2006  put  the  worldwide  prevalence  between 
0.2%  and  2.6%2.  The  NHS  choices  website  reports  it  is  estimated  that  around 
250,000 people in the UK have CFS/ME. 
The mean age of onset is 29-35. It affects women more than men (75% cases are 
female). It can affect all social classes and ethnic groups2. 
4.2  Aetiology 
There is no generally accepted theory of the aetiology of CFS/ME. To date there has 
been  no  single  cause  found  and  CFS/ME  is  probably  best  regarded  as  a 
multifactorial  heterogeneous  illness  with  physiological,  psychological  and  social 
factors all playing a part.  
Many  theories  have  been  proposed  for  pathophysiology  of  CFS/ME  but  precise 
mechanisms  remain  elusive.  Multiple  studies  have  shown  abnormalities  in  brain 
structure/function  (including  neuroendocrine  responses)  and  muscular  function. 
There  have  also  been  numerous  studies  that  have  demonstrated  abnormalities  of 
sleep  and  abnormalities  within  the  immune  system  (including  abnormal  cytokine 
function).  Other  studies  have  suggested  an  association  with  previous  exposure  to 
infectious  agents.  However,  there  is  no  consistent  abnormality  that  has  been 
demonstrated across all people with CFS/ME. There is no laboratory abnormality (or 
biomarker)  that  allows  one  to  make  a  confident  diagnosis  of  CFS/ME  and  the 
                                            
1 A report of the CFS/ME Working Group (Report to the Chief Medical Officer of an Independent Working 
Group) 2002 
2 Prins JB, van der Meer JW, Bleijenberg, G. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Lancet 2006; 367:346-55 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 11 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
diagnosis remains a clinical one based on identifying the very characteristic pattern 
of symptoms. It is likely that the term CFS/ME represents several different conditions 
and  much  research  currently  concentrates  on  describing  and  classifying  these 
different conditions (usually referred to as “phenotypes” of CFS/ME). This wil  al ow 
more carefully targeted intervention trials. 
The  complex  nature  of  the  aetiology  has  led  researchers  to  try  to  identify  factors 
which predispose to developing CSF/ME, those which precipitate it and those which 
perpetuate the illness. 
To  date  no  genetic  abnormalities  have  been  found  although  twin  studies  have 
shown a familial predisposition.3  
Precipitating factors include an infectious trigger in up to three quarters of patients4. 
Infectious  agents  reported  include  Epstein  Barr  virus,  as  well  as  non-specific 
infections  like  a  cold  or  a  ‘flu  like’  il ness.  CFS/ME  has  also  been  reported  after  Q 
fever and Lyme disease. Serious life events (such as death of close family members 
or loss of a job) have been associated with precipitating CFS/ME5. 
Psychological and social factors appear to be involved in perpetuating the symptoms 
of the illness. Factors associated with increased fatigue and severity of the condition 
include:  a  strong  belief  in  the  physical  cause  of  the  illness,  a  focus  on  bodily 
sensations  and  a  poor  sense  of  control  over  the  complaints6,7.  Evidence  suggests 
that  patients  with  CFS/ME  use  more  avoidance  strategies  to  cope  with  the 
debilitating  effects  of  fatigue.  However  avoidance  strategies  have  been  associated 
with  more  fatigue  and  more  functional  impairment,  including  greater  psychosocial 
disturbance in CFS/ME8,9. 
4.3  Differential Diagnosis 
When  considering  a  diagnosis  of  CFS/ME,  the  list  of  conditions  that  could  be 
included  in  a  list  of  differential  diagnoses  is  large,  because  of  the  wide  variety  of 
possible  symptoms.  Any  chronic  condition  that  has  fatigue  as  a  symptom  can  be 
included, however fatigue may not be the main presenting symptom. 
                                            
3 Buchwald D, Herrell R, Ashton S, Belcourt M, Schmaling K, Goldberg J. A twin study of chronic fatigue. 
Psychosom Med 2001; 63: 936-43 
4 de Becker P, McGregor N, de Mierleir K. Possible triggers and mode of onset of chronic fatigue 
syndrome. J Chronic Fatigue Syndr 2002; 10: 3-18 
5 Hatcher S, House A. Life events, difficulties and dilemmas in the onset of chronic fatigue syndrome: a 
case-control study. Psychol Med 2003; 33: 1185-92 
6 Joyce J, Hotopf M, Wessely S. The prognosis of chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a 
systematic review. QJM 1997; 90: 223-233 
7 Heijmans JWM. Coping and adaptive outcome in chronic fatigue syndrome: importance of illness 
cognitions. J Psychosom Res 1998; 45: 39-51 
8 Ray C, Jeffries S, Weir WR: Coping and other predictors of outcome in chronic fatigue syndrome. 
Psychosom Med
 1997; 43:405-415;  
9 Antoni MH, Brickman A, Lutgendorf S, Klimas A, Imia-Fins A, Ironson G, Quillian R, Miguez MJ, van 
Riel F, Morgan R, Patarca R, Fletcher MA: Psychosocial correlates of illness burden in chronic fatigue 
syndrome, Clin Infect Dis 1994; 18:S73-S78 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 12 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
Conditions that may be considered as a differential diagnosis of CSF/ME include: 
  Infectious:  Epstein-Barr  virus,  influenza,  HIV  infection,  other  viral  infections 
and tuberculosis  
  Endocrine:  diabetes,  hyper-  and  hypothyroidism,  Cushing’s  disease, 
Addison's disease and adrenal insufficiency 
  Psychiatric: depressive disorders, anxiety disorder and eating disorders 
  Neurological: multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease 
  Haematologic: anaemia, lymphoma 
  Rheumatologic:  rheumatoid  arthritis,  systemic  lupus  erythematosis  (SLE), 
fibromyalgia, Sjögren's syndrome, polymyalgia rheumatica, giant cell arteritis, 
polymyositis, dermatomyositis 
  Other:  obstructive  sleep  syndromes  (sleep  apnea,  narcolepsy),  sleep 
disorders,  occult  malignancy,  chronic  illness  (including  renal,  hepatic  or 
pulmonary  disease,  autoimmune  conditions  and  congestive  heart  failure), 
body  weight  fluctuation  (severe  obesity  or  marked  weight  loss),  drug  side 
effects (e.g., beta blockers, antihistamines), alcohol or substance abuse and 
heavy metal toxicity (e.g., lead) 
NICE  guidance  recommends  that  when  considering  a  diagnosis  of  CFS/ME,  signs 
and  symptoms  that  can  be  caused  by  other  serious  conditions  (‘red  flags’)  should 
not  be  attributed  to  CFS/ME  without  consideration  of  alternative  diagnoses  or 
comorbidities, such as: 
  Localising/focal neurological signs  
  Signs and symptoms of inflammatory arthritis or connective tissue disease  
  Signs and symptoms of cardiorespiratory disease  
  Significant weight loss  
  Sleep apnoea  
  Clinically significant lymphadenopathy  
4.4  Diagnosis 
There  is  considerable  controversy  over  the  diagnostic  definition  of  CFS/ME  and 
numerous  different  criteria  have  been  proposed..  As  noted  above  no  specific 
biological  marker  or  abnormality  on  physical  examination  has  been  consistently 
identified  in  cases  of  CFS/ME  and  the  diagnosis  is  made  from  the  history  of  the 
symptoms and resulting disability while ruling out other specific causes of fatigue. 
A number of definitions have been proposed including the CDC/Fukuda criteria, the 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 13 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
Oxford  case  definition  and  the  Canadian  case  definition.  In  the  UK  the  Fukuda 
criteria  is  the  one  most  commonly  used,  in  almost  all  CFS  services  (information 
about the Oxford and Canadian criteria can be found in Appendix A). 
4.4.1  CDC / Fukuda criteria 
In  1988  the  United  States  Centers  for  Disease  Control  and  Prevention  (CDC) 
developed  a  case  definition  primarily  to  standardise  the  patient  populations  for 
research. 
The case definition was revised in 1994 and is also known as the Fukuda Criteria10. 
This definition is now the most widely used internationally. Although these guidelines 
were primarily developed for use in research studies they are also used clinically. 
International Centre for Disease Control 1994 definition 
Clinically evaluated, unexplained, persistent or relapsing chronic fatigue lasting more 
than six months 
• of new or definite onset 
• not the result of ongoing exertion 
• not substantially alleviated by rest 
•  including  substantial  reduction  in  previous  levels  of  occupational,  social  or 
personal activities 
Four of the following symptoms concurrently present for at least six months 
• sore throat 
• tender cervical or axil ary lymph nodes 
• muscle pain 
• multi-joint pain 
• new headaches 
• unrefreshing sleep 
• post-exertion malaise. 
  cognitive dysfunction 
Exclusion criteria: 
• active, unresolved, or suspected disease likely to cause fatigue 
• psychotic, melancholic or bipolar depression 
• psychotic disorders 
• dementia 
• anorexia or bulimia nervosa 
• alcohol or other substance misuse 
• severe obesity. 
                                            
10 Fukuda K, Straus SE, Hickie I et al. The chronic fatigue syndrome: a comprehensive approach to its 
definition and study. Annals of Internal Medicine 1994, 121:953–959 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 14 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
4.4.2  Classification 
The  classification  of  CFS/ME  is  not  used  for  diagnostic  purposes.  The  current 
classification does illustrate the difficulty of the complex nature of aetiology and the 
presence of both physical and psychological elements of the condition. 
 
4.4.3  NICE Guidance  
NICE  guidance  for  the  management  of  CFS/ME11  was  issued  in  2007,  with  the 
overall goal of improving care for people with CFS/ME.  
The NICE guidance advises healthcare professionals should consider the possibility 
of CFS/ME if a person has:  
fatigue with all of the following features:  
  new or had a specific onset (that is, it is not lifelong)  
  persistent and/or recurrent  
  unexplained by other conditions  
  has resulted in a substantial reduction in activity level  
  characterised by post-exertional malaise and/or fatigue (typically delayed, for 
example by at least 24 hours, with slow recovery over several days)  
and one or more of the following symptoms:  
  difficulty with sleeping, such as insomnia, hypersomnia, unrefreshing sleep, a 
disturbed sleep–wake cycle  
  muscle  and/or  joint  pain  that  is  multi-site  and  without  evidence  of 
inflammation  
  headaches 
  painful lymph nodes without pathological enlargement  
  sore throat 
  cognitive  dysfunction  -  including  impairment  of  short-term  memory,  and 
difficulties  with  word-finding,  planning/organising  thoughts  and  information 
processing,  inability  to  concentrate  (patients  will  often  refer  to  these 
symptoms as “brain fog” 
  physical or mental exertion makes symptoms worse (patients will often refer 
to this phenomenon as “payback” 
  general malaise or ‘flu-like’ symptoms dizziness and/or nausea palpitations in 
the absence of identified cardiac pathology.  
A diagnosis should be made after other possible diagnoses have been excluded and 
                                            
11 Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (or encephalopathy): diagnosis and 
management of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (or encephalopathy) in adults 
and children 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 15 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
the symptoms have persisted for:  
  4 months in an adult  
  3  months  in  a  child  or  young  person;  the  diagnosis  should  be  made  or 
confirmed by a paediatrician 
In summary, the fact that there are multiple different classifications with no universal 
agreement on diagnostic guidelines reflects the complex nature of the disease and 
the lack of a clear aetiology. There is little evidence that any of the case definitions 
or diagnostic criteria in use demonstrate accuracy in the diagnosis of CFS.  
CFS/ME  involves  a  complex  range  of  symptoms  that  includes  fatigue,  malaise  (in 
particular  post  exertional  malaise),  headaches,  sleep  disturbance,  poor 
concentration / poor short term memory (‘Brain Fog’), muscle and/or joint pain, sore 
throat,  tender  lymph  nodes,  stomach  pain/bloating/constipation/diarrhoea/nausea, 
sensitivity  or  intolerance  to  light/loud  noise/alcohol,  dizziness,  excessive  sweating 
and  difficulty  controlling  body  temperature.    Anhedonia,  panic  attacks,  depression, 
irritability, and emotional lability are also commonly present.   
A person’s symptoms may fluctuate in intensity and severity, and there is also great 
variability  in  the  symptoms  different  people  experience.  There  is  significant  clinical 
overlap between CFS/ME and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS).12 
4.5  Functional Impairment and Levels of Severity 
XXXXXX 
4.6  Management 
The NICE guidance gives the following advice to healthcare professionals about the 
management of a patient with CFS/ME: 
 
Healthcare professionals should recognise that the person with CFS/ME is in charge 
of  the  aims  and  goals  of  the  overall  management  plan.  The  pace  of  progression 
throughout the course of any intervention should be mutually agreed. 
 
An  individualised  management  plan  should  be  developed  with  the  person  with 
CFS/ME, and their carers if appropriate. The plan should be reviewed and changes 
documented at each contact. It should include:  
  relevant symptoms and history  
  plans for care and treatment, including managing setbacks/relapses  
  information and support needs  
  any education, training or employment support needs  
  details  of  the  healthcare  professionals  involved  in  care  and  their  contact 
details.  
 
                                            
12White K Speechley M Harth M Ostbye T.  Co-existence of chronic fatigue syndrome with fibromyalgia 
syndrome in the general population.  Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology 2000;29(1):44 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 16 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
Any  decision  to  refer  a  person  to  specialist  CFS/ME  care  should  be  based  on  their 
needs,  the  type,  duration,  complexity  and  severity  of  their  symptoms,  and  the 
presence  of  co  morbidities.  The  decision  should  be  made  jointly  by  the  person  with 
CFS/ME and the healthcare professional. 
 
 
Symptom management 
 
  Manage  symptoms  of  CFS/ME  as  in  usual  clinical  practice.  Advice  on 
symptom management should not be delayed until a diagnosis is established. 
This advice should be tailored to the specific symptoms the person has and be 
aimed at minimising their impact on daily life and activities. 
 
  Share decision making with the person with CFS/ME during diagnosis and all 
phases of care.  Acknowledge the reality and impact of the condition and the 
symptoms.    Provide  information  on  the  range  of  interventions  and 
management  strategies  covered  in  this  guideline,  including  their  risks  and 
benefits. Take into  account  the  person’s  age,  the severity  of  their  symptoms 
and the outcome of previous treatments. 
 
  Complementary  therapies  are  not  usually  recommended  but  may  help 
symptom control. 
 
  Supplements  such  as  vitamin  B12,  vitamin  C,  co-enzyme  Q10,  magnesium, 
NADH  (nicotinamide  adenine  dinucleotide)  or  multivitamins  and  minerals  are 
also not usually recommended.  
 
People  with  CFS/ME  are,  in  general,  sensitive  to  medications  and  therefore  can 
develop  side  effects  easily  to  many  medications,  which  needs  to  be  taken  into 
account when prescribing. 
 
Function and quality-of-life management 
 
  Sleep  management  –  provide  tailored  sleep  management  advice,  do  not 
encourage daytime sleeping/naps 
  Rest  periods  –  advise  people  on  how  to  introduce  ‘rest  periods’  into  their 
routine 
  Relaxation – various relaxation techniques can be advised for managing pain, 
sleep problems, co morbid stress or anxiety 
  Diet – emphasize importance of well balanced diet, eating regularly, develop 
strategies  to minimise  problems  due  to  nausea, sore  throat  or  problems  with 
buying and preparing food 
  Aids and Adaptations - For people with moderate or severe CFS/ME, consider 
providing or recommending equipment and adaptations (such as a wheelchair, 
blue badge or stair lift). This should be as part of an overall management plan, 
taking  into  account  the  risks  and  benefits  for  the  individual  patient,  to  help 
them to maintain their independence and improve their quality of life 
 
 
Education and Employment 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 17 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
  Having  to  stop  work  or  education  is  generally  detrimental  to  people’s  health 
and well-being. Address each person’s ability to continue in education or work 
early, and review it regularly. 
 
  Proactively  advise  about  fitness  for  work  and  education,  and  recommend 
flexible adjustments or adaptations to help people to return to them when they 
are ready and fit enough. A graded return to work is often helpful 
 
Liaise, with the person’s informed consent, with  
  Employers and occupational health services 
  Disability services through Jobcentre Plus 
  Social care and Education services 
 
 
Treatment plans 
 
  Offer  an  individualised,  person-centred  program  that  aims  to  sustain  and 
gradual y  extend,  if  possible,  the  person’s  physical,  emotional  and  cognitive 
capacity and manage the physical and emotional impact of their symptoms. 
 
  Explain the rationale and content of the different programmes, including their 
potential benefits and risks, and that no single strategy will be successful for 
all people with CFS/ME, or at all stages 
 
Recognise that the person is in charge of the aims of the programme. Agree together 
the choice of programme, its components, and progression through it, based on: 
  the person’s age, preferences and needs 
  the person’s skil s and abilities in managing their condition, and their goals  
  the severity and complexity of symptoms 
  physical and cognitive functioning 
 
  Offer  cognitive  behavioural  therapy  (CBT)  and/or  graded  exercise  therapy 
(GET) to  people  with  mild  or  moderate  CFS/ME,  and  provide  them for  those 
who choose them, because these are the interventions for which there is the 
clearest  research  evidence  of  benefit.  Components  of  CBT  or  GET  may  be 
offered together with activity management strategies, sleep management and 
relaxation techniques, where the full CBT or GET program is not appropriate. 
 
  Offer people with severe CFS/ME an individually tailored activity management 
program as the core therapeutic strategy. 
 
  Consider referral to Pain Management clinic if pain is a predominant feature. 
 
  Consider low dose tricyclic antidepressant for poor sleep or pain. 
 
NICE guidance provides the following definitions for CBT, GET and specialist care: 
 
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) 
An  evidence-based  psychological  therapy  that  is  used  in  many  health  settings, 
including  cardiac  rehabilitation  and  diabetes  management.  It  is  a  collaborative 
treatment  approach. When  it  is  used for  CFS/ME,  the  aim  is  to  reduce the  levels  of 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 18 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
symptoms,  disability  and  distress  associated  with  the  condition.  A  course  of  CBT  is 
usually  12–16  sessions.  The  use  of  CBT  does  not  assume  or  imply  that  symptoms 
are psychological or ‘made up’.  
 
Graded Exercise Therapy (GET) 
An evidence-based approach to CFS/ME that involves physical assessment, mutually 
negotiated goal-setting and education. The first step is to set a sustainable baseline 
of physical activity, then the duration of the activity is gradually increased in a planned 
way  that  is  tailored  to the  person. This  is followed  by  an  increase  in  intensity,  when 
the  person  is  able,  taking  into  account  their  preferences  and  objectives,  current 
activity and sleep patterns, setbacks/relapses and emotional factors. The objective is 
to improve the person’s CFS/ME symptoms and functioning, aiming towards recovery. 
 
Specialist Care  
A  service  providing  expertise  in  assessing,  diagnosing  and  advising  on  the  clinical 
management  of  CFS/ME,  including  symptom  control  and  specific  interventions. 
Ideally  this  is  provided  by  a  multidisciplinary  team,  which  may  include  GPs  with  a 
special interest in the condition, neurologists, immunologists, specialists in infectious 
disease, paediatricians, nurses, clinical psychologists, liaison psychiatrists, dieticians, 
physiotherapists and occupational therapists. 
 
 
Avoid 
 
  Specialist management programs which are delivered by practitioners with no 
experience in the condition 
  Giving  advice  to person  to undertake unsupervised  or  unstructured vigorous 
exercise  
  Various  drugs  such  as  monoamine  oxidase  inhibitors,  glucocorticoids, 
mineralocorticoids, 
thyroxine, 
antiviral 
agents, 
methylphenidate, 
dexamphetamine 
 
Preparing for a setback/relapse 
 
Advise people with CFS/ME that setbacks/relapses are to be expected. 
 
Develop  a  plan  with  each  person  with  CFS/ME  for  managing  setbacks/relapses,  so 
that  skills,  strategies,  resources  and  support  are  available  when  needed.  This  plan 
may be shared with the person’s carers, if they agree. 
 
Review and ongoing management 
 
Perform  regular  structured  review  of  management,  assessing  improvement  or 
deterioration  in  symptoms,  assessing  any  side  effects  of  medication,  reviewing  the 
diagnosis  if  signs  and  symptoms  change,  consider  need  for  further  investigation, 
consider  referral  to  specialist,  reviewing  any  equipment  needs,  assessing  need  for 
additional support. 
 
(The  NICE  guidelines  were  reviewed  in  2010  –  2011  to  determine  whether  any 
amendments  needed  to  be  made  to  the  2007  guidelines  in  view  of  more  recent 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 19 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
medical evidence, however no new evidence was available to suggest that a change 
was required.)  
4.6.1  Ongoing debate 
 
Following  release  of  the  NICE  guidance  some  patient  organisations  within  the  UK 
(ME  association  and  Action  for  ME)  released  survey  results  which  indicated  that 
people with CFS/ME found pacing to be more beneficial and also reported that CBT 
and GET are sometimes harmful. 
 
The  report  of  the  Chief  Medical  Officer’s  working  group13  defined  the  principles  of 
pacing  as  “an  energy  management  strategy  in  which  patients  are  encouraged  to 
achieve  an  appropriate  balance  between  rest  and  activity.  This  usually  involves 
living  within  physical  and  mental  limitations  imposed  by  the  illness,  and  avoiding 
activities  to  a  degree  that  exacerbates  symptoms  or  interspersing  activity  with 
periods of rest. The aim is to prevent patients entering a vicious circle of overactivity 
and setbacks, while assisting them to set realistic goals for increasing activity when 
appropriate.“ 
 
An  article  published  in  The  Lancet  in  March  2011  gave  details  of  results  from  a 
randomised  trial  -  PACE  study  -  which  looked  at  Adaptive  Pacing  Therapy  (APT), 
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT), Graded Exercise Therapy (GET) and Specialist 
Medical  Care  (SMC)  in  the  treatment  for  Chronic  Fatigue  Syndrome  (CFS).  The 
results suggested that CBT and GET could safely be added to SMC to moderately 
improve outcomes for CFS but APT was not an effective addition14. There were no 
differences between the groups of reported serious deterioration or serious adverse 
reactions. 
 
The ME Association issued a press statement on the results of the PACE trial on the 
18th  of  February  2011,  which  stated  that  ‘the  results  are  at  serious  variance  to 
patient evidence on both cognitive therapy and exercise therapy’. This was based on 
results  from  a  survey  performed  by  the  ME  Association  in  200815,  during  which  a 
comprehensive  questionnaire  was  sent  to  people  with  Chronic  Fatigue  Syndrome 
and their carers, which suggested that pacing was found to be more beneficial than 
Graded Exercise therapy.  
 
Recent research reviewed treatment outcomes for patients attending NHS CFS/ME 
specialist  services16.  One  of  the  aims  of  the  research  was  to  see  whether  the 
                                            
13 A report of the CFS/ME Working Group (Report to the Chief Medical Officer of an Independent 
Working Group) 2002 
14 White PD, Goldsmith KA, Johnson AL, Potts L, Walwyn R, DeCesare JC, et al. Comparison of adaptive 
pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise therapy, and specialist medical care for 
chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): a randomised trial. Lancet 2011; 377: 823-836 
15 Managing my M.E. What people with ME/CFS and their carers want from the UK’s health and social 
services. The results of the me association’s major survey of illness management requirements. ME 
Association 2010. 
16 Crawley E, Collin SM, White PD, Rimes K, Sterne JAC, May MT, and CFS/ME National Outcomes 
Database. Treatment outcomes in adults with chronic fatigue syndrome: a prospective study in England 
based on the CFS/ME National Outcomes Database. Q L Med 2013; 106: 555-565 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 20 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
outcomes were similar to those of the PACE trial. Patients attending NHS specialist 
CFS/ME  services  were  treated  with  CBT,  GET,  a  combination  of  both  or  activity 
management, in group and/ or individual treatment sessions of varying numbers and 
lengths. The evidence showed that although improvements in fatigue similar  to the 
PACE  trial  were  present,  there  was  far  less  improvement  in  levels  of  physical 
function in a clinical setting. One of the factors postulated for the difference was the 
amount  of  treatment  patients  underwent.  In  NHS  it  appeared  that  patients  were 
offered  5-6  sessions,  whereas  in the  PACE  trial  it  was  12-14  sessions. There may 
also  be  differences  in  the  content  of  the  treatment  offered  between  the  trial  and 
clinical  settings.  However  it  is  clear  that  further  research  is  required  for  further 
clarification of treatment outcomes. 
At  times  it  appears  that  the  arguments  and  controversies  around  the  aetiology  of 
CFS/ME  detract  from  the  management  of  the  condition  itself.  Following  a 
biopsychosocial  model  of  illness  reinforces  the  idea  of  an  illness  having  both 
physical and mental components with social influences. Understanding and treating 
CFS/ME should be less about the dichotomy of whether it is a physical illness or a 
mental illness and more about recognising the complex nature of the condition. The 
management regime offered should be effective in helping the patient and improving 
their condition no matter what the aetiology of the condition.  
 
4.7  Prognosis 
CFS/ME is not associated with increased mortality. Studies have shown that whilst 
some  patients  do  improve  (figures  vary  from  17  to  64%),  between  10-20%  worsen 
over time and less than 10% recover fully to a pre-morbid level of functioning. 
CFS/ME  often  follows  a  variable  fluctuating  course  with  periods  of  remission 
interspersed with relapses. 
Factors that have been associated with a poorer prognosis include17: 
  Older age 
  Longer illness duration 
  Fatigue severity 
  Comorbidities ( psychiatric or physical) 
  Physical attribution of symptoms 
However a recent study looking at treatment outcomes did not find that depression, 
anxiety or duration of illness predicted outcome. 18 
                                            
17 Joyce J, Hotopf , Wessely S. The prognosis of chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a 
systematic review. QJM 1997; 90: 223-233 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 21 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
CFS/ME in children and adolescents is associated with a better prognosis. 
                                                                                                                                         
18 Crawley E, Collin SM, White PD, Rimes K, Sterne JAC, May MT, and CFS/ME National Outcomes 
Database. Treatment outcomes in adults with chronic fatigue syndrome: a prospective study in England 
based on the CFS/ME National Outcomes Database. Q L Med 2013; 106: 555-565 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 22 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
5. 
Face-to-Face Assessment in the Disability 
Analysis Setting 

XXXXXXXX 
5.1  Before the Assessment 
XXXXXXXXXXX 
5.2  Setting the Scene at the Beginning of the Assessment 
XXXXXXXX 
5.3  History   
5.3.1  Condition History 
Symptoms  should  be  carefully  elicited.    Fatigue,  post-exertional  malaise,  muscle 
pain, disturbed sleep, poor concentration and other features of cognitive dysfunction 
and  are  commonly  reported,  but  be  sure  to  enquire  about  any  other  related 
symptoms.  
Any concomitant condition must be identified and individually recorded, as it may be 
contributing to any functional impairment present.  
Information  about  any  treatment  received,  including  medication  or  specialist 
treatment, must be recorded along with its impact on the symptoms/function.  
5.3.2  Typical Day History 
An  account  of  the  activities  of  a  typical  day  should  be  taken,  in  keeping  with  the 
general  guidelines  (see  Revised  WCA  Handbook  or  Guidance  for  Health  Care 
Professionals  undertaking  Disability  Living  Allowance/Attendance  Allowance 
Assessments Handbook).  The HCP should explore all of life’s key activities in the 
process,  such  as feeding,  cooking, keeping the  house  clean,  shopping, gardening, 
social life and so on. This should include clarifying details such as how often the task 
is performed, is it repeatable and is there any after effects? Evidence of consistency 
should be sought in how each of these activities is managed.  This in turn should be 
confirmed by informal observation where possible. 
It should be noted in interpreting this evidence that one of the common complaints of 
claimants  with  CFS/ME  is  that  although  tasks  can  often  be  accomplished  they 
cannot  be  sustained;  or  reliably  performed  again  without  significant  detriment  (e.g. 
exhaustion, to the extent of being unable to continue with any other activities for the 
rest of the day/ next few days).  Ensure this is probed and explored within the typical 
day history. 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 23 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
5.3.3  Variability 
In  addition,  careful  account  must  be  taken  of  variability;  since  CFS/ME,  like  most 
other  chronic  conditions,  encompasses  a  spectrum  of  capabilities.    Information  on 
variability, indicating to the DM ‘where’ the claimant sits on the severity spectrum, is 
an important contributor to the HCP’s advice.  It is not sufficient simply to make the 
general comment that the symptoms “vary from day to day”, or between one part of 
the  day  and  the  next.    The  DM  requires  information  on  the  actual  duration  of 
disabling  problems;  the  frequency  of  days  when  severe  fatigue  or  pain  is 
experienced;  the  average  proportion  of  “bad”  days  to  “good”,  and  a  description  of 
what the person says he/she can and cannot do on the “good” days and the “bad” 
days.   
In  Revised  Work  Capability  assessments  remember  to  look  for  added  clues  about 
the  extent  of  variability,  and  other  ways  CFS/ME  impacts  on  a  claimant’s  life,  by 
scrutinising  information  which  may  be  contained  under  the  section  headed  ‘About 
your il nesses or disabilities’ (page 3, of ESA 50 version 01/13).   
Here, claimants have an added opportunity to describe in their own words the way in 
which  they  feel  their  condition(s)  affects  them;  to  expand  on  their  personal 
experiences of living with CFS/ME – especially important if they feel that subsequent 
parts  of  the  form  (detailing  the  functional  ‘Activity’  areas)  are  not  applicable/  “don’t 
fit” their view of the difficulties they have.    
5.4  Examination 
XXXXXXX 
5.4.1  Physical Examination 
XXXXXXX 
5.4.2  Mental State Examination 
XXXXXXX 
5.5  Observed Behaviour 
XXXXXXX 
5.6  Logical Reasoning and Justification of Advice 
An important step in disability analysis is to logically reason all the available evidence 
in  order  to  formulate  the  advice.  Remember  evidence  is  not  just  that  available  from 
the face-to-face assessment. Sources such as the ESA 50 (in Revised WCA cases), 
hospital/specialist  letters  as  well  as  information  from  carers  if  available  must  be 
considered.  
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 24 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
In  CFS/ME,  where  there  are  few  if  any  overt  clinical  findings,  it  is  particularly 
important  to  carefully  evaluate  whether  the  person’s  description  of  their  disability  is 
consistent with their daily activities and lifestyle. 
Take  careful  account  of  the  effects  of  fatigue,  of  variability  of  symptoms,  and  of  the 
ability to reasonably sustain any given activity, not just the ability  to perform it once. 
Ensure the advice given is not formed from a "snapshot" of the claimant on the day of 
assessment, but reflects their functional ability over a period of time. Taking all of this 
into  account,  if  a  claimant  cannot  repeat  an  activity  with  a  reasonable  degree  of 
regularity, and certainly if they can perform the activity only once, then they should be 
considered unable to perform that activity.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 25 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
6. 
CFS/ME and the Revised Work Capability 
Assessment 

HCPs  will  recall  the  main  aims  of  the  ESA  Work  Capability  Assessment  are  to 
provide  a  fairer,  more  accurate  and  more  robust  assessment  of  the  level  of  a 
person’s functional ability in relation to capability for work in the modern workplace, 
as  well  as  to  ensure  that  those  who  currently  have  limited  capability  for  work  and 
work related activity are identified. 
The Work Capability Assessment has been reviewed regularly since its inception to 
ensure  the  aims  are  fulfilled.  These  reviews  have  resulted  in  revision  of  the 
regulations on two occasions (2011 and 2012) so that the process is now known as 
the Revised Work Capability Assessment.  
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A  review  of  symptoms  associated  with  CFS/ME  reveals  great  heterogeneity  and 
therefore  it  is  likely  that  multiple  activity  areas  and  descriptors  may  need  to  be 
considered.  
Symptoms such as fatigue, post-exertional malaise, muscle and joint pain may affect 
lower  limb  and  upper  limb  activities;  mobilising,  sitting  and  standing,  reaching, 
picking up and moving and manual dexterity. 
 
CFS/ME  is  not  usually  associated  with  sensory  loss  (affecting  vision,  hearing  or 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 26 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
speech). It is also not usually associated with loss of consciousness or incontinence. 
Therefore sensory, consciousness and continence functional impairment is unlikely 
unless other conditions affecting these modalities are present. 
Symptoms  of  CFS/ME  such  as  fatigue,  post-exertional  malaise,  poor  sleep,  poor 
concentration  and  cognitive  difficulties  may  all  impact  on  mental  functioning, 
especially  within  the  understanding  and  focus  group  of  activities.  If  the  symptoms 
are significant they may affect the ability to complete personal action and if severe 
hazard awareness may be affected. Unless there are other co-morbid mental illness 
conditions  (such  as  depression  or  anxiety)  present,  it  is  unlikely  there  will  be 
functional impairment of the adapting to change or  social  interaction activities.  The 
scope  of  these  activity  groups  shows  the  focus  of  these  activities  is  intended  for 
conditions such as psychosis, autism, severe anxiety and depression. 
For  the  purposes  of  Revised WCA,  skill  is  required  to  assess  the  degree  to  which 
stated  difficulties  in  persisting  with  tasks  is  due  to  the  physical  component  of  the 
illness, and which is due to psychological factors – and there may be a risk of double 
application  of  physical  and  mental  function  descriptors.  The  ability  to  perform 
activities  reliably  and  repeatedly  is  integral  to  the  activity  descriptors  in  Revised 
Work Capability Assessment (Amended 2012 Regulations) and to the advice given 
to the DM in any of the benefit assessments.  
HCPs may wish to reinforce their knowledge by re-reading the scope of each of the 
Revised WCA descriptors in the Revised WCA handbook. 
6.1  Revised Work Capability Assessment Case Study 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 27 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 28 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
XXXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 29 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 30 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 31 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
7. 
CFS/ME and Disability Living Allowance 
Disability Living Allowance consists of 2 components: 
Care – XXXX 
Mobility – XXXX 
7.1.1  Forming a Mobility Opinion  
DLA  legislation  requires  the  claimant  to  have  a  physical  disability  in  order  to  be 
entitled to the higher rate mobility component. Where a person has a condition with 
both  physical  and  mental  elements  (such  as  CFS/ME),  providing  the  physical 
problem is contributing to walking difficulties, Upper Tribunal Judges have ruled that 
all the walking problems should be considered ‘physical’ in this context. 
7.1.1.1  The Limb Function Table 
XXXXXX 
7.2  Care Component  
XXXX  
XXXXXX 
7.3  Disability Living Allowance Case Study 
XXXXX 
XXXXX 
XXXXX 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 32 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 33 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
8. 
Self Assessment and Case Study Guidance  
8.1  Knowledge Self Assessment Quiz 
XXXXX 
 
Don’t 
 
Yes 
No 
Know 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 34 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
8.2  Revised WCA Case Study Suggested Guidance  
XXXXX 
8.3  Disability Living Allowance Suggested Case Example Guidance 
XXXXX 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 41 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
9. 
Further Reading 
  DWP’s published medical guidance for DLA/ AA, available on sharepoint or 
on the internet http://www.dwp.gov.uk/publications/specialist-guides/medical-
conditions/a-z-of-medical-conditions/ 

  Occupational aspects of the Management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A 
National Guideline (2006)- 
http://www.anhops.com/docs/92_8_273539_CFSyndrome_full_review.pdf 
  Treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome (Occupational Medicine review – K 
A Rimes & T Chalder 2005) - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15699088 
  Diagnosis  and  Management  of  Chronic  Fatigue  Syndrome/Myalgic 
encephalomyelitis  in  adults  or  children    -  NICE  Guidelines  (National 
Collaborating  Centre  for  Primary  Care  &  Royal  College  of  GPs)  – 
http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/live/11824/36191/36191.pdf 
  A systematic review describing the prognosis of chronic fatigue syndrome (R. 
Cairns & Hotopf 2005) - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15699087 
  Chronic  Fatigue  Syndrome:  A  Review  (Afari  N  &  Buchwald,  D)  - 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12562565 
  CDC information on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome http://www.cdc.gov/CFS/ 
 
  Carruthers BM, Jain AK, De Meirleir KL, Peterson DL, Klimas NG, Lerner AM 
et al. (2003) Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: clinical 
working case definition, diagnostic and treatment protocols. Journal of 
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome 2003; 11(1):7- 115 
http://www.aqem.org/includes/documents/consensus canadian(full).pdf - 
page=18 

  Crawley E et al. Treatment outcome in adults with chronic fatigue syndrome: 
a  prospective  study  in  England  based  on  the  CFS/ME  National  Outcomes 
Database.    Quarterly  Journal  of  Medicine,  2013,  6,  555-  565 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3665909/pdf/hct061.pdf 
  CMO Working Group Report –
http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130107105354/http://www.dh.go
v.uk/prod_consum_dh/groups/dh_digitalassets/@dh/@en/documents/digitala
sset/dh_4064945.pdf 

  NHS - http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/chronic-fatigue-
syndrome/pages/introduction.aspx 
  Holgate  ST  et  al.    Chronic  fatigue  syndrome:  Understanding  a  complex 
illness.    Nature  Reviews  Neuroscience,  2011,  12,  539  –  544 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21792218 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 42 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
  Various documents available on sharepoint including: 
  Revised WCA Handbook 
  Guidance  for  Health  Care  Professionals  undertaking  Disability  Living 
Allowance/Attendance Allowance Assessments Handbook 
  Mobility Questions in DLA 
  General Principles of Examination Learning Set 
  EBM – Chronic Fatigue Syndrome  / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis 
 
  Variability 
  ME Association (2010) Managing my ME  – What people with ME/CFS  and 
their  carers  want  from  the  UK’s  health  and  social  services 
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/2010-survey-
report-lo-res4.pdf 

  Action  for  ME.  ME  2008:  what  progress?  Action  for  ME  2008 
http://www.actionforme.org.uk/Resources/Action 
for 
ME/Documents/get-
informed/ME 2008  What progress.pdf 
  ME/CFS/PVFS  An exploration  of the key  clinical  issues  (written  by  Medical 
Adviser  to  ME  association)  http://www.leger.me.uk/health  Professional 
Information/Key Clinic Issue.pdf 

 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 43 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
  
 
10.  Conclusion 
The objectives of this module were to enable HCPs to:- 
  Have an overview of CFS/ME including aetiology, diagnosis, management and 
prognosis 
  Consider  the  assessment  of  CFS/ME  in  disability  analysis,  developing  a 
consistent and focused approach 
  Consider the assessment of CFS/ME in Revised WCA and DLA cases 
In order to evaluate your understanding of this module, please answer the following 
questions, referring to the reference material when required. 
 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 44 of 49 
 
 

  
 
11.  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome MCQ 
Name: 
Registration Number: 
Signature: 
Date: 
 
 
 
Correct  Incorrect 
 
 

1.    XXXXX 
 
 
2.    XXXXX 
 
 
3.   
 
XXXXX 
 
 
 
4.    XXXXX 
 
 
5.    XXXXX 
 
 
 
6.    XXXXX 
 
 
7.    XXXXX 
 
 
 
 
 
On completion please return to the Clinical Manager or Training 
Support Manager at your Assessment Service Centre (ASC) 
 
  
 
 


 Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
 
 
Appendix A -  Oxford and Canadian Case Definitions 
11.1.2  Oxford Case Definition  
 

The  Oxford  Criteria  were  developed  at  a  consensus  meeting  in  Oxford  in  19911. 
They  retained  some  of  the  features  of  the  initial  CDC  case  definition  but  included 
physical and mental fatigability. Psychiatric illness was no longer excluded. 
Severe, disabling fatigue lasting at least six months that: 
• affects both physical and mental functioning 
• is present more than 50% of the time 
Other symptoms possibly present: 
• myalgia 
• sleep disturbances 
• mood disturbance. 
Exclusion criteria: 
• active, unresolved or suspected disease likely to cause fatigue 
• psychotic or bipolar depression (but not uncomplicated major depression) 
• psychotic disorder 
• dementia 
• anorexia or bulimia nervosa. 
11.1.3  Canadian Case Definition (Canadian Expert Consensus Panel) 
This new case definition2, developed and published in 2003, provided a more clinical 
focus. It considered post-exertional malaise essential to the diagnosis as well as the 
presence  of  neurological/cognitive,  autonomic,  neuroendocrine  and  immune 
manifestations. 
Clinical Working Case Definition of ME/CFS 
A  patient  with  ME/CFS  will  meet  the  criteria  for  fatigue,  post-exertional  malaise 
and/or  fatigue,  sleep  dysfunction  and  pain  (items  1–4);  have  two  or  more 
neurological/cognitive manifestations (item 5) and one or more symptoms from two 
of the categories of autonomic, neuroendocrine and immune manifestations (item 6); 
and adhere to item 7. 
1.  Fatigue:  The  patient  has  a  significant  degree  of  new  onset,  unexplained, 
persistent, or recurrent physical and mental fatigue that substantially reduces activity 
level. 
 
                                            
1 Sharpe MK, Archard LC, Banatvala JE, et al. A report – chronic fatigue syndrome: Guidelines for 
research. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 1991, 84:(2)118–121 
2 Carruthers BM, et al. Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: clinical working case 
definition, diagnostic and treatment protocols. J Chronic Fatigue Syndr 2003; 11: 7-116 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 47 of 49 
 
 


 Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
 
 
2. Post-exertional malaise and/or fatigue: There is an inappropriate loss of physical 
and  mental  stamina,  rapid  muscular  and  cognitive  fatigability,  post-exertional 
malaise  and/or  fatigue  and/or  pain  and  a  tendency  for  other  associated  symptoms 
within  the  patient’s  cluster  of  symptoms  to  worsen.  There  is  a  pathologically  slow 
recovery period–usually 24 hours or longer. 
3.  Sleep  dysfunction:*  There  is  unrefreshed  sleep  or  sleep  quantity  or  rhythm 
disturbances such as reversed or chaotic diurnal sleep rhythms. 
4.  Pain:*  There  is  a  significant  degree  of  myalgia.  Pain  can  be  experienced  in  the 
muscles and/or joints, and is often widespread and migratory in nature. Often there 
are significant headaches of new type, pattern or severity. 
5.  Neurological/cognitive  manifestations:  Two  or  more  of  the  following  difficulties 
should  be  present:  confusion,  impairment  of  concentration  and  short-term  memory 
consolidation, disorientation, difficulty with information  processing, categorising and 
word retrieval, and perceptual and sensory disturbances – e.g. spatial instability and 
disorientation  and  inability  to  focus  vision.  Ataxia,  muscle  weakness  and 
fasciculations are common. There may be overload phenomena: cognitive, sensory 
– e.g. photophobia and hypersensitivity to noise – and/or emotional overload, which 
may lead to “crash” periods and/or anxiety. 
* There are a small number of patients who have no pain or sleep dysfunction, but 
no other diagnosis fits except ME/CFS. A diagnosis of ME/CFS can be entertained 
when this group has an infectious illness type onset. 
6. At least one symptom from two of the following categories: 
a.  Autonomic  manifestations:  orthostatic  intolerance  –  neurally  mediated 
hypotension,  postural  orthostatic  tachycardia  syndrome,  delayed  postural 
hypotension;  light-headedness;  extreme  pallor;  nausea  and  irritable  bowel 
syndrome;  urinary  frequency  and  bladder  dysfunction;  palpitations  with  or 
without cardiac arrhythmias; exertional dyspnoea. 
b.  Neuroendocrine  manifestations:  loss  of  thermostatic  stability  –  subnormal 
body  temperature  and  marked  diurnal  fluctuation,  sweating  episodes, 
recurrent  feelings  of  feverishness  and  cold  extremities;  intolerance  of 
extremes  of  heat  and  cold;  marked  weight  change  –  anorexia  or  abnormal 
appetite; loss of adaptability and worsening of symptoms with stress. 
c. Immune manifestation: tender lymph nodes, recurrent sore throat, recurrent 
flu-like  symptoms,  general  malaise,  new  sensitivities  to  food,  medications 
and/or chemicals. 
7. The illness persists for at least six months. It usually has a distinct onset, although 
it  maybe  gradual.  Preliminary  diagnosis  may  be  possible  earlier,  three  months  is 
appropriate for children. 
To  be  included, the  symptoms must  have  begun  or  have  been  significantly  altered 
after the onset of this illness. It is unlikely that a patient will suffer from all symptoms 
in 5 and 6. The disturbances tend to form symptom clusters that may fluctuate and 
change over time. 
Exclusions:  Exclude  active  disease  processes  that  explain  most  of  the  major 
symptoms  of  fatigue,  sleep  disturbance,  pain  and  cognitive  dysfunction.  If  a 
potentially  confounding  medical  condition  is  under  control,  then  the  diagnosis  of 
ME/CFS  can  be  entertained  if  the  patients  meet  the  criteria  otherwise.
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 48 of 49 
 
 


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) 
 – Guidelines for the Disability Analyst 
 
  
Observation Form 
Please photocopy this page and use it for  any comments and observations on this 
document, its content or layout, or your experience of using it.  If you are aware of 
other standards to  which  this  document  should refer,  or  a  better  standard,  you  are 
requested to indicate on this form.  Your comments will be taken into account at the 
next scheduled review. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Name of sender: 
Date: 
Location and telephone number: 
 
Please return this form to: 
XXXXXX 
                                    
 
Service Delivery Lead 
 
 
 
 
 
Atos Healthcare 
 
 
 
 
 
3300 Solihull Parkway 
 
 
 
 
 
Birmingham Business Park 
 
 
 
 
 
Birmingham 
                                
B37 7YQ 
MED-CMEP~0017 
 
Page 49 of 49