This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Monitoring of cctv'.

link to page 3 link to page 3 link to page 4 link to page 5 link to page 6 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 10 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 19 link to page 19 link to page 19 link to page 20 link to page 20 link to page 21 link to page 21 link to page 21 link to page 22 link to page 22
 
ICO lo 
 
Recognising a request made under the 
Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8)  
 
 
Freedom of Information Act  
Contents 
 
Introduction ............................................................................. 3 
Overview ................................................................................. 3 
What FOIA says ....................................................................... 4 
Requirement to submit requests in writing ................................... 5 
Name of the applicant ............................................................... 6 
The definition of a ‘real name’ ................................................. 7 
Pseudonyms ......................................................................... 8 
Requesters who are commonly known by another name ............. 9 
Requests submitted by organisations ....................................... 9 
Requests made ‘on behalf of’ another person .......................... 10 
Valid Address for correspondence ............................................. 11 
Description of the information .................................................. 12 
Requests framed by physical location ..................................... 14 
Requests framed by electronic locations ................................. 15 
Requests defined by the cost limit ......................................... 16 
Requests which are valid but not clear enough to enable the 
authority to locate and identify the information ....................... 16 

Requests framed as questions ............................................... 18 
Requests which are unreasonably broad ................................. 18 
Requests made using keywords ............................................. 19 
Conditional requests ............................................................... 19 
Requests that are conditional on a change in the status quo ..... 19 
Requests which are conditional on the continuation of the status 
quo .................................................................................... 20 

Round robin requests .............................................................. 21 
Questionnaires ....................................................................... 21 
Requests for information in publications schemes ....................... 21 
Requests made through What Do They Know.com or Social Media.
 ............................................................................................ 22 
 
Recognising a request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 8) 
20140226 
Version: 1 

link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 24 link to page 24  
WhatDoTheyKnow.com ......................................................... 22 
Social media websites .......................................................... 22 
Responding to a request made via a social networking site or 
online forum ....................................................................... 23 

Provision of advice and assistance where the request is invalid .... 24 
More information .................................................................... 24 
 

Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
Introduction 
1.  The Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) gives rights of 
public access to information held by public authorities.  
2.  An overview of the main provisions of FOIA can be found in The 
Guide to Freedom of Information.  
3.  This is part of a series of guidance, which goes into more detail 
than the Guide, to help public authorities to fully understand 
their obligations and promote good practice.  
4.  This guidance provides advice on how to recognise a valid FOI 
request. 
Overview 
 
  To be valid under Section 8 a request must: 
 
o  be in writing; 
 
o  include the requester’s name and an address for 
correspondence; and, 
 
o  describe the information being requested. 
 
  The requester can be an individual, a company or an 
organisation but in each case they must provide their real name. 
A request made under a pseudonym will be invalid. 
 
  There is a low threshold for meeting the requirement to describe 
the information. A description will be valid if it contains sufficient 
detail for the requested information to be distinguished from 
other information held by the authority. 
 
  If the description of the information is unclear or ambiguous, the 
authority must ask the requester for further clarification in 
accordance with Section 1(3) of the Act.  
 
  A request defined solely by keywords will be valid. If the 
keywords are so common that the scope of the request is 
unreasonably broad, then the authority should consider whether 
Section 12 (cost limits) or Section 14 (vexatious requests) apply.  
 
 

Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
  A request that is conditional on circumstances remaining the 
same (for example, ‘Unless x happens, please give me 
information on y …’) should be treated as valid. 
 
  However, a request that is conditional on a change in 
circumstances (for example, ‘In the event of x, please send me 
information on y…’) will be invalid. 
 
  FOIA requests made via online forums and social media will be 
valid provided they meet the criteria in Section 8(1). If it is not 
reasonably practicable for the authority to provide a response 
through the website concerned, it should ask the requester for 
an alternative address for correspondence.  
 
  If the request does not meet the requirements of Section 8(1), 
then the authority should issue the requester with a timely 
response explaining why their request is not valid, and provide 
advice and assistance to help them submit a new request.  
 
What FOIA says 
5.  To be valid under the FOIA, a request must fulfil the criteria set 
out in Section 8 of the Act. 
 
8.—(1) In this Act any reference to a “request for information” 
is a reference to such a request which— 
 
(a) is in writing, 
(b) states the name of the applicant and an address for 
correspondence, and 
(c) describes the information requested. 
 
(2) For the purposes of subsection (1)(a), a request is to be 
treated as made in writing where the text of the request— 
(a) is transmitted by electronic means, 
(b) is received in legible form, and 
(c) is capable of being used for subsequent reference. 
 
6.  Section 8 stipulates that a request for information must: 
  
be in writing; 
 

Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
    state the name of the requester and provide an address 
for correspondence; and,  
    describe the information being requested.  
7.  Each of the above criteria are considered in more detail later in 
this guidance, but public authorities should note that this is not 
a hard test to satisfy; the vast majority of written requests for 
information will be valid. The Act contains other provisions to 
deal with requests which are too broad, unclear or 
unreasonable. 
8.  However, there are some circumstances where, despite the 
validity of a request, it may be more appropriate to deal with it 
outside of the Act. 
  
If the requested information can be quickly and easily sent 
to the requester then it may be better dealt with in ‘the 
normal course of business’; for example, a request for a 
current leaflet. 
    If the request is for the requester’s own personal data 
then it should be dealt with as a subject access request 
under the Data Protection Act (see our Guide to Data 
Protection)
    If the request is for environmental information then it 
should be dealt with under the Environmental Information 
Regulations (see our Guide to the Environmental 
Information Regulations for further details), although the 
guidance provided here on pseudonyms and describing 
information may still be helpful.  
Requirement to submit requests in writing 
9.  The term ‘in writing’ covers requests submitted by letter and 
electronic form, including those sent via the internet through 
WhatDoTheyKnow.com and social networking sites such as 
Twitter and Facebook. 
10.  The request does not have to make any direct reference to the 
Act, or be the sole or main theme of the requester’s 
correspondence. In fact, a request buried within the text of a 
long piece of correspondence will be as valid as a stand-alone 
request, so long as it also fulfils the other criteria outlined in 
Section 8.  
 

Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
11.  The tone and language of the request are not relevant factors 
in determining whether a request is valid under Section 8, 
although where the authority objects to these, it can take this 
into account as evidence the request is vexatious. Advice on 
how to identify and respond to vexatious requests can be found 
in our guidance Dealing with vexatious requests. 
12.  If the request is illegible then it will be invalid. However, we 
would expect the authority to offer the requester help in 
submitting a legible version in accordance with its duty to 
provide reasonable advice and assistance under Section 16 of 
the Act to those seeking to make a request. 
13.  Further information about the provision of advice and 
assistance can be found later in this guidance.  
Name of the applicant 
14.  A requester can be an individual, a company or an 
organisation, but in each case Section 8(1)(b) requires that a 
request for information must include the name of the 
requester.  
15.  In our view, the intention of the legislation is for the requester 
to provide their real name so their request could be processed 
in accordance with the requirements of the FOIA. 
16.  This is supported by the fact that there are circumstances 
under the FOIA where a requester’s true identity can be 
relevant, for example, where an authority is considering 
aggregating the cost of requests or refusing a request as 
vexatious or repeated. 
17.  However, if the public authority is not considering one of the 
above issues, and there is no obvious indication that the 
requester has not used their real name, then we don’t suggest 
that the authority takes steps to check the requester’s identity. 
In most cases it will be appropriate to accept the name that 
has been provided at face value and respond to the request in 
the normal way. 
18.  Even if a public authority suspects that the requester isn’t using 
their real name, this doesn’t mean that it can’t answer the 
request. 
 

Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
19.  However, where an authority does elect to comply with an 
invalid request, the requester will have no recourse to make a 
complaint to the Commissioner if they are dissatisfied with the 
response. This is because the Commissioner’s powers only 
extend to requests for information as defined under Section 8 
of the Act. 
20.  We would therefore recommend any authority complying with a 
request that it suspects is invalid to inform the requester of this 
and advise them to provide their full real name when 
submitting requests in future. 
The definition of a ‘real name’ 
21.  For a request to be valid, the requester must provide enough of 
their real name to give anyone reading that request a 
reasonable indication of their identity. 
22.  This means that if the staff processing the request cannot 
identify the requester from the name provided, that request 
will be invalid. 
23.  Authorities do not have to take into account the possibility that 
there may be staff elsewhere within the organisation who have 
dealt with the requester before and might be capable of 
working out their identity from the contents of their request 
alone. 
24.  Even if this were the case, the authority could still refuse the 
request, as the absence of a real name would make it 
technically invalid under Section 8(1)(b). 
25.  Any variation of the requester’s title or first name combined 
with their surname (e.g. Mr Smith or John Smith) will be 
sufficient to meet this requirement. However, a first name or 
surname provided in isolation, or a set of initials, will not. 
Example 
 
A requester named Robert Jones could call themselves ‘Rob 
Jones’, ‘Bobby Jones’, ‘R Jones’, ‘Bob Jones’ or ‘Mr Jones’.  
 
However, they could not just use ‘Robert’, ‘Bob’, ‘Bobby’ or 
‘R.J’. 
 
 
 

Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
26.  A combination of the requester’s middle names and surname 
will also be acceptable as this is simply another way of 
expressing their real name. 
Example 
A requester called Sarah Anne Elizabeth Spencer could make a 
request in the name of ‘Anne Spencer’ or ‘Liz Spencer’. 
 
27.  If the requester has a name they sometimes reverse or write in 
several different ways, then the authority should accept all of 
the possible variations. 
Example 
A requester called Mohammed Ali could use ‘Mr Ali’, ‘Mr 
Mohammed’, ‘Muhammed Ali’, or ‘Ali Muhammad’.  
However, ‘A.M’, ‘M.A’, ‘Ali’ or ‘Mohammad’ would not be 
acceptable. 
 
Pseudonyms 
28.  If the requester has used a pseudonym then their request will 
be invalid. 
29.  In some cases it will be immediately obvious that a pseudonym 
is being used, for example where the request has been signed 
in the name of a famous fictional character, such as ‘Mickey 
Mouse’, an inanimate object, like ‘Mirrorball’, or by location, for 
instance as ‘disgruntled of Stockport’. Pun names such as Sue 
D Nym 
may also fall into this category. 
30.  However, if the name provided is not an obvious pseudonym 
and the public authority has no reason to believe that a 
pseudonym is being used, the authority should just accept the 
name provided at face value. 
31.  Whilst this may mean that some pseudonymous requests will 
slip through the net, we would not want to see a situation 
where authorities routinely carry out checks on requesters’ 
identities. The Act provides a public right to information, not a 
right limited to certain individuals. 
 

Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
Requesters who are commonly known by another name 
32.  If the requester is commonly known by another name then the 
authority should accept this as valid for the purposes of Section 
8(1)(b). Examples might be: 
  
a married woman who uses her maiden name for 
professional reasons but is known by her married name 
outside work;  
  
an individual child who has assumed the surname of a step 
parent without formally changing their name, and has 
gone by that title for a number of years; or, 
    an author who publishes work under a pen name. 
33.  The examples given above are not exhaustive and we 
recognise that in some instances it may difficult for the 
requester to provide the authority with evidence that they are 
commonly known by a particular name. 
34.  In any case where this is an issue, the authority should aim to 
use a relatively informal means of confirming the requester’s 
identity rather than seeking formal evidence of identification. 
Requests submitted by organisations  
35.  If the request is from a company, then the authority should 
accept either its full registered name or a name that exists as a 
legal entity (such as a trading name) as valid. 
36.  Where the request is from a sole trader, the authority should 
accept either the proprietor’s name or the company name.  
37.  Again, companies’ names should generally be accepted at face 
value, but in any case where the authority has reason to verify 
the authenticity of the company, it should check Companies 
House or the Charity Commission Register to clarify whether it 
is a genuine organisation. 
38.  Requests from unincorporated bodies such as campaign groups 
or clubs are also valid and in most cases should be accepted at 
face value. However, if the authority has reason to check 
whether the organisation is authentic, it may need to take a 
more pragmatic approach to validating its identity because 
these bodies are often relatively informal associations of people 
with no ‘official’ status. 
 

Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
39.  We therefore recommend that authorities adopt a lower and 
more informal test for determining whether a name provided 
by an unincorporated body is genuine. 
Requests made ‘on behalf of’ another person 
40.  These are requests submitted by an ‘agent’ acting on behalf of 
another party. Examples of this would be: 
  
A private individual making a request on behalf of a friend; 
  
an employee making a request on behalf of a 
company/employer;  
  
a journalist making a request on behalf of a newspaper; 
or, 
    a professional (such as a solicitor or accountant) making a 
request on behalf of a client. 
41.  For the purposes of this type of request, authorities should 
interpret ‘the requester’ to mean the party on whose behalf the 
request has been made (in these examples, the friend, 
company, newspaper and client) not the person or organisation 
acting as their agent (the private individual, employee, 
journalist or professional in the above examples). 
42.  This means that to be valid under Section 8(1)(a), the request 
must state the real name of the party on whose behalf the 
agent is acting. 
43.  A request which only includes the real name of the agent will 
be invalid. 
Example 
A journalist called Jane Davies wants to make a request for 
information about the cost of a new housing project on behalf 
of her newspaper, The Morning Herald. 
In this scenario, the following request would be valid under 
Section 8(1)(a);  
‘On behalf of “The Morning Herald” I would like a detailed 
breakdown of the cost estimate for the new housing project.’ 

Signed 
Jane Davies’ 
 
10 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
This is because it includes the real name of the party on 
whose behalf a request is being made (The Morning Herald). 
However, if the journalist was to submit a request which made 
no reference to The Morning Herald, as in the example below, 
then it would be invalid; 
‘On behalf of my newspaper, I would like a detailed breakdown 
of the cost estimate for the new housing project.’ 
Signed 
Jane Davies’ 
This is because the request only states the identity of the 
agent; it does not name the party on whose behalf she is 
acting. 
 
44.  It also follows that when someone who is acting as an agent for 
an organisation leaves its employment, the request doesn’t go 
with them but instead stays with that organisation.   
Example 
Returning to the previous example when the request was 
made as follows  
‘On behalf of “The Morning Herald” I would like a detailed 
breakdown of the cost estimate for the new housing project.’ 
Signed 
Jane Davies’  
If Jane Davies left the employment of the Morning Herald then 
it would be The Morning Herald who would remain entitled to a 
response to this request under FOIA, and not the former 
employee Jane Davies.  
 
Valid Address for correspondence 
45.  Section 8(1)(b) also requires the requester to provide a valid 
address for correspondence. 
 
11 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
46.  This can be any address where the requester may be contacted 
(including postal or email addresses) and does not have to be 
their normal residential or business address.  
47.  It follows that a requester can use a “care of” or PO Box 
address, or even provide another individual’s email account as 
their contact address. 
48.  If the request has been posted on a social media website such 
as Twitter, then as long as that site offers a means for the 
authority to respond, such as a hyperlink to the requester’s 
email address or a ‘reply’ button, that request will fulfil the 
requirement to provide a valid address. 
49.  However, we recognise that in some cases it may be technically 
difficult for an authority to provide an FOIA response via a 
social media site, especially if a large volume of material is 
involved. This issue is addressed later in the guidance in the 
section entitled ‘Requests made through What Do They 
Know.com or Social Media’. 
Description of the information 
50.  Section 8(1)(c) provides that a request can only be valid if it 
describes the information requested’.  
51.  It is important to recognise that most requesters are unlikely to 
know what exact information is held by the authority, or have 
an appreciation of how its records are stored.  
52.  This means that they cannot always reasonably be expected to 
be specific about details such as the titles, contents and 
location of documents. 
53.  It also follows that they will not always provide enough detail 
to enable the authority to identify the information from the 
description provided. 
54.  For these reasons, we are of the view that there has to be a 
low test for a description to meet the requirements of Section 
8(1)(c). 
55.  Authorities should therefore treat any description that allows 
the requested information to be distinguished from other 
information held by the authority as valid under Section 
8(1)(c). 
 
12 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
56.  There are many distinguishing characteristics that can help to 
set the information apart from any other material held by the 
authority when referenced in a request. 
57.  One of the most obvious of these is the subject matter of the 
information, as illustrated in the example below.  
Example 
A police authority launches an initiative to crackdown on anti-
social behaviour in town centres. Once the crackdown has 
concluded the authority receives the following request; 
‘Please provide me with all the information you hold 
concerning the effectiveness of your recent initiative to reduce 
anti-social behaviour’. 

Although this request does not reference any particular 
documents, the subject matter tells the authority that the 
information: 
  is on the subject anti-social behaviour; 
  relates specifically to the recent police crackdown; and 
  concerns any assessment of the impact of that 
crackdown. 
These distinguishing characteristics will be sufficient to 
differentiate the requested information from the other 
information the authority holds on record. 
 
58.  Other potentially distinguishing characteristics could be the 
date of publication, the name of the author, the origins of the 
information, the recipients of documents or types of documents 
- although this should by no means be considered an 
exhaustive list.  
 
Example 
 
On 12 July 2013 a Council published a report on its local care 
homes entitled ‘Providing residential care in the 21st Century’
The report’s author was John Smith. The Council distributed 
copies of the report to every residential home in the borough. 
 
13 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
 
The following descriptions of this report would all be valid as 
each reveals something about the distinguishing 
characteristics of the information. 
 
‘I would like a copy of the report that you sent out to local 

care homes’ 
 
The distinguishing characteristics described here are the type 
of document and its recipients. 
 
‘Please send me a copy of John’s Smith’s report’ 
 
The characteristics described in this request are the type of 
document and author. 
 
‘Please provide me with a copy of the report you published on 
12 July 2013’ 
 
The distinguishing characteristics in this request are the date 
of publication and type of document. 
 
 
59.  The example above also illustrates that it is possible to describe 
the distinguishing characteristics of information without 
reference to its subject matter or content. 
Requests framed by physical location 
60.  Requests that define the information solely by its physical 
location, such as, 
 
Please provide me with a copy of all the information on your 
desk’
 
 
are not valid because they reveal nothing about the recorded 
characteristics of the information. They simply define its 
physical whereabouts at a particular point in time.  
61.  However, if the request links that location to a recorded 
characteristic of the information then the description may still 
be valid. 
 
14 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
62.  For example, a request phrased, ‘I would like a copy of the 
contents of your private secretary’s notebook for September 8 
2009’ describes the location (a notebook) but also ties this to 
recorded characteristics such as the date and author, so that it 
is still possible to differentiate that information from other 
information held by the authority. 
Requests framed by electronic locations 
63.  There will often be a direct link between an electronic location 
(such as an email inbox) and the nature of the information 
recorded there. 
64.  This means that it is sometimes possible to infer the recorded 
characteristics of electronically held information from its 
location alone. 
65.  It follows, therefore, that there will be instances where a 
request defined solely by an electronic location will reveal 
enough about the distinguishing characteristics of the 
information to be valid. 
Example 
A public authority receives a request for; 
all the information in your chief executive’s email account’. 
By nature, an email account contains copies of electronic 
correspondence sent and received by the account holder, 
which effectively makes this a request for all email 
correspondence sent and received by the chief executive. 
The request does, therefore, reveal distinguishing 
characteristics about the information, such as the identity of 
the sender of the correspondence and the type of 
communication, despite only being defined in terms of an 
electronic location. 
 
66.  By their nature, requests based on an electronic location can 
often be very broad in scope. If an authority is concerned that 
a request is unreasonably broad then it should consider 
refusing the request under Section 12 of the Act (cost limits) 
and offer the requester advice and assistance to help them 
 
15 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
refine their request. More details about the cost limits can be 
found in our guidance Requests where the cost of compliance 
with a request exceeds the appropriate limit. 
Requests defined by the cost limit 
67.  These are characterised by requests such as; 
‘Beginning this year and going back each previous year until 
the cost limit is reached, I would like copies of all expenses 
claims submitted by the chief executive’ 

OR 
‘I would like as much information about the new retail 
development as you can provide within the cost limits’. 
68.  Requests defined by the Section 12 cost limits are invalid under 
Section 8(1)(c) because their scope is determined by the 
extent of the record search the authority can carry out within 
those limits, rather than the distinguishing characteristics of 
the information itself. 
69.  Nonetheless, although authorities are not obliged to process 
such requests, we consider they still have a Section 16 duty to 
provide the requester with reasonable advice and assistance to 
allow them to submit a properly defined request. 
70.  This advice might take the form of advising the requester what 
information could be provided within the cost limits and asking 
if they would like to make a request for that information. 
Alternatively the authority could offer to help the requester to 
define their description so it focuses more narrowly on the 
distinguishing characteristics of the information rather than the 
parameters of the search. 
Requests which are valid but not clear enough to enable 
the authority to locate and identify the information 
71.  Section 1(3) states: 
 
1.—(3) Where a public authority— 
 
(a) reasonably requires further information in order to identify 
 
16 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
and locate the information requested, and 
 
(b) has informed the applicant of that requirement, 
 
the authority is not obliged to comply with subsection (1) 
unless it is supplied with that further information. 
 
 
72.  Section 8(1)(c) is only concerned with the validity of the 
description; it cannot be used to refuse requests that are 
unclear. 
73.  If a request is not sufficiently clear to enable the authority to 
locate or identify the information without further details, then 
the Section 16 duty to provide advice and assistance will be 
triggered, and the authority must ask the requester to provide 
further clarification in accordance with Section 1(3) of the Act.  
 
Example  
 
A requester asks a parish council for; 
 
‘A copy of the minutes of the parish meeting chaired by 
Councillor Jones.’   
 
The authority accepts that the request is valid under Section 
8(1)(c) because it describes distinguishing characteristics of 
the information, such as the type of document and the name 
of the chairman of the meeting. 
 
However, Councillor Jones has chaired several council 
meetings and the authority is unclear which meeting the 
requester is referring to. 
   
As the authority cannot locate and identify the minutes 
without further information, its duty to provide advice and 
assistance will be engaged, and it must contact the requester 
to ask them to clarify which meeting minutes theywould like. 
 
 
74.  Once an authority asks for further details under Section 1(3) it 
will not be obliged to progress the request further until it 
receives the required clarification from the requester, at which 
point the time for compliance with the request will reset to 20 
working days. 
 
17 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
Requests framed as questions 
75.  A request in the form of a question will be valid under Section 
8(1)(c), provided it still describes distinguishing characteristics 
of the information, as in the examples below where the 
information is differentiated by its subject matter. (sickness 
absence policy, overseas aid spending, and measures to tackle 
vandalism respectively); 
76.  ‘Why has the Council changed its policy on sickness absence?’  
77.  ‘How much money did the department spend on overseas aid 
last year?’ 
‘What is being done to tackle vandalism in the local park?’ 
 
78.  If the question fulfils the above criteria but is ambiguous or 
unclear then it will still be a valid request under 8(1)(c), 
although the authority will have to go back to the requester to 
ask them for clarification in accordance with its duty to provide 
advice and assistance under Section 16. 
Requests which are unreasonably broad 
79.  If the authority can identify and locate the information but 
regards the request as unreasonably broad, then it should 
consider refusing it under Section 12 (cost limits) and offering 
advice and assistance to help the requester narrow down the 
scope of their request. 
80.  In some circumstances it may be appropriate to refuse an 
unreasonably broad request under section 14(1) (vexatious 
requests). However we recommend that public authorities 
consider if section 12 is appropriate first. 
81.  For further information on the Section 12 cost limits and 
handling of vexatious requests please see our guidance; 
Requests where the cost of compliance with a request exceeds 
the appropriate limit 
Dealing with vexatious requests (section 14) 
 
18 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
Requests made using keywords 
82.  Sometimes a request may describe the information using one 
or more keywords, as in the example below;  
‘I would like copies of all the documents you hold containing 
the words ‘inquiry’ or ‘investigation’’ 
 
83.  These types of requests will be valid under Section 8(1)(c) 
because they make a distinction between information that does 
and does not contain those keywords. 
84.  However, we recognise that there is a possibility a requester 
may cite a keyword so common that it makes the scope of the 
request unreasonably broad. Where this is the case the 
authority should consider refusing the request under Section 12 
of the Act and contact the requester to ask them to narrow 
down their request (see our guidance Requests where the cost 
of compliance with a request exceeds the appropriate limit). 
85.  There might also be circumstances where the framing of a 
request using a very common keyword may be an indication 
that the request is vexatious. (see our guidance Dealing with 
vexatious requests) 
Conditional requests 
86.  These are requests that can be objectively read as only 
becoming active when certain conditions are met. These fall 
into two categories;  
Requests that are conditional on a change in the status 
quo 

87.  These are requests that only become active when 
circumstances change, for example: 
88.  ‘If you do decide to close the local hospital, please provide me 
with the reasons for your decision.’ 
89.  ‘Should you amend your admissions policy, I would like 
information about why you have changed it.’  
 
19 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
 
90.  A request that is conditional on a change in the status quo will 
not be valid. This is because the requester does not want any 
information ‘as things stand’. They are only expressing an 
intention to ask for information in the future, which is not a 
‘request for information’ in the ordinary meaning of those 
words as they appear in Section 8. 
91.  Nevertheless, the authority’s duty to provide assistance to a 
requester who wishes to make a request is likely to be 
triggered. 
92.  The authority should therefore go back to the requester to 
advise them to resubmit the request once the change in 
circumstances they are anticipating has occurred. 
93.  For instance, when applied to the example given above this 
would mean advising the requester to wait for a decision to 
close the hospital to be made before making their request. 
Requests which are conditional on the continuation of 
the status quo 
94.  These are requests that are dependent upon circumstances 
remaining the same, for example: 
95.  ‘Unless the decision to impose parking restrictions in the town 
centre is reversed, I would like a copy of the minutes of the 
meeting at which this policy was approved’. 

96.  ‘Assuming my appeal fails, please provide me with a copy of 
the school’s anti-bullying policy’.  
 
97.  A request that depends on the continuation of the status quo 
will be valid because it is a clear statement that the requester 
wants the information ‘as things stand’, rather than at some 
future time. Authorities should therefore deal with these types 
of requests upon receipt in the usual manner. 
98.  Because the request is valid, the duty to respond under Section 
1(1) will continue to apply even if the circumstances do change 
or the requester’s assumptions prove to be incorrect. 
99.  In that event, the authority would still be free to contact the 
requester to ask if they wanted to withdraw the request. 
 
20 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
However, unless the requester does withdraw their request, the 
authority remains under an obligation to provide a response. 
Round robin requests 
100. Provided the request is in writing, states the name and address 
of the applicant and describes the information, it should be 
treated as valid under Section 8, even if that same request has 
been sent to a number of authorities at the same time. 
Questionnaires 
101. A questionnaire will qualify as an FOIA request provided the 
requester has supplied their real name and an address, and at 
least one of the questions provides a valid description of the 
information. 
102. However, authorities will need to treat each individual question 
on its merits which means adopting the following approach:  
    Respond to any questions that provide a valid description 
of the information. 
    For questions that are unclear, ask the requester for 
further clarification under Section 1(3).  
    If any of the questions fail to meet the criteria for a valid 
description, issue the requester with a timely response 
advising that they are invalid under Section 8(1)(c) and 
explaining why.  
Requests for information in publications schemes 
103. A request for information included in a publication scheme will 
be valid provided it is in writing, states the name and address 
of the applicant and describes the information. However, the 
authority could, if it wished, refuse such a request under 
Section 21 of the Act on the grounds that the information is 
reasonably accessible to the requester by other means. 
104. If an authority does choose to apply Section 21, then we would 
expect it to provide the requester with details on how to obtain 
the information through its publication scheme. 
 
21 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
105. For further information please read our guidance Information 
reasonably accessible to the applicant by other means (Section 
21). 
Requests made through What Do They Know.com or 
Social Media. 
WhatDoTheyKnow.com 
106. Requests made through the whatdotheyknow.com website will 
be valid, provided the requester supplies their real name and 
describes the information concerned. 
107. With respect to the address for correspondence, we consider 
the @whatdotheyknow.com email address provided to 
authorities when requests are made through the site to be a 
valid contact address for the purposes of Section 8(1)(b). 
108. In any case where it is not reasonably practicable for the 
authority to provide the information in the electronic format 
required by the whatdotheyknow.com site, it should ask the 
requester to provide an alternative postal address where it can 
send its full response. 
Social media websites 
109. If the authority subscribes to a social media site such as 
Twitter or Facebook, then any request it receives through that 
site will be valid, provided it fulfils the criteria set out in Section 
8. 
 
With specific regard to Twitter, requests that refer to the 
authority in the context of an ‘@mention’ context, for 
example, ‘@ICO news’, should be treated as having been 
directed at and received by that authority for the purposes of 
the FOIA. 
 
 
110. Where the requester’s username is an obvious pseudonym, or 
only includes a part of their real name (for example @john3453 
or @smith6474) then the request will only be valid if their real 
name is visible elsewhere on their user profile.  
 
22 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
111. However we would urge authorities to remain mindful of the 
applicant and motive blind principles behind the Act in any case 
where they are not satisfied as to the requester’s identity but 
would still be content to disclose the information. 
112. Where an authority does refuse the request on the grounds 
that the name is invalid, we would expect it to fulfil its Section 
16 duty to provide advice and assistance to those wishing to 
make a request by advising the requester to resubmit the 
request using their real name. 
Responding to a request made via a social networking 
site or online forum 
113. If the requester has effectively made the request public by 
publishing it on a website, as opposed to sending a private 
message to the authority’s account, then we will consider it 
within the requester’s reasonable expectations that the 
authority will also publish its response on the site. 
114. However, if the authority has any particular reason to believe 
that it would be inappropriate to publish the information online, 
then it may wish to respond via a private message to the 
requester’s account instead. If this facility is not available then 
it should obtain an alternative contact address from the 
requester. 
115. Issues may also arise if technical constraints make it 
impractical for the authority to provide a response through the 
site in question. 
116. For example, where a request is submitted through Twitter, the 
limitations on the length of a ‘tweet’ may prevent the authority 
from providing its full response via that site. 
117. Where this is an issue the authority should address the 
problem by asking the requester to provide an alternative email 
or postal address where it can send its response. 
118. Another possible solution would be for the authority to post the 
information on its own website and post a link to this from the 
site. 
 
23 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1 

 
Provision of advice and assistance where the request is 
invalid 
119. If the request does not include a valid name, address or 
description then it will be invalid; it also follows that the 
authority will have no obligation to confirm or deny whether the 
information is held under Section 1(1), or issue a formal refusal 
notice under Section 17. 
120. However, Section 16 of the Act does state that a public 
authority has a duty to provide advice and assistance, ‘…so far 
as it would be reasonable to expect the authority to do so, to 

persons who propose to make, or have made, requests for 
information to it
’. 
121. We consider this duty to extend to requesters who have made 
invalid requests. This being the case we will expect the 
authority to issue a prompt response to the requester 
explaining why their request was invalid under Section 8. 
122. Further information on the duty to provide advice and 
assistance can be found in our guidance Good practice in 
providing advice and assistance.
 
More information   
123. This guidance has been developed drawing on ICO experience.  
Because of this it may provide more detail on issues that are 
often referred to the Information Commissioner than on those 
we rarely see. The guidance will be reviewed and considered 
from time to time in line with new decisions of the Information 
Commissioner, Tribunals and courts.  
124. It is a guide to our general recommended approach, although 
individual cases will always be decided on the basis of their 
particular circumstances. 
125. If you need any more information about this or any other 
aspect of freedom of information, please contact us: see our 
website www.ico.org.uk.   
 
24 
Recognising a Request made under the Freedom of Information Act (Section 
8) 
20140226 
 
Version: 1