Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Badger population in the cull zones'.

Estimates of badger population sizes in the West 
Gloucestershire and West Somerset pilot areas 
 
A report to Natural England 
 
 
 
 
 
 
22 February 2013 

 

Executive summary 
 
1)  Surveys for active badger setts were undertaken in two pilot areas (West Gloucestershire 
and West Somerset) in order to estimate the total number of active setts within each area. 
2)  These were supported by hair trapping surveys conducted to estimate the average number 
of badgers per active sett. 
3)  Corrections for sett mis‐identification and sampling bias according to sett size were made to 
improve population estimates. 
4)  A number of other analyses were undertaken in attempts to further refine estimates, but 
the current estimates were concluded to be the most robust and biologically plausible. 
5)  Current, best‐available estimates of populations, with 80% confidence in both limits, in the 
pilot areas during summer/autumn 2012 are 2657 to 4079 in West Gloucestershire and 1972 
to 2973 in West Somerset.

 

link to page 2 link to page 4 link to page 5 link to page 5 link to page 5 link to page 5 link to page 5 link to page 5 link to page 6 link to page 6 link to page 6 link to page 6 link to page 7 link to page 7  
Contents 
Executive summary ................................................................................................................................. 2 
1. 
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 4 
2. METHODS ............................................................................................................................................ 5 
2.1 Selecting survey areas ................................................................................................................... 5 
2.2 Sett surveys ................................................................................................................................... 5 
2.3 Hair trapping ................................................................................................................................. 5 
2.4 Quality assurance .......................................................................................................................... 5 
2.4.1 Staff training and auditing ..................................................................................................... 5 
2.4.2 Re‐surveys .............................................................................................................................. 6 
2.4.3 Photographic checks .............................................................................................................. 6 
2.4.4 Peer review ............................................................................................................................ 6 
2.5 Data analysis ................................................................................................................................. 6 
3. RESULTS ............................................................................................................................................... 7 
4. DISCUSSION ......................................................................................................................................... 7 
 

 

 
1.  INTRODUCTION 
The Government’s policy is to allow controlled culling and vaccination of badgers in areas of high 
incidence of bovine TB in cattle in a carefully regulated way for the purpose of controlling the spread 
of the disease, in accordance with the requirements set out in Defra’s Guidance to Natural England: 
“Licences to kill or take badgers for the purpose of preventing the spread of bovine TB under section 
10(2)(a) of the Protection of Badgers Act 1992” (Defra publication PB13692).  
In the first year of culling, a minimum number of badgers must be removed during an intensive cull 
which must be carried out throughout the land to which there is access, over a period of not more 
than six consecutive weeks. This minimum number should be set at a level that in Natural England’s 
judgement should reduce the estimated badger population of the application area by at least 70% 
(para 10(c)(i) and (ii) of the Guidance). 
Natural England should aim to ensure that culling will “not be detrimental to the survival of the 
population concerned” within the meaning of Article 9 of the Bern Convention on the Conservation 
of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats. For that purpose Natural England should determine 
appropriate area‐specific licence conditions, and set a maximum number of badgers to be removed 
from the licence area (para 12 of the Guidance).  
Hence, there is a requirement to gain an estimate of the population size that is sufficiently accurate 
for setting targets that meets these requirements. The estimate of population size must be based on 
information that is available to Natural England during the application process, and must relate to 
the whole culling area, whether culling will take place on a landholding or not. With the possible 
exception of a full census, any population estimate will have some degree of uncertainty; there will 
be an interval around the population estimate within which the true population is likely to lie: higher 
uncertainty leads to a wider interval around the estimated population.  
Here we present estimates of population size and uncertainty about these estimates (as the relative 
standard error), using data gathered during surveys for active badger setts immediately prior to the 
anticipated start of badger culling operations.

 

 
2. METHODS 
2.1 Selecting survey areas 
GIS shapefiles of area outlines of each of the pilot areas and landholdings within them participating 
in the cull or vaccination programme were received from Natural England. Using Arc GIS 10 (ESRI, 
Redlands, California) a grid of 1km cells was superimposed over each area outline, which was aligned 
with the British National Grid. Cells that overlapped with the boundary of a pilot area were excluded 
from further work. From the remaining cells, 100 were selected at random from each area. 
Participating landowners were contacted by the badger control companies to inform them that they 
would be receiving a request to survey their land. Sufficient landowners were contacted to ensure 
access to approximately 80km2 of land in the West Gloucestershire pilot area and 67km2 in the West 
Somerset pilot area. We intended to survey only land falling within a randomly‐selected cell, but 
time and access limitations forced us to survey land falling into immediately adjacent cells if it was a 
continuation of land falling within the selected cell.  
2.2 Sett surveys 
Surveyors worked in pairs, walking every linear feature and inspecting farmyards present within the 
survey area, noting the presence of badger setts, active latrines and badger runs on a 1:10,000 scale 
map and, on a data sheet, noting their location to the nearest 1m (i.e. with a 12‐figure grid 
reference) using a hand‐held GPS. Large woodlands were surveyed using multiple surveyors walking 
parallel transects within 20m of each other, until the entire woodland had been surveyed.  Setts 
were classed as active if at least one entrance hole showed signs of recent badger activity, such as 
fresh spoil on the spoil heap, smooth, compacted earth in the entrance, or badger footprints in the 
entrance or on the spoil heap. 
2.3 Hair trapping 
Hair trapping was undertaken at active setts and other locations in order to collect genetic material 
from badgers. Material was collected every day for 10 days, and the hair traps were flamed with a 
cigarette lighter to denature any genetic material remaining on the trap after sample collection. This 
material was sequenced to derive profiles of individual badgers, and dates on which each individual 
was sampled, including multiple occasions. 
2.4 Quality assurance 
2.4.1 Staff training and auditing 
All staff engaged in sett surveying activities were experienced badger sett‐surveyors who received 
two days of training in the use of the relevant standard operating procedures. Adherence to the 
standard operating procedures was independently assessed and verified by an experienced badger 
sett surveyor during visits to the pilot areas. An independent assessment of data recording and 
manipulation was undertaken by an experienced external assessor. Errors identified by the assessor 
were corrected before final estimates were calculated. 

 

2.4.2 Re­surveys 
For each pilot area a total of 15 of the surveyed cells was repeatedly randomly drawn from the full 
database of cells surveyed until a set of 15 cells was drawn that contained at least 30 putative active 
setts. Land to which we had access within the 15 cells and contiguous land outside the cell that had 
been surveyed were re‐surveyed by surveyors with no experience of those cells during the primary 
survey. Re‐surveys were undertaken in the same way as during the primary surveys. 
2.4.3 Photographic checks 
During the primary surveys, surveyors took at least one photograph of at least one entrance hole of 
each putative active sett using a compact digital camera. A laminated sheet of white, A4 paper was 
placed next to the entrance hole, and on the paper was written the date, location (grid reference), 
unique cell identifier, unique sett identifier and unique surveyor identifier. This allowed 
identification of the location and sett as well as providing a means of assessing the scale of the 
entrance hole and accompanying signs of activity. 
Photographs were downloaded and examined by an experienced sett surveyor. This observer looked 
for evidence within each photograph to refute the claim that the photograph was of an active 
badger sett entrance hole, therefore belonging to an active badger sett. Such evidence included 
debris blocking the entrance, vegetation covering the entrance, footprints other than those of 
badgers in the entrance, faeces from animals other than badgers in the entrance or on the spoil 
heap (especially rabbit droppings), size (holes appearing less than half the height of the A4 sheet 
were assessed as mis‐classified). 
The intention was to quantify overlap and mis‐match rates between primary surveys and re‐surveys 
in order to correct active sett counts upwards from the primary surveys, and to estimate the 
uncertainty component due to imperfect sett detection.  
2.4.4 Peer review 
Assumptions used to underpin analyses, calculations and interpretation were all externally peer‐
reviewed. Recommendations to improve estimates were followed. The peer‐reviewers accepted the 
final outputs prior to production of this report. 
 
2.5 Data analysis 
To produce an estimate of the total number of active setts in each pilot area the average active sett 
density measured in the sample areas was multiplied by the total area of each pilot area, and 
uncertainty was included as the between‐sample area relative standard error. Badger genetic 
profiles collected from hair traps within 40m of a sett were analysed using the CAPWIRE program 
(Miller et al. 2002. Molecular Ecology 14: 1991‐2005) to estimate the number of badgers per active 
sett, averaged across active setts within 40m of a hair trap. However, in Somerset active setts with 
more than one active hole were over‐sampled, and active setts with one active hole were under‐
sampled, potentially biasing the population estimate high. Therefore, we re‐sampled the hair 
trapping data (without replacement) in both pilot areas to produce a balanced dataset with large 
and small active setts represented in proportion to their frequency observed in the field. The 
resultant estimates of the average number of badgers per active sett was multiplied by the total 
number of active setts within each area to derive a total population estimate for each area. 

 

3. RESULTS 
A total of 183 active setts were found in West Gloucestershire and 275 in West Somerset. 
Substantial variability in sett surveying ability meant that variation in sett counts between primary 
surveys and re‐surveys was very high and biased. Consequently, sett counts could not be corrected 
for imperfect sett detection rates, so we assumed that all active setts were found. 
Table 1. Measurements contributing to the population estimates. 
 
 
Location 
Somerset 
Gloucestershire 
Active setts surveyed 
275
183
Number of 1 (km2) squares surveyed 
67
80
Area surveyed (km2) 
62.82
77.96
Total pilot area (km2) 
256.05
311.00
Photograph reliability 
0.727
0.897
Estimated number of badgers per sett 
3.061
5.193
RSE between location (%) 
11.39
14.51
RSE mean badgers per sett (%) 
21.69
21.31
RSE photograph reliability (%) 
3.5
2.3
Average density (80% one‐tailed 
interval) (number per km2) 
9.74 (7.7‐11.61)
10.93 (8.54‐13.12)
RSE = Relative Standard Error  
In Gloucestershire 381 hair traps yielded 563 putative samples and in Somerset 331 hair traps 
yielded 526 putative samples. A total of 678 samples produced viable badger profiles. 
Population estimates, with 80% confidence in both limits, for summer/autumn 2012 are as follows: 
West Gloucestershire: 2657 to 4079  
West Somerset: 1972 to 2973  
4. DISCUSSION 
These new estimates have arisen due to the availability of new data. The previous estimates of 15th 
October 2012 (which were 3145‐4391 with a central figure of 3644 for West Gloucestershire and 
3740‐5085 with a central figure of 4289 for West Somerset, with 80% confidence in both limits) were 
calculated using an assumed average number of badgers per active sett of 5.4, which was calculated 
from two other studies conducted over several years in the Gloucester region. This was the best 
information available at the time, which has now been superseded by new information on the 
number of badgers per active sett collected in each of the pilot areas.  
The new estimates equate to mean densities of 9.74 badgers per km2 in the West Somerset area and 
10.93 badgers per km2 in the West Gloucestershire area. These are well within the limits of other 
populations in the west‐country, which have included densities as low as 5.8km‐2 and as high as 
30.7km‐2. (Cheeseman et al. 1981. J. Appl. Ecol. 18: 795‐804). 
The inability to correct for imperfect sett detection rates is unlikely to substantially affect estimates 
of sett abundance. We anticipated that sett detection would be imperfect in only one direction, i.e

 

that setts that were present were not detected, because those incorrectly recorded as active setts 
were likely to have been filtered out during the analysis of photographs. However, rarely, some 
surveyors also reported multiple setts when only one was present i.e. they classified a single sett as 
multiple setts. This means that the error was more symmetrical than anticipated, limiting its impact 
on the central estimate or its uncertainty. Therefore, we are confident that the estimates presented 
here are as robust as they can be given the data available from which to calculate them. 
The bias in sett sampling in Somerset was in large part due to collecting the data for a slightly 
different objective to the one addressed here. The main impact of sub‐sampling the data to correct 
for this bias was a slight increase in uncertainty, and hence population estimate confidence limits. 
However, the alternative was a high‐biased population estimate. Several attempts were made to re‐
analyse the data in order to refine estimates and decrease confidence intervals, but the current 
estimates were concluded to be the most robust and biologically plausible. The new estimates 
presented here are the best currently‐available information on badger population size in the pilot 
areas, and these should be used in preference to the older estimates. 
 

 

Document Outline